Jewish groups have expressed outrage at the involvement of a Warsaw Ghetto graffiti vandal in the organisation of antisemitism training for the National Education Union (NEU). Although the NEU insisted that Ewa Jasiewicz had no say over the content or delivery of the sessions, Campaign Against Antisemitism can reveal that they were led by two fringe Jewdas activists.

The three-part course was organised by Ewa Jasiewicz, through the North West Black Member Organising Forum of the NEU.

Ms Jasiewicz is infamous for spraying the slogan “Free Gaza and Palestine” on the walls of the Warsaw Ghetto in 2010. The vandalism breached the International Definition of Antisemitism and was roundly condemned by the Jewish community. Now with the NEU, Ms Jasiewicz was previously a union organiser with Unite and has spoken at an event with the pro-Corbyn pressure group, Momentum. She has previously had to apologise for comments that appeared to incite terrorism, and Jeremy Corbyn has reportedly called her a “very good friend”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to the NEU about Ms Jasiewicz’s involvement in the course. In a reply from the Joint General Secretaries of the union, Mary Bousted and the outspoken Kevin Courtney insisted that Ms Jasiewicz “facilitated the organisation of the event at the request of members but had no role in deciding or delivering the content of any sessions.”

However, Campaign Against Antisemitism can reveal who did lead the sessions and their content.

The course leaders, Eran Cohen, who works in the tech centre and is an Education Officer for the United Tech and Allied Workers, and arts activist Keziah Berelson, have both been involved in the far-left fringe Jewish group, Jewdas, and either support or have defended BDS — the campaign to boycott the Jewish state — the tactics of which an overwhelming majority of British Jews find intimidating. Mr Cohen is reportedly a self-professed anti-Zionist who has previously been described as a ‘Jewish’ Jeremy Corbyn.

Jewdas is a fringe Jewish group which appears to pride itself, as its name suggests, in taking positions that many in the Jewish community would see as a betrayal. For example, it has suggested that Campaign Against Antisemitism is run as a money-making scam by its volunteers, has said that “Israel is itself a steaming pile of sewage which needs to be properly disposed of”, and claimed that those calling out antisemitism in the Labour Party are “playing a dangerous game with people’s lives” before claiming that the entire crisis is a “bout of faux-outrage” that “is the work of cynical manipulations by people whose express loyalty is to the Conservative Party and the right wing of the Labour Party”.

The three online sessions, all held in May, were billed as part of the NEU’s “ongoing antiracist organising and racial literacy-building work in the region”. They were intended to “place an emphasis on antisemitism’s self-perception as ‘punching upwards’, in contrast to other forms of racism which ‘punch down’,” with the first session exploring the history of antisemitism, the second on alleged racism within the Jewish community and the third on intersectionality.

The reading materials for the sessions included a video by the late former Chief Rabbi, Lord Sacks, who was described as a “prominent right-wing rabbi”, despite his long working relationships with two Labour Prime Ministers; excerpts from Judith Butler, a far-left academic who is involved in the highly controversial and fringe American group, Jewish Voice for Peace; extracts from work by Hannah Arendt and Jean-Paul Sartre, both of whom had controversial views on antisemitism; writings by a French Marxist philosopher known for his harsh criticism of Israel; and other materials from Jewish Voice for Peace and the Jewish Anarchist ‘Treyf’ podcast.

With the exception of the video from Rabbi Sacks and some material from Yad Vashem, Israel’s Holocaust Museum, almost all of the resources were from fringe and unrepresentative authors and, in some cases, from groups widely considered to be hostile to the Jewish community.

Campaign Against Antisemitism sought to contact Mr Cohen and Ms Berelson for comment.

It is absolutely extraordinary that these course leaders and these materials could be deemed appropriate for antisemitism training. The fact that Ms Jasiewicz was not directly involved in selecting the resources or delivering the sessions is no reassurance given that the speakers — who may well have been contracted by her — appear to have provided a warped view of what antisemitism is. This is all the more concerning given the dire relations between several trade unions — including the NEU — with the Jewish community.

Recently, Jewish teachers have lamented that the NEU has failed them, with a significant number resigning their membership en masse. One Jewish teacher has also recently complained that the NEU classes him as black, notwithstanding his protestations. It is unclear whether that is why a course on antisemitism was being organised by the North West Black Member Organising Forum.

In their reply to Campaign Against Antisemitism, the Joint General Secretaries said: “The NEU has a proud record of tackling racism and antisemitism. Like other forms of racism antisemitism is on the rise and needs to be urgently tackled. Our website points to teaching and learning resources to support teachers and leaders in tackling antisemitism in education.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The involvement of the notorious Warsaw Ghetto graffiti vandal, Ewa Jasiewicz, in arranging antisemitism training for the NEU is insulting enough. Regardless of the precise level of her participation, inviting two fringe figures to lead the sessions with resources from utterly misleading and highly controversial sources shows that the NEU is not serious about tackling antisemitism at all. It is no wonder that we routinely receive complaints from Jewish members of this union and others in the sector and that Jewish teachers have lately resigned en masse from the NEU. If these sessions reflect what the NEU believes antisemitism is, it has no hope of attracting these teachers to return.

“We would urge teachers, union officials are others who are interested in learning about antisemitism to contact us for training or consult our website and resources or those of other mainstream Jewish organisations or antisemitism specialists.

“If you rely on fringe figures for education on antisemitism, your perspective on anti-Jewish racism will be accordingly fringe and you will not be able to show the real solidarity with your Jewish colleagues that a union is supposed to instil.”

Campaign Antisemitism has produced teachers’ guides for classes on antisemitism, which have been endorsed by the BBC. We have also recently produced a short resource for pupils and parents who encounter antisemitism at schools.

Do you or your friends/family have stories of schoolteachers or pupils facing antisemitism at schools in the UK? Contact us at [email protected] or call +44 (0)330 822 0321.

Evidence has emerged that the second ‘Free Palestine’ convoy did lead to antisemitism on the streets of London.

A visibly Jewish man has revealed that one driver in the 35-car convoy shouted ‘Free Palestine’ at him and another beeped their car horn.

The incident took place on Shabbat on Finchley Road.

The victim, who was targeted by the convoy because he wears a kippah, wrote on Twitter: “I walked down Finchley Road today wearing my kippa (Jewish skullcap) & one member of #Convoy4Palestine shouted ‘Free Palestine’ at me & another blew a horn at me. You are entitled to demonstrate for your cause but not to do so at people who are visibly Jewish. That is antisemitism.”

Finchley Road was also where participants in the previous ‘Free Palestine’ convoy last month shouted “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” through megaphones. Four men were arrested and bailed over the former incident and an alleged antisemitic incident committed in Manchester before the convoy arrived in London. Other incidents of antisemitic intimidation and even a car ramming were also reported in connection with the convoy.

The police declined a request by Campaign Against Antisemitism, supported by legal representations, to ban the returning convoy.

The convoy ultimately joined an antisemitism-infested demonstration at Downing Street that was addressed by the antisemitic former Labour Party leader, Jeremy Corbyn.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A journalist who tweeted “Hitler was right” and other antisemitic comments and images “no longer works for the BBC”.

Tala Halawa, until recently a Palestine Affairs Specialist at the BBC Monitoring Service, posted a series of antisemitic tweets in 2014, including one that read: “#Israel Is more #Nazi than #Hitler! Oh, #HitlerWasRight #IDF go to hell. #PrayForGaza”. She also asserted that “ur media is controlled by ur zionist government in order 2 produce ignorant people [sic]”, shared the graphic that caused Naz Shah MP to be suspended from the Labour Party several years ago as well as an image of a child being burned on a menorah, and posted on Facebook: “They [Zionists] are crying the holocaust every single moment but they’re practicing it every single moment as well.”

The social media posts dated from prior to Ms Halawa’s employment at the BBC.

Campaign Against Antisemitism and others submitted complaints to the BBC, which has now responded saying:“Whilst these tweets predate the individual’s employment with the BBC, the BBC took this extremely seriously and investigated the matter with urgency. The journalist in question no longer works for the BBC.

“We are clear there is no place for views like this to exist within the BBC and we deplore racism and antisemitism.”

This is not the first time in recent months that the antisemitic social media activity of a BBC employee has led to a quiet departure.

BBC anchors and leading journalists have not been immune either. A few weeks ago, a BBC Arabic anchor was given a mere slap on the wrist after sharing an antisemitic social media post while employed by the Corporation, and last month Campaign Against Antisemitism launched a petition calling for the veteran journalist Jeremy Bowen to be fired after he posted a tweet instructing “every Jew” to read an “exploration of Judaism” that claimed that “Racism, hate and violence are Jewish values too”.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “While we are pleased to hear that Tala Halawa no longer works at the BBC, and that the Corporation deplores antisemitism, several questions remain answered.

“Why was she hired in the first place, given that these tweets pre-dated her employment at The BBC, and what changes are being introduced to the Corporation’s vetting process for new employees? Why was so little due diligence conducted prior to hiring Ms Halawa even though her role focused on the sensitive issue of Israel and the Middle East? Finally, was Ms Halawa’s employment terminated, demonstrating the BBC’s opposition to antisemitism, or was she simply permitted quietly to resign? We will continue to take up these questions with the BBC.

“The BBC must understand that its reputation in the Jewish community is extremely poor, and it needs desperately to demonstrate that it believes in zero tolerance of antisemitism. Transparency would be the first step.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 revealed that two thirds of British Jews are deeply concerned by the BBC’s coverage of matters of Jewish concern, and 55% by its handling of antisemitism complaints.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

A neo-Nazi, former UKIP member who advocated for the murder of Jewish people has been jailed for at least eighteen years on terror charges.

Dean Morrice, 34, was found guilty at Kingston-upon-Thames Crown Court last week on ten counts related to terrorism and explosives.

He was reported to have posted “violent racist, antisemitic and Islamophobic propaganda online and collected the means for making bombs.”

Judge Peter Lodder said: “You have described yourself as a patriot. You are not a patriot, you are a dangerous neo-Nazi, your bigotry and hatred is abhorrent to the overwhelming majority in this country.”

Judge Lodder added that Mr Morrice had attempted to “fool” the court into believing that he was a respectable family man: “You attempted to fool the jury into thinking that you are a family-orientated, caring man who was simply trying to find friends. In the witness box you cried as you spoke of missing your own children. Yet you revelled in the Christchurch mosque massacre in which children as young as three years old were murdered, and glorified Brevijk who slaughtered more than 30 children in Norway.”

Mr Morrice, who previously drove a truck in the army, also reportedly ran a Telegram channel which disseminated virulently antisemitic, neo-Nazi content that encouraged the killing of Jews and other minorities.  

Detective Chief Superintendent Kath Barnes, Head of Counter Terrorism Policing South East, said: “The evidence in this case has shown that Morrice had a clear extreme right-wing ideology and had terrorist intentions. He was also in possession of terrorist literature including ‘weapon and militia manuals’ and distributed this to further aid his warped ideology and try and encourage others.

“Through dedicated investigation, Morrice was stopped before he was able to carry out any physical act of terror but the evidence showed that he actively encouraged terrorism to others with his toxic ideology and had the intention and potentially the capability to commit one himself.”

Mr Morrice was given a 23-year custodial sentence, of which he will spend a minimum of eighteen years in prison.

Recently, Andrew Dymock, a 24-year-old politics graduate from Aberystwyth University who was accused of creating and running the website of the neo-Nazi System Resistance Network group, was found guilty on twelve terrorism charges.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Image credit: Counter Terrorism Policing South East

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds Universities UK for releasing a guide on how to tackle antisemitism.

Universities UK represents 140 universities in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland and its mission is “to create the conditions for UK universities to be the best in the world; maximising their positive impact locally, nationally and globally.”

The guide was published on 11th June and is titled: “Tackling antisemitism: practical guidance for universities.” It was drafted to focus on three main issues: widespread limited understanding of antisemitism; an under-reporting of antisemitic incidents and issues with complaints processes; and online harassment.

The guide is a nineteen-page document which describes these problems, along with a section dedicated to “suggested actions and best practice” for each.

It also discusses the International Definition of Antisemitism. Notably, it recognises that the eleven examples that accompany the Definition are integral to it: “The definition is followed by 11 examples which demonstrate how antisemitism may manifest in practice.”

The guide also rightly emphasises that the Definition does not stifle freedom of expression: “The [D]efinition should not be seen as restricting free speech or academic freedom, and universities that choose to adopt the definition should make sure it is used and understood in combination with other duties and protections.” Campaign Against Antisemitism has also produced an accessible guide to why the Definition does not stifle freedom of expression.

The final section of the guide is dedicated to case studies and cites the University of Essex, Middlesex University, the University of Birmingham, and Buckinghamshire New University as examples. Here, the guide briefly details each university’s history of dealing with antisemitism, and its process of adopting the Definition.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

A sticker belonging to the neo-Nazi group, British National Socialist Movement, was found on a lamppost near Manchester’s Charedi Jewish community.

Discovered on 31st May, the sticker was affixed to street furniture on Great Cheetham Street West and bore the symbol of the racist organisation with the words “British Movement Manchester,” along with the group’s website.

Founded during the 1960s and having supposedly dissolved in the early 1980s, the movement exhibited antisemitism and advocated for violence towards ethnic minorities.

The group now appears, however, to have reactivated, with a website currently featuring several antisemitic tropes and images, including references to “globalists” and “cultural Marxists,” praise for Hitler, and images of people performing the Nazi salute.

Last year, we reported that the Royal United Services Institute (RUSI), a British think-tank, had published a report noting the “conspiracy theories propagated widely online” in connection with COVID-19 and calls for violence against minority communities, among them Jews. The report observed that “the pandemic has amplified antisemitic tropes and calls for violence against Jewish communities”, and also noted that there have been “calls online by groups such as the British National Socialist Movement for the virus to be ‘weaponised’”.

Last year, members of the proscribed National Action group were sentenced to prison, having engaged, amongst other activities, in far-right stickering and recruitment campaigns. Campaign Against Antisemitism continues to monitor and report on far-right stickering campaigns.

Yesterday, Jeremy Corbyn addressed another antisemitism-infested demonstration in central London.

An evidence gathering team from Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Demonstration and Event Monitoring Unit was present at the rally in Whitehall and observed countless antisemitic placards, especially ones equating Israel with Nazism, in breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Pamphlets were also distributed at the demonstration explaining, in breach of the Definition, why Israel and the Nazis are indeed supposedly comparable, bizarrely and baselessly accusing the Jewish state of implementing policies of extermination and antisemitism.

There were also signs claiming that the Jewish state abducts and murders children, reminiscent of the antisemitic blood libel.

Mr Corbyn was a keynote speaker at yesterday’s rally, which came just days after he appeared at the Cambridge Union and yet again play down the institutional antisemitism in the Labour Party during his leadership and his own antisemitism, including insisting that one Jewish Labour MP had not been “hounded out” of the Party but had simply “unfortunately decided to resign from the Party”. Following the interview, Campaign Against Antisemitism reiterated our call for Mr Corbyn to be expelled from Labour. It is being reported that the Party is “looking into” his remarks.

Yesterday’s rally was reportedly organised by the Palestine Solidarity Campaign (PSC). This is not the first time in recent weeks that a PSC rally has been riddled with antisemitism. An investigation by Campaign Against Antisemitism in 2017 exposed extensive antisemitic bigotry amongst supporters of the PSC.

Yesterday’s protestors were joined by participants in a second ‘Free Palestine’ convoy that drove down to London from cities in the North and Midlands. The returning convoy included some 35 cars (a considerably smaller number than the previous convoy). At one point, police pulled over two cars to prevent them from entering Jewish neighbourhoods in the north of London.

On Friday, the Metropolitan Police Service declined a request by Campaign Against Antisemitism, supported by legal representations from our lawyers, to prohibit the convoy, particularly after the previous ‘Free Palestine’ convoy drove through a Jewish neighbourhood shouting “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” through megaphones, and a vehicle, believed to be from the convoy, chased a Jewish mother down a London street and rammed her car whilst she was driving her four-year-old child. Four men were arrested and bailed over the former incident and an alleged antisemitic incident committed in Manchester before the convoy arrived in London.

In the event, the Metropolitan Police Service is understood to have placed conditions on the returning convoy and monitored its progress, leading to its intervention to prevent the two cars diverging.

protest was also held yesterday in Manchester, bringing the city centre to a standstill.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Another weekend, another antisemitism-infested demonstration on the streets of Britain’s capital. Heavy policing ensured the safety of the Jewish community as another convoy was permitted to pass through London. Nevertheless, it is extraordinary that, unlike with any other minority, week after week open displays of anti-Jewish racism in the nation’s capital are deemed acceptable. If the authorities will not bring antisemitic criminals to justice, we intend to use all legal and regulatory avenues to defend our community and force the authorities to act.

“Less remarkable is the ubiquity of Jeremy Corbyn at these rallies. Coming after his remarks earlier this week playing down Labour antisemitism yet again, the Party has ever fewer excuses not to expel him, as we have demanded for several months now.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Andrew Dymock, a 24-year-old politics graduate from Aberystwyth University who was accused of creating and running the website of the neo-Nazi System Resistance Network group, has been found guilty on twelve terrorism charges.

During the trial at the Old Bailey, the court heard that Mr Dymock wrote and shared several antisemitic and hate-motivated articles through the website. He was being prosecuted for fifteen offences including encouraging terrorism through the use of propaganda.

One article was allegedly titled “Join your local Nazis”, while another, “The Truth about the Holocaust”, said that “the only guilt felt by the Germanic race in regard to the Holocaust should be that we did not finish the job.” The article reportedly went on to say that Jews were a “cancer on this earth…that must be eradicated in its entirety”. Numerous antisemitic stereotypes and tropes were also said to have been included, such as conspiracy theories about Jewish control of the banks and the Government.

Another article reportedly written by Mr Dymock read that white people needed to “wake up and bring slaughter to Europa, cleansing it of the unclean filth that pollutes her lands”.

System Resistance Network is the successor to National Action, which the government proscribed as a terrorist organisation in 2016 following a long campaign by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others.

Mr Dymock was convicted of a total of fifteen offences, which include five counts of encouraging terrorism, four of disseminating terrorist publications, two of terrorist fundraising, one of possessing material useful to a terrorist, one of possessing racially inflammatory material, one of stirring up racial hatred, and one of stirring up hatred on the grounds of sexual orientation.

During the trial, Mr Dymock denied all charges, stating: “I’m doing my dissertation on the rise of nationalism and why, and how, ranging from moderate to extreme. I kind of thought I might as well start preparing for my third year in advance.”

Mr Dymock told jurors “thank you for killing me” as they delivered their verdicts.

A sentencing hearing has been scheduled for 24th June.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Image credit: Crown Prosecution Service

The Metropolitan Police Service has confirmed to Campaign Against Antisemitism that, notwithstanding our representations, another ‘Free Palestine’ convoy will be permitted to drive across the country and through the capital tomorrow.

Campaign Against Antisemitism took legal advice which we provided to the police and Home Office setting out the legal basis for prohibiting the returning convoy on the basis that it constitutes a “public procession” likely to cause “serious public disorder”, engaging section 13 of the Public Order Act 1986.

The fact that the Metropolitan Police Service has not chosen to avail itself of legislation specifically designed to prevent this kind of intimidation is deeply concerning, particularly after the previous ‘Free Palestine’ convoy drove through a Jewish neighbourhood shouting “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” through megaphones, and a vehicle, believed to be from the convoy, chased a Jewish mother down a London street and rammed her car whilst she was driving her four-year-old child. Four men were arrested and bailed over the former incident and an alleged antisemitic incident committed in Manchester before the convoy arrived in London. 

Instead of banning the convoy under section 13 of the Public Order Act, police instead appear to have opted for imposing conditions on it under section 12, but as we noted in our representations, we can conceive of no conditions that will be both sufficient to protect the Jewish community and enforceable against a convoy potentially consisting of hundreds of vehicles.

The returning convoy is due to leave Bradford on Saturday morning and arrive outside Number 10 Downing Street at 13:00, joining a ‘Free Palestine’ protect that will be underway in Whitehall. The convoy’s passage through London will coincide with Jewish families leaving synagogue and walking home. Due to Jewish religious practices outlawing the use of mobile telephones during the Sabbath, they will have neither the means to call the police or take recordings in the event that they are targeted in antisemitic hate crimes.

Despite our request and legal representations, the Metropolitan Police Service has confirmed to Campaign Against Antisemitism that it will permit this convoy to proceed. In a letter, the police force insisted that it is “taking this incident very seriously” and understands “how alarming it is to feel threatened within your home community”. The letter promised that the force has “put in place a central command team to monitor any convoy and accompany it if it travels into London” and “will try to ensure any convoy takes a central route into London avoiding any residential areas”.

The letter also sought to assure the Jewish community that it will have high levels of policing, including outside synagogues. It is remarkable that the police can recognise that the threat to the Jewish community and its religious institutions is real enough to warrant enhanced policing, but at the same time permit a convoy from which it recognises that that threat may emanate.

The Metropolitan Police Service‘s insistence that it will be monitoring the convoy provides limited reassurance, given the events of the previous convoy and the numerous recent incidents of police officers standing by while alleged antisemitic hate crimes were being committed before their eyes.

Yesterday, the London Assembly unanimously passed a motion calling on the Mayor and the Metropolitan Police Service to commission and publish a strategy to tackle antisemitism in the capital.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “This week we have been at pains to explain to the authorities why we do not believe that imposing conditions on this convoy offers sufficient protection and that instead they must prohibit it. They have specific authority to ban any ‘public procession’ that poses a risk of ‘serious public disorder’ but they have chosen not to use their powers.

“The Jewish community is already traumatised by the recent convoy and will be even more severely impacted if cars are once again permitted to drive across the country terrorising Jews. Vehicles from the last convoy are suspected of involvement in antisemitic crimes, including incitement to rape Jewish girls, violence and the ramming of a car containing a Jewish woman driving her 4-year-old child. The convoy organisers have of course condemned this, but once in motion we have seen that they have no control over their members.

“The Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service has permitted this convoy to proceed and all eyes are now upon her and her officers to prove that they can ensure that British Jews are able to go about their lives without incident this weekend.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

YouTube has allowed the creators of virulently antisemitic videos that refer to the “Jewish lobby” and describe Hitler as “an angel” to remain on its platform.

The JC reported on the antisemitic videos last week, hosted by Urdu-speaking YouTubers, and the hosts have now hit back at the newspaper for shining a light on their racism.

One the hosts, Zaid Hamid, can be seen declaring that “In reality, Hitler was an angel, the way he took action against Jews, the way he killed Jews.”

Pakistani news presenter Imran Riaz Khan stated in a video to his 1.65 million subscribers that “Jewish lobbyists” are “very strong”, and that they “lobby for others too in exchange for money.” He went on to proclaim that there are several “Jewish lobbies” in America and Europe, and that they have a desire to “control America.”

“Anyone who stands in any important elections for the House of Representatives or any other forum, they interview them and view their life and keep an eye on them,” the presenter said, adding: “Anyone who is in big positions in America, Jews keep an eye on them and spy on their lifestyle and anyone who disagrees with them they create troubles for him. Jews were behind Trump. Similarly anyone else who runs for the Presidency has the Jewish lobby support.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy or of Jews controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions” is an example of antisemitism.

Makhdoom Shahab-ud-Din, another YouTuber who has over 600,000 subscribers, is also accused of spreading antisemitic hate. In one video, he claimed that Jewish people “play” an “antisemitism card” when confronted about the actions of the Israeli Government, and that any criticism of Israel causes Jews to “come together and start attacking.”

According to the Definition, “Accusing Jewish citizens of being more loyal to Israel, or to the alleged priorities of Jews worldwide, than to the interests of their own nations” is also an example of antisemitism.

He also went on to praise Hamas, the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group, stating that they “gained a huge success” in their bombing of Israel.

Umer Karim, a Visiting Fellow at the Royal United Services Institute (RUSI) with an interest in Pakistan, said: “The Pakistani Urdu media discourse, whether electronic, print or digital, is heavily influenced by conspiracy theories that remain overarchingly antisemitic and consider Jews responsible for every wrongdoing in the world, particularly when it concerns the Muslim world. These narratives then resultantly fuel extremist attitudes, particularly against Jews who are considered as the centre of all evil, regardless of the fact if they politically support Israel or not.”

However, the YouTubers in question have since attacked the JC for its reporting on the issue.

Mr Khan accused the newspaper of being a “cabal” that is spreading “fake news” about Jew-hatred, even going as far to state that “there’s no hatred of Jews.” During this video, he displayed numerous images of Orthodox Jews in the background.

Further alluding to the antisemitic trope of global Jewish power, Mr Shahab-ud-Din stated that their “reporting” was not “liked by certain powers in the world.” He went on to refer to himself, Mr Khan, and Mr Hamid as the latest “victims” of the “antisemitism card.” He then requested that his viewers subscribe to his backup YouTube channel so that the “Jews fail in their nefarious and dirty objectives.”

A spokesperson for YouTube said: “Hate has no place on YouTube. To fight the spread of harmful content and protect our community, we’ve worked hard to develop responsible guidelines to define and make clear what content is unacceptable. When content is flagged to us, we work quickly to remove videos that violate our policies.”

However, it is notable that while several of the antisemitic videos have been removed, the creator’s channels have been allowed to remain.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “YouTube has become a top tier platform for spreading hatred of Jews. Google has been making some progress in removing antisemitic incitement videos that are in the English language, but that progress is slow. However, as we know, some of the worst anti-Jewish incitement is not in English. The JC’s investigation has shone a spotlight on the fact that some of the worst incitement on YouTube is in languages like Urdu. These prolific broadcasters are whipping up hatred of Jews amongst Urdu speakers around the world, including here in the UK. There can be no excuses — Google needs to act and we will be discussing the JC’s findings with them.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

Jeremy Corbyn has again played down antisemitism during his tenure as Leader of the Labour Party.

In an interview at the Cambridge Union, when asked about Luciana Berger being “hounded out” of the Labour Party due to antisemitism, he insisted that “Luciana was not hounded out of the Party; she unfortunately decided to resign from the Party”. Ms Berger was among a number of MPs who quit the Labour Party in protest at its institutional antisemitism.

Private WhatsApp messages have previously been reported on indicating that Ms Berger and others may have even been deliberately hounded out of the Party by senior officials.

Though pushed on how he could reconcile his call for a “kindler, gentler politics” with the report of the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s (EHRC) finding that the Labour Party had committed unlawful acts of victimisation of Jewish people, Mr Corbyn reverted to his familiar claims that he improved the processes in the Party and condemned antisemitism as well as “any racism, Islamophobia, far-right racism”. His comments appeared to confirm that he continues not to grasp the phenomenon of far-left antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant in the EHRC’s investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party.

Mr Corbyn had little of comfort to say even to his interviewer, the President of the Cambridge Union, who recounted his own experiences as a Jewish Labour member since 2016.

Mr Corbyn disclosed that he speaks to a range of Jewish people in his constituency, including “both those that would be followers of roughly the position of the Board of Deputies, those that would be followers of the Jewish Socialist group, Jewish Voice for Labour” and the Haredi community. Jewish Voice for Labour is an antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation whose chair has admitted was founded in order “to tackle allegations of antisemitism in the Labour Party”. To suggest that this fringe group is on a par with mainstream Jewish communal organisations – a view that Mr Corbyn held throughout his term as leader – is part of the problem.

Mr Corbyn also noted that he commissioned the Pears Institute for Antisemitism at Birkbeck to prepare resources for antisemitism training in the Labour Party, which was an attempt to displace the training offered by Labour’s Jewish affiliate in favour of an institute directed by an academic opposed, like Mr Corbyn, to the International Definition of Antisemitism. Labour’s Jewish affiliate refused Labour’s request to adapt their sessions to fit with this new course, suggesting that it would make them little more than “useful idiots.” The Pears Foundation recently withdrew its name from the Institute.

Mr Corbyn also defended his association with the disgraced Rev. Stephen Sizer, on the basis that Rev. Sizer’s various inflammatory comments views were expressed later on, as well as his invitation to the controversial Sheikh Raed Salah.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has previously lodged a complaint against Mr Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day of the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

Mr Corbyn was suspended by the Labour Party following his disgraceful comments on the publication of the report into Labour antisemitism by the EHRC and a complaint by Campaign Against Antisemitism. He was then rapidly and controversially readmitted to the Party but the whip has not been restored to him, leaving him as an Independent MP outside of the Parliamentary Labour Party.

Now that Mr Corbyn has again downplayed antisemitism in the Party, he must be expelled, as per Sir Keir Starmer’s declaration that anyone who thinks that accusations of antisemitism in the Labour Party are “exaggerated or a factional attack…are part of the problem” and “should be nowhere near the Labour Party”.

Joe Glasman, Head of Political Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Jeremy Corbyn remains defiant and unrepentant when it comes to the institutional antisemitism of the Labour Party under his watch and his own antisemitism. Despite the findings of the EHRC, and despite the complaints made by us against him, and despite his brief suspension from the Party and ongoing suspension from the Parliamentary Labour Party, he continues to refuse to accept the scale of the problem or his responsibility for it. Mr Corbyn has not learned a thing.

“Given that Sir Keir Starmer has insisted that anyone who holds views such as these ‘should be nowhere near the Labour Party’, it is time for Mr Corbyn to go. We have previously called for Mr Corbyn to be expelled by the Labour Party. We reiterate that call today.”

The Labour Party was found by the EHRC to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The London Assembly has unanimously passed a motion calling on the Mayor, Sadiq Khan, and the Metropolitan Police to commission and publish a strategy for tackling antisemitism in London.

The motion comes following numerous antisemitic incidents in the capital, including the beating of patrons of a kosher restaurant and an assault on a rabbi, harassment of Jews on the street, the hacking of the social media account of a prominent Jewish charity, incidents at hospitals targeting Jewish patients and staff, and a Jewish school directing pupils to conceal clothing that may identify them as Jewish, to name but a few, as well asa convoy of cars that drove down the Finchley Road shouting “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” through a megaphone.

In some incidents, police officers appeared to stand by as possible hate crimes were being committed.

The motion, which was passed yesterday, was proposed by Greater London Authority Conservatives Leader, Susan Hall. Ms Hall said: “It’s no surprise many Jewish Londoners feel let down by our city’s response to the recent horrific scenes of antisemitism on our streets. Something has clearly gone wrong when mobs parading on our streets, and even a convoy of vehicles driving through a Jewish community, can freely broadcast their hateful, disgusting and violent views. Worryingly, while antisemitism on London’s streets went unchecked, a police officer chose to agree publicly and shout the protest’s political message.

“The officer’s misguided action not only undermines the force’s impartiality but the Jewish community’s faith in the police. This cannot happen again. Condemnation of antisemitism alone won’t make London any safer. We need strong action to root it out. In the future, there must be a swifter police response with robust police action to keep Jewish Londoners safe. We cannot allow a repeat of the antisemitic demonstrations and displays we have seen recently in London. I hope the Mayor and the Metropolitan Police listen and act on the recommendations the London Assembly have made today.”

Labour Assembly members added a disclaimer amendment that “ultimately the power to ban protests lies solely with the Home Secretary, who should carefully scrutinise future requests for demonstrations to ensure a zero-tolerance approach against any antisemitic speech or imagery,” as well as an amendment congratulating the Mayor on his recent re-election.

After the passage of the amendments, Labour also backed the motion.

Labour’s Unmesh Desai said:” “We must all take a stand against antisemitism and some of the appalling scenes we have seen in London recently, which have left Jewish Londoners to feel insecure, unsafe and under attack. I have seen and been sent clips of incidents of the marches in Central London, with hard antisemitic statements being made. Sadly, the Met was standing by and saying nothing, and doing nothing.

“I understand that sometimes it is better for the Met to act afterwards and gather evidence, but this does send out the wrong signal, that they are scared to act, that they are losing control of the streets of London and pandering to the politically correct lobby. The appalling antisemitic attacks we saw on the Rabbi in Redbridge, and other antisemitic incidents need to be condemned unequivocally, no ifs and no buts.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A controversial Warwick lecturer has reportedly claimed that the International Definition of Antisemitism is part of a Conservative plot to “legitimate racist speech and de-legitimate anti-racist and anti-colonial research, teaching and activism”.

Goldie Osuri, a sociology lecturer at the University of Warwick, made the comments at an event in April organised by the Universities and Colleges Union (UCU) called ‘Resisting the IHRA Working Definition of Antisemitism’ (also known as the International Definition of Antisemitism).

UCU has been at the forefront of efforts to oppose or revoke adoption of the Definition at British campuses, and its reputation in the Jewish community is in the gutter. The union recently included the Definition on a list of potential threats in a survey of members.

According to Hurry Up Harry, which this week released audio and a transcript of the event, Dr Osurie added that “Pressure to recognise or adopt the [Definition] with its examples should be understood as a racist move against Palestinians” and that the Definition “should be understood as a way of smearing as antisemitic and hence silencing critics of Israel and pro-Israel advocacy organisations” and “is part of a broader gamut of Tory moves to legitimate racist speech and de-legitimate anti-racist and anti-colonial research, teaching and activism.”

Dr Osuri is part of a coalition of Warwick academics disgracefully trying to pressure the University to retract its adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism, which the University only did after significant pressure.

In the past, the University backed Dr Osuri after she dismissed concerns over the Labour Party’s crisis of institutional antisemitism by saying that such concerns are “an Israeli lobby kind of idea.” The University rejected a complaint by the Warwick Jewish and Israel Society (JISoc) against Dr Osuri. Campaign Against Antisemitism shared the Jewish students’ conclusion that the University had committed “a shameful dereliction of its responsibility to protect Jewish students” and that “the University has chosen to side with antisemites and not Jewish students.”

Earlier this year, the University’s official Twitter account ‘liked’ a tweet endorsing recent inflammatory comments by the academic and conspiracy theorist David Miller, with the University subsequently deleting the ‘like’ and blaming“unauthorised access” to the account.

In the past, other concerns have been raised over the University’s failure to address a scandal over a group chat which gained national attention, in which antisemitic, misogynistic, abusive and threatening messages, including rape threats, were uncovered.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to Sky News over a tweet posted by its Middle East Correspondent, Mark Stone.

In response to a tweet stating that “unbalanced reporting” in the media “is resulting in such Jew hatred in the UK. My children have to hide who they are”, Mr Stone yesterday tweeted: “I am so sorry your children have to hide. Unacceptable,” adding: “It’s interesting that so many ‘Israelis’ tell me that the ‘Jew hatred’ you experience is actually the consequence of the current Israeli government’s policies; their prolongation of an untenable occupation.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Holding Jews collectively responsible for the actions of the State of Israel” is an example of antisemitism.

Mr Stone has since deleted the tweet and apologised, but sought to blame others by claiming: “These are not my views; they are those of people I have spoken to in my reporting from Israel. I am sorry.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is appalling for Mark Stone to give credence to victim-blaming and excuses for antisemitism by portraying as legitimate the view that anti-Jewish racism is a reasonable reaction to the policies of the Israeli Government. Furthermore, his tweet also implies doubt about the experience of antisemitism by the victim to whom he was responding. Even his apology was inadequate, as he denied that the views were his but still held them out as being worthy of consideration.

“Anyone airing and disseminating such grotesquely antisemitic views is not fit to be entrusted with the responsibility of working at Sky News. We have submitted a complaint to Sky News and will also be writing to Ofcom. We look forward to hearing what action Sky News will be taking to avoid further loss of public confidence.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

Jewish passers-by have reported to Campaign Against Antisemitism that police stood by as a demonstrator shouted “F””” the Jews” outside the residence of the Israeli ambassador in London.

The witnesses did not see the demonstrator but described the voice as being that of a woman.

The incident took place at around 19:10 at a protest last night outside the residence.

This is not the first time in recent weeks that police officers have failed to act in the face of antisemitic hate crime or have participated in political protests in contravention of policing protocols. Campaign Against Antisemitism has submitted complaints in respect of the relevant officers.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is in discussions with the Metropolitan Police Service over this and other incidents.

Image credit: Google

Carlisle Castle has been daubed with antisemitic graffiti.

Cumbria Police are reportedly investigating the vandalism at the 900-year-old landmark near the border between England and Scotland as racially aggravated criminal damage.

The graffiti was discovered on 2nd June and the police are currently appealing for witnesses.

A police spokesman said: “Hate related incidents can have a serious impact on communities and individuals. There is no place for hate on the streets of Cumbria and these types of incidents are dealt with vigorously and appropriately.”

If you have any more information, please contact PC 2999 on 101, or report online at www.cumbria.police.uk/reportit, quoting incident 191 of 2nd June.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Schools have been warned by their regulator, Ofsted, that they risk failing inspections if they do not act over antisemitism.

Following a meeting with representatives from the Jewish education sector and reports of anti-Jewish bullying at schools – including one teacher whose pupils competed to stick ‘Free Palestine’ stickers in their hair – Ofsted said that there was no place for antisemitism in schools and that it was supporting victims among teaching staff.

Recently, Jewish teachers have also lamented that their union, the National Education Union, has failed them, with a significant number resigning their membership en masse.

A spokesperson for Ofsted said: “Where these incidents occur, we want to see schools deal with them quickly and effectively, and any failure to do so will be reflected in our inspection judgements,” adding: “We also expect a school’s curriculum and teaching to promote equality of opportunity and diversity.”

Ofsted’s warning comes just days after Education Secretary Gavin Williamson wrote to headteachers urging action over antisemitism.

Campaign Antisemitism has produced teachers’ guides for classes on antisemitism, which have been endorsed by the BBC. We have also recently produced a short resource for pupils and parents who encounter antisemitism at schools.

Do you or your friends/family have stories of schoolteachers or pupils facing antisemitism at schools in the UK? We have received a significant number of reports and the Incident Response colleagues would be keen to hear of further examples if you could share them. Contact us at [email protected] or call +44 (0)330 822 0321.

A new GMB union General Secretary, with a history of speaking out against antisemtism, was elected last Thursday.

Gary Smith has previously said: “No political party has clean hands on the issue of antisemitism but nobody should need any reminders that antisemitism is on the rise and we in GMB are clear that it is absolutely intolerable.”

In the past, he has spoken out against Richard Leonard, the former Scottish Labour leader, for failing to support the International Definition of Antisemitism.

In March 2019, he labelled the Labour Party’s handling of antisemitism “disgraceful” and revealed that he even thought about leaving the Party himself.

Mr Smith also spoke out when Rhea Wolfson, a Jewish official with the GMB Scotland union, was targeted in an article which mentioned that Hitler had alleged that Jews had gradually assumed leadership of the trade union movement.

A colleague of Mr Smith’s stated: “Some union people struggle with the idea of treating racism against Jews in the same way they would treat racism against other ethnic minorities. Gary understands the poisonous nature of anti-Jewish racism, and does not operate with any hierarchies.”

In April, it was reported that a former senior official from the GMB union allegedly referred to victims of antisemitism as “rich b****** Jews” in an appalling speech, sources claim.

Last month, Dennis McNulty, a GBM union activist, was jailed for nine years after he assaulted a Jewish barrister in an antisemitic attack and saying: “It’s always you f***ing people, you’re always the problem.”

Labour’s General Secretary’s invitation to Party members to antisemitism training in line with the Action Plan agreed with the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) has been met with a revolt and antisemitic conspiracy theories.

David Evans, who has undertaken antisemitism training himself, wrote: “When I first became General Secretary of the Labour Party, I made my priorities clear. I want to ensure that our Party is a welcoming environment for all our members. In order to tackle antisemitism, it is vital to understand it.”

He added: “Our movement thrives when it is together. That’s why I am very grateful for all the invaluable work that has gone into this training session, and would like to stress its importance. I have undertaken the training myself and found it thought provoking and useful.”

The online training is due to be led by Labour’s Jewish affiliate from on 14th June.

However, it is understood that a revolt by some members is being mounted on WhatsApp, accusing the affiliate of being a propaganda tool for Israel and urging a boycott of the training sessions.

Some members were reportedly concerned that they might be recorded in the sessions, with their comments used to expel them from the Party. One participant in the discussions portrayed the Party as white supremacist, while others described antisemitism as having been weaponised or used as a smear.

Numerous pro-Corbyn groups within and beyond Labour have reportedly urged members to boycott the training sessions.

The Labour Party was found by the EHRC to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is asking the Metropolitan Police Service to use its powers under the Public Order Act 1986 to address the threat of the returning “Free Palestine” convoy, after the previous convoy drove through a Jewish neighbourhood shouting “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” through megaphones.

Four men were arrested and bailed over that incident and an alleged antisemitic incident committed in Manchester before the convoy arrived in London.

In addition to this, a vehicle chased a Jewish mother down a London street and rammed her car whilst she was driving her four-year-old child to see friends.

The drivers were alleged to have been part of the same convoy of some 200 cars displaying Palestinian Authority flags, which is understood to have driven from Bradford, Sheffield and Leicester down the M1 motorway before veering into Hendon and Golders Green, two of North London’s Jewish neighbourhoods. According to witnesses, convoy participants shouted to Jewish passers-by “Free Palestine! Go back to Poland” and other antisemitic chants.

The returning convoy is due to leave Bradford on Saturday morning and arrive outside Number 10 Downing Street at 1pm.

Under sections 12 and 13 of the Public Order Act 1986, the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service may, with the consent of the Home Secretary, prohibit processions or impose specific conditions upon them.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Less than one month after the ‘Free Palestine’ convoy drove through a Jewish area of London shouting “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” and ramming a car where a mother was driving her four-year-old child, it is returning this weekend.

“We are in talks with the Metropolitan Police Service to use its powers under the Public Order Act to ensure that the malicious acts of hatred we saw last month do not reoccur and that they prioritise the safety of the Jewish community.”We are also having ongoing discussions with the Met regarding recent events, including the investigation into the previous convoy, to ensure that offenders are brought to justice.

“Protest is one thing, but intimidation and violent hatred have absolutely no place on our streets, and anyone victimising British Jews must face the full force of the law.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Cardiff University has refused to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism in order to avoid a “potentially divisive situation.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has seen a response by the University to a letter that was sent from the Cardiff University Conservative Association requesting that the University adopts the Definition, in which the University Council refused, stating in its reply that it had concerns about how other groups may react.

The response also said that “adopting selected religion- or race-specific definitions may have the unfortunate consequence of appearing to exclude other faith groups or races in relation to whom definitions are not adopted.” The letter went on to say: “Avoiding such a potentially divisive situation was key to Council’s decision not to adopt either definition.”

The Council stated that the University’s existing framework for tackling racism was sufficient, and that its policies would be subject to ongoing evaluation.

Despite deciding to not adopt the Definition, the University said that it refers to the Definition in its intranet guidance section within its Dignity at Work and Study policy.

The Vice-Chancellor of the University has recommended late last year that the University adopts the Definition. The Equality, Diversity and Inclusion Sub-committee of the Senate then voted in favour of adoption, but not unanimously, and so decided to “pause and engage in further discussion”, after which “the issue was…appropriately brought to University Council for advice.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism calls on Cardiff University to reconsider its decision and join the over half of British universities who have pledged their support to tackling antisemitism on campus by adopting the Definition, and we applaud the Cardiff University Conservative Association for valiantly leading on this issue on campus.

Recently, Campaign Against Antisemitism’s researchers recorded that half of all universities in the UK have now adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism. Widespread adoption of the Definition also shows that those universities in Britain that have yet to adopt the Definition will become increasingly isolated.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

A Cornish man has pleaded guilty to eight charges under the Public Order Act 1986 after investigations by Campaign Against Antisemitism prompted action by Devon and Cornwall Police.

Graham Hart, 69, of Penponds, Camborne, was charged earlier this year with five counts of using offending words or behaviour in a programme involving threatening, abusive or insulting visual images or sounds which was included in a programme produced with intent or likely to stir up racial hatred.

Three further charges arose from comments that Mr Hart made on another radio show in late December 2020.

Mr Hart pleaded guilty to all counts today of producing a programme with intent or likely to stir up racial hatred at Truro Crown Court. The Judge, HHJ Linford, noted that these are serious offences and scheduled a sentencing hearing for 6th August, pending a psychiatric report. The judge warned Mr Hart that he “should anticipate an immediate sentence of imprisonment”. The maximum sentence for each of these charges is seven years in prison.

We will be providing further information following sentencing.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Thanks to the diligence of Devon and Cornwall Police, who acted on our investigations, Graham Hart has pleaded guilty to eight very serious charges of inciting racial hatred. The offences constitute some of the most extreme hatred towards Jews that we have ever encountered. It is vital that the Jewish community is protected from this man, and we hope that the sentence will also send a message to like-minded people that hate towards British Jews will not be tolerated.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A writer for HuffPost and Al Jazeera has defended the harassment of Jewish people, tweeting that British Jews are “either dual-nationals of Israel, serve in the army and/or have homes and lands there.”

Dilly Hussain’s Twitter thread sought to justify the three anti-Israel YouTubers who filmed themselves harassing members of the Jewish community in Golders Green – to whom they appear to refer in the video’s title as “radical Israelis” – over “child-killing” last month.

The video, the premise of which is initially outlined by one of the presenters as intending to open “a dialogue…a discussion…a friendly debate,” quickly became an excuse for the presenters to accost passing members of the Jewish community, including children.

Mr Hussain’s thread began with: “I believe Muslims (be it lay or public figures) questioning Jews (many of whom are pro-Israel to different degrees) about Israel is legitimate.”

He proceeded to say that it is a false equivalence to question Muslims about terrorism and compared Israel to ISIS, writing: “Muslims don’t support ISIS or lone-wolf attacks in the remotest way in comparison to British Jews who are either dual-nationals of Israel, serve in the army and/or have homes and lands there.”

He added: “In short, the number of Muslims who support, justify and defend acts of criminality by their co-religionists is simply incomparable to a faith community who are grossly and intimately involved with Israel.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Accusing Jewish citizens of being more loyal to Israel, or to the alleged priorities of Jews worldwide, than to the interests of their own nations” is an example of antisemitism, as is “Holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the State of Israel.”

A councillor for Bingham Town Council has apologised for shouting out “Heil Hitler” during a council meeting on 25th May.

Councillor Viv Leach shouted the remark after the councillors voted on a motion, seemingly comparing their raised arms to Nazi salutes.

A Bingham Town Council spokesperson said: “During the Town Council’s meeting on Tuesday May 25, an inappropriate comment of ‘Heil Hitler’ was made by Councillor Leach for which she wishes to apologise unreservedly.”

Apologising for the comment, Cllr Leach said: “The comment was made in response to an observation which, on reflection, was stupid and thoughtless of me. My comment was not intended to cause offense, but it has and for that I am extremely sorry. If I could take the comment back I would, and therefore I fully accept that there may be consequences.”

The Town Council’s Mayor, Councillor Andrew Shelton, said: “the Council does not and will not tolerate such offensive language or unacceptable comments. However, we will support Councillor Leach in making amends and help identify appropriate training.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The Nazi genocide of six million Jewish men, women and children was punctuated by the call of ‘Heil Hitler’. It is therefore shocking to hear the call of ‘Heil Hitler’ in a town council meeting in 2021 Britain. Cllr Viv Leach’s conduct was utterly deplorable and it is no wonder that she has now apologised for it and accepted that there will be consequences. Mere ‘training’ is, however, insufficient. Instead, she should devote time to taking meaningful action against antisemitism so as to show the sincerity of her remorse. She could start by proposing that her council adopts the International Definition of Antisemitism.”

Switzerland has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

At a meeting on 4th June, the Federal Council, which is the seven-member executive council that constitutes the federal government of the Swiss confederation, adopted a report incorporating the Definition to assist the Government in identifying antisemitic incidents. The report also makes recommendations for developing further measures to combat antisemitism in the Alpine nation.

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds the decision, which demonstrates the Swiss Government’s solidarity with the Jewish community at this worrying time for Jews in Europe and around the world.

Britain was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism and Lord Pickles worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street. Serbia joins a growing list of national governments and public bodies to use the Definition.

The disgraced Labour MP, Naz Shah, reportedly spoke at a rally where calls were made to “lift the curse of the Jews off the Muslims in Palestine!”

Footage has become available of the rally, held in May in Ms Shah’s home town of Bradford, in which speakers appear to beseech G-d to “make us part of the mujahideen in Palestine!”; “purify al-Aqsa from impure people!”; “make the earth quake under their [impure people’s] feet!”; and “make the Jews lose!”

Other chants included beseeching G-d to “lift the curse of the Jews off the Muslims in Palestine!” and “make Islam win!”

Ms Shah, who also serves as Labour’s Shadow Minister for Community Cohesion, urged demonstrators: “Don’t stop just here today. It must carry on, even when this stops. The year 2015 we all know what happened. We were here. This place was packed. And again we find ourselves here. It’s not unacceptable to be coming here time and time again because children are being killed.”

Ms Shah’s previous dalliances with antisemitism were so grave that they led to her suspension from the Labour Party even under Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership, has appeared in recent weeks to resent how she was held to account. She also recently shared a platform with Mr Corbyn but has not been disciplined, even though Mr Corbyn, like Ms Shah before him, was suspended from the Party for antisemitism. 

The disgraced former Liberal Democrat MP, David Ward, was also reportedly present at the same rally. He lost his council seat in last month’s local elections, running as an Independent after being expelled by the Liberal Democrats in 2017 for standing against the Party in an election, having previously been disciplined for comments about Jews, the Holocaust and Israel.

Ms Shah is not the only Labour MP to have courted controversy in recent weeks. John McDonnell, the former Shadow Chancellor, encouraged his “Muslim constituents” in particular to come out to protest in demonstrations against Israel over the past month, seemingly stoking religious and communal divisions in the UK at a particularly vulnerable time for the Jewish community. He also promoted an antisemitic image in one of his tweets about a march that he himself attended.

Former Party Leader (and now Independent MP) Jeremy Corbyn addressed a rally where antisemitism was also on display. Mr Corbyn failed to condemn Hamas in his remarks, having previously described the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group as his “friends”.

Former Shadow Home Secretary Diane Abbott spoke also spoke at a rally, describing it as a “great demonstration” even as it featured chants praising the massacre of Jews, Hamas-style headbands and antisemitic signs.

According to extensive research conducted by Campaign Against Antisemitism, the Parliamentary Labour Party and its leadership – including Sir Keir Starmer and Shadow Foreign Secretary Lisa Nandy – have been particularly one-sided in its condemnations of Israel and have appeared to give Hamas a free pass for its responsibility for its latest conflict with the Jewish state, with many in the Jewish community concerned that the volume and vehemence of the one-sidedness coming from many MPs, particularly in the Labour Party, have contributed to an atmosphere conducive to the horrendous antisemitism recently witnessed on British streets and campuses, in hospitals and schools, online and elsewhere.

Beyond the Parliamentary Labour Party, numerous Labour councillors have also courted controversy in relation to the Jewish community and antisemitism in recent weeks as well. Among them were Kirk Master, Yusuf Jan-Virmani, David Owen and Puru Miah.

Cllr Master, Labour’s Assistant Mayor of Leicester and the city’s former Deputy Police and Crime Commissioner, demanded that Jewish and Muslim faith leaders in Leicester sign a declaration to “condemn the killings of the innocent and Palestinian people.” He subsequently apologised.

Cllr Jan-Virmani, a Labour councillor in Blackburn, was suspended after making derogatory comparisons between Israelis and animals while referencing the antisemitic blood libel conspiracy theory in the council chamber and refusing to apologise.

Cllr Owen, a prominent Labour councillor in Blackpool, has reportedly been referred to the Party over social media posts he allegedly shared, including one quoting former Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard David Duke and another comparing Israel to Nazis.

Cllr Miah, a Labour councillor in Tower Hamlets, was pictured standing in front of a sign with an antisemitic message comparing Zionism to Nazis (later disavowed by the council).

Meanwhile, Mohammed P Aslam, a former councillor on Nottinghamshire County Council has reportedly been suspended by Labour after comparing Israel to Nazis and making remarks about “Jewish treachery”. Louise Regan, the Chair of the same Constituency Labour Party – Nottingham East – has reportedly been reinstated after an investigation following her handling of a meeting at which a Jewish member felt that he had to leave due to the atmosphere.

In addition, Ruth George, the former MP for High Peak, was elected Deputy Leader of Derbyshire County Council, where she retained her seat in the recent local elections. Campaign Against Antisemitism has an outstanding complaint with the Labour Party against Ms George, who was challenged during the election campaign by a member of the public over her past antisemitic comments, for which she has apologised. In her response, she said: “You may wish to look into the political affiliations of the Campaign against Antisemitism and the ongoing complaints to the Charity Commission so you have a full picture.” The suggestion that those calling out antisemitism in the Labour Party had mendacious or political motives for doing so was highlighted by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) in its report on antisemitism in Labour as being part of the unlawful victimisation of Jews that took place in the Party.

Joe Glasman, Head of Political Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Despite being declared institutionally racist against Jews just six months ago by the EHRC, and notwithstanding the current special measures imposed on the Party to address its unlawful antisemitism, Labour MPs appear to have learned nothing.

“Too many have encouraged, attended and addressed rallies featuring antisemitic banners and chants, contributing to the atmosphere conducive to the rampant antisemitism, physical assaults on Jews and damage to Jewish property that we have seen in recent weeks. The condemnations by those same MPs of the antisemitism that they helped to unleash ring hollow and give no comfort to the Jewish community.

“Over the past month, it has been difficult to tell the difference between today’s Labour and the Party as it was under Jeremy Corbyn. Labour has managed to return to square one when it comes to antisemitism.”

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A Jewish teacher at a non-Jewish school was physically abused after their pupils “competed” to stick Palestinian Authority flags on their hair and clothing, it was reported this week.

The teacher, who chose to remain anonymous, said that they were targeted because they were Jewish, and immediately resigned following the incident.

They said: “The whole school was full of Palestine flags, the pupils all began shouting ‘Free Palestine’.

“At the beginning, I thought they were just making a statement for all the teachers, but then I realised it was targeted to me and other teachers that are Jewish.”

Detailing the incident, they went on to say: “They [the pupils] were trying to stick Free Palestine stickers in my hair, I broke into tears, I couldn’t take my class that morning.”

The teacher claims that the school’s senior leadership offered no support whatsoever.

Recently, Education Secretary Gavin Williamson wrote to schools demand that they act against antisemitism and the politicisation of classrooms.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We applaud the Education Secretary for raising awareness of antisemitism in schools. We have received multiple reports of antisemitic incidents targeting Jewish pupils and teachers, and just last week one Jewish school advised its pupils to conceal garments that might identify them as Jewish. We recently published a short resource for parents and schoolchildren who encounter anti-Jewish hate, and we continue to urge the community to be vigilant and to report any incidents.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently published a short resource on “What to do about antisemitism at school” for children and parents, which helps identify antisemitism using the International Definition of Antisemitism and provides pointers on how to act when antisemitic incidents arise.

Do you or your friends/family have stories of schoolteachers or pupils facing antisemitism at schools in the UK? We have received a significant number of reports and the Incident Response colleagues would be keen to hear of further examples if you could share them. Contact us at [email protected] or call +44 (0)330 822 0321.

A Jewish children’s school bus that featured religious memorabilia has had its tyres slashed in Stamford Hill.

The incident took place on Vartry Road and was reported yesterday by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CHS 28842 02/06/21.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The Communities Secretary, Robert Jenrick, has said that he is “very concerned” by the rise in antisemitism in Britain.

Mr Jenrick, married to the granddaughter of Holocaust survivors, added that he was “horrified” by the convoy of cars which spouted antisemitic hatred through megaphones less than a month ago.

“Some of the themes we’ve seen in recent weeks are more than just casual antisemitism, or people who don’t understand what antisemitism is and drift into it by accident. I think there were signs of something more pernicious – of extremism,” he told The Telegraph. “And that makes my desire to root out extremism even stronger.”

Recently, Mr Jenrick, along with the Home Secretary, Priti Patel, wrote to reassure the Jewish community of the Government’s intent to combat antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 showed that three in five British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

A suspended nurse who reportedly described the NHS as the “new Auschwitz” has reportedly been permanently removed from the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) register.

Kate Shemirani’s removal from the register comes after she was suspended as a registered nurse for eighteen months last July, pending an investigation into her past alleged comments on COVID-19 and 5G conspiracy theories.

However, it was reportedly decided last Friday by the NMC Fitness to Practise Committee that she would be permanently struck off from the register. Ms Shemrani can appeal this ruling in five years. In the meantime, however, she will be unable to practice as a registered nurse.

Last year, Ms Shemirani led protests against mask-wearing and lockdown restrictions, defending her use of comparisons to Auschwitz and Nazis. Ms Shemirani said at the time: “When I likened this to Auschwitz and the cattle trucks – you tell me the difference? Because the only time in history I could find where the doctors and nurses were able to end people’s lives was the nurses of the Third Reich. The nurses of the Third Reich are here today. I don’t care if they find it offensive. I find it offensive that our elderly have been murdered in care homes. Stop being a special snowflake and saying you’re offended. They are killing our elderly, our most vulnerable.”

It has also been reported that Ms Shemrani is a follower of the “Committee of 300” conspiracy theory, which over a century ago laid the foundations for the antisemitic fabrication, The Protocols of the Elders of Zion.

Ms Shemirani said: “Can I state the obvious. There is no covid19. It’s a scam. There is however contaminated vaccines, contaminated tests and a lovely direct energy weapon system being primed to activate those nano particles you have injected, ingested and inhaled.”

She has also claimed: “Without the help of the doctors and nurses, the extermination of Jews, gypsies, homosexuals, blacks, disabled… in the Holocaust could not have been executed…”

According to the JC, Ms Shemirani has also made frequent reference to the Jewish financier, philanthropist and controversial political activist, George Soros, who is often the target of antisemitic conspiracy theories.

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds the British Government for announcing its decision to boycott the controversial United Nations “Durban IV” event.

The decision follows “serious concerns” of antisemitism which have been present at previous Durban events.

Campaign Against Antisemitism had called last month on the British Government to boycott this year’s Durban IV event, following a similar decision by the United States, Australia and Canada.

The Durban conferences, while presented under the guise of combatting racism, have previously provided a stage for antisemitic hate speech and actions. At the original 2001 conference in the South African city, there were attempts to equate Zionism with racism, in an echo of the United Nations’ darkest period. Subsequent review conferences in the Durban series have included the distribution of the notorious antisemitic propaganda, The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, an early twentieth-century forgery long used to incite mob violence against Jews, as well as then-Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad referring to the Holocaust as “ambiguous and dubious.”

Earlier this year, Campaign Against Antisemitism reported that the UN General Assembly approved an operating budget that includes money to commemorate the Durban conference, an event which has been widely described as antisemitic.

Despite protests from the United States, the $3.231 billion budget containing a provision to mark the notorious 2001 World Conference Against Racism in Durban, South Africa, was approved. The General Assembly voted 167 in favour, with only the United States and Israel voting against.

The Durban conference was dominated by clashes over the Middle East. The US and Israel walked out over a draft resolution that equated Zionism with racism. The language was amended in the final documents, but the conference was seen as the beginnings of the boycott of Israel known as BDS, the tactics of which an overwhelming majority of British Jews believe are intimidatory.

A senior Essex rabbi has spoken out about “frightening” incidents of antisemitism, as well as safety concerns regarding his children identifying as Jewish in public.

Noting the anxiety felt by both him and his community, Senior Rabbi Mordechai Wollenberg of Woodford Forest United Synagogue said: “My wife went to get her vaccine the other day and I went with her and it was the first time I thought, ‘Do I put a kippah on?’

“I thought, I don’t know who is going or who would be there and I felt slightly uncomfortable.”

Regarding his children, Rabbi Wollenberg said that he worried about his children identifying as Jewish, “because what has happened in recent weeks is very ugly.”

“Sentiments under the surface have come to the surface now. It’s not new, we have seen it before and it is happening again,” he added.

In the last few weeks, several members of the Jewish community have had to question whether they would continue to publicly identify as Jewish. Recently, a prominent Jewish school has advised its pupils to wear hats over their skullcaps and to cover their school blazers in public amid skyrocketing cases of antisemitism. These a fellow Essex rabbi being assaulted and hospitalised.

Speaking on this issue, Rabbi Wollenberg said: “I definitely feel there’s much more of an angst and I sense that as a community, for those of us most visible, which I am, we are primary targets of physical hate attacks. We have seen it happen and seen that change in recent weeks.”

“You still think, that could happen to me. I’m obviously Jewish and my kids are obviously Jewish. I don’t hate who I am but we are also a little careful. You have to take care and protect yourself outside,” he added.

Many Jews have been worried about being identified as such on public transport, including Rabbi Wollenberg’s son.

“My son was going out and was going to put on a mask when he was leaving and one of the masks had Hebrew on it that said ‘Love your neighbour as yourself’ and he said ‘I probably shouldn’t wear that on a tube, people will probably get a bit jumpy’ and that was really smart,” the Rabbi said.

The country has seen a number of rallies take place recently where several antisemitic signs and chants were present. Rabbi Wollenberg acknowledged this, while also stating that he believes that the demonstrations were organised with “good intentions.”

“We can all have our views as long as it doesn’t spill out into how we treat each other,” he said, adding: “The one thing that sticks out to me also is there is a peculiar double standard in our culture. Every liberal cause going, people jump on the bandwagon and Jews are the only minority who they will say ‘stop complaining’. If it was the other way around, it wouldn’t be like that. We say we feel threatened on the streets and feel uncomfortable and people say ‘sorry it’s our freedom of speech’.”

In recent weeks, there have been several videos of people issuing threats to Jewish people. Rabbi Wollenberg spoke about one in which he saw people allegedly chanting “kill the Jews” in Arabic.

He said: “I don’t know much Arabic but I know how you say ‘Kill the Jews’ and hearing people shouting that in tandem – they weren’t shouting ‘Kill Israelis’, they are saying ‘Kill the Jews’ and it’s happening now in our country and social media means we are all aware of it. That is very frightening. We know from Jewish history that we are often not taken seriously. People are making these threats, what happens next?

“If there’s a message to ‘go kill the Jews’ then someone will go do it. I have heard a lot from Jewish friends say it’s only a matter of time before someone dies. That doesn’t mean it is necessarily going to happen in Essex but nationally, it’s a disaster waiting to happen.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 showed that three in five British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

A new study has suggested that one-quarter of the top universities in the United Kingdom released antisemitic statements during last month’s conflict between Israel and Hamas.

The report from the Pinsker Centre, a British think-tank with a focus on international policy, noted that out of the UK’s top 40 universities, student unions or faculty bodies at twelve of them released “highly partisan” statements that may have breached the International Definition of Antisemitism.

According to the Definition, “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour)” and “Applying double standards by requiring of Israel a behaviour not expected or demanded of any other democratic nation” are both examples of antisemitism.

Nine of the twelve universities mentioned in the study have adopted the Definition, leading Jonathan Hunter, the Chairman of the Pinsker Centre, to feel that the Definition may not be sufficient by itself without stricter measures from universities.

This is particularly concerning in view of the likely connection between inflammatory statements in connection with Israel by university bodies and campus antisemitism.

In the report, it was stated that there was “an extremely high possibility of a strong correlation between the publication of highly emotionally-charged statements on the Israel-Gaza conflict, and reports of antisemitism on campus.”

The report went on to suggest that Students’ Union officers should be provided with appropriate training in order properly to look after their Jewish students.

A Charity Commission spokesperson said: “It’s concerning to hear these reports. Our guidance makes clear our expectations of all trustees around political activity and campaigning. We will carefully assess the contents of this report in line with our risk and regulatory framework.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently reported on University College London’s one-sided Instagram post that Jewish students considered to be inflammatory.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

A visibly Jewish man was left injured and needing a tetanus injection after repeat offenders set their vicious dog upon him.

The attack took place on Queen Elizabeth’s Walk in Stamford Hill and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

Hackney Police are investigating the incident. If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: 4612639/21.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 showed that three in five British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

It has been reported that a gang in Stamford Hill, understood to be operating on the Webb Estate, have been involved in three recent antisemitic incidents involving attacks Jewish homes and heinous threats against Jews.

The first incident took place on Craven Walk in Stamford Hill at the end of May, as four youths attacked the front door of a Jewish home (CAD 7646 30/05/21).

The second incident, also on Craven Walk the next day, involved the Webb Estate gang throwing rocks at Jewish homes (CAD 5790 31/05/21).

A third incident, reported today, saw the same gang sitting on a garden fence belonging to a Jewish person. The gang members swore at both the victim and her eight-year-old daughter, and then threatened to “blow up the house” (CAD 3728 02/06/21).

All three incidents were reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information regarding any of these incidents, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting the relevant reference number.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 showed that three in five British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds the Education Secretary’s decision to demand that schools act against antisemitism and the politicisation of classrooms.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has, in recent days, held urgent meetings with multiple Cabinet ministers, including the Prime Minister, to seek immediate intervention against surging antisemitism.

Gavin Williamson has told schools to ensure that they maintain “political impartiality” after the recent surge in antisemitism in the wake of the conflict between Israel and Gaza.

Mr Williamson, noting the recent victimisation of many Jewish students and teachers, said: “Schools should ensure that political expression by senior pupils is conducted sensitively, avoiding disruption for other pupils and staff.

“It is unacceptable to allow some pupils to create an atmosphere of intimidation or fear for other students and teachers.

“School leaders and staff have a responsibility to ensure that they act appropriately, particularly in the political views they express.”

Mr Williamson added that schools should not work with organisations which do not recognise Israel’s right to exist.

Recently, the Education Secretary wrote to the Office for Students on the matter of adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

In his letter, which covered numerous topics relating to universities and campus life, Mr Williamson called for the Office for Students to undertake “a scoping exercise to identify providers which are reluctant to adopt the definition”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently published a short resource on “What to do about antisemitism at school” for children and parents, which helps identify antisemitism using the International Definition of Antisemitism and provides pointers on how to act when antisemitic incidents arise.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We applaud the Education Secretary for raising awareness of antisemitism in schools. We have received multiple reports of antisemitic incidents targeting Jewish pupils and teachers, and just last week one Jewish school advised its pupils to conceal garments that might identify them as Jewish. We recently published a short resource for parents and schoolchildren who encounter anti-Jewish hate, and we continue to urge the community to be vigilant and to report any incidents.”

Do you or your friends/family have stories of schoolteachers or pupils facing antisemitism at schools in the UK? We have received a significant number of reports and the Incident Response colleagues would be keen to hear of further examples if you could share them. Contact us at [email protected] or call +44 (0)330 822 0321.

Jewish patients and a staffer have been targeted in multiple antisemitic incidents at two London hospitals.

In one incident on Tuesday morning of this week, a staff member allegedly made a cutthroat death-threat gesture towards a Jewish patient, who was attending the Royal Free Hospital for a blood test. The patient reportedly noticed that the practitioner was wearing a Palestinian Authority flag on her jacket and a badge that read “Stop killing our children”.

The patient asked for a different practitioner to administer the test, but as she walked away the staffer “swiped her finger across her throat.” Campaign Against Antisemitism has been in contact with a witness and officials from the hospital.

The hospital is investigating the incident, and the Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust said in a statement: “We do not tolerate racist or antisemitic behaviour of any kind, from anybody on our premises. The Royal Free London is proud of the rich diversity of the patients that we serve and we are taking these allegations extremely seriously. Although we have not received a formal complaint, we will investigate this matter thoroughly.

“We would urge anybody who experiences racist or antisemitic abuse in any of our hospitals to report it immediately to a member of our security team or to the patient advice and liaison service.”

However, this incident, which was highly publicised on social media, came barely a fortnight after a much less prominent incident at the same department in the same hospital. In that incident, another Jewish patient was also present for a blood test. The tests were being administered by a practitioner of reportedly Pakistani origin. When the Jewish patient came into the room, the practitioner left the room. The patient was reportedly told to wait to be tested, and in the meantime other patients were all being tested before him, including some who arrived later than he had.

Eventually, the patient asked a female attendant whether he would be seen, and she assured him that he would be seen imminently, and he then asked if he had not yet been seen because of prejudice, a question that the attendant, apparently now blushing, refused to address. The patient was deeply upset and immediately left the hospital, without being tested, despite the urgency of the test.

Eventually, after intervention by a senior staffer at the hospital, the patient returned to the hospital some days later and was seen immediately, but the case is reportedly being investigated.

Elsewhere, a Jewish staffer was the target of antisemitic abuse at the Royal London Hospital in East London. Hadasa Mayerfeld, 27, a Jewish neonatal intensive care nurse, reports that she was left “shaken” after being told by a man, “I want to kill all your people”.

The incident took place in on Tuesday in a hospital lift as a man noticed her Magen David necklace and shouted: “So you don’t support a free Palestine? How can someone who comes from people who kill all our innocent children get a job working here? I want to kill all your people, we need to kill all you people.”

A second man in the lift, apparently dressed in a religious Muslim garment, stood by and laughed.

The men are not believed to be employees of the hospital, but it is understood that Ms Mayerfeld will be submitting a formal complaint in the coming days. She said: “I spend hours on end caring for babies from all walks of life. Every race, every religion, every ethnicity. I care for each of them with so much love and devotion to give them all the care they need. Even at work I need to be scared to stand up for my religion and my beliefs.”

A spokesperson for Barts Health NHS Trust reportedly said: “We are investigating a distressing report of verbal abuse by visitors to The Royal London Hospital, and supporting the wellbeing of the nurse involved. We do not tolerate antisemitism, racism or abusive behaviour in our hospitals and are committed to making them safe places for all our communities.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Notwithstanding the ceasefire in Israel, we are continuing to see antisemitic incidents not only on the streets and online, but even in schools and hospitals. These cowardly perpetrators are targeting young people, vulnerable patients and heroic medical staff and teachers, which is utterly shameful. The Jewish community must continue to remain vigilant, and we call on the hospital trusts to conduct thorough investigations and ensure that racist abusers are appropriately sanctioned.”

Earlier this week, Campaign Against Antisemitism welcomed the statement by the British Medical Association (BMA) condemning antisemitism and racism.

Despite the ceasefire in Israel, ‘low-level’ antisemitic incidents that do not get media coverage are persisting in North London.

This week, a man yelled “f***ing Jews, f*** you, free Palestine”” outside Brent Cross Shopping Centre. The incident was reported by Shomrim North West London, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

Meanwhile, in Stamford Hill, provocative stickers featuring the flag of the Palestinian Authority and the phrase “Free Palestine” continue to be plastered on Jewish homes and businesses.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the State of Israel” is an example of antisemitism.

These incidents come amid reports of the beating of patrons of a kosher restaurant, harassment of Jews on the street, the hacking of the social media account of a prominent Jewish charity, resignations by Jewish union members, antisemitic incidents at hospitals targeting Jewish patients and staff, and a Jewish school directing pupils to conceal clothing that may identify them as Jewish – all of which have taken place since the ceasefire.

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues to urge the Jewish community and its institutions to remain vigilant.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 showed that three in five British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

The Culture Secretary has called on Facebook to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism and condemned the recent surge of antisemitic incidents in Britain.

Speaking at Bevis Marks, the oldest synagogue in Britain, about the Definition, Oliver Dowden said: “There may be some practicalities about exactly how [social media giants] incorporate it, but the essence of the International Definition [of Antisemitism] I want them to adopt, just as the Government has committed to that.”

Mr Dowden added: “If companies fail to comply with the legislation, they will face fines of up to ten percent of their global revenue. But I’ve set out the overall direction I want them to go in and I don’t see why they can’t get on with it now.

“Ultimately, as the fallback, we will have it [in law] and we’ll look at how we incorporate the [D]efinition into the online harms legislation.”

The Culture Secretary also condemned the recent surge of antisemitism in Britain, stating: “I have lots of shuls in my constituency, not least in Bushey, Borehamwood and Radlett, and I think the community is feeling vulnerable and deeply worried. I have had people contacting me saying they didn’t expect to see these scenes on the streets of London.

“I want to send an absolutely unambiguous message to the Jewish community: that this government is on their side and we will stand absolutely steadfast and resolute in showing zero tolerance for antisemitic abuse, whether it’s in the street or online.

“A Jewish pensioner in Golders Green is a Jewish pensioner and any attacks are antisemitism, pure and simple. It does worry me that there is this kind of conflation with events in Israel. There is no culpability of Jewish people in this country, regardless of one’s views on what is happening in Israel, and it’s really important that we address this.”

Last year, the Culture Secretary announced that social media companies will have a duty of care to users under new legislation, and that “criminal antisemitic posts will need to be removed without delay”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been at the forefront of calls for Online Harms legislation, and last year joined a global coalition calling on Facebook to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities, public bodies and other institutions. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

Three anti-Israel YouTubers filmed themselves harassing members of the Jewish community in Golders Green – to whom they appear to refer in the video’s title as “radical Israelis” – over “child-killing” last Saturday.

The video, the premise of which is initially outlined by one of the presenters as them just wanting to “have a dialogue…a discussion…a friendly debate,” quickly became an excuse for the presenters to accost passing members of the Jewish community, including children.

This involved one of the presenters, Ali Dawah, confronting Jewish passers-by with a microphone and asking: “Do you agree with what’s happening [in Israel]?”

Mr Dawah is also seen following and questioning a group of Jewish men and their children who are walking away from him.

When the YouTubers saw that Jews were crossing the street in order to avoid a confrontation, another one of the presenters, known as Smile2Jannah, commented: “The thing is, if somebody is being butchered in this way, the least you should be able to do is have a conversation. Provide your view. I mean, why would you cross the road and not be willing to engage?”

His co-host, Mohammed Hijab, then instructed the cameraperson to film them crossing the road, before Smile2Jannah said: “They should understand, they should realise that people want answers. People want to know your opinion, so go on record. Give your opinions. Discuss, debate.”

When a group of Jews walked past the YouTubers, declining to engage, Smile2Jannah told them: “You should really give your opinion about what’s going on, guys.”

At one point, the police asked what the cameras were for, at which point Mr Dawah explained that they were “raising awareness.” 

The YouTubers also brought with them an LED billboard, upon which they displayed images of Jewish Holocaust victims in a concentration camp. Next to the images were the words: “Did we learn nothing from the Holocaust?” The images were then proceeded by photos from the conflict between Israel and Gaza.

Standing in front of the billboard, Mr Hijab went on to say that “as Muslims”, they “have no problem with Jews, per-se,” before pressuring them to “reveal their viewpoints.”

Shouting at a Jewish man who was walking away, Mr Hijab yelled: “Do you condemn the killing of children? Do you condemn it? Do you condemn it? See, look at you. The silence is deafening.”

In an outtake from that video, uploaded to Mr Hijab’s own YouTube channel, Mr Hijab is seen acting aggressively towards another Jewish man off-camera, yelling: “You need to go back to the Torah. That’s what I tell you all. Go back to the Torah, read it from the beginning again.”

Abandoning all pretences that their video was ever solely about Israel, Mr Dawah states directly to camera: “The reason we came here today is to speak to our Jewish brothers and sisters, those who are Zionist or those who are not, and just ask how they feel…we’re using our freedom of speech to come and have a dialogue and say ‘what’s your say on the matter on what’s going on in Palestine?’”

Golders Green is a neighbourhood renowned for its large Jewish population. According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the State of Israel” is an example of antisemitism. The program was also being filmed on the Jewish Sabbath, when many observant Jews do not wish to be filmed.

When questioned as to why the YouTubers chose to visit Golders Green on Shabbat, Mr Hijab denied that they went to Golders Green “looking for Jewish people”, but instead for “pro-Israeli Zionists.”

He also claimed that they used images of victims of the Holocaust in order to “demonstrate that just as the rest of the world watched on while Jewish people were brutally incinerated at the hands of fascists, so too it looks on whilst Arab Palestinians are brutally bombed in the most densely populated area in the world.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

The video appears to show that the police stood by without interfering.

A spokesperson for the Metropolitan Police said: “Police are aware of a video circulating on social media of two men in Golders Green on Saturday, 22 May with a van displaying messages and images on a screen. Officers were called at approximately 19:28 and engaged with those present. No offences were identified. We have since been made aware of concerns that have been brought to our attention from the community and will liaise with the appropriate partners. Local officers had already increased patrols in the area in response to recent community concerns and will continue to provide additional reassurance in coming days.”

Recently, Campaign Against Antisemitism filed a complaint to the Directorate of Professional Standards at the Metropolitan Police after officers ignored antisemitic threats among demonstrators at a pro-Israel rally who were shouting: “We’ll find some Jews there. We want the Zionists. We want their blood!”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 showed that three in five British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

Dennis McNulty, a GBM union activist, has been jailed for nine years after he assaulted a Jewish barrister in an antisemitic attack and saying: “It’s always you f***ing people, you’re always the problem.”

Mr McNulty and Tim Ludbrook became embroiled in a heated political discussion in the King William IV pub in Hampstead in 2018. The debate then drifted into the tensions between Israel and Gaza, leading Mr Ludbrook to call Mr McNulty a “Hamas-loving b*****d.”

It was then revealed by Mr Ludbrook that he was Jewish, which apparently angered Mr McNulty even further.

Mr Ludbrook said: “He [McNulty] was swearing about the Tory government and intended to try and inflame the situation with his language and said: ‘You can’t support those f***ing c***s’.

“He must have thought I was supporting them because I am a Conservative and I told him: ‘Yes, I am Jewish and a supporter of Israel.’

“It was like lighting a blue touch paper and he said: ‘It’s always you f***ing people, you’re always the problem.’

“He said he was going to show what kind of f***ing person I was on social media and started recording with his phone.

“The really aggressive stuff started when he goaded me into revealing my ethnicity. He’s obviously got some view about Jews.”

Mr McNulty was ejected from the pub, but found Mr Ludbrook on the bench outside, upon which he attacked him, causing a broken nose and a torn retina.

“My nose was broken in two places and I was very lucky not to lose the sight in one eye,” Mr Ludbrook added.

“I will forever see him in that moment for the rest of my life. It is as clear as day, seared on my memory.

“There he was, bearing down at me and moments later he was striking me around the head from both sides and I don’t recall anything else until I came around.”

According to Judge John Dennis who spoke at Isleworth Crown Court, Mr Ludbrook required emergency surgery in order to save his eye.

Judge Dennis told McNulty: “During the discussion in the pub you became quite irate on the subject of Hamas and Mr Ludbrook being Jewish.

“You were affected by what was said and your goading of Mr Ludbrook was sufficient for him to lose his temper and he jumped up and had to be restrained and you had to be restrained. There was a religious background to this and you were provoked.”

However, Judge Dennis also added: “On the positive side I treat you as a man of good character and you come to the court as a relatively elderly defendant, who can say they have spent most of their life out of trouble. I put in your favour your record of good public works as a school keeper and forty years of work in the union, helping the weak and vulnerable.”

Mr McNulty will have to serve at least six out of his nine year sentence before he is considered for parole.

Recently, a former senior official from the GMB union allegedly referred to victims of antisemitism as “rich b****** Jews” in an appalling speech, sources claim.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Google

Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to the Vice-Chancellor of Middlesex University raising concerns about one of its course leaders, Raza Kazim. The University has confirmed that it is investigating.

Following a complaint from a member of the public, Campaign Against Antisemitism was able to confirm that on his WhatsApp profile, Mr Kazim likened Zionism to Nazism. According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

Mr Kazim is also a spokesman for the Islamic Human Rights Commission (IHRC), an organisation known in the past for its pro-Hizballah “Al-Quds Day” parades. The IHRC has also previously been accused by a Holocaust education campaigner of “using false equivocations of the Holocaust and deliberately conflating, downgrading and revising the Holocaust.”

Additionally, Mr Kazim has appeared on Press TV, an Iranian state-owned news network whose British broadcasting licence was revoked by Ofcom in 2012. The network has a history of giving platforms to notorious antisemites and Holocaust deniers. In one appearance, Mr Kazim can be seen speaking on the ban of Hizballah in Britain and the impact that this will have on future Al-Quds Day parades. He states that “there’ll be surprises for the authorities and for the Zionists as there have been every year”. Mr Kazim can also be seen talking about the influence of Al-Quds Day parades whilst images of people burning an Israeli flag play in the background.

In 2017, Al Quds Day leader and pharmacist Nazim Ali shouted over a public address system: “Some of the biggest corporations who are supporting the Conservative Party are Zionists. They are responsible for the murder of the people in Grenfell, in those towers in Grenfell. The Zionist supporters of the Tory Party. Free, Free, Palestine…It is the Zionists who give money to the Tory Party to kill people in high-rise blocks. Free, Free, Palestine. From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently reported on our success after the Professional Standards Authority asked the High Court to quash a decision of the General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC), over its decision in relation to Mr Ali. The GPhC has subsequently confirmed to Campaign Against Antisemitism that it agrees that its decision was wrong, that Mr Ali’s comments were antisemitic and that it shall not be contesting the matter in the High Court.

Middlesex University’s Code of Conduct states that staff “must conduct themselves outside of work in a manner which will not be reasonably regarded as bringing the University into disrepute.” It also states that the University “will not accept unlawful discrimination of any kind.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

The Instagram page belonging to the Jewish charity Norwood has been hacked by anti-Israel trolls today.

Norwood’s display photo was changed to that of a Palestinian Authority flag with the words “Free Palestine, end apartheid” circling it.

The hackers also uploaded a photo of a man holding a Palestinian Authority flag with the caption “From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free.”

Another photo uploaded of the Palestinian Authority flag bore the caption: “Repeat after us: Palestine will be free. Free free Palestine.”

According to Norwood’s description on Instagram, it is “the UK’s largest Jewish charity supporting children, families and people with learning disabilities and autism.”

The charity has no affiliation with Israel and has likely been targeted purely because of its association with the British Jewish community.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the State of Israel” is an example of antisemitism.

A spokesperson for Norwood said: “We became aware that Norwood’s Instagram account was breached on Thursday afternoon with content posted from the Free Palestine movement. As a British charity, our duty is to support vulnerable members of the British Jewish community and, as such, we condemn as abhorrent all hate crimes. Norwood stands for inclusivity regardless of our differences and we endorse Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s recent statement that there is no place for antisemitism in British society.”

Norwood has now regained control of its Instagram account.

Campaign Against Antisemitism urges all Jewish institutions to be vigilant with their digital assets and operations.

The University and College Union (UCU) has listed the International Definition of Antisemitism on a list of potential threats, prompting outrage from Jewish groups.

In a survey created by UCU, one question asked: “In your experience, what are the biggest current threats to or restrictions on academic freedom?”

Among a list of answers, which also included “censorship” and “no platforming”, “Imposition of IHRA definition and examples of antisemitism” was a possible option, referencing the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Last month, UCU Scotland defended Prof. David Miller over recent inflammatory comments that he had made, which included his assertion that “Zionism is racism”, a declaration of his objective “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world” and accusing the Bristol University Jewish Society of being part of a worldwide Zionist conspiracy, adding that it is “fundamental to Zionism to encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”.

UCU has also been at the forefront of efforts to oppose or revoke adoption of the Definition at British campuses.

Recently, the number of British universities that have adopted the Definition passed the halfway point.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Image credit: It’s No Game

Campaign Against Antisemitism welcomes Chelsea Football Club’s tweet in which the club announced its support for the Jewish community by condemning the recent acts of antisemitism in Britain.

These incidents include mezuzahs being vandalised in Borehamwood, a rabbi in Essex being assaulted and hospitalised, and a convoy of cars that drove down the Finchley Road shouting “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” through a megaphone.

The football club released a tweet last weekend, stating: “Chelsea FC stands with the UK’s Jewish community, and Jewish communities across the world, in the face of rising antisemitism. This hatred and intimidation towards the Jewish community is unacceptable and must stop. #SayNoToAntisemitism #NoToHate”

However, Chelsea received backlash from some Twitter users over the anti-racist tweet.

One wrote: “I think im changing clubs.”

Another tweet read: “F**k Chelsea club,” while a different user remarked: “A s**thole club, disgusting, disgraceful f**k off”

Recently, Chelsea Football Club announced that it had banned an abusive online troll from its matches for ten years after he hounded a Jewish journalist who came forward and received support from Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Chelsea and the Premier League have adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We commend Chelsea for this show of solidarity with Britain’s Jewish community. At a time of surging antisemitism, it is reassuring to have the support of a club that has itself made enormous progress in tackling anti-Jewish hate, including a recent ten-year ban from matches for an online troll who hounded a Jewish journalist who received support from us. We hope that fellow Premiership teams and other sporting clubs and association will follow Chelsea’s lead.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

Campaign Against Antisemitism welcomes the statement released by the British Medical Association (BMA) condemning antisemitism and racism.

The BMA is the trade union and professional body for doctors and medical students in Britain, and its statement comes in the wake of multiple instances of antisemitism over the past fortnight, which include mezuzahs being vandalised in Borehamwood, a rabbi in Essex being assaulted and hospitalised, and a convoy of cars that drove down the Finchley Road shouting “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” through a megaphone.

In its statement, the BMA said: “Recent events internationally and in the UK have brought to the fore how differences in ethnicity, faith and culture can be used as a justification for hate and violence. Shameful acts of antisemitism and incitements to violence against Jewish people witnessed in recent days, on the streets of the UK and on social media, run contrary to a key ethical principle for doctors to do no harm. Antisemitism and racial discrimination harms people and harms communities. We empathise with the negative impact these events have had on our Jewish members. Therefore, we have and will continue to affirm that hate in all forms is unacceptable. Whether by doctors or towards doctors; from patients, other doctors, or any healthcare professional. Antisemitism and any form of racial discrimination is unacceptable and to maintain the trust of our patients and colleagues, the BMA affirms that we cannot achieve equality for some without equality for all.”

A spokesperson for the Jewish Medical Association told Campaign Against Antisemitism: “Racism – structural, institutional or plain and simple personal – can take many different forms and guises. Antisemitism is one type of racism. One doesn’t have to look different to be subject to racism. And doctors are at least as likely as anyone else to be subjected to racism, including antisemitism. Sadly, some doctors and some patients are perpetrators of antisemitism. Ignoring antisemitism as racism is unacceptable.

“Against this background, the Jewish Medical Association (UK), in supporting Jewish medical professionals and students in the UK, welcomes the forthright recognition of this issue by the British Medical Association in their recent statement. We are saddened that it has been necessary for the BMA to publish this statement about tolerance and respect, but it is clearly needed and we call upon other national organisations to adopt this as their model.”

Other unions have come under fire for their stance on recent antisemitism-infested demonstrations, with Jewish members quitting one union en masse in protest.

At least 25 members of the National Education Union (NEU) from JFS have reportedly quit over concerns about antisemitism.

The resignations over the past few weeks come as Kevin Courtney, the NEU’s Joint General Secretary, spoke at antisemitism-infested rallies in the past fortnight.

There were also general concerns that the NEU’s stance on the conflict between Israel and Hamas was unbalanced, with some JFS staffers alleging that the NEU failed to condemn Hamas, an antisemitic genocidal terrorist organisation.

John Lopez, a former NEU representative at JFS, said: “I felt I had no choice to leave the Union which isolated me as a Jewish, pro-Israel, teacher. I spent close to two years trying to get the NEU (starting with Brent Branch) to adopt the [International Definition of Antisemitism] so Jewish NEU members can feel safer, as well as writing letters with others to Educate magazine which were ignored. 

“Most recently they urged NEU members to join the PSC [Palestine Solidarity Campaign] rally for Palestine which involved antisemitism and calls for the abolition of the Jewish State. The NEU have picked a side which is not only anti-Israel but indifferent to Jews. I am glad I am no longer part of this Union,” he added.

Research conducted by Campaign Against Antisemitism has previously revealed widespread antisemitism amongst supporters of the Palestine Solidarity Campaign.

There was also discontentment among Jewish teachers, with one claiming that she was muted on an NEU Facebook page after she wrote: “I wish to cancel my membership, with immediate effect. This is due to the union’s continuous and in my opinion biased involvement with demonstrations that have unfortunately seen a rise of antisemitic attacks against one of the smallest UK communities. A teaching union should be impartial, as we are a professional body, who must represent these strong ethics and values in our schools. I do not feel comfortable being part of a union that encourages (although not necessarily intended) antisemitism. This is not why I became a teacher. I expect my membership to be terminated immediately.”

Recently, a Jewish school advised their students to cover their skullcaps and avoid wearing their school blazers in public.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has reported on pupils and teachers being intimidated by peers in connection to the conflict between Israel and Hamas and published a short resource for children and parents facing antisemitism in schools.

A who’s who of suspended Labour Party members, Twitter trolls and controversial parliamentarians will reportedly be gathering online this evening to celebrate the birthday of former Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn and discuss how to restore the Party whip to him.

Tonight’s speakers include:

  • John McDonnell: the former Shadow Chancellor recently tweeted a photo of an antisemitic sign which was featured at a rally that he himself attended and, notwithstanding the antisemitic slogans, chants and banners, said that he was “proud” to attend the rally. Disturbingly, Mr McDonnell also specifically encouraged his Muslim constituents to join the protests, seemingly stoking religious and communal divisions in the UK at a particularly vulnerable time for the Jewish community. Last year, Mc McDonnell was accused of sharing a platform with expelled Labour members at the Labour Representation Committee’s Annual General Meeting, namely Jackie Walker and Tony Greenstein, but he claimed that it was “ridiculous” to suggest that as it was an open meeting and that he could not control who spoke. He remains the Honorary President of the controversial group.
  • Richard Burgon: the former Shadow Justice Secretary is best known for having stated that “Zionism is the enemy of peace” and then lied about having done so. He has also participated in rallies with suspended Labour activists without sanction. Mr Burgon is the subject of a complaint to the Labour Party by Campaign Against Antisemitism.
  • Shami Chakrabarti: the disgraced peer authored the whitewash report into antisemitism in the Labour Party and shortly thereafter was awarded a peerage by Mr Corbyn, who had previously pledged never to nominate anyone to the House of Lords. She recently and unironically told school pupils not to leave victims of discrimination to “stand up for themselves”.
  • Zarah Sultana: the controversial new Labour MP has expressed her solidarity with antisemitic terrorist murderers, on the back of a surprisingly long history of unseemly comments about Jews, including telling a Jewish student that it was “privilege” that allowed them to argue for peace in the Middle East; saying that students who “go to Zionist conferences and trips should be ashamed of themselves” because they were advocating a “racist ideology”; describing Israel as a “state created through ethnic cleansing”; saying that “those who lobby for Israel” would “in the near future feel the same shame and regret as South African Apartheid supporters”; advocating for “violent resistance” against Israelis; saying that she would celebrate the deaths of Tony Blair and other past and present world leaders (for which she was forced to apologise and was defended by Labour then-frontbencher John McDonnell); writing that “the Labour Right are scum and genuinely make me sick. Is there any form of discrimination that they won’t weaponise to politically point score like they’ve done in the past with antisemitism and now with homophobia?”; and accusing Jewish students on social media of being on the payroll of Israel’s Prime Minister. Ms Sultana is the subject of a complaint to the Labour Party by Campaign Against Antisemitism.
  • Jo Bird: the local councillor who joined the Party in 2015 when Mr Corbyn was running for the Party’s leadership has a long history of controversy relating to Jews, including renaming ‘due process’ in the Labour Party as “Jew process”, for which she was suspended; supporting the expelled Labour activist and friend of Mr Corbyn, Marc Wadsworth, who was thrown out of the Party after a confrontation with Jewish then-MP Ruth Smeeth; and worrying about the “privileging of racism against Jews, over and above — as more worthy of resources than other forms of racism.” Cllr Bird is a member of Jewish Voice for Labour, the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, and she has described Labour’s institutional antisemitism as based on mere “accusations, witch-huntery and allegations without evidence”. She failed in her bid for election to Labour’s ruling National Executive Committee and has been investigated by Labour at least three times, latterly after reportedly suggesting that antisemitism is being privileged over other forms of racism.
  • Naomi Wimborne-Idrissi: the Media Officer of Jewish Voice for Labour, an antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, and Vice-Chair of Chingford and Woodford Green Labour Party, has recently been suspended from the Labour Party after talking about the “weaponisation” of antisemitism and calling for Labour members to “resist” Sir Keir Starmer’s efforts to address antisemitism in the Party.
  • Karie Murphy: Mr Corbyn’s former Chief of Staff was deemed “completely unfit” for a peerage by the House of Lords Appointments Commission after being nominated by the outgoing Party leader, although this was due to serious allegations of bullying (which she denies) rather than the institutional antisemitism of the Labour Party that developed under her boss’ watch.
  • Kerry-Anne Mendoza: the disgraced editor of the far-left blog, The Canary, has repeatedly compared Israel to the Nazis, in a breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism. She has also used violent language in protest at what she calls the “antisemitism witch hunt”.
  • Maria Carroll: the failed Labour parliamentary candidate is the subject of a complaint to the Labour Party by Campaign Against Antisemitism.
  • Alexei Sayle: the activist comedian has previously claimed that allegations of antisemitism “amongst supporters of Jeremy Corbyn are a complete fabrication.” He is also a patron of the Palestine Solidarity Campaign. Research conducted by Campaign Against Antisemitism revealed widespread antisemitism amongst supporters of the Palestine Solidarity Campaign. Last week, Matthew Offord MP wrote to the BBC urging the Corporation not to broadcast the episode of Desert Island Discs featuring Mr Sayle.

According to the invitation, “as well as celebrating his birthday, we will be discussing the importance of the whip being restored to Jeremy”.

Mr Corbyn was suspended by the Labour Party following his disgraceful comments on the publication of the report into Labour antisemitism by the Equality and Human Rights Commission and a complaint by Campaign Against Antisemitism. He was then rapidly and controversially readmitted to the Party but the whip has not been restored to him, leaving him as an Independent MP outside of the Parliamentary Labour Party.

Not only should the whip not be restored to Mr Corbyn, but Campaign Against Antisemitism’s two recent complaints to the Labour Party against Mr Corbyn should be investigated – only once an independent disciplinary system is established in the Party later this year – and he should be expelled.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has lodged a complaint against Jeremy Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s (EHRC) shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day of the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the EHRC to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A prominent Jewish school has advised its pupils to wear hats over their skullcaps and to cover their school blazers in public as reports of antisemitism have risen 568 percent within the last seventeen days, equating to some 267 reported incidents. Reported incidents are lower than actual incidents as reports can take time to process and many incidents go entirely unreported.

The letter from the school’s headmaster, which was sent out to parents, read: “I am writing to remind you and your children about the need for enhanced awareness and caution with regard to security in these troubled times. Of course, the news of the recent ceasefire was most welcome, but I fear that the tensions and the incidents of antisemitism in this country will be slow to decline.

“We still advise all boys to wear a cap over their kippah when travelling to and from school, but we are also now suggesting that not wearing the College blazer (or at least covering it with a coat) on those journeys is an additional, sensible precaution for all pupils.

“It is sad that this should be necessary, but safety is – as ever – our top priority.”

The rise in incidents come in the wake of the conflict between Israel and Hamas. These incidents include mezuzahs being vandalised in Borehamwood, a rabbi in Essex being assaulted and hospitalised, and a convoy of cars which drove down the Finchley Road shouting “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” through a megaphone.

However, despite a ceasefire being announced last week, several more incidents were reported over the weekend. After a demonstration on Sunday in support of Israel, counter-demonstrators were seen roaming the surrounding streets looking for Jewish people to target.

Another incident which took place after the rally saw two visibly Jewish men assaulted outside of a kosher restaurant. A video uploaded to Twitter by the activist Joseph Cohen shows the alleged victims describing the assault. One said: “We crossed the street and the next thing we know, we turn around and they’re essentially swinging for us.”

The other added: “They connected a few punches…[we] got hit in the head, got kicked.”

A woman across the road invited them into her café where they then called the police.

We are continuing to hear of incidents and urge the Jewish community around the country to remain vigilant.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 showed that three in five British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

 A tribunal has found in favour of a Jewish sales manager who was reportedly dismissed from his firm after alleging racist and sexist discrimination in connection with “unpleasant banter” at the office.

Michael Weinreb took his former employer, Online Travel Training Group, to the tribunal following comments from colleagues such as “Is that the Jew coming out of u [sic]?” and alleged bullying.

After Mr Weinreb raised the complaint, his employment was reportedly terminated, which the court considered amounted to victimisation.

The court said that “We find that the ‘banter’ often crossed the line of acceptable behaviour,” adding: “We note that it is often difficult for the butt of the joke to complain about the joke for fear of being regarded as humourless and, indeed, we find that the claimant put up with a lot of unpleasant banter without complaint in order to have a good working environment.”

However, Mr Weinreb’s claim for discrimination failed due to insufficient evidence that the alleged bullying was motivated by his race or sexuality.

A hearing for remedy is set for July.

Parliament’s Joint Committee on Human Rights has published evidence from Campaign Against Antisemitism which counters claims that the International Definition of Antisemitism restricts freedom of expression.

The written evidence was submitted in February and was published by the Committee earlier this month on 12th May.  

The campaign to encourage universities to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism has encountered opposition on the basis that adoption somehow stifles freedom of expression, but this argument does not have merit, and the evidence that we have submitted lays out in detail why this is the case. “The claim that adoption of the Definition conflicts with the duty on universities to protect free speech is a familiar and flawed argument, notwithstanding its persistence,” our letter says.

The letter proceeds to analyse the difference between speech that is ‘merely’ insulting or offensive, and speech that is antisemitic, and the implications for whether those types of speech are protected under Article 10 of the European Charter of Human Rights.

We also cite the legal opinion, produced for us in 2017 by Lord Wolfson of Tredegar QC and Jeremy Brier, which argued that “this Definition should be used by public bodies on the basis that it will ensure that the identification of antisemitism is clear, fair and accurate” and emphasised that “Criticism of Israel, even in robust terms, cannot be regarded as antisemitic per se and such criticism is not captured by the Definition.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities, public bodies and other institutions. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

The full letter to the Joint Committee can be accessed below, and we have made the material available on our website, in particular for students, here.

A Jewish student at the University of Glasgow was told to “go and gas yourself” after she called out antisemitism online.

The antisemitic comment came after Lucinda Bathie, the former President of the Glasgow University Jewish Society, wrote in an online post, “Let’s not be antisemitic.”  

Ms Bathie says that this is not the first time that she has been on the receiving end of antisemitism. Whilst working the desk in her customer service job, she says that she was once approached by a man carrying a box of Israeli avocados. Noting that she was wearing her Star of David necklace, the man said: “I don’t want these, they’re from Israel you dirty Jew.” He then began to throw the avocados at her.

“Jews everywhere are held to this high standard where we are expected to condemn the actions of a government in a country that I have visited once in my life,” Ms Bathie said. “My friends and I remove anything that makes us visibly Jewish. These are longstanding attitudes but they have become worse in recent weeks,” she added. “So many of my friends in Scotland in the last week have said they are thinking of moving to Israel permanently because in Britain it feels less safe to be visibly Jewish.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the State of Israel” is an example of antisemitism.

A spokesperson from the University of Glasgow said: “The University will not tolerate antisemitism or any form of racism or racial discrimination on campus. Every student has the right to feel safe on campus and the university recently published a comprehensive action plan to tackle racism and racial harassment as part of its effort to address racial inequality.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities. The University of Glasgow has adopted the Definition.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Dame Maureen Lipman has quit the actors’ union, Equity, after it reportedly encouraged its members to join London’s anti-Israel rallies which were revealed to have been infested with antisemitic chants and signs.

Dame Maureen, a member of Equity for 54 years, warned Jewish members to “get the hell out,” adding: “I didn’t join a political union. I joined a union to protect its members. You don’t dictate to artists what they believe in, and don’t incite them to join a mob.”

The actress and columnist, Tracy-Ann Oberman, was another leading figure who criticised Equity, asking on Twitter: “How are UK Jewish performers and friends meant to feel safe?”

In a statement, Equity said: “Equity has a long, and proud history of standing up for peace and justice around the world – including in Palestine. Violence directed against ordinary working people in both Israel and Palestine is appalling, and it is to be condemned by our movement. The disproportionate actions of the current Israeli government over the past few weeks, both in the policing of Jerusalem and toward Gaza, are particularly horrifying. We stand in solidarity with Palestinians taking industrial action, and workers around the world taking action in support of them.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Equity should take a long hard look at themselves after associating with a march infested with antisemitic banners and other signs appearing to condone violence and where a speaker blamed Israel for racism against Jews. It is difficult to see how Equity can possibly pretend to represent their Jewish members when they turn a blind eye to anti-Jewish hate.”

Recently, Dame Maureen showed her support of France’s Jewish community when speaking at Campaign Against Antisemitism’s rally for Sarah Halimi.

Mary Hassell, the Senior Coroner who covers Inner North London, has withdrawn a controversial decision just one day before she would have had to defend it in court against an application for judicial review brought by a bereaved Jewish family.

Ms Hassell, who is well known in the Jewish community for her past controversial campaign to delay Jewish and Muslim burials in contravention of religious practice, has been caught up in yet another legal dispute turning on Jewish religious sensibilities.

As late as last week, Ms Hassell had insisted on carrying out a full invasive autopsy on an Orthodox Jewish woman, despite objections by the family on religious grounds that there should be no unnecessary desecration of a human body after death and burial should take place as soon as possible. But she has now changed her mind, on the eve of the hearing due to take place today.

In the meantime, her actions have caused anguish and distress to the grieving family, given that the cause of death was established by relevant medical practitioners as injuries sustained from a fall. Ms Hassell nevertheless wished to conduct an autopsy to determine whether the deceased had been “pushed”, despite the police having ruled out any suspicion of murder or any third-party involvement and notwithstanding that an invasive autopsy would in any event be very unlikely to prove whether the deceased had been pushed.

Trevor Asserson, acting for the claimant, said: “The present case would have almost certainly found her to have been discriminatory and irrational again.”

Mr Assersion was alluding to Ms Hassell’s track record of bad decisions struck down by the High Court for being discriminatory, irrational and wrongful.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Mary Hassell seems to be making a habit of needless interventions that impede grieving Jewish families from laying their dead to rest. How many times must bereaved Jews have to take her to court, and how much of local taxpayers’ money she will have to lose before she simply respects Jewish and other religious burial practices as coroners around the country already do. Several years ago, after she insisted on delaying Jewish burials, we called on Ms Hassell to resign. We repeat that call today.

“We commend the legal team who have brought this just conclusion about, and urge other victims of Ms Hassell’s gratuitous stubbornness to continue to come forward and seek redress for their loved ones rather than accept arbitrary or discriminatory decisions.”

The claimant was represented by Sam Grodzinski QC and Ben Tankel, instructed by Asserson Law Offices.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has submitted a complaint to the BBC in connection with an employee who allegedly tweeted “Hitler was right“, and other antisemitic themes.

Tala Halawa, a Palestine Affairs Specialist at the BBC Monitoring Service, posted a series of antisemitic tweets in 2014, including one that read: “#Israel Is more #Nazi than #Hitler! Oh, #HitlerWasRight #IDF go to hell. #PrayForGaza”

In another tweet, Ms Halawa appeared to dismiss antisemitism as “melodrama”, and, in a further tweet, said that “#Zionists can’t get out of our blood.”

In yet another tweet, Ms Halawa asserted that “ur media is controlled by ur zionist government in order 2 produce ignorant people [sic].”

She has also shared the graphic that caused Naz Shah MP to be suspended from the Labour Party several years ago, as well as an image of a child being burned on a menorah.

It was also reported that Ms Halawa posted on Facebook: “They [Zionists] are crying the holocaust every single moment but they’re practicing it every single moment as well.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

The social media posts date from prior to Ms Halawa’s employment at the BBC, which is investigating.

The is reported to have said: “These tweets predate the individual’s employment with the BBC but we are nevertheless taking this very seriously and are investigating.”

After receiving an online backlash, Ms Halawa has since locked her Twitter account.

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently wrote to Tim Davie, the BBC’s Director-General, after our concerns over another BBC journalist’s social media activity were dismissed by BBC Arabic’s Head of Daily Output.

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

Sheikh Asrar Rashid, a controversial cleric in Birmingham, has stood by his description of Jews as “a cowardly nation” and call for a “jihad” on Israel.

Whilst commenting on the violence in Israel and Gaza in a panel discussion, Mr Rashid was quoted as saying: “Personally, I believe the only solution is jihad, and a call for jihad, and an announcement for jihad by Muslim majority states that we have.

“Even surgical strikes or wallpaper strikes, the type that Saddam Hussein did in the early Nineties, I believe. Thirty-nine rockets he fired into Tel Aviv and every Jew was running into his shelter. Those with a European passport would be running back to Europe.”

“You see the way they react to Katyusha missiles or Qassam missiles that do not even kill anyone, they run into their shelters so the Jews are known as…a cowardly nation.”

Following criticism from the Jewish Chronicle, which Mr Rashid described as a “Zionist newspaper”, he defended his comments on Facebook and Twitter, writing that the term “Jews” was “used in the same vein as the mainstream media regularly employ ‘Muslim’, ‘Arabs’, or ‘Palestinian’.”

He went on to say: “This context also reflects my statements that the ‘Jews are known as a cowardly nation’, pertaining to the State of Israel and its actions against the Palestinians where women and children are indiscriminately killed.”

In his online post, Mr Rashid went as far as to say that it was impossible for Muslims to be antisemitic because the Prophet Muhammad “had a Jewish wife”. He did, however, maintain that “a call for jihad – a just war – in the form of military intervention by Muslim-majority states to avert the humanitarian catastrophe unfolding in Occupied Palestine, is the only solution.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Calling for, aiding, or justifying the killing or harming of Jews in the name of a radical ideology or an extremist view of religion” is an example of antisemitism, as is “Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 showed that over eight in ten British Jews consider the threat from Islamists to be very serious.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is filing a complaint to the Directorate of Professional Standards after police ignored antisemitic threats among demonstrators on Sunday who were shouting: “We’ll find some Jews there.  We want the Zionists. We want their blood!”

The demonstrators were trying to counter-protest a rally of the Jewish community and allies in solidarity with Israel, in Kensington. However, towards the end of the peaceful gathering, police were required to step in due to the arrival of counter-demonstrators.

After being told to leave the area by the police, the counter-demonstrators were escorted away by officers. But in a video posted online, at least one of the counter-demonstrators can be seen shouting: “We’ll find some Jews there,” before adding: “We want the Zionists. We want their blood.”

The video appears to show policemen walking alongside the perpetrators without taking action against the incitement.

In a rally held just the day before, participants held up antisemitic banners and heard speakers who blamed Israel for antisemitism and were told that “there will be no ceasefire in our campaign”. Crowds also marched in Manchester, Cardiff and elsewhere. Campaign Against Antisemitism is now reviewing a large volume of evidence from rallies and incidents over the past two weeks with our lawyers.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Over the past two weeks, on too many occasions the Metropolitan Police has failed to intervene against antisemitic crime and incitement on the streets of London, and in some cases officers have even joined protestors despite rules prohibiting such participation. Britain’s Jews need to be proactively protected by the police at this dangerous time.

“We are submitting yet another complaint to the Directorate of Professional Standards, this time in connection with the spectacle of police indifference toward counter-protestors on Sunday screaming ‘We’ll find some Jews there.  We want the Zionists. We want their blood!’. These threats are criminal and the police should know better than merely to escort the perpetrators away from a Jewish crowd: they should be arresting them.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 showed that three in five British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

London was the scene of yet another antisemitism-strewn demonstration today, as crowds were told that Israel creates antisemitism and that “there will be no ceasefire in our campaign”. Crowds also marched in Manchester, Cardiff and elsewhere. Campaign Against Antisemitism is now reviewing a large volume of evidence from today’s rallies and those of the past fortnight with its lawyers.

As demonstrators in London flew the flags of genocidal antisemitic terrorist organisations, other protesters held aloft placards decrying “Zionists” as Nazis and the flags of violent or terrorist organisations, speakers addressed them with inflammatory messages, making no effort to condemn the antisemitic hatred that has surged on the streets of Britain for a fortnight.

One protester brought a placard apparently denouncing Jews for having killed Jesus, bearing an image of Jesus carrying a cross and the slogan “Don’t let them do the same thing today again”. The charge of deicide was long used within Christian theology to justify hatred of Jews, until it was rejected by the Vatican and major Protestant denominations.

Numerous placards praised the genocidal antisemitic terrorist organisation, Hamas, as “freedom fighters”, while others claimed that “Nazis are still around, they call themselves Zionists now”, that the Israeli Prime Minister “surpasses Hitler in barbarism” and that Israel is committing a Holocaust.

An evidence gathering team from Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Demonstration and Event Monitoring Unit did not witness any of the marchers for “justice” remonstrating with the antisemites in the midst or seeking justice for Jews.

The marchers only seemed to have had one disagreement amongst themselves, which reportedly occurred when Islamists in the crowd began to use megaphones to address their fellow protesters over the top of the main speakers.

Former Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell, who last week tweeted a picture of an antisemitic placard and said that he was “proud” to march alongside it, told the thousands who had gathered: “Yes, a ceasefire has been negotiated and we welcome a ceasefire, but let’s be clear, there will be no ceasefire in our campaign to boycott, disinvest and sanction the Israeli apartheid state. The message is clear, we will not cease our campaign in solidarity until there is justice. So let’s make it clear, no justice, no peace.” Jeremy Corbyn and Richard Burgon were among other speakers from the Labour Party.

Another speaker, Tariq Ali, who has previously tried to link Israel to the killing of George Floyd, declared that some Israelis “have learnt nothing from what happened in to them in Europe. Nothing. They talk a lot about saying all those marching for Palestine are antisemities. This of course isn’t true, but I will tell you something, they don’t like hearing. Every time they bomb Gaza, every time they attack Jerusalem – that is what creates antisemitism. Stop the occupation, stop the bombing and casual antisemitism will soon disappear.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “For two weeks, Britain’s Jews have been threatened with rape and murder, with a synagogue vandalised and a rabbi hospitalised. Now, our traumatised community has again had to endure politicians and activists addressing yet another antisemitism-infested rally. 

”Last week, John McDonnell tweeted an image of an antisemitic placard held by protesters whom he said made him ‘proud’. Despite the ceasefire, he promised no end to the protests. Jews were told by Tariq Ali that they will continue to face antisemitism. None of the speakers had words of regret for the abuse and violence that has been incited against Britain’s Jews under cover of the ‘Free Palestine’ slogan, there was only inflammatory rhetoric and posturing.

“Protesters are getting the message that those promoting hatred against Jews in their midst will be tolerated or encouraged, whilst Britain’s Jews are hearing loud and clear that when it comes to racism against us, our allies are drowned out by the bigots. Having seen the solidarity shown for Black Lives Matter, this just reinforces the feeling that in the UK in 2021, racism against Jews does not count.”

Today’s events are only the latest in a string of antisemitic protests in Britain held under the “Free Palestine” slogan.

WH Smith removed The Protocols of the Elders of Zion overnight last week from its online shop but continues to offer for sale several books and DVDs by the antisemitic hate preacher David Icke to remain on sale.

This comes despite Campaign Against Antisemitism writing to WH Smith last year after it was discovered that the retailer was selling Mein Kampf and The Protocols of the Elders of Zion.

At the time, WH Smith was quoted as saying that it has “strict guidelines on the books it sells, and it is against our policy to stock books which incite hatred. These books have been immediately removed from sale, and we are investigating how this has occurred with our wholesaler. We apologise sincerely for any offence caused.”

That was the third time that WH Smith had been caught selling Mein Kampf, with the book previously found to be on sale in branches in Jordan and Singapore.

However, WH Smith is now selling books and DVDs by Mr Icke.

Mr Icke uses social media, his books and his stage performances to incite hatred. His preaching is so absurd that since the 1990s he has been dismissed as a crank, but because he is dismissed, there has been no major opposition to him and he has built up a following of thousands upon thousands of disciples whom he has persuaded to adamantly believe that the world is in the grip of a conspiracy run by the “Rothschild Zionists”. His repertoire includes conspiracy myths and tropes classified as antisemitic according to the International Definition of Antisemitism, adopted by the British Government. Campaign Against Antisemitism has successfully persuaded some venues to pull out of hosting his events.

After years of pressure from Campaign Against Antisemitism, Mr Icke was banned from most social media platforms.

Campaign Against Antisemitism welcomes the open letter from the Home Secretary, Priti Patel, and the Communities Secretary, Robert Jenrick, written to reassure the Jewish community of the Government’s intent to combat antisemitism.

Addressing some of the horrifying antisemitic attacks that have taken place this past week, the letter reads: “The Government is appalled by the disgraceful antisemitic incidents of recent days. Particularly the attack on a Rabbi in Essex, the vandalism of a synagogue in Norwich, and the reprehensible threats against Jewish women bellowed from a car in North London by purportedly pro-Palestinian protestors last weekend.

“Whatever one’s views on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, there can be no justification for the racist behaviour we have seen on our streets and on social media. The police have our full support in taking the toughest possible action against those responsible.”

Acknowledging the spread of online antisemitism, Ms Patel and Mr Jenrick wrote: “Many are discovering that non-Jewish friends do not understand antisemitism, refuse to recognise it, or do not care that they are spreading it. Some openly share content supporting Hamas, a terrorist organisation which shows callous disregard for human life and is committed to the violent destruction of Israel,” before adding: “As a Government we will do whatever is necessary to protect our Jewish communities, prosecute offenders and stamp out hatred.”

In a sign of solidarity with the Jewish community, Ms Patel and Mr Jenrick had breakfast at a kosher bakery in Temple Fortune. in North London.

In response to last weekend’s convoy that drove through Jewish neighbourhoods in North London that shouted antisemitic chants through a sound system, Ms Patel, weighed in, saying: “This is disgusting antisemitism. There is no place for this hatred in the UK. I expect @metpoliceuk to be taking this seriously.”

Last week, as antisemitism online, on our streets and on campuses had skyrocketed, the Communities Secretary reiterated his and the Education Secretary’s calls on universities to adopt the Definition.

Yesterday, Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Chief Executive and other communal leaders met with Prime Minister Boris Johnson to discuss the severe rise in antisemitism over the past two weeks.

A man has been arrested in Golders Green after allegedly attacking a car displaying an Israeli flag.

The suspect is said to have stopped his car to block another car displaying an Israeli flag, exited his car and began physically attacking the victim’s car. He reportedly tried to tear the Israeli flag from the car as it drove up Golders Green Road in the heavily Jewish North London neighbourhood.

According to the victim, the alleged assailant was detained by personnel from the Community Security Trust. Volunteers from Shomrim North West London, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol, then attended to assist before police arrested the suspect.

If you have any further information, please contact the police on 101.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We are grateful for the swift response of CST and Shomrim personnel, thanks to whom a suspect has been detained. At a time of severely heightened concerns over antisemitism, it is vital that offenders face the full consequences of their actions.“

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Sheffield Students’ Union and the Sheffield Jewish Society, which represents Jewish students at both the University of Sheffield and Sheffield Hallam University, have passed a motion against antisemitism.

The motion, titled “Condemnation of Antisemitism and Solidarity with Jews”, begins by noting the “increase of domestic antisemitic incidents since the recent crisis in Gaza and Israel”, which includes death chants towards Jews, antisemitic social media trends, such as the hashtag “Hitler was right,” and the antisemitic convoy of cars where drivers shouted “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” through a megaphone.

It goes on to discuss Jewish students in Sheffield having reported feeling “uncomfortable and unsafe, and facing racist abuse online and in person.” Also mentioned is the recent incident in which the the National Union of Students (NUS) blamed antisemitism in Britain on Israel, for which the NUS has since apologised.

The motion goes on to state that “Jews are not responsible for the bad behaviour of some Jews,” and that “antisemitism is never a rational response.” It goes on to stress that “people who understand the world in an antisemitic way are responsible for their own antisemitism,” before adding that “the spike in antisemitism is therefore not caused by Israel, but caused by racism.”

The motion resolves to express solidarity with Jews on campus and around the world and for the Students’ Union to write to the NUS “explaining to them why antisemitism is caused by antisemites.”

Notably, the motion also promises to “ensure that all anti-racism training from the Students’ Union includes about antisemitism as defined by the [International Definition of Antisemitism].”

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds the Students’ Union for passing this motion of solidarity with Jewish students and against antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Police have arrested two people after an Israeli flag with a swastika was put up at Royal Holloway, University of London (RHUL). A Surrey Police spokesperson cofirmed that a man, 21, from Egham, and a woman, 19, from Englefield Green, were arrested in connection with the incident and then released on bail.

Last week, the President of RHUL Jewish Society tweeted a photo of an Israeli flag that had been placed on the RHUL’s library terrace, but with a swastika replacing the Star of David. The student wrote: “This was undeniably done by a student, as non-students don’t have access to the library. This is who we share a campus with. We see your attempts to intimidate us, but you will never succeed.”

In another tweet, the President shared a video recording that was sent to him. The video shows a protestor praising Hamas who can be heard saying: “If anyone ever tells you Hamas is, like, the real terrorists in this…no, it’s not. They’re actually defending their country.” Hamas is an antisemitic genocidal terrorist group.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

In a statement, the University’s Principal, Professor Paul Layzell, wrote: “Within our own community, we seek to uphold principles of respect for individuals, with an abhorrence of violence, and a belief that education can be used to make society better for all. We all have a role to play in maintaining a peaceful, respectful, inclusive and welcoming community, on and off campus. I ask that we all play our part. Individuals who fail to behave appropriately will be subject to our full disciplinary procedures.”

However, nowhere in the statement did it mention antisemitism or support for their Jewish students, despite RHUL having adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Former Shadow Chancellor and Labour Party MP John McDonnell has tweeted a photo of an antisemitic sign which was featured at a rally that he himself attended.

The sign, which features an antisemitic quote falsely attributed to Albert Einstein, reads: “It would be my greatest sadness to see Zionists do to Palestinian Arabs much of what Nazis did to Jews.” According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism. Many of these rallies have featured antisemitic slogans, chants and banners. Mr McDonnell said that he was “proud” to attend the rally.

Disturbingly, Mr McDonnell also specifically encouraged his Muslim constituents to join the protests, seemingly stoking religious and communal divisions in the UK at a particularly vulnerable time for the Jewish community. He tweeted: “I urge my Muslim constituents to join me on Saturday in the demonstration in London to support the Palestinian people in their call for peace and justice.”

As antisemitism has become rampant on British streets in recent days, some of Mr McDonnell’s Parliamentary colleagues have backtracked on their unadulterated support for these protests and have condemned antisemitism. Mr McDonnell has not.

Last year, Mc McDonnell was accused of sharing a platform with expelled Labour members at the Labour Representation Committee’s Annual General Meeting, namely Jackie Walker and Tony Greenstein, but he claimed that it was “ridiculous” to suggest that as it was an open meeting and that he could not control who spoke. He remains the Honorary President of the controversial group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Matthew Offord, the Conservative MP for the heavily-Jewish constituency of Hendon in North London, has written to the BBC’s Director-General, Tim Davie, to request that the BBC not broadcast the upcoming episode of Desert Island Discs, which is set to feature Alexei Sayle this Sunday.  

Mr Sayle has previously claimed that allegations of antisemitism “amongst supporters of Jeremy Corbyn are a complete fabrication.” He is also a patron of the Palestine Solidarity Campaign. Research conducted by Campaign Against Antisemitism revealed widespread antisemitism amongst supporters of the Palestine Solidarity Campaign.

According to a statement that was released on his website, “Matthew’s request comes in response to the antisemitic incidents which occurred over the weekend following the violence in Israel.” It goes on to say that “The letter says that every broadcaster should be wary of giving a platform to anyone who is seen to be excusing antisemitism. For a person to state publicly that another who made allegations of antisemitism is a liar is not only wrong but also allows antisemitism to continue and in some cases flourish.”

The statement continued: “Matthew said: ‘ITV recently took the decision not to broadcast the final episode of a drama starring Noel Clarke after allegations were made against him. In light of Alexei Sayle’s continuing behaviour and the distress this is causing my constituents and others, the BBC should take the same action and not broadcast the next episode of Desert Island Discs which features Mr Sayle.’”

Mr Sayle claimed in 2014 that BBC presenter Emma Barnett, who is Jewish, supported the murder of children following an article and radio interview in which she had decried antisemitism amongst anti-Israel activists.

Dr Offord is an Honorary Patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

This morning, Campaign Against Antisemitism and Jewish community and religious leaders were convened for an urgent meeting by Prime Minister Boris Johnson following a week of skyrocketing antisemitic crime on the streets of Britain.

A number of important matters were raised with the Prime Minister in relation to antisemitic hate crime witnessed over the past week in the form of Jew-hatred at rallies and vehicle convoys, as well as support for genocidal antisemitic terrorist organisations, criminal damage and assaults.

We are grateful to the Prime Minister for his solidarity with the Jewish community in the wake of horrendous antisemitism on our streets and on social media. We raised a number of matters relating to the surge in antisemitism with the Prime Minister.

In addition to Campaign Against Antisemitism, which was represented by Gideon Falter, those invited included the Chief Rabbi and representatives of the Union of Orthodox Hebrew Congregations, Reform Judaism, the Jewish Leadership Council, the Community Security Trust, the Board or Deputies. The Prime Minister was joined by his Chief of Staff and the Government’s Independent Adviser on Antisemitism.

At least two Jewish homes in Borehamwood have seen their mezuzahs vandalised in heinous antisemitic attacks.

Police are investigating the incidents, which took place at two next-door houses in the heavily-Jewish Hertfordshire neighbourhood as racially-motivated crimes.

One mezuzah was wrenched from the doorframe while next door the mezuzah was “maliciously” removed and the parchment trodden into the ground. The families were reportedly left “petrified”.

One of the victims reportedly said: “”At about 5pm yesterday, I picked up a package from Amazon and then saw something on the ground. I realised it was my mezuzah, lying on the floor broken. The top had been opened and the parchment had been taken out, scrunched up and then trodden into the mud. It had been deliberately sabotaged. That’s what really upset me, the maliciousness of the act. We are the only two Jewish families in this section of our road, which is a beautiful, multicultural neighbourhood. I got such a shock. We’ve had that mezuzah for years. My son is now 18 and we’ve had it all his life, so it’s very special to us. I can’t get that image out of my head of seeing it scrunched up and trodden into the ground. In all my life I’ve never seen anything like this.”

She added: “It’s had a terrible effect. My son and I couldn’t sleep last night and I’ve been throwing up. I think I went into shock.”

Her neighbour, also a victim, said: “It’s clearly malicious. You don’t want to believe it’s a hate crime, but that’s exactly what it is.” She added: “My son, who is at secondary school, doesn’t want to walk by himself, while my daughter, who is at primary school, knows someone has targeted her house. It’s not nice at all.”

In a statement, Hertsmere Police said: “I would like to make it clear to the local Jewish community that we will not tolerate antisemitism. Please be reassured that thorough enquiries are being carried out to find those responsible and get justice. We have currently got extra patrols in place across Hertsmere; please don’t be afraid to approach us with any concerns when you see us out and about. I would also like to reassure you that we have reported these incidents centrally so that it can feed into the wider intelligence picture across the UK. The victims are understandably shaken by what has happened and we will be putting them in touch with a specially trained hate crime officer in case they want extra support.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “This is a heinous antisemitic crime that targets Jewish houses on their doorsteps and is designed to signal to Jewish families that they are unsafe even in their own homes. It is particularly terrifying at a time of skyrocketing antisemitism on our streets. We are grateful to the Hertsmere Police for their strong stance and support for the local community, which broadcasts the message that the authorities stand with local Jewish residents against such attacks. The criminals behind this vandalism must be caught and face the full force of the law.”

There are also reports that hostile signs are being affixed to the front doors of Jewish flats inside apartment blocks in Stamford Hill. These incidents come just days after antisemitic graffiti was found in the common parts of an apartment block in the same area.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101, quoting reference numbers 41/36556/21 and 41/36605/21.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Two men have been arrested on suspicion of religiously-aggravated assault over an antisemitic attack which hospitalised Rabbi Rafi Goodwin on Sunday.

Leeds-born father of two Rabbi Goodwin, who is in his thirties, was brutally beaten with a blunt object, sustaining head injuries, according to the police.

The United Synagogue, the umbrella body to which Chigwell and Hainault Synagogue belongs, said that Rabbi Goodwin sustained injuries necessitating a stay in hospital so that he could be treated and assessed for concussion. A police statement issued soon after the incident added that he was treated for cuts to his head and eye.

Essex Police said: “It is believed that two teenagers stepped out in front of the victim’s vehicle whilst he was driving, they shouted at him and spoke in a derogatory way about his religion before going on to damage his car. When he got out of his car to confront them, he was attacked with an unknown object causing him to require hospital treatment. During the attack the victim’s phone was also stolen.” Chief Superintendent Stuart Hooper added: “At this time we do not believe this incident is related to events taking place overseas or incidents which have taken place elsewhere in the country.”

The following day, Essex Police confirmed that it had made two arrests, stating: “Two men from Ilford, aged 18 and 25 were arrested this afternoon on suspicion of [causing] Grievous Bodily Harm with intent.”

Police also issued an appeal anyone with mobile or CCTV recordings to contact them by calling 101, quoting crime reference number 42/92174/21.

Local Councillor Jas Athwal, leader of Redbridge Council, said: “Antisemitism has no place in our society and, if you have any information about this unprovoked and cowardly attack, please contact the police. We are proud of our community and all parts of the community in Redbridge, we unequivocally condemn this attack and will continue to work together to support each other.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “This is a time when there is considerable fear within the Jewish community over the outpouring of Jew-hatred of the past week. This attack deepened that alarm, so we would particularly like to praise Essex Police for its swift response, resulting in these arrests. We will follow the case closely.”

A Jewish mother has told of her terror at being chased down a London street and rammed whilst driving her four-year-old child to see friends.

The victim wrote that at 14:24 on Sunday, she was driving her child to a friend’s house, when she noticed two cars draped in flags of the Palestinian Authority. She wrote: “I turned right and both cars started to chase me down the road and rammed into the back of my car. As I approached the light, I put my foot on the accelerator and sped through a red light, trying to make my way through the traffic. I turned into my friend’s road, but the cars continued to chase me. Once again I found myself with my foot flat on the accelerator racing down the road to try and find somewhere safe. Thankfully I found a small ally where I parked my car behind a large truck. I called my friend to check the cars had gone and made my way to his home to calm down.”

Earlier that day, cars festooned with Palestinian Authority flags drove through Jewish neighbourhoods shouting from a megaphone: “F*** the Jews…f*** all of them. F*** their mothers, f*** their daughters, and show your support for Palestine.” The speaker went on to call listeners to “Rape their [the Jews’] daughters”. Four men have been arrested and bailed.

Fortunately there were no injuries reported, though the victim’s car was damaged. The victim said of the incident: “We deserve to live in a country where we are protected…You will not intimidate me and my family.”

In a statement, the police said: “At around 15:00hrs on Sunday, 16 May, we received a report of a car being driven aggressively in Parsons Street, Hendon. It is alleged that it made contact with the rear bumper of another car.” The statement added: “As part of their investigation, officers will consider whether there is any link between this report and a convoy of vehicles that passed through North London on the same afternoon.”

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “The victim was clearly very afraid for her and her child’s safety. It is very fortunate indeed that nobody was injured. Police need to restore law and order to our streets and defend the Jewish community from this kind of targeted violence. This is yet another incident arising from the protests this weekend in which people have felt able to commit criminal acts against British Jews, whilst masquerading as protesters. They are not protesters, they are criminals, and confidence in the police will rapidly fall if these people are not brought to justice.”

Witnesses should call the police and contact [email protected].

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Four men have been arrested and bailed on suspicion of shouting “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” as they drove in a convoy through Jewish neighbourhoods on Sunday, waving the flag of the Palestinian Authority, as well as an antisemitic incident in Salford, Manchester in the early hours that day.

The men are alleged to have been part of the convoy of some 200 cars displaying Palestinian Authority flags is understood to have driven from Bradford, Sheffield and Leicester down the M1 motorway before veering into Hendon and Golders Green, two of North London’s Jewish neighbourhoods. According to witnesses, convoy participants shouted to Jewish passers-by “Free Palestine! Go back to Poland” and other antisemitic chants.

The men arrested are alleged to have blared from a megaphone: “F*** the Jews…f*** all of them. F*** their mothers, f*** their daughters, and show your support for Palestine.” The speaker went on to call listeners to “Rape their [the Jews’] daughters”. The incident took place a stone’s throw from a synagogue in West Hampstead.

Additionally, the men are suspected of involvement in an alleged antisemitic incident in Manchester in the early hours that day.

In a statement, the Metropolitan Police Service admitted that they had failed so badly to monitor the convoy that it took hours to find the car in question, which was identified from photographs taken by a Jewish member of the public who had the presence of mind to capture images of the vehicles’ licence plates. The statement said that “Enquiries were carried out and officers traced the car to the A40 in Hillingdon. The police helicopter was deployed and officers stopped the car at approximately 18:30. Four men were arrested on suspicion of racially aggravated public order offences. They were taken into custody at a west London police station. Whilst there, they were additionally arrested in connection with a similar incident which took place at around 01:35 on Sunday, 16th May in the Broughton Park area of Salford, Manchester.”

The incident attracted widespread condemnation, including from the Prime Minister and Home Secretary.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “The convoy and demonstrations this weekend were utterly predictable and preventable. They have been advertised for a week. Jews have had to witness the shocking reality that in 2021, people can drive through the capital of our country calling for our daughters to be raped, with nobody in sight to protect us or take action. Whilst we commend the police on tracking down suspects, they should have been there at the time, monitoring this convoy.

“Many hate crimes have been committed against Britain’s Jews in the past week, but there have only been half a dozen arrests. There must be an immediate police crackdown on those responsible for these acts of Jew-hatred, and an inquiry into why the Metropolitan Police Service permitted these protests to go ahead without proper measures in place to stop this criminality, in full knowledge that the appalling scenes of antisemitism that we have witnessed were likely to the point of certainty. Britain’s Jews will not wait until this persistent antisemitic incitement leads to violence. We pray that it will not take bloodshed on our streets before the authorities realise they have let this go too far. These antisemitic thugs must face the full force of the law.”

Witnesses should call the police and contact [email protected].

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The image on this article has been partially obscured due to legal restrictions on the reporting of active criminal cases.

Following a “one-sided” Instagram post about Israel by University College London (UCL)’s Students’ Union, Jewish students at UCL have been told on social media that “Hitler was right” and that when they come back to campus there will be people “waiting for you”.

There have been multiple death threats, with one Jewish student sent an image of her faced superimposed on a person being executed by a guillotine, whilst another was told: “I wish death upon you and curses for life and inshallah to your unborns. Your mother, your father and you will burn in this life and the life after.”

On Friday night, shortly before the Jewish sabbath began, UCL Students’ Union posted a message on Instagram that Jewish students considered to be inflammatory. UCL’s Jewish Society and Friends of Israel Society issued a joint statement, noting that antisemitism was surging and appealing for understanding, however, when they turned their smartphones back on after the sabbath ended on Saturday night, they discovered a slew of aggressive comments, some of which may constitute criminal offences.

The matter is being reported to UCL and the police, with assistance from Campaign Against Antisemitism.

A spokesperson for UCL’s Jewish Society and Friends of Israel Society said: “Jewish students across the country are under attack on social media. Our universities and students’ unions are not standing up for us. In response to UCL Students’ Union’s one-sided statement, we issued a call for understanding and tolerance on Friday night, but by Saturday night we were answered with praise for Hitler and threats to our physical security. The perpetrators must be swiftly identified and held to account. If they are students, they should be expelled.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Social media has become rife with antisemitic abuse, and Jewish students are being abandoned to face it alone. All of the recent talk of solidarity against racism is just talk if it does not extend to Jews too. We are appalled by the comments sent to Jewish students at UCL and will provide all necessary support, including legal assistance if necessary.”

Dr Michael Spence, President and Provost of UCL, said he was “particularly distressed that there have been a number of disturbing reports of antisemitic incidents and threats – online and in person – within the UCL community over the weekend. We unreservedly condemn abuse, harassment or bullying directed at Jewish and Israeli students. There can never be a justification for this behaviour, but most especially at a university such as UCL. Abuse, racism and hate speech have no place here. We will not hesitate to take disciplinary action against anyone who is found to have engaged in antisemitism, either by word or deed.”

There have been a number of antisemitic incidents at UCL, including violence. Whilst the University has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism, the Students’ Union has failed to confirm its stance and there has been a concerted effort by UCL’s chapter of the University and College Union to overturn adoption of the definition.

If you have experienced antisemitism at university, please contact [email protected].

An obsessive neo-Nazi admirer of Adolf Hitler has been sentenced to three years in prison after being convicted of posting “abhorrent” racist material online.

Tobias Powell, 33, of Wythering Close in Bognor Regis, who has a Nazi tattoo, was investigated by Counter Terrorism Policing South East (CTPSE) over his social media activity. His home was raided by CTPSE in February 2019, where it was discovered that he had “called for a civil war to stop the ethnic suicide of white people; showed support for the terrorist organisation National Action; and shared a picture of his tattoo which contained the Nazi emblem,” according to a CTPSE spokesperson.

While elements of Mr Powell’s offending seemed bizarre, such as setting his Apple ID to “Adolf Hitler” and filming his dog performing a Nazi salute, much of it was much more threatening, for example in one e-mail in which he said that he would have no problem “shooting off a kneecap” or “scalping” someone, referring to the cutting or tearing off of part of a human head.

In an attempt to reduce his sentence, Mr Powell’s lawyer told Portsmouth Crown Court that Mr Powell was “in no position to influence anyone. He is what he is, which is a rather pathetic individual who holds unattractive views and nothing more serious than that,” adding that “He is a petty criminal, he is a drug addict living at home, unemployed, with nothing to do with his time or his day.”

Judge Tim Mousley QC was clearly not persuaded, sentencing Mr Powell to three years in prison, ruling: “I am quite satisfied that you have demonstrated attitudes towards many different ethnic groups, religious groups, people of difference sexualities which are abhorrent to most people. I am also satisfied your views and how you expressed them is particularly worrying and deeply entrenched, they are far-reaching and they are obsessive.”

Detective Chief Superintendent Kath Barnes, head of CTPSE, said evidence gathered during the probe revealed Powell had “some very unacceptable views.” She added: “We know there is a fine line between hate speech and terrorism. Showing support for terrorist organisations is not acceptable and if you do that, you should expect to be investigated by us.”

Sussex Police’s Arun and Chichester District Commander, Jon Carter, said that the case “shows the importance of thorough investigation of any use of the internet to spread hate and dangerous material.”

Following a complaint from Campaign Against Antisemitism, the Metropolitan Police Service is investigating multiple police officers over their participation in antisemitic protests whilst in uniform.

Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to Commissioner Dame Cressida Dick after two videos emerged, one showing a uniformed police officer embracing protestors and chanting “Free, free Palestine,” with another showing officers at the same demonstration greeting and shaking hands with the drivers of a convoy of cars that displayed Palestinian flags.

The protests were characterised by some of the worst incidents of antisemitism seen on the streets of London in recent years. Swastikas and pictures of Adolf Hitler as well as calls for Jews to be murdered and Jewish women to be raped were all accompanied by the constant beat of the same words that were chanted by the officer who appears in the first video.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Director of Investigations and Enforcement, Stephen Silverman, wrote to Dame Cressida: “At events as highly charged as those we witnessed over the weekend, the shameless abandonment by these officers of any pretence at impartiality can only serve to embolden those who have caused such fear amongst British Jews. These disgraceful videos have been widely circulated. It would be impossible for any Jewish person to trust these officers to assist them impartially. Our latest Antisemitism Barometer shows that three in five British Jews believe that the authorities are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism, and less than one third are confident that antisemitic hate crimes against them would be prosecuted. The behaviour of these officers can only have caused further damage. It is now vital that a disciplinary hearing into the conduct of the officers concerned is conducted with the utmost urgency, and that a clear message is sent that officers who engage in such behaviour have no place in the Metropolitan Police Service.”

In a statement to journalists he added: “Over the weekend we have seen a car convoy drive through Jewish areas calling for Jewish girls and women to be raped, we have seen a Rabbi hospitalised in an assault, and we have documented numerous antisemitic crimes at demonstrations. For police officers to cheer such a convoy and join in those same demonstrations in uniform is utterly incompatible with the impartiality that is a basic requirement of service. A firm message must be sent that officers who engage in such behaviour will have no place in the Metropolitan Police Service.”

Confirming that an investigation would take place, Chief Superintendent Roy Smith warned: “Whilst we expect officers to engage they must remain impartial.”

In a statement, the Metropolitan Police Service said: “While officers are encouraged to positively engage with those attending demonstrations, they know they are not to actively participate or adopt political positions. This is vital to ensuring the public have confidence in our officers. The Directorate of Professional Standards has been informed and are investigating the full circumstances of this incident and to determine what further action is appropriate.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism is calling for an immediate police crackdown on a convoy that drove through Jewish neighbourhoods in North London this afternoon shouting antisemitic chants through a sound system, concluding with a rally at Downing Street.

The convoy of some 200 cars displaying Palestinian Authority flags is understood to have driven from Bradford, Sheffield and Leicester down the M1 motorway before veering into Hendon and Golders Green, two of North London’s Jewish neighbourhoods. According to witnesses, convoy participants shouted to Jewish passers-by “Free Palestine! Go back to Poland” and other antisemitic chants.

The convoy then headed down Finchley Road and into St John’s Wood. A stone’s throw from a synagogue in West Hampstead, the convoy blared from a megaphone: “F*** the Jews…f*** all of them. F*** their mothers, f*** their daughters, and show your support for Palestine.” The speaker went on to call listeners to “Rape their [the Jews’] daughters”.

Local Jewish residents have contacted us expressing their terror at the convoy.

The convoy then reached Downing Street to join a rally, which was monitored by Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Demonstration and Event Monitoring Unit.

We filmed one protester yelling that Jews should “Go back to all the sh**y countries you came from”.

The protest featured numerous antisemitic signs, including several equating Israel to Nazis. According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

Attendees of the rally were also seen wearing Hamas-style headbands. Hamas is an antisemitic genocidal terrorist group, which over 90% of British Jews would like to see proscribed in its entirety by the British Government.

In a statement on Twitter, the Metropolitan Police said: “We are aware of a video appearing to show antisemitic language being shouted from a convoy of cars in the St John’s Wood area this afternoon. Officers are carrying out urgent enquiries to identify those responsible. This sort of behaviour will not be tolerated.”

The Home Secretary, Priti Patel, also weighed in, saying: “This is disgusting antisemitism. There is no place for this hatred in the UK. I expect @metpoliceuk to be taking this seriously.”

Prime Minister Boris Johnson has also released a statement, saying: “There is no place for antisemitism in our society. Ahead of Shavuot, I stand with Britain’s Jews who should not have to endure the type of shameful racism we have seen today.”

Even Sir Keir Starmer, whose MPs have played no small part over the past week in inflaming the situation we are now witnessing, described the scenes as “Utterly disgusting. Antisemitism, misogyny and hate have no place on our streets or in our society. There must be consequences.” It remains to be seen whether those consequences will apply to his own Parliamentary colleagues.

Today’s rally came a day after another rally in Central London featured antisemitic placards, terrorist emblems and genocidal anti-Jewish battle cries, which all went completely unchallenged by the crowd, whose leaders claimed to be avowed anti-racists.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “This convoy and demonstration were utterly predictable and preventable. They have been advertised for a week. Jews have had to witness the shocking reality that in 2021, people can drive through the capital of our country calling for our daughters to be raped, with nobody in sight to protect us or take action. There must be an immediate police crackdown on those responsible for these acts of Jew-hatred, and an inquiry into why the Metropolitan Police Service permitted these protests to go ahead without proper measures in place to stop this criminality, in full knowledge that today’s scenes were likely to the point of certainty. Britain’s Jews will not wait until this persistent antisemitic incitement leads to violence. We pray that it will not take bloodshed on our streets before the authorities realise they have let this go too far. These antisemitic thugs must face the full force of the law.”

Witnesses should call the police and contact us at [email protected].

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

We are hearing disturbing accounts of Jewish schoolchildren being pressured by their peers to “pick a side” in the conflict between Israel and the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group, Hamas.

We have published a short resource on “What to do about antisemitism at school” for children and parents, which helps identify antisemitism using the International Definition of Antisemitism and provides pointers on how to act when antisemitic incidents arise.

The problem is not only impacting pupils but also Jewish teachers. The spouse of one Jewish teacher wrote on Facebook this week of how she had to “ensure multiple incidents” in one day at her school in Mill Hill, as students repeatedly screamed “Free Palestine” at her in large groups, “targeting her alone as a known Jewish teacher at the school”.

She is reportedly feeling very unsafe and is considering handing in her notice.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Reports of antisemitism directed at Jewish schoolchildren and teachers are harrowing. Teachers, colleagues, headteachers and governors have an obligation to step in to prevent abuse and punish perpetrators when it arises. There must be no place for racism in schools. We have produced a resource for pupils and parents who encounter antisemitism at school, and we urge victims to contact us for assistance.”

If any pupils, parents or teachers are concerned about antisemitism at school, please contact us at [email protected]

Ryan Houghton, a Conservative councillor who was previously suspended over antisemitic Facebook posts which diminished the Holocaust, has withdrawn from his role as the next Leader of the Aberdeen Conservatives after complaints.

This comes less than one week after Mr Houghton agreed to take up the position.

In a post on a martial arts forum eight years ago, Mr Houghton wrote under the username, Razgriz, that there was “no credible evidence to suggest the Holocaust did not happen” but revealed that “I do find some of the events fabricated, and exegarated [sic] in some cases.” He continued: “As history is written by the victors there is always going to be a bit of re-writing.” He also praised the “interesting” research of the antisemitic Holocaust-denier, David Irving. However, in a later post he said that he was “not defending David’s Irving’s views” and that he does not agree with “some of the stuff he says.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Denying the fact, scope, mechanisms (e.g. gas chambers) or intentionality of the genocide of the Jewish people at the hands of National Socialist Germany and its supporters and accomplices during World War II (the Holocaust)” is an example of antisemitism.

Mr Houghton is also accused of having made homophobic and anti-Muslim statements online. In a statement at the time, he said: “I apologise unreservedly for any hurt now caused by these comments and have been in contact with members of the Jewish community in Aberdeen.” Mr Houghton also said that he was a member of the Holocaust Education Trust, had visited Auschwitz-Birkenau and has “never held antisemitic or intolerant views.”

The Scottish Conservatives readmitted him last year, but apparently there was no further sanction or expectation for him to undertake antisemitism training.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A Messianic institution in Norfolk has been vandalised with antisemitic graffiti where a swastika was spray painted below the words “Free Palestine” and the antisemitic slur ‘kike’.

Binyamin Sheldrake, the spiritual leader of the Adat Yeshua Messianic Synagogue, said: “It’s horrible, it’s just people feeling they have permission to be antisemitic at the moment. They get encouraged to step out and do stuff like this…it’s not the kind of place where you would expect this kind of reaction.”

Norfolk Police issued an appeal around midday today which read: “Police are appealing for witnesses following an incident of criminal damage in Norwich overnight. The incident happened sometime between 4pm on Thursday 13 May and 7.30am on Friday 14 May when offensive graffiti was sprayed onto the door of a synagogue in Essex Street. Enquiries into the incident are ongoing and officers are conducting reassurance patrols in the area. Police are appealing for anyone who may have witnessed the incident or has any information concerning it, to come forward. Please contact PC James McAvoy at Earlham Police Station on 101 quoting crime reference 36/32537/21.”

We recently reported on the rise of antisemitic incidents in Britain in the wake of fighting between terrorist organisations and Israel.  

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

In a success for Campaign Against Antisemitism, the General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC) has accepted that comments made by Nazim Ali, a pharmacist and leader of the annual Al Quds Day rally, were antisemitic.

The GPhC has also confirmed that it will not contest an appeal brought at Campaign Against Antisemitism’s behest by the Professional Standards Authority (PSA) over a previous decision to let Mr Ali off with a formal warning over his comments at the rally in 2017.

Last year, the GPhC’s Fitness to Practise Committee, found that Mr Ali brought the pharmaceutical profession into disrepute, following a two-week hearing that culminated on 5th November arising from a complaint by Campaign Against Antisemitism. However, the GPhC panel did not find that he had been antisemitic and let him off with just a formal warning.

Following the GPhC’s ruling, Campaign Against Antisemitism made representations to the PSA, which oversees disciplinary decisions made by the GPhC. We asked the PSA to use its statutory power to appeal the GPhC’s decision to the High Court under the National Health Service Reform and Healthcare Professionals Act 2002, on the grounds that the decision made by the GPhC panel was insufficient to protect the public because it was “irrational and perverse”.

In particular, we asked the PSA to review the GPhC’s ruling that Mr Ali’s statements were not antisemitic, including by attempting to distinguish between “antisemitism” and “antisemitic”. We have asked the PSA to consider the International Definition of Antisemitism, which has been adopted by the British Government, and the Guidance to all Judiciary in England and Wales produced by the Judicial College that makes clear that the word “Zionist” or “Zio” as a term of abuse has no place in a civilised society.

Furthermore, we argued that the ruling misapplied the law when asking whether a “reasonable person” would have considered the comments made by Mr Ali as being antisemitic. The GPhC’s Fitness to Practise Committee ruled that Jewish bystanders who saw the demonstration or watched the recording of it posted online could not be considered to be “reasonable persons” in the legal sense because of their “selective view of events”.

The PSA made the referral that we requested, opening the way for the High Court to decide whether to quash the GPhC panel’s decision, leading to the matter being re-opened.

However, the Chief Executive of the GPhC has now told Campaign Against Antisemitism that the regulator “took the view, and still does, that the comments were antisemitic.” He confirmed that the GPhC does not intend to contest the PSA’s appeal to the High Court, accepts that Mr Ali’s comments were indeed antisemitic and that the GPhC panel’s decision was inadequate and wrong, and that it intends to leave Mr Ali to defend the decision himself in the High Court if he wishes to do so. The GPhC has suggested to the High Court that it might consider the option of making a decision on the matter itself rather than returning it to the GPhC for another fitness to practice hearing.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We commend the GPhC for recognising that the original ruling by its Fitness to Practise panel was badly flawed and for taking the necessary steps to correct it. It is absolutely right to recognise that Nazim Ali’s comments were antisemitic and that the panel’s decision and sanction were inadequate and wrong. The road to justice in this case has proved long and winding, but we are again heading in the right direction. It is important that we are unrelenting in pursuit of such cases.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism made its initial complaint to the GPhC related to Mr Ali’s actions in 2017, when he led the pro-Hizballah “Al Quds Day” parade for the controversial London-based organisation calling itself the Islamic Human Rights Commission, just four days after the Grenfell Tower tragedy in which over 70 people were burned alive.

Heading the parade, surrounded by the flags of Hizballah, the genocidal antisemitic terrorist organisation, Mr Ali shouted over a public address system: “Some of the biggest corporations who are supporting the Conservative Party are Zionists. They are responsible for the murder of the people in Grenfell, in those towers in Grenfell. The Zionist supporters of the Tory Party. Free, Free, Palestine…It is the Zionists who give money to the Tory Party to kill people in high-rise blocks. Free, Free, Palestine. From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free.”

At another point he told marchers: “Careful of those Rabbis who belong to the Board of Deputies, who have got blood on their hands, who agree with the killing of British soldiers. Do not allow them in your centres.”

The events were filmed by members of Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Demonstration and Event Monitoring Unit.

Mr Ali is the Managing Partner of Chelsea Pharmacy Medical Clinic. Campaign Against Antisemitism submitted a complaint to the GPhC, which confirmed that the matter “calls into question the pharmacy professional’s fitness to practise as a pharmacist.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism previously sought a criminal prosecution of Mr Ali. When the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) refused to prosecute him, we launched a private prosecution which the CPS disgracefully used its statutory powers to take over and discontinue, protecting Mr Ali from prosecution.

The Jewish neighbourhood of Stamford Hill has been rocked by numerous antisemitic hate crimes over the past several days.

On Friday 7th May, a man dressed in camouflage issued Nazi salutes to Jewish passers-by at Manor House Station (CAD 7253 09/05/21).

On Saturday morning at 01:45, two Jewish men walking on Cazenove Road were approached by a man threatening them with a large knife.

Also over the weekend, Jewish residents of Clock House woke to find the word “Hitler” scribbled onto the ceiling of a communal area in their block (CAD 5431 09/05/21).

All three incidents were reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting the relevant reference numbers above.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Andrew Dymock, a politics graduate from Aberystwyth University, has been accused of creating and running the website of the neo-Nazi System Resistance Network (SRN) group.

During the trial at the Old Bailey, the court heard that Mr Dymock wrote and shared several antisemitic and hate-motivated articles through the website. He is being prosecuted for fifteen offences which include encouraging terrorism through the use of propaganda.

One article was allegedly titled “Join your local Nazis”, while another, “The Truth about the Holocaust”, said that “the only guilt felt by the Germanic race in regard to the Holocaust should be that we did not finish the job.”

It reportedly went on to say that Jews were a “cancer on this earth…that must be eradicated in its entirety”. Numerous antisemitic stereotypes and tropes were also said to have been included, such as conspiracy theories about Jewish control of the banks and the Government.

Another article reportedly written by Mr Dymock read that white people needed to “wake up and bring slaughter to Europa, cleansing it of the unclean filth that pollutes her lands”.

Prosecutor Jocelyn Ledward told jurors that “the article is clear in its encouragement of the eradication of Jewish people.” She added: “Such encouragement constitutes encouragement to commit acts of terrorism.”

Mr Dymock is accused of harbouring “books, flags, clothes and badges” in both his bedroom at home and at university. It was understood that Mr Dymock promoted the SRN on a right-wing website, claiming that SRN was “focused on building a group of loyal men, true to the cause of National Socialism and establishing the Fascist state through revolution.

“The System in the United Kingdom is the most oppressive within the Western World, so we are only looking for the truly dedicated and motivated soldiers to carry the flame with their comrades and ignite the fire that will burn the rats and rot out,” he is alleged to have written.

Ms Ledward told the court that “Before its proscription, the prosecution case contends that Mr Dymock was not only an active member of SRN but also participated in its activities in significant and specific ways. It is the prosecution case that he set up and operated both a website and a Twitter account which he used to promote, encourage and advance the organisation and its aims.”

Ms Leward went on to say that Mr Dymock was not being prosecuted for his beliefs, but rather: “He is facing prosecution for his encouragement of terrorist activity, of violence, as a means to shape society in accordance with his beliefs, rather than through free speech and democracy.”

The court was also shown a propaganda video which was hosted on the SRN website that featured members posing with the groups flag. Others, believed to be members of the American neo-Nazi group, Atomwaffen Division (AWD), were also seen in the video wearing masks covered in skulls.

The video depicted people burning flags and putting a pumpkin with a swastika carved into it outside a Welsh police station.

AWD is a paramilitary neo-Nazi group that trains its members in the use of firearms and reportedly seeks to ignite a race war in the United States. Last year, a member of AWD who made terror threats against American Jewish journalists and activists was sentenced to sixteen months in federal prison in Washington state.  

The Home Secretary, Priti Patel, recently called for the proscription of the AWD. This would make membership of the group punishable by up to ten years in prison.

Denying all charges, Mr Dymock stated: “I’m doing my dissertation on the rise of nationalism and why, and how, ranging from moderate to extreme. I kind of thought I might as well start preparing for my third year in advance.”

Mr Dymock denies five charges of encouraging terrorism, two of funding terrorism, stirring up racial hatred and hatred based on sexual orientation, four counts of disseminating terrorist publications, possessing a terrorist document and possessing racially inflammatory material. 

The trial continues.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Image credit: Crown Prosecution Service

There have been mixed results for candidates with controversial histories relating to the Jewish community and antisemitism in last week’s local elections. The candidates hail from all political parties and ran in races across the UK. 

ENGLAND

In England, the Conservatives’ Darran Davies, who used an antisemitic “Jew Boy” slur online before apologising with a slap on the wrist from his Party, won his election for a seat on Hillingdon Council.

Labour’s Ruth George, the former MP for High Peak, retained her seat representing Whaley Bridge ward on Derbyshire County Council. Campaign Against Antisemitism has an outstanding complaint with the Labour Party against Ms George, who was challenged during the election campaign by a member of the public over her past antisemitic comments, for which she has apologised. In her response, she said: “You may wish to look into the political affiliations of the Campaign against Antisemitism and the ongoing complaints to the Charity Commission so you have a full picture.”

The suggestion that those calling out antisemitism in the Labour Party had mendacious or political motives for doing so was highlighted by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) in its report on antisemitism in Labour as being part of the unlawful victimisation of Jews that took place in the Party. Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant in the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party.

Elsewhere, Lisa Forbes, the controversial former MP for Peterborough, ran in the Fletton and Woodston ward, where two seats were being contested. Ms Forbes finished third, losing out on a place on the council. Campaign Against Antisemitism has an outstanding complaint with the Labour Party against Ms Forbes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently reported on the allegations of antisemitism in Peterborough within both the Constituency Labour Party and the local Conservative Association only days before the election.

The former Liberal Democrat MP and incumbent councillor David Ward campaigned to hold his seat in Bolton and Undercliffe ward in Bradford. He was running as an Independent after being expelled by the Liberal Democrats in 2017 for standing against the Party in an election, having previously been disciplined for comments about Jews, the Holocaust and Israel. There was some concern after the Liberal Democrats declined to run a candidate of their own in the ward, which some interpreted as the Party giving Mr Ward a free run. In the event, Mr Ward lost his election.

Several reports of antisemitism have emerged regarding some of Banbury’s Labour candidates, according to one Twitter user. Cllr Clair Bell, who did not win in Calthorpe North, was said to have shared an article entitled “The Jewish establishment’s ‘War Against Corbyn’ risks bringing real antisemitism to Britain.” The article alleged that the “Jewish community’s leadership or media” only had “one issue on their mind – Israel, and how best to protect it from criticism.”

Also in Banbury, Cllr Wajdan Majeed, who unsuccessfully ran for Calthorpe South, was similarly alleged to have shared a lengthy Facebook post which featured “long-ago debunked propaganda maps.” In a separate post, he was also said to have shared antisemitic tropes alleging that ISIS was “found to protect Israel”, going on to state that “the Iraqi people fought a war against the alternative Zionist army.”

Cllr Cassi Perri, who lost the seat for Banbury Town Centre, tweeted that the International Definition of Antisemitism was “unlawful” and that for political parties to adopt it would “put them in direct conflict with human rights legislation.”

Labour Party Councillor Ross Willmott was unsuccessful in his bid for the position of Leicester and Rutland’s Police and Crime Commissioner. He has previously shared several antisemitic Facebook posts, including the antisemitic meme: “An antisemite used to be a person who disliked Jews. Now it is a person who Jews dislike.”

Ian Middleton, representing the Green Party, was elected in the Oxfordshire ward of Kidlington South.

Andrea Carey-Fuller, also representing the Green Party, stood for the New Cross ward in Lewisham but was not elected.

Brian Rose, the podcaster and entrepreneur, failed in his campaign for Mayor of London with the ‘London Real Party’. He previously interviewed the antisemitic hate preacher, David Icke, in a podcast, during which Mr Rose failed to challenge any of Mr Icke’s antisemitic diatribe regarding 9/11 or COVID-19. The podcast remains on Mr Rose’s website, even thought Ofcom sanctioned the television channel London Live for carrying the interview.

SCOTLAND

In Scotland, three controversial SNP candidates were in the spotlight.   

Stephanie Callaghan retained her seat in Uddingston and Bellshill, Lanarkshire. Colm Merrick failed to unstead his opponent in Eastwood in Glasgow, while Suzanne McLaughlin was also unsuccessful in winning Glasgow Southside. Past social media comments by all three candidates emerged during the race, with the first two comparing other mainstream political parties to the Nazis, and the third likening Zionism to fascism. 

Derek Jackson, the unsuccessful, anti-vaccination candidate for the Liberal Party (no connection to the Liberal Democrats), arrived at the Emirates Arena in Glasgow during the election count wearing sunglasses, a black suit, and a yellow star whilst performing a Nazi salute. Claiming his antics were merely satire, he was later escorted out by police.

Ryan Houghton, a Tory councillor who was previously suspended over antisemitic Facebook posts which diminished the Holocaust, has now been made the leader of the Aberdeen Conservatives.

WALES

In Wales, representing Plaid CymruLeanne WoodCarrie Harper and Sahar Al-Faifi were all unsuccessful in this year’s election to the Welsh Assembly.

Ms Wood, the former leader of Plaid Cymru with a history of endorsing controversial comments and articles, lost her Rhondda seat to Labour candidate Buffy Williams.

Ms Harper failed to take Wrexham, while Ms Al-Faifi was unsuccessful in her bid to gain the South Wales Central seat.

Joe Glasman, Head of Political Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Not only are some of these results troubling, but the very fact that some of these controversial candidates were endorsed by their parties to stand for office in the first place is deeply disappointing. We have publicised the records of many of these figures in the past, in many instances submitting formal complaints directly to their parties. Yet here they are again, representing their parties on local election ballots.

“No political party should have allowed these candidates to stand for office, particularly after the EHRC made clear that its recommendations applied not just to Labour but to all parties. These elections have shown how much more there is to do to combat antisemitism in public life.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is mobilising volunteers following a significant increase in reports by members of the Jewish community of antisemitism on our streets, on social media and in traditional media in the wake of fighting between terrorist organisations and Israel.

We have been contacted by a growing number of British Jews reporting antisemitic harassment on the street and in schools, and countless attacks on social media, including praise for Adolf Hitler and the Holocaust.

On social media, abhorrent hashtags such as #HitlerWasRight, #HitlerTheGreat and #Holocaust_was_right, have all been trending internationally.

The hashtags were invariably accompanied by explanations. For example, one tweet was captioned: “Our modern history is always biased. The great Hitler was right about these Zionists”.

Many directly called for the extermination of the Jewish people. For example, one tweet read “#F***theJews Hitler was right. Now I know why he like slaughtering those Goddamn Jews [sic].”, and in another where one user wrote: “Now I think everyone has understand that Hitler was right [sic].”

Twitter users have also begun to spread a fabricated quote attributed to Hitler, in which it is claimed that he said: “I would have killed all the Jews of the world…but I kept some to show the world why I killed them.” Influencers including Pakistani actress Veena Malik tweeted the false quote to her 1.2 million followers before deleting it later.

Meanwhile on Britain’s streets, protesters in Manchester targeted a housing complex for Charedi Jews on Sunday, and in London, protesters yesterday tried to gain entry into Chelsea football stadium before burning an Israeli flag outside. Chelsea is owned by Jewish business Roman Abramovich who has pioneered a campaign to drive antisemitism out of football. Outside Downing Street, a demonstration last night featured numerous antisemitic banners comparing Israel to Nazi Germany, in breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

We have also received reports from Jewish people of abuse shouted at them in the streets, for example in Golders Green, a Jewish patron of a kosher restaurant reported today that she and her friend were left shaken as a driver yelled “Free Palestine” at them as they walked in the street.

In a particularly concerning development, Jewish schoolchildren are being victimised by their peers, forced to try to explain allegations put to them about a foreign conflict, with demands made that they condemn Israel or face the consequences.

The situation has not been helped by media coverage of the fighting. For example, Sky News has blamed “powerful Jewish lobbies” overseas for housing policies in Jerusalem, strengthening the perception that the Jewish Diaspora is to blame for rising tensions in the city. Campaign Against Antisemitism’s most recent Antisemitism Barometer revealed that 90% of British Jews believe that media bias against Israel is used to fuel persecution of Jews in Britain.

Due to the volume of demand for our assistance, we are mobilising additional volunteers to help with the influx and to monitor online antisemitism, as well as to provide assistance to victims. If you would like to volunteer, please visit https://antisemitism.org/volunteer. If you cannot give your time, please consider donating to support our work at antisemitism.org/donate.

To report an antisemitic incident, please e-mail [email protected].

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We fear we may see a recurrence of the record-breaking spike in antisemitism that we witnessed in 2014, when we first established CAA due to the failure of the criminal justice system to enforce the law against anti-Jewish racists.

“This week, we have seen social media and our streets rife with antisemitic motifs, with a foreign conflict used as a pretext by antisemites to target Jewish schoolchildren, adults and institutions in Britain.

“In anticipation of a spike in antisemitism, we are mobilising volunteers to help monitor and report antisemitic incidents and provide assistance to victims.

“We continue to call on the Government to proscribe in its entirety Hamas, an antisemitic genocidal terrorist organisation that aspires to the destruction of Jews worldwide. Proscription is supported by over 90% of British Jews and will send a message of zero-tolerance of anti-Jewish hatred.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s 2020 Antisemitism Barometer revealed that an overwhelming 91% of British Jews want the British Government to proscribe the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group Hamas in its entirety.

rally was held outside Downing Street yesterday that protested the ongoing events in the Middle East and featured several antisemitic themes.

Around 1,500 people attended Tuesday’s “Emergency Rally for Palestine – Save Sheikh Jarrah.” Volunteers from our Demonstration and Event Monitoring Unit gathered material which we are now reviewing for possible legal action.

We photographed several disturbing banners comparing Israel to the Nazis. One disturbing sign (pictured) read: “Holocaust 1941 (with a swastika), Holocaust 2021 (with a Star of David).”

Another antisemitic sign, referencing both the Holocaust and South African apartheid, read: “It wasn’t ok in South Africa. It wasn’t ok in Nazi Germany. So why is it ok in Palestine (It’s not!)”.

“Israel have no conscience, no honour, no pride. They curse Hitler day & night but they have surpassed Hitler in Barbarism”, read another.

At one point, protesters jumped on top of a double decker London bus and held aloft a banner equating the Israeli flag with the Nazi swastika. According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

Other banners – in Arabic – appeared to incite and glorify violence against Israelis in graphic language, while songs were chanted calling for the destruction of the Jewish state.

The rally was addressed by former Labour Party leader, Jeremy Corbyn, who failed to condemn Hamas in his remarks. The crowd welcomed Mr Corbyn with the familiar refrain of “Oh, Jeremy Corbyn.” In the past, Mr Corbyn has referred to Hamas as his “friends”.

The demonstration was organised by the Friends of Al Aqsa (FOA), Palestine Solidarity Campaign (PSC), Stop the War Coalition and Palestine Forum in Britain.

The founder of FOA told a cheering crowd in 2009 during a war between Israel and Hamas: “Hamas is not a terrorist organisation. The reason that they hate Hamas is because they refuse to be subjugated to be occupied by the Israeli state and we salute Hamas for standing up to Israel.”

An investigation by Campaign Against Antisemitism in 2017 exposed extensive antisemitic bigotry amongst supporters of the PSC.

Stop The War Coalition has appeared in the past to advocate war against Israel and its marches routinely feature antisemitic tropes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s 2020 Antisemitism Barometer revealed that an overwhelming majority of British Jews — 91% — want the British Government to proscribe the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group Hamas in its entirety.

St Anne’s College at the University of Oxford has removed a statement issued by the President of the College’s JCR and its MCR BAME representatives offering “support to the Muslim and Palestinian members of our community” but not to its Jewish members.

The statement related to ongoing violence in Jerusalem and said: “We want to sincerely support and send solidarity to St Anne’s Muslim and Palestinian members and the wider Oxford community. We would also like or remind students to reach out to the St Anne’s JCR & MCR Welfare and BAME Officers if they are struggling and would like somebody to talk to. In addition, you can also reach out to the Oxford University Islamic Society (ISOC) ‘Welfare Officers’ and/or the Oxford University Champaign for Racial Awareness Equality (CRAE) Officers.”

It went on to say: “We also encourage other Oxford colleges’ JCRs and MCRs to show solidarity with the wider Oxford Muslim and Palestinian community and combat the noticeable lack of support.”

Disgracefully, nowhere did the statement offer any support or resources to Jewish students. The “lack of support” to the College’s Jews was thus particularly “noticeable”.

The statement was shared on St Anne’s College’s official Instagram account. The College then prohibited comments on the statements before deleting the post entirely, without explanation or apology.

There are growing reports of Jewish students facing antisemitism on campus and online since violence in the Middle East has erupted in recent days.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].  

It was announced today in the Queen’s Speech, in which Her Majesty announces the Government’s legislative agenda, that a new law will be passed banning public bodies from joining in with the Boycotts, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) campaign, on the grounds that it “may legitimise antisemitism”. 

According to the Government’s official documentation, the purpose of the legislation is to “deliver the manifesto commitment to stop public bodies from imposing their own approach or views about international relations, through preventing boycott, divestment or sanctions campaigns against foreign countries.”

The document also acknowledges the long-standing connections between the BDS movement and antisemitism, stating that: “Unofficial boycotts have been associated with antisemitism in the United Kingdom — including kosher food being removed from supermarket shelves, Jewish films being banned from a film festival and a student union holding a vote on blocking the formation of a Jewish student society.” 

While boycotting a country is neither illegal nor racist per se, the problem with BDS is that it is no mere boycott. Supporters of BDS routinely engage the International Definition of Antisemitism by:

  • Setting political tests which Jews must pass, or face being treated as a pariah, especially by demanding that Jews renounce their cultural and religious ties to Israel, the physical centre of the Jewish religion, the world’s only Jewish state, and the country in which almost half of the world’s Jewish population lives;
  • Attempting to isolate and shame Israeli Jews, but not non-Jews, who do not support BDS when they visit Britain or come to study or teach at British universities;
  • Treating the entirety of the State of Israel as occupied land, and thereby asserting that the existence of the state of Israel is a racist endeavour;
  • Working with genocidal antisemitic terrorist organisations;
  • Claiming that Israeli policy is to deliberately kill babies, or harvest the vital organs of non-Jews, which revives ancient blood libels;
  • Attempting to portray Israeli Jews as having created a Nazi state in the model of Nazi Germany, and of ‘using’ the Holocaust as political cover for purported Jewish crimes;
  • Defending against claims of antisemitism by proposing that the allegations are a ruse used by Jewish victims, not to call out racism but to silence criticism of Israel;
  • Projecting antisemitic conspiracy myths about nefarious Jewish power onto the Jewish state.

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds the Government’s latest efforts in tackling antisemitism in Britain.

Singer Van Morrison has faced fresh allegations of antisemitism after releasing a new song entitled “They Own the Media.”

The song alludes to a powerful elite who control the media and have influence over societal behaviours and beliefs. Some of the lyrics read:

“They tell us that ignorance is bliss
I guess by those that control the media, it is
They own the media, they control the stories we are told
If you ever try to go against them, you will be ignored”

In another verse, Mr Morrison sings:

“They control the narrative, they perpetuate the myth
Keep on telling you lies, tell you ignorance is bliss
Believe it all and you’ll never get, nеver get wise
To thе truth, ’cause they control everything you do”

By singing “they own the media,” Mr Morrison has been accused of deploying a trope regarding the hidden power of Jews which featured heavily in the antisemitic propaganda of the Soviet Union, as well as in other eras and places.

Tom Breihan, the Senior Editor for Stereogum, wrote that the song had “a title that sure seems to be an antisemitic trope.”

He went on to say: “Maybe it’s satire. Maybe the ‘they’ of the title doesn’t refer to any specific group of people. But when you consider that this man just went on a months-long COVID-denial tantrum, we have every right to be suspicious about this one.”

This is not the Northern Irish musician’s first brush with accusations of antisemitism. In 2005, Mr Morrison released “They Sold Me Out”, a song that appeared to perpetrate the antisemitic conspiracy theory of deicide. One verse of the song reads:

“Sold me out for a few shekels and divided up my robes
They sold me out
It’s the oldest story that’s ever been told
They sold me out”

Ryan Houghton, a Tory councillor who was previously suspended over antisemitic Facebook posts which diminished the Holocaust, has now been made the Leader of the Aberdeen Conservatives.

In a post on a martial arts forum eight years ago, Mr Houghton wrote under the username, Razgriz, that there was “no credible evidence to suggest the Holocaust did not happen” but revealed that “I do find some of the events fabricated, and exegarated [sic] in some cases.” He continued: “As history is written by the victors there is always going to be a bit of re-writing.” He also praised the “interesting” research of the antisemitic Holocaust-denier, David Irving. However, in a later post he said that he was “not defending David’s Irving’s views” and that he does not agree with “some of the stuff he says.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Denying the fact, scope, mechanisms (e.g. gas chambers) or intentionality of the genocide of the Jewish people at the hands of National Socialist Germany and its supporters and accomplices during World War II (the Holocaust)” is an example of antisemitism.

Mr Houghton is also accused of having made homophobic and anti-Muslim statements online. In a statement at the time, he said: “I apologise unreservedly for any hurt now caused by these comments and have been in contact with members of the Jewish community in Aberdeen.” Mr Houghton also said that he was a member of the Holocaust Education Trust, had visited Auschwitz-Birkenau and has “never held antisemitic or intolerant views.”

The Conservatives in Scotland readmitted him last year, but apparently there was no further sanction or expectation for him to undertake antisemitism training.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is appalling that a politician who has previously minimised the impact of the Holocaust, a genocide which killed six million Jews, has been promoted to leader of the Aberdeen Conservatives. Denying the scope of the Holocaust violates the International Definition of Antisemitism, which the Conservative Government has adopted. This is not what zero tolerance looks like.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has called on the British Government to boycott this year’s “Durban IV” event, following a similar decision by the United States, Australia and Canada.

The Durban conferences, while presented under the guise of combatting racism, have previously provided a stage for antisemitic hate speech and actions. At the original 2001 conference in the South African city, there were attempts to equate Zionism with racism, in an echo of the United Nations’ darkest period. Subsequent review conferences in the Durban series have included the distribution of the notorious antisemitic propaganda, The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, an early twentieth-century forgery long used to incite mob violence against Jews, as well as then-Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad referring to the Holocaust as “ambiguous and dubious.”

While Britain boycotted the Durban III conference, the Government has yet to confirm its withdrawal from this year’s event. When asked in Parliament whether Britain would commit to a boycott recently, Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said that the UK “will not support any partisan or political attacks on Israel.” He went on to say that the Government is “absolutely crystal clear in our condemnation of and opposition to any and all forms of antisemitism.”

However, last month, the Minister of State for the Commonwealth and UN, Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon, was reported to have said that the Government would “gauge how likely the conference is to host antisemitism again.”

Earlier this year, CAA reported that the UN General Assembly approved an operating budget that includes money to commemorate the Durban conference, an event which has been widely described as antisemitic.

Despite protests from the United States, the $3.231 billion budget containing a provision to mark the notorious 2001 World Conference Against Racism in Durban, South Africa, was approved. The General Assembly voted 167 in favour, with only the United States and Israel voting against.

The Durban conference was dominated by clashes over the Middle East. The US and Israel walked out over a draft resolution that equated Zionism with racism. The language was amended in the final documents, but the conference was seen as the beginnings of the boycott of Israel known as BDS, the tactics of which an overwhelming majority of British Jews believe are intimidatory.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has provided training to the Oxford University Labour Club (OULC) after the campus group reached out to us to provide an online training session to fight antisemitism.

The training was particularly poignant given the OULC’s contribution to the scandal of institutional antisemitism in the Labour Party. The event, held last Tuesday, was very well received. 

In 2016, the OULC was investigated by the Labour Party following multiple allegations of antisemitism levelled by the Club’s co-Chair, who resigned in protest against the antisemitic conduct he witnessed. However, the investigation was dropped in January 2017.

Students testified that members of the OULC had called Auschwitz a “cash cow”; Jews were called “Zios”; Jewish members were asked to renounce Israel publicly before speaking; the dead Jewish victims of the Paris Hypercacher terrorist attack were mocked; terrorist acts against Jews in Europe were rationalised; and it was asserted that the banks were controlled by the “Paris-Tel Aviv axis” — all in clear breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Following this, Labour Students was sent to investigate, but its findings were suppressed. Baroness Royall was then commissioned to undertake her own investigation into alleged antisemitism in the OULC and in the Party more generally to her chagrin, only the executive summary of her report was published, providing a misleadingly positive account of the problem, and she later leaked the entire report to give the fuller picture. The Royall report was not officially published in full because it too was rolled into yet another inquiry, that of Shami Chakrabarti, who went on to produce a whitewash report that introduced a system of secrecy into the Party’s disciplinary process and thereby contributed significantly to the institutionalisation of Labour’s antisemitism problem.

As for the OULC, all accused students were cleared without censure.  

While the Club’s past cannot be undone, it is extremely encouraging to see its current members’ commitment to fighting antisemitism. In the description for the online event, the organisers wrote that the training was “mandatory for all committee members but strongly encouraged for other members – especially for those interested in running for OULC committee positions in future.”

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We provide antisemitism training to university groups, regulators, police forces and others, but this session was particularly poignant given the OULC’s prominent role in the Labour Party’s antisemitism scandal.

“This new generation of OULC members clearly grasps the importance of fighting antisemitism and has shown a commitment to restoring the reputation of the Club, and we are proud to have contributed to that noble effort. We encourage other university societies and public bodies to contact us to arrange antisemitism training and become allies in the fight against the world’s oldest hatred.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, or wish to arrange antisemitism training for their university society, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Campaign Against Antisemitism will be writing to Tim Davie, the BBC’s Director-General, after our concerns over a BBC journalist’s social media activity were dismissed by BBC Arabic’s Head of Daily Output.

Last month, Nour Eddine Zorgui shared an article titled “Who are the Israel lobbyists that want David Miller fired?” that referred to Zionism as “Israel’s racist ideology”.

The article was published by The Electronic Intifada, an online news outlet which has also previously attacked Campaign Against Antisemitism.

In a letter from the BBC Arabic’s Head of Daily Output, we have been informed that Nour Eddine Zorgui was merely “reminded of the BBC social media guidelines.”

However, not only is the description of Zionism in the article offensive, but the article and tweet represents an intervention in the public debate over Prof. David Miller, a Professor of Political Sociology at the University of Bristol with a history of peddling conspiracy theories relating to Jewish students. Most recently, he asserted that “Zionism is racism”, declared his objective “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world” and accused the Bristol University Jewish Society of being part of a worldwide Zionist conspiracy, adding that it is “fundamental to Zionism to encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”. At the same online event, Prof. Miller also observed that the Jewish Society and the Union of Jewish Students are Zionist, thereby implying that Jewish students (and the wider Jewish community) inherently “encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”.

For a BBC journalist to intervene in this debate, share an offensive article and defend an academic accused of antisemitism – and to do so by suggesting that those making the allegations do so in service to Israel, which is precisely the sort of antisemitism-denial found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission to have contributed to institutional antisemitism in the Labour Party – is unacceptable. It is woefully insufficient for the BBC to be served with a mere reminder of the Corporation’s guidelines.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 revealed that two thirds of British Jews are deeply concerned by the BBC’s coverage of matters of Jewish concern, and 55% by its handling of antisemitism complaints.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

Author Shazia Hobbs is being investigated by police over allegations of posting pro-Nazi hate messages on social media platforms Telegram and Gab.

Ms Hobbs, who wrote a book centred around her own experiences of racism, was said to have attacked a member of an antisemitism awareness group by posting a photo of a Nazi salute with the caption: “raise your hand if you are tired of [name of member].”

Ms Hobbs’ Twitter account has been suspended, reportedly for antisemitic posts. She is also said to have created posts that featured swastikas on the social media platform Telegram and is accused of labelling a Holocaust survivor a “liar” on Gab.

In light of these accusations, her book contract is said to have been cancelled.

Last year, Ms Hobbes was photographed at an event for far-right group Patriotic Alternative. The group is led by the former head of the youth wing of the BNP, Mark Collett, who is reported to have dabbled in Holocaust denial, collaborated with the infamous American antisemite David Duke, and espoused antisemitic and racist views.

report into Patriotic Alternative published last summer found that several members of the group engaged in Holocaust denial.

The group was found using social media platform Telegram to create neo-Nazi channels dedicated to share vile messages, antisemitic conspiracy theories and images glorifying Hitler. An investigation by Scottish news site The Ferret found over 2,000 messages swapped by members of Patriotic Alternative on Telegram.

Ms Hobbs is also known to have associated with the notorious antisemite Alison Chabloz, who was recently jailed for malicious communications relating to Jews.

When asked to comment, the Metropolitan Police said: “Police received an allegation of malicious communications relating to content of an antisemitic nature that had been posted online. Officers are in touch with the complainant. Inquiries are ongoing. There have been no arrests at this stage.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

This week saw the first “key monitoring date” in the Labour Party’s Action Plan, agreed with the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) regarding antisemitism in the Party.

The Action Plan came following the publication of the EHRC’s damning report into antisemitism in the Labour Party, the product of an investigation in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant. The EHRC found that Labour had unlawfully discriminated against and harassed Jews. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Party.

A large proportion of the requirements due to be met by this first monitoring date are either proposals or internal policy changes, which will be assessed by the EHRC.

However, a number of items are outward-facing and are therefore available for evaluation.

The Labour Party is required by now, for example, to have engaged with stakeholders in the Jewish community and established an Advisory Board on antisemitism. It is understood that the Party has achieved this, but selectively. As we noted earlier this month, Sir Keir’s repeated refusal to engage with us, despite our being the complainant in the EHRC’s investigation into antisemitism in his Party, and Labour’s failure even to acknowledge our complaints against MPs, do not reflect a leadership wholly willing to address past failures.

The Party was also required, by this stage, to have published “at least one performance report”. The Party discharged this requirement earlier this year in part; the report contained ambiguities that made it difficult to assess. In particular, it referenced case numbers in 2014-2018 but appeared to make no reference to 2019 whatsoever.

By this first monitoring date, the Party was required to have published a Complaints Handling Handbook, which it has done. The handbook made some welcome improvements to the process but was largely a disappointment. In particular, the Handbook was pilloried for including a number of examples of what seemingly purported to be best practice, but which in fact served only to illustrate why Labour’s disciplinary process is unfit for purpose.

In one example, a Labour member “posted and shared several things on social media that were antisemitic; using Hitler, Nazi and Holocaust metaphors, distortions and comparisons in debates about Israel-Palestine”. In other words, they breached the International Definition of Antisemitism in at least one and possibly multiple ways. Yet the sanction given in the handbook was merely that the member was given a Formal Warning, which would remain on their record for eighteen months.

These case studies have now, however, been scrubbed from the Handbook entirely.

The Party was also required, by this stage, to have completed antisemitism training for all those officials responsible for disciplinary cases relating to anti-Jewish hatred. However, it recently emerged that a member of Jewish Voice for Labour, an antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, chaired a Labour disciplinary panel on antisemitism just earlier this month. It is difficult to square that development with the fulfilment of the training requirement.

Labour was also due by now to demonstrate to the EHRC that it has completed its “clearing of the backlog” of antisemitism cases. It is difficult to see, however, how the Party can do so before introducing an independent disciplinary system, which it has said it will not do until later this year. Campaign Against Antisemitism has submitted numerous complaints against MPs and others, which we expect the Party to investigate only once the independent system is in place. But the Party has not acknowledged our complaints, and the only indication that the Party has taken any action whatsoever was a report that our complaint against Deputy Leader Angela Rayner was dismissed out of hand earlier this year.

Reflecting on the milestone, Joe Glasman, Head of Political Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “This week was intended to be a landmark moment in the Labour Party’s recovery from the institutional antisemitism ushered in by Jeremy Corbyn. However, progress has been marked by inconsistencies, lack of transparency and potential burying of awkward issues, for example our complaints against Labour’s Deputy Leader and numerous other MPs.

“Only in the last few weeks, we have seen perplexing disciplinary outcomes, a member of an antisemitism-denial group chair a disciplinary panel, and now Labour has embarrassingly scrubbed its ‘best practice’ case studies from its Complaints Handling Handbook after we and others highlighted their absurdity.

“At this first major juncture in the Action Plan, we are yet to be reassured that the Party is capable of getting to grips with its antisemitism problem.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer study in 2019 found that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A police officer found guilty of being a member of the banned neo-Nazi terrorist group National Action has been jailed for four years and four months.

Benjamin Hannam, a 22-year-old from Edmonton in North London, has now been fired from by the Metropolitan Police for gross misconduct following his conviction earlier this month. Last year, it was alleged that he belonged or professed to belong to the proscribed group National Action between December 2016 and January 2018 and that he falsely represented himself in his application to join the Metropolitan Police in this connection.

With his conviction at the beginning of April, Mr Hannam became the first police officer to be convicted of far-right terrorism after being found guilty at the Old Bailey of membership in National Action, lying on his application to join the police and possessing guides to knife-fighting and bombmaking. It is understood that the ban on reporting the case was lifted after Mr Hannam admitted possessing an indecent image of a child.

Mr Hannam, who reportedly has autism, was apparently “desperate to impress” an older National Action organiser who gave him free stickers, but he ended his association with the organisation before he joined the Metropolitan Police.

Sentencing Mr Hannam at the Old Bailey today, Judge Anthony Leonard QC told him that “I consider what you did to be very serious and you have harmed public trust in the police by your deceit”, as he sentenced Mr Hannam to four years and four months in prison.

The Head of the Metropolitan Police’s Counter Terrorism Command, which carried out the investigation, emphasised earlier this month that there is no evidence that Mr Hannam abused his position at the police force to further his far-right views.

Mr Hannam had denied being a member of National Action before or after it was proscribed, and told the court that he had been attracted to fascism aged sixteen because of its artwork and propaganda and was under the impression that it was a youth network. He denied engaging in any stickering or propaganda campaigns and insisted that he only attended social events.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “National Action was proscribed as a terrorist organisation at our behest because it poses a considerable threat. Its members are indoctrinated to kill and instructed in the use of weapons. Benjamin Hannam posed as someone who would protect the public, when in fact he was a member of a dangerous far-right terrorist organisation, in possession of knife fighting and bomb-making manuals, as well as disturbing sexual images of a child.

“We applaud Counter Terrorism Command for its investigation of this very troubling case, as well as the CPS for prosecuting it and the court for delivering an appropriate sentence. Public confidence in the police depends on holding officers to a high standard and zero tolerance of far-right or neo-Nazi infiltration. The verdict and sentence in this disturbing case sends exactly the right message.”

Other members of National Action were recently convicted and sentenced to prison for their role in the organisation.

National Action was proscribed as a terrorist organisation in December 2016 following a long campaign by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others. Under section 11 of the Terrorism Act 2000, membership of a proscribed terrorist organisation is a criminal offence.

Image credit: Metropolitan Police

Chelsea Football Club has announced that it has banned an abusive online troll from its matches for ten years after he hounded a Jewish journalist who came forward and received support from Campaign Against Antisemitism. The announcement comes as football clubs around the country are walking out of social media in protest at online hate.

Sam Mole, a twenty-year-old from Kettering, had sent antisemitic and homophobic messages online to freelance Jewish journalist Dan Levene, including one wishing that Mr Levene would die and another lamenting that Mr Levene had not been killed in the Holocaust.

Further abusive messages had also been sent by Mr Mole from another account that Twitter suspended. Mr Mole, a fan of Chelsea Football Club, took issue with Mr Levene’s stance in opposition to antisemitic chanting by some fans of the club.

Earlier this year, a legal case against Mr Mole ended with a judge declaring his regret that “the law prohibits me from punishing you” following a blunder by the investigating police force. Mr Mole had admitted to police that he had sent the abusive tweets in October 2019, but he was found not guilty at Leicester Magistrates Court in February 2021 on the technicality that he was on holiday in Australia at the time, and therefore outside the jurisdiction of the UK’s courts.

Mr Mole was nonetheless issued a three-year restraining order prohibiting him from directly or indirectly contacting Mr Levene and posting messages about him on social media or encouraging others to do so. He was told that if he broke this order, he could go to prison.

The court heard that Mr Mole, a trainee teacher, expressed remorse for his actions. Campaign Against Antisemitism is in contact with the Teaching Regulation Agency.

Campaign Against Antisemitism contacted Chelsea to urge the football club to exclude Mr Mole from attending matches and the club confirmed that it would investigate. Chelsea has now confirmed that it has banned Mr Mole for a period of ten years.

In a statement, Chelsea said: “Following the conclusion of court proceedings in February, the club conducted our own investigation into the matter and has taken the decision to ban the individual from Chelsea FC for a period of ten years. Everybody at Chelsea is proud to be part of a diverse club. Our players, staff, fans and visitors to the club come from a wide range of backgrounds, including the Jewish community, and we want to ensure everyone feels safe, valued and included. We will not tolerate any behaviour from supporters that threatens that aim.”

The statement added: “As a club, we will continue to take action against individuals or groups who produce or disseminate social media posts that contravene these values.”

Chelsea was among nineteen Premiership clubs, along with the Premier League itself, to have adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Dan Levene said: “I’m delighted with this outcome. It sends a very strong message that abusive and antisemitic behaviour online is unacceptable. And it’s particularly poignant coming today, when football clubs are walking out from social media because of racism online. I hope this case leads to better processes at Chelsea and other clubs so that it doesn’t take so long to come to the right decision in future, but this is a good day for the fight against racism in football.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Chelsea should be applauded for banning an abusive troll for ten years. This announcement sends a powerful message that antisemitism in football and online must not be tolerated. Football clubs walking out of social media over online hate is one thing, but backing it up with strong action like this is the strongest antidote.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

Canterbury Christ Church University has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Last year, the University acted to remove its brand from Urban Dictionary after Campaign Against Antisemitism alerted it to its advertisements featuring alongside antisemitic and offensive entries on the controversial website.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authoritiesuniversities and public bodies. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Eric Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Several parliamentary candidates in Peterborough, belonging to both the Labour Party and the Conservative Party, have been accused of antisemitism, resulting in suspensions.

It has been reported that in response to several candidates allegedly harbouring and sharing antisemitic videos and opinions, including that Sir Keir Starmer is under “Zionist control”, the Peterborough Constituency Labour Party (CLP) has moved to suspend fourteen individuals, at least seven of whom were local councillors.

A spokesperson for the Labour Party said that the decision reflected the Party’s “determination to root out all forms of antisemitism from our party and it is testament to our commitment to zero tolerance that we will not be influenced by an election timetable.”

It was reported that some of the names of those suspended from Peterborough CLP were Councillor Ansar Ali, Richard Stargward, Cllr Angus Ellis, Colin and Linda Watson, Cllr Samantha Hemraj, Kit Hubback, and Cllr Mahboob Hemraj.

Other suspended individuals reportedly included Cllr Shabina Qayyum, Cllr Aasiayah Joseph and Cllr Mohammed Jamil, also from Peterborough CLP.

In addition, it is understood that Janet Armstrong and Jonathan Orchard were suspended from North Cambridgeshire CLP.

The Conservative Party in Peterborough has faced similar pressure to reprimand members who have also been accused of antisemitism. Cllr Muhammed Ikram was alleged to have shared an antisemitic article that propagated the idea that Israel was enacting a “Final Solution” in Gaza, adding: “Can you really support Zionism after this?”

Meanwhile, Cllr Mohammed Nadeem was said to have shared videos from a hate preacher who is banned from entering the UK.

Ishfaq Hussain, a Conservative candidate running in Dogsthorpe, is understood to have been suspended. He recently apologised for sharing antisemitic tropes on Facebook. In one Facebook post, he accused the “Saudi regime” of being “long standing puppets of America and Israel,” and went on to label them “a trilogy of zionists.” He then remarked that “Islam doesn’t breed terrorists the zionist trilogy do.” Mr Hussain also shared a video that was captioned: “The Jews in Israel are not true Jews.”

In his apology, Mr Hussain said: “I recognise Israel’s right to exist and wholeheartedly support a two-state solution. I deeply regret that my frustration at events in Israel and Palestine led me to suggest otherwise. Some of my previous language was ill-judged and offensive. It also echoed antisemitic tropes in ways I had not fully understood. However strongly we feel, we should never let our emotions get the better of us. By doing so, I allowed myself to become part of the problem. I am truly sorry.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is encouraging to see both the Labour and Conservative Parties taking action against local councillors and members in Peterborough accused of antisemitism. In this instance, Labour has been particularly proactive in issuing suspensions in spite of looming local elections, although any investigations must be delayed until the Party introduces an independent disciplinary system later this year. Conservative action in this instance leaves considerable room for improvement. Slaps on the wrist are no substitute for zero tolerance of antisemitism.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Police in Watford are investigating after swastikas were seen daubed on a wall in the town centre.

The two, yellow swastikas were spotted near Atria Watford and the police have informed Watford Borough Council. Police also said that they were “investigating an incident of racially or religiously aggravated criminal damage on Watford High Street.”

The rabbi at Watford & District Synagogue, Rabbi Mordechai Chalk, stated: “The daubing of swastikas in the centre of town is shocking. It is a friendly and inclusive place to live with a diverse community including hundreds of Jewish residents. We are pleased the police have dealt with it so quickly and thank them for their support.”

The graffiti was reportedly being removed as of 26th April.

If you have any information regarding this incident, please report it online at herts.police.uk/report or use their online web chat at herts.police.uk/contact. You can also call their non-emergency number 101 and quote the reference 41/30499/21.

Image credit: Jewish News

Brian Rose, a London mayoral candidate and podcaster, has been asked to step down from his run after a video interview promoting an antisemitic conspiracy theorist hosted on his website resurfaced.

A 2020 video podcast featured an interview with the antisemitic hate preacher David Icke, who explained to Mr Rose how Israel was was using the COVID-19 pandemic to “test its technology”. He then went on to detail how the Jewish state was supposedly responsible for orchestrating the 9/11 attacks, and that a group of American “ultra-Zionists” were responsible for covering up the story. 

Mr Icke also suggested that there was a hidden hand of “ultra-Zionist extremists” who run the world through a series of shadowy organisations. In addition, he referenced the Rothschild family and its supposed role in the “Illuminati”, another common antisemitic trope.

Mr Rose failed to challenge Mr Icke on any of his points during the interview.

Mr Rose also drew the ire of fellow mayoral candidate, Luisa Porritt. Ms Porritt, running as a candidate for the Liberal Democrats, criticised Mr Rose’s passivity, stating: “No candidate seeking to represent our diverse and liberal city should be giving a platform to sickening, antisemitic conspiracy theories about the tragedy of 9/11. Brian Rose is not only weird but dangerous and he should withdraw immediately.”

However, when questioned on hosting Mr Icke, Mr Rose did not believe he had acted inappropriately. He stated: “When he was on my show we didn’t discuss these things and I don’t allow anything illegal to be discussed. We weren’t discussing what you were talking about. You’re reading off titles, but I’m talking about what content was – I believe in freedom of speech, I believe in people.”

Ofcom sanctioned the television channel London Live for originally airing the video last year.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is very worrying that Brian Rose would see fit to interview the antisemitic hate preacher David Icke, let alone not to challenge him when he peddled antisemitic tropes about Rothschilds, 9/11 conspiracies and claims about Israel using coronavirus to ‘test its technology’. London Live was censured by Ofcom for airing the interview, but the fact that it remains on Mr Rose’s website appears to show that, in Mr Rose’s judgement, Mr Icke’s views should be promoted.”

Mr Icke uses social media, his books and his stage performances to incite hatred. His preaching is so absurd that since the 1990s he has been dismissed as a crank, but because he is dismissed, there has been no major opposition to him and he has built up a following of thousands upon thousands of disciples whom he has persuaded to adamantly believe that the world is in the grip of a conspiracy run by the “Rothschild Zionists”. His repertoire includes conspiracy myths and tropes classified as antisemitic according to the International Definition of Antisemitism, adopted by the British Government. Campaign Against Antisemitism has successfully persuaded some venues to pull out of hosting his events.

After years of pressure from Campaign Against Antisemitism, Mr Icke was banned from most social media platforms.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and candidates and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Protesters at an anti-vaccination rally held in London this past weekend were pictured wearing the yellow star that was forced upon Jews during the Holocaust.

Comedian David Baddiel took to Twitter to share a photo of a woman wearing the yellow star, accompanying it with the caption: “Take. That. Off.”

The Auschwitz Memorial replied to this photo in support of Mr Baddiel, tweeting: “Instrumentalization of the tragedy of Jews who suffered, were humiliated, marked with a yellow star, and finally isolated in ghettos and murdered during the Holocaust, in order to argue against vaccination that saves human lives is a sad symptom of moral and intellectual decline.”

This is not the first time that anti-vaccination protesters have used the yellow star during their rallies. Recently, French protesters were seen wearing them at a demonstration in Avignon, and they have also been seen elsewhere in Europe and North America.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Jews were forced to wear a yellow Star of David so that the Nazis could easily identify them and massacre them in a systematic genocide that saw six million Jewish men, women and children slaughtered simply for being Jewish.

“Comparisons between the Holocaust and COVID-19 regulations and vaccinations are grossly ignorant and utterly despicable, because to compare vaccination passports, restrictions on who can enter a football area or rules about wearing masks on public transport with the genocide of over a third of the world’s Jewish population in the Holocaust is essentially a form of Holocaust denial.”

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The BBC has been forced to amend its website to confirm that Jews are indeed considered an ethnic minority, after Campaign Against Antisemitism demanded an apology in response to the BBC’s airing of an offensive segment last month titled “Should Jews count as an ethnic minority?”

In addition to having launched a petition, signed by thousands, calling on the BBC to apologise for the “ridiculous” and insensitive segment, we also submitted a complaint to the Corporation. 

The segment featured four panellists and a guest, Ben Cohen, the Editor of Pink News, who is Jewish. Mr Cohen rightly observed on air that “the notion of this debate is ridiculous”.

Host Jo Coburn proposed that “many Jews have succeeded in reaching high political office and therefore don’t need to be seen as a group needing recognition in the same way as others”, but Mr Cohen observed that Jews “face antisemitism and racism very clearly” and referenced the Labour Party’s institutional antisemitism.

The debate was triggered by social media backlash against Labour’s Deputy Leader, Angela Rayner, who had tweeted that Scottish Labour’s newly-elected leader is “the first ever ethnic minority leader of a political party anywhere in the UK”.

The BBC has now confirmed to Campaign Against Antisemitism that our comments had been passed on to senior editors of the programme, and that they would publish a clarification to their website to “make clear that Jews are officially an ethnic minority.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It was outrageous for the BBC to air a segment questioning whether Jews count as an ethnic minority. The show’s only Jewish guest rightly considered the debate to be ‘ridiculous’. It is a question that the Corporation would never presume to ask of any other minority community in Britain, and it is telling that it does so in relation to the Jews. Debacles such as this one show why, according to our research, two thirds of British Jews consider that the BBC’s coverage of Jewish matters is unfavourable. Accordingly, we launched a petition, signed by thousands, calling for action, and submitted a complaint to the BBC. We are pleased that the BBC has recognised its error and clarified the position, but it must still consider the editorial failures that allowed the question to be asked in the first place.”

It is notable that the BBC initially rejected our complaint and only upheld it on appeal.

Our Antisemitism Barometer 2020 showed that two thirds of British Jews view unfavourably the BBC’s coverage of matters of Jewish interest (including antisemitism). Given segments like these, this breathtaking finding is wholly reasonable.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reports in the media, they should contact us.