Tom Tugendhat MP has asserted that Shami Chakrabarti “only got her peerage because she cosied up and covered up antisemitism in the Labour Party”.

The Conservative MP and Chairman of the House of Commons Foreign Affairs Select Committee made the claim on BBC’s PoliticsLive yesterday, where he featured on a panel with Baroness Chakrabarti.

He said: “It’s a bit rich for Shami to talk about cosying up when she only got her peerage because she cosied up and covered up antisemitism in the Labour Party.”

Baroness Chakrabarti denied that this was the case.

But Mr Tugendhat insisted: “The entire Jewish community sees you as having covered up the antisemitism [in] the Corbyn Labour Party.”

Baroness Chakrabarti then referred Mr Tugendhat to her report on Labour antisemitism, the publication of which directly preceded her nomination for a peerage, which was the first such nomination Jeremy Corbyn had made, having promised never to nominate anyone to the House of Lords. Lady Chakrabarti’s report was a whitewash.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has lodged a complaint against Jeremy Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day of the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is proud that our teachers’ guide on antisemitism for Years 5-13 is now also available through BBC Teach.

The guide is available in two versions: Love Thy Neighbour, designed specifically for Church of England schools, and Love Your Neighbour, for Catholic schools. Both versions are also suitable for all other schools, and versions for other faiths and non-denominational schools are also in production.

The guides are intended for use with an accompanying student-friendly PowerPoint presentation, which is also available on our website and through BBC Teach.

These guides, which were prepared by a former teacher who refined this material whilst speaking to 25,000 children in over 100 schools, provide information for teachers on topics such as prejudice, stereotyping, bullying and the importance of being an upstander and not a bystander. They also complement numerous bases.

You can download the guides here or visit BBC Teach here.

Rachel Riley, the Jewish TV personality and campaigner against Jew-hatred, has been vindicated in a defamation case that she brought against a Twitter troll who Campaign Against Antisemitism exposed in 2017 over his blog in which he claimed that there was a “conspiracy” by Jews and those who would defend them in the UK, and in which he has posted and linked to the work of notorious antisemites.

Mr Sivier had promoted a narrative started by another online troll that Ms Riley was bullying a teenage girl.

In a statement celebrating today’s judgement, Ms Riley noted that from the moment she began to criticise antisemitism in the Labour Party, she was subjected to a “large volume of abuse” that “seemed to increase exponentially”.

Instead of addressing her concerns, she explained, trolls on social media “turned their attention to discrediting my arguments by smearing my character”. One of them launched “a particularly nasty (defamatory and untrue) smear” accusing Ms Riley of bullying, but due to the fact that he was not located in the UK, Ms Riley did not pursue him for libel.

Today’s judgement has vindicated Ms Riley and her persistence, with the court striking out all of Mr Sivier’s defences, which the judge described as “fanciful” and “verging on the perverse”. This judgement leaves Mr Sivier with the option to concede or proceed to a full trial in which he would need to meet evidentiary thresholds that, in the circumstances, are thought to be impossibly high.

Mr Sivier has continued his crowdfunding campaign for legal funds.

Ms Riley was represented by solicitor Dr Mark Lewis, who is also an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism, and barrister John Stables.

Campaign Against Antisemitism congratulates Ms Riley on her success today, and applauds her, Tracy-Ann Oberman, and other activists against antisemitism who are unafraid to confront and expose antisemitic abuse online.

Jeremy Corbyn, the former leader of the Labour Party, has launched a bid in the High Court to overturn his suspension from Labour over remarks he made following the publication of the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s (EHRC) devastating report into antisemitism in the Party.

The first hearing, which took place earlier this week, related to the disclosure of evidence pursuant to Mr Corbyn’s insistence that there was a deal between his representatives and Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer on which Sir Keir supposedly reneged.

Campaign Against Antisemitism lodged a complaint against Mr Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

Separately, a case brought against the EHRC in connection with its report by two members of the public has apparently failed to advance because the claimants lacked legal standing. At least one of the claimants, Justin Schlosberg, last year lost a case in the High Court challenging Ofcom’s decision not to sanction the BBC over the Panorama investigation into Labour antisemitism.

Another challenge against the EHRC has reportedly been brought by the disgraced former Mayor of London Ken Livingstone and Cllr Pam Bromley, who were both singled out for criticism by the EHRC’s report.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Geeta Sidhu-Robb, who last year was shortlisted as a Liberal Democrat candidate for the London mayoralty, has reportedly been expelled from the Party.

Ms Sidhu-Robb was revealed to have made antisemitic comments when she was a Conservative candidate in the 1997 General Election (she apologised for the comments at the time and again more recently when they re-emerged).

However, the Liberal Democrats’ leader, Sir Ed Davey, said that the Party’s vetting process was “completely flawed” and that he was “furious” when the incident resurfaced.

A disciplinary panel was reportedly convened and, after hearing evidence, apparently unanimously decided to uphold all the complaints.

Ms Sidhu-Robb reportedly said: “I have already publicly apologized for an act of momentary stupidity that took place 24 years ago under extreme provocation, but I am not a racist or antisemite and never have been, as anyone who knows me will attest. I find it deeply disappointing that a faction within the Liberal Democrats, who felt threatened by a fresh, engaging, female-centric approach to politics, have used this incident as a pretext to remove me from the party. However, I am now looking forward to focusing fully on my broader work, empowering a new generation of women to become strong, healthy, confident leaders by sharing the tools which have helped me during my career as an award-winning entrepreneur.”

A Lib Dem spokesperson reportedly said: “The Liberal Democrats take all allegations of this nature extremely seriously. The party suspended Geeta Sidhu-Robb within 24 hours of receiving a complaint and can confirm that, following our investigation, she was expelled late last year.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to the University of Leeds regarding a politics professor with a history of antisemitic tweets.

Ray Bush, Professor of African Studies and Development Politics, appears to have tweeted from the Twitter handle @raymondobush a large number of tweets that breach the International Definition of Antisemitism, which the University of Leeds recently adopted.

There are three types of breaches.

First, Prof. Bush states that Israel’s existence itself is unacceptable, using the exact language of the Definition in referring to Jewish self-determination as “a racist endeavour”. The Definition states that “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour)” is antisemitic. Prof. Bush has, for example, made this claim herehereherehere (“#DefyIHRA the state of #Israel is a #racist endeavour”), herehere and here.

Second, Prof. Bush has breached the Definition by comparing Israelis and Zionists to Nazis. According to the Definition: “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is antisemitic. He has done so here (“Does it take a nazi to recognise a #nazi #Israel #racism ?”) and here, for example.

Third, Prof. Bush has contravened the Definition by claiming that concerns about institutional antisemitism in the Labour Party, which were vindicated by the recent report of the Equality and Human Rights Commission, were due to a campaign run by the “Israeli embassy.” He has thus supported one of the oldest tropes used to justify acts of antisemitism – the discredited myth of a Jewish conspiracy in which Jews are disloyal and act as a fifth column against the interests of their home countries. The Definition states that: “Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as a collective – such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions” is antisemitic. He has done so, for example, here (“The reason they hate Corbyn of course is because he is anti #Zionist and the antisemitic campaign is ran by the #Israeli embassy among others) and here.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “These posts are clearly in breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism. Anyone airing and disseminating dangerous antisemitic views such as those promoted by Prof. Ray Bush is not fit to be entrusted with the responsibility of teaching young people. For this reason, Prof. Bush must be held to account. Accordingly, we have written to the University of Leeds to request that it investigates and takes appropriate disciplinary action to protect Jewish students from Prof. Bush.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Concerns have been raised over the prospect of Cllr Noah Tucker being reinstated to the Labour Party in March, despite his history of troubling comments which led to his suspension in September 2020, and further reported comments since.

The Haringey councillor was exposed last year as having told Tottenham’s Constituency Labour Party to drop a “zero-tolerance” clause from an antisemitism motion that it was debating, and is Cllr Tucker is reported to have suggested that Israel was somehow to blame for the racist killing of George Floyd, which is a popular antisemitic conspiracy theory. He has also defended the disgraced former Labour MP Chris Williamson.

It was also recently reported by On London that Cllr Tucker may have opined on a group chat that “The purging will be outsourced to people nominated by the BoD,” by which he meant suspensions of Labour members over antisemitism will be “outsourced” to the Board of Deputies of British Jews, a leading Jewish communal organisation. He reportedly also lamented the failure of the pro-Corbyn pressure group Momentum to “oppose the centrists on Brexit and antisemitism.” Other concerning pronouncements were also reported.

Cllr Tucker reportedly said at the time of his suspension: “I am an opponent of racism in all its forms including antisemitism. Social media posts have been collated, including selective editing, seemingly in a malicious attempt to falsely associate me with antisemitism. States and organisations which engage politically are legitimately subjects of discussion and criticism. I am confident that a fair process by the Labour Party will reinstate me soon to full membership.”

It is not believed that Haringey Council itself has taken any action against Cllr Tucker, despite having adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Something is rotten in the London Borough of Haringey. This one Labour-dominated local authority has seen a Council Leader step down in protest at Labour’s antisemitism, another councillor withdraw as a parliamentary candidate over antisemitism, two further councillors suspended by the Labour Party over antisemitism, and Jewish councillors complain of being the targets of antisemitism or having their identity give rise to prejudice by fellow local Party members.

“Under previous leadership, Haringey adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism. Not only must Labour investigate the local Party in the borough, but the Council itself must now launch its own investigations and take action against the offenders. This disgraceful state of affairs is totally unacceptable.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently lodged a complaint against Mr Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Watford Football Club has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

In a statement, the Championship club said: “Through the adoption of this definition, we aim to increase the understanding of antisemitism within our supporters, staff, and the wider football family.” The statement added: “It will also become an additional key element within our educational process moving forward, should we receive reports of antisemitism, specifically around acceptable language and behaviour.”

The Hornets join nineteen Premiership clubs and the Premier League, which all adopted the Definition last month. Th twentieth club, Sheffield United, declined to do so.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities, public bodies and other institutions. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

A court has ruled that a neo-Nazi teenager who planned to throw homemade bombs at Durham synagogues can be named.

Jack Reed, 18, can be named after his bid for anonymity was rejected by a court.

Last January, Mr Reed was sentenced at Manchester Crown Court to six years and eight months in prison after being found guilty by a unanimous jury of preparation of terrorist acts between October 2017 and March 2019. He has also been given a separate custodial sentence for unrelated child sexual offences against a schoolgirl.

Mr Reed, who is from Durham, had begun drafting a manifesto titled “A Manual for practical and sensible guerrilla warfare against the kike system in the Durham City area, Sieg Heil”. Other items seized from his home included a copy of Mein Kampf and material on explosives and firearms.

The prosecution claimed during the trial that the defendant had become “an adherent of neo-Nazism – the most extreme of right-wing ideology”, noting that he had written in his diary on the occasion of Hitler’s birthday that the Nazi leader was “a brave man to say the least. Although maybe having written proof that I admire their number one enemy isn’t such a wise idea. I will however say that I one day hope to follow in his footsteps.”

Mr Reed’s anonymity was due to expire on his eighteenth birthday, which fell on Christmas Eve, but an extension was granted following a request to continue the restrictions, which, after the latest legal proceedings, has now been denied. The defence claimed that there would be a “huge negative impact” on the teenager – who is undergoing mental health assessments – and his family, if his identity were revealed.

At a hearing at Manchester Crown Court, the judge reportedly ruled that the Crown Court had “no power…to make the order sought”. In fact, the judge even ruled that there was no power even to have made the short extension.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Antisemitic stickers have been found appended to street furniture in Penzance.

According to Cornwall Against Antisemitism, stickers reading “The Holocasut didn’t happen. But it should have” and featuring a swastika, have been found in numerous locations, including the A30 Heamoor roundabout underpass.

Other stickers read: “Antisemitism is caused by Semitism”.

Those seeing the stickers have been called on to report them to the police on 101.

Last year, members of the proscribed National Action group were sentenced to prison, having engaged, amongst other activities, in far-right stickering and recruitment campaigns.

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues to monitor and report on far-right stickering campaigns, including by the far-right Hundred Handers group.

Concerns have been raised by calls from the British far-right to emulate the attack on the US Capitol in the UK.

Posts on 4chan and Gab, both networks popular with the far-right, were of particular concern, including a Gab group called Britfam with close to 5,000 British members.

A significant proportion of the posts were reportedly threats against British politicians and calls for action emulating the attack on the US Capitol, and included antisemitic abuse toward social media companies (for example, “another Jew silencing us”), the British Prime Minister and the President of the United States. 

There were also references to the Rothschilds and Israeli involvement.

Research by the Community Security Trust and Hope Not Hate suggests that calls for violence currently remain marginal, but called for vigilance from Government.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Labour’s Deputy Chair of Newham Council has been suspended over social media posts, including the same antisemitic post as that shared by Naz Shah MP several years ago, according to the Jewish News.

Cllr Nazir Ahmed shared a post in December 2017 with an image situating Israel in the middle of the United States and calling for the relocation of Israel to America. This was the same post for which Ms Shah apologised and was suspended from the Labour Party in 2016.

Cllr Ahmed described the image as an “easy solution for Israel Palestine conflict!”

According to the report, in another Facebook post, from 2014, Cllr Ahmed shared a video that asked whether “Israel have USA in the pocket [sic]”.

A Labour spokesperson reportedly said that the “Party takes all complaints of antisemitism extremely seriously and they are fully investigated in line with our rules and procedures, and any appropriate disciplinary action is taken.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently lodged a complaint against Mr Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A customer at the Mill Hill East Waitrose was called a “f”””ing Jew” by a fellow customer who had allegedly jumped the queue and whom she had confronted for not wearing a facemask, according to the JC.

The victim, from Hendon in North London, reported that the other customer turned to her and said: “f*** off, you f***ing Jew. Go back to where you came from, you c***.”

The victim said that she reported the customer to the Waitrose staff but was shocked at being told to “walk away”, with the staff allegedly ignoring the matter.

She then tried calling 999 but was informed by the operator that this was not a police matter.

The victim said that she felt “very vulnerable walking around the aisles”, particularly as she continued to see the other customer, whom she eventually encountered again at the checkout line. “She started calling me a c*** again and said ‘keep the mask on, I bet you’re so ugly behind that mask’.”

She claims that a manager then ordered both of them to be quiet.

The victim has apparently not returned to the branch, and says that she has contacted the chain twice to demand an apology. “I do feel absolutely victimised. I’ve never felt like this before. I felt horribly alone, and that’s why I can’t let it go. It’s keeping me awake,” she reportedly said.

When approached by the JC, a spokesperson for the Metropolitan Police reportedly urged the victim to report the incident online, saying: “That would be unlikely to amount to an investigation in respect of close contact/unmasked etc, but an allegation of racial abuse ought to be recorded.”

A Waitrose spokesperson reportedly said: “We are very sorry to hear about this. We do not tolerate any sort of discrimination. Any customer who is found to discriminate against a member of staff or another customer will be banned. We are also now taking a more robust approach to mask wearing and customers must wear a mask when they are in our shops unless they are exempt.  We will refuse entry to those who do not comply. Once again, we are very sorry to learn about the customer’s experience.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The online marketplace Etsy has apologised for selling a t-shirt with the phrase “Camp Auschwitz” and reported that it had immediately banned the seller after being made aware of the item.

The t-shirt also featured a skull and crossbones and had apparently been posted by an American seller. It was available for purchase in the UK for £19.95.

The item, which came to prominence after photographs emerged of a protestor at the attack on Capitol Hill wearing similar apparel, was described on the website as “everything you’ve dreamed of and more” and “flattering for both men and women”.

The Auschwitz Memorial, which noticed the item and called for its removal, thanked Etsy for swiftly complying.

An Etsy spokeswoman reportedly said: “We are deeply saddened by the events that took place at the US Capitol. Etsy’s long-standing policies prohibit items that promote hate or violence, and we are vigilantly monitoring our marketplace for any such listings that may have been inspired by recent unrest. We removed this item immediately when it was brought to our attention and have also banned the shop that attempted to list this item. Items that glorify hate or violence have no place on Etsy and we are committed to keeping our marketplace safe.”

A man with “entrenched racist views” has walked free from court after shouting antisemitic abuse and giving Nazi salutes on a flight from Warsaw to Liverpool.

Louis Mann’s rant was reportedly filmed by a fellow passenger, a family member of Holocaust victims, who said that he was “shaken”, “shocked” and “disgusted” by the abusive language. Mr Mann is a 28-year-old medical student studying in Poland and was allegedly under the influence of alcohol during the incident.

The prosecution advised that “The defendant was a passenger on a Wizz Air flight from Poland, Warsaw, to Liverpool on 19th October 2019 The flight arrived at Liverpool John Lennon Airport at 17:37,” adding: “The flight was full and passengers reported during the flight Mr Mann had had to be repeatedly asked to sit down, to fasten his seatbelt and to refrain from making rude and offensive gestures.”

The offence for which Mr Mann was charged apparently took place once the flight had landed in the UK. He allegedly “got out of his seat before permitted to do so” and responded to requests from the flight crew to sit down with a “tirade of racial and religious abuse by words and gestures”. According to the prosecution, “He was standing in the aisle of the flight making a Nazi salute and was shouting ‘Anglo-Saxon race, we are superior’.” He also apparently said, “‘Know your place, don’t answer back, you’re a Slavic race traitor n***** lover’,” spoke of “inferior people”, and shouted abuse to “Jewish n***** lovers”.

Mr Mann’s racist rantings apparently continued as he was being arrested and even once he reached the custody suite, where he told one policeman: “You’re alright, you’re Aryan.”

According to the defence, Mr Mann was impacted by recent mental health problems and that he had been “groomed” by far-right groups in Poland.

Wlodzimier Tych wrote in a victim impact statement: “Prior to this I have always felt very welcome in this country. I have lived in this country for 31 years; I have never experienced this sort of behaviour. I am of Jewish origin, this made me feel very shaken and upset, I also felt angry, disgusted and upset as he continued his behaviour regardless of other people’s feelings.”

Mr Mann, of Morecambe, admitted being drunk on the plane but denied a charge of racially aggravated harassment. The court described Mr Mann as having “entrenched racist views” and upheld the drunkeness charge, increasing the sentence to reflect the racial element.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Today, Campaign Against Antisemitism publishes its latest Antisemitism Barometer, comprising a survey of the British public’s views toward Jews and a poll of the Jewish community.

The Barometer’s poll of the British public’s views towards Jews is the first survey to use the Generalised Antisemitism Scale, devised by Dr Daniel Allington of King’s College, Louise Katz of the University of Derby, and Dr David Hirsh of Goldsmiths, for the purpose of this study. The survey was designed and analysed by Dr Allington, with fieldwork carried out by YouGov.

  • Using the new twelve-question Generalised Antisemitism Scale, the survey shows that 55% of British adults do not harbour any antisemitic views; they did not affirm a single one of the twelve statements.
  • The other side of the coin, however, is that there is deeply troubling normalisation of antisemitism, as 45% of British adults did affirm at least one antisemitic statement, although over half of them only agreed with one or two antisemitic statements.
  • 12% of British adults have entrenched antisemitic views, affirming four or more antisemitic statements. 
  • The most popular antisemitic statement was that “Israel treats the Palestinians like the Nazis treated the Jews”, with which 23% of British adults agreed. That view is antisemitic under the International Definition of Antisemitism adopted by the Government.

The Barometer also includes a separate survey of British Jews designed and analysed in consultation with Dr Allington and carried out by Campaign Against Antisemitism and Jewish community partners. The survey reveals that:

  • British Jews are showing early signs of recovery from the Corbyn era but have been left scarred. Far more British Jews are optimistic about their future in the UK this year, but the proportion who decline to display visible signs of their Jewish identity due to antisemitism is at a record high.
  • British Jews’ confidence in the criminal justice system is low: a majority believes that the Crown Prosecution Service does not do enough to protect British Jews and the courts were also strongly criticised. Only the police receive more praise than criticism.
  • British Jews reserve the greatest opprobrium for politicians. They believe that almost every political party is more tolerant of antisemitism than it was last year; the Labour Party is viewed as more than twice as tolerant of antisemitism than any other party showing that it still has a great deal of work to do to win the confidence of British Jews.
  • In the first ever poll on the subject, an overwhelming majority of British Jews — 91% — want the Government to proscribe Hamas in its entirety.
  • Two thirds of British Jews are deeply concerned by the BBC’s coverage of matters of Jewish concern, and 55% by its handling of antisemitism complaints, Channel 4 also performs poorly with British Jews. Both broadcasters are state-funded.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Britain’s Jews are back from the brink. This study starkly shows that Labour under Jeremy Corbyn dealt a crushing blow to Jews’ confidence in their very future in this country, and that our community is now beginning to recover.

“But scars remain. Notwithstanding the relief felt by so many, our data shows that nearly half of those who normally wear outwards symbols of their Judaism now feel they have to hide it, and despite nine months of Sir Keir Starmer’s leadership of Labour, British Jews remain just as sure that the Party harbours antisemites.

“Though Britain remains one of the best countries in the world in which to live as a Jew, almost a fifth still feel unwelcome in this country. The departure of Mr Corbyn is no substitute for the sustained action and leadership to protect the Jews of this country — in politics, universities and social media — for which we have been calling for years.”

The full Barometer is available at antisemitism.org/barometer.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to Audio Valley, owners of streaming service Shoutcast, asking that they stop hosting David Duke on the Rense Radio Network after the former Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard used a broadcast to call on his followers to converge on Washington DC.

Shoutcast is a platform for media streaming and Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Online Monitoring and Investigations Unit monitors the Rense Radio Network, which Shoutcast hosts.

During an hour-long internet radio broadcast on 5th January, Dr Duke exhorted his followers to join the protest on Capitol Hill to defend the United States against a supposed Jewish conspiracy to overthrow President Donald Trump. Dr Duke claimed that the Jewish conspirators spanned the higher echelons of US business, media and politics and had plotted to depose President Trump and replace him with Joe Biden, who Dr Duke said was under Jewish control. Dr Duke was joined throughout the broadcast by British Holocaust denier Andrew Carrington Hitchcock.

The next day, the US Capitol was breached by a group including various white supremacists and neo-Nazis.

Campaign Against Antisemitism contends that this broadcast and others like it are a breach of Shoutcast’s Terms of Use and we have called for an urgent investigation leading to the termination of Rense Radio Network’s broadcasts.

Dr Duke has previously been removed by several other social media networks.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We regularly monitor output by far-right and far-left individuals and groups, and on this occasion the former Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard David Duke was heard exhorting his deranged followers to converge on Washington DC. Dr Duke has rightly been removed from numerous social media networks, and we have now written to Shoutcast to follow suit and stop streaming Rense Radio Network, which broadcasts his radio show.”

Several Jewish homes in the heavily-Jewish neighbourhood of Stamford Hill have been daubed with crosses apparently painted in blood.

The incident took place at around 02:00 on 10th January on Portland Avenue, and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

The police are investigating.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD5149 10/01/21.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “This vandalism is grotesque and marks yet another escalation in the incidence of antisemitism in Stamford Hill. It is particularly concerning in view of the global rise of far-right antisemitism. We applaud the Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol, for their continued vigilance, and urge the police to do everything possible to find the perpetrators of his hideous crime.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has submitted a complaint to the Bar Standards Board against a barrister over a tweet asserting that “Zionism is a kind of racism”.

Franck Magennis is a barrister at Garden Court Chambers in London. 

At 21:35 on 17th December 2020, Mr Magennis apparently tweeted from the Twitter handle @FranckMagennis that: “Zionism is a kind of racism. It is essentially colonial. It has manifested in an apartheid regime calling itself ‘the Jewish state’ that dominates non-Jews, and particularly Palestinians. You can’t practice anti-racism at the same time as identifying with, or supporting, Zionism.”

His profile on the Chambers’ website describes him as “an expert on the Palestinian struggle for emancipation from Israeli apartheid and occupation”.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour)” is an example of antisemitism.

Furthermore, by asserting that “You can’t practice [sic] anti-racism at the same time as identifying with, or supporting, Zionism,” Mr Magennis has besmirched British Jews and the Jewish community, over 90% of which identifies as Zionist according to polls.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to the Bar Standards Board to investigate Mr Magennis over the tweet, on the grounds that it breaches the standards expected of barristers and damages trust and confidence in the profession.

Under the Action Plan published by the Labour Party in December 2020, the Party had pledged that “A new antisemitism complaints handling webpage will be uploaded by 31 December 2020”. The Party has fulfilled this requirement by publishing a discrete Antisemitism Complaints holding page on its website.

The Action Plan was produced in response to the devastating report by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) that found that the Labour Party had broken the law in its discrimination against Jewish people.

The new webpage serves two functions. The first is as a holding page, reiterating that “the Labour Party is committed to implementing the recommendations [of the EHRC] as quickly as possible” and explaining that “This webpage will continue to be updated regularly throughout 2021, including for: [a] Further guidance for antisemitism complaints procedures [and b] Code of conduct against Antisemitism.”

The second function is to provide a portal to a “summary of statistics of disciplinary cases determined by the Labour Party’s NEC [National Executive Committee] in 2019,” although the document itself appears to be designed to showcase the disciplinary action that Labour has taken since May 2020, shortly after Sir Keir became leader, and the reference to 2019 in the title is an error. That being said, the document makes reference to case numbers in 2014-2018 but makes no reference to 2019 whatsoever. We are therefore writing to the Labour Party to clarify what this document is showing.

Campaign Against Antisemitism will continue to monitor Labour’s progress in fulfilling its Action Plan, implementing the recommendations of the EHRC and, above all, making the Party safe for Britain’s Jews.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has lodged a complaint against Jeremy Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day of the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A man armed with a large stick was seen shouting abuse and chasing Jewish families on their way to synagogue in Stamford Hill.

According to witnesses, the man appeared to be trailing the visibly Jewish passers-by specifically.

The incident took place on Dunmore Road at 09:00 last Saturday 2nd January and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD5521 05/01/2021.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that close to two thirds of British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

The notorious antisemite Alison Chabloz is facing a charge of incitement to racial hatred, which carries a potential prison term of seven years if she is convicted. The charge follows action by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Ms Chabloz is being charged under section 21 of the Public Order Act 1986, which covers incitement to racial hatred when a defendant “distributes, or shows or plays, a recording of visual images or sounds which are threatening, abusive or insulting and [s]he intends thereby to stir up racial hatred, or having regard to all the circumstances racial hatred is likely to be stirred up thereby.”

The charge concerns a video of the scene in the classic Oliver Twist film when Fagin, a fictitious Jewish criminal (a character that has come under significant criticism over the past century for its antisemitic depiction), is explaining to his newest recruit how his legion of children followers pick pockets. Ms Chabloz uploaded the video and sings an accompanying song of her own about how Jews are greedy, “grift” for “shekels” and cheat on their taxes.

The video appears to be either a bizarre fundraising effort for her mounting legal costs due to numerous charges she has faced, including several ongoing prosecutions in which Campaign Against Antisemitism has provided evidence, or an attempt at mockery of Campaign Against Antisemitism for pursuing her in the courts.

Ms Chabloz is a virulent antisemite and Holocaust denier who has an extensive record of using social media to publicise her hatred for Jews and to convert others to her views about Jewish people. Following a private prosecution by Campaign Against Antisemitism, which was later continued by the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), Ms Chabloz became the first person in Britain to be convicted over Holocaust denial in a precedent-setting case.

Ms Chabloz is fixated on the idea that the Holocaust did not occur, and that it was fabricated by Jews and their supporters as a vehicle for fraudulently extorting money in the form of reparations. This forms the basis for her second obsession, that Jews are liars and thieves who are working to undermine Western society. Ms Chabloz is also connected to far-right movements, at whose meetings she gives speeches and performs her songs, in the UK and North America. She is currently banned from entering France, where Holocaust denial is illegal.

Ms Chabloz is due to appear at Westminster Magistrates’ Court on 21st March in relation to this latest charge,

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We are very pleased to see the CPS finally charging the notorious antisemite Alison Chabloz with incitement to racial hatred. She has repeatedly evaded justice, and we are grateful to the CPS for pursuing this matter following our discussions with them. If convicted, Ms Chabloz must face a sentence with real teeth in order to bring an end to her rampage of anti-Jewish racism which has continued relentlessly for far too long.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Photographs have emerged showing that neo-Nazis did respond to calls by Dr David Duke, former Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan (KKK), and others to attend the demonstration that turned into an attack on the US Capitol building yesterday.

Amongst those who breached the building were men photographed wearing slogans such as “Camp Auschwitz, Work Brings Freedom”, referring to Nazi Germany’s genocide of six million Jews in the Holocaust and the slogan above the gates of Auschwitz, one of the most notorious concentration camps where over a million people were murdered. The back of the clothing reportedly read “Staff”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Online Monitoring and Investigations Unit observed neo-Nazis calling for attendance at the protest, including Dr Duke, who used an hour-long internet radio broadcast carried by the ShoutCast internet radio network and monitored by Campaign Against Antisemitism, to exhort his followers to join the protest to defend the United States against a supposed Jewish conspiracy to overthrow President Donald Trump. Dr Duke was joined throughout the broadcast by British Holocaust denier Andrew Carrington Hitchcock.

A number of antisemitic extremists were reportedly sighted at the march, from white supremacists of the National Anarchist Movement to black supremacist Black Hebrew Israelites.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Actress and fitness studio owner, Kelechi Okafor, has dropped out of BBC Woman’s Hour, hanging up the telephone before going on air after finding out that the programme’s new host, Emma Barnett, planned to ask her questions about her defence of antisemitic comments by Reggie Yates, who apologised only once he had been caught out.

Ms Barnett had been approached by Twitter users, including journalists Rosa Doherty, who first discovered Ms Ofakor’s comments, and Adam Cailler, who tweeted Ms Barnett with Campaign Against Antisemitism’s reporting on Ms Ofakor.

Ms Okafor reportedly hung up on Ms Barnett during a conversation shortly before broadcasting was due to commence.

She had been invited onto the programme to speak about the #MeToo movement but Ms Barnett noticed the information from Campaign Against Antisemitism that had been sent to her about Ms Okafor. She was concerned that is Ms Okafor was to be on the programme, she must face questions about her past.

According to a string of angry tweets posted by Ms Okafor, Ms Barnett had been commenting about her without realising that Ms Okafor could hear her. Ms Okafor tweeted that she was “being talked about like a dickhead” and that it was “absolutely degrading and vile”. She then appeared to dismiss the entire matter as “other bs”.

Ms Barnett had brought up Ms Ofakor’s decision in 2017 to defend comments about Jews made by BBC presenter Reggie Yates in which he claimed that it was “great” that the young generation of grime music artists is not “managed by some random fat Jewish guy from north west London, they’re managed by their brethren”.

Ms Okafor had argued that Mr Yates was wrong to apologise for the comments and to step down as a host of the BBC’s Top of the Pops programme.

In a 24-minute podcast on iTunes and Soundcloud that has since been removed, Ms Okafor addressed Yates’ comments, remarking that she “had a huge problem with people apologising for things that they meant”, adding that Yates’ apology statement was “well-manicured”. She said that Yates’ comments were “not problematic”, that he was speaking “the truth”, and that the whole affair demonstrated “the power of a specific community”. Ms Okafor challenged whether these Jewish music managers really are from North West London, adding “I just want to know where the fallacy is”, and that “stereotypes are based on an element on truth”.

Ms Okafor then began describing how black entertainers had been “so short changed by the kind of people Reggie Yates describes”. She commented that “all sorts of ethnicities” can be capable of this but added “the fact is, these men has dominated the industry for decades [sic]” and are “taking most of the profits”. She claimed that black artists “are having to work [their] entire arse off while they’re keeping everything”. Ms Okafor remarked near the end of the podcast that grime, RnB, and hip-hop music have been “diluted” by these supposed Jewish music managers who “like blackness as long as it’s making them money”.

Ms Okafor also appeared to take umbrage at how the Holocaust receives public attention each year, but claimed that the legacy of slave trade was seemingly ignored. She described how these historical events are responsible for the “power dynamic” that she was discussing.

Ms Okafor then turned her attention to Harvey Weinstein, a Jewish figure in the entertainment industry who had recently been accused of sexual assault and rape, of which he has since been convicted. She remarked how accusations of inappropriate behaviour from the black actress Lupita Nyong’o were not taken seriously, but that “if you offend one of the more powerful sectors of the community, then off be with your head”. Ms Okafor claimed that what’s happening now is that “people are demanding their pound of flesh, and I am very specific about the reference I just made”. Ms Okafor mentioned how the phrase is linked to Shakespeare. The “pound of flesh” is a central plot device in Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice in which the antagonist Shylock is portrayed as a stereotypical money-grabbing Jew. Shylock has become synonymous with the antisemitic trope that Jews control money and the banks, and it appears that Ms Okafor explicitly intended this understanding.

Ms Okafor was not in the least apologetic about her comments in the podcast, saying that “if people don’t like what I said, they can drink some water and go to sleep”.

When approached privately by Ms Doherty, a journalist with the Jewish Chronicle, who first discovered the podcast, Ms Okafor responded via Twitter: “Hi @Rosa_Doherty thank you for your email regarding my podcast. I appreciate the time you took to reach out to me. What does the Jewish Chronicle do to tackle anti-blackness?”

In a statement about today’s incident, Ms Barnett said that she had raised the issue with her producers and Ms Okafor after being sent a “report of the transcript of what she had said on her podcast supporting antisemitic comments by Reggie Yates comments about Jewish male managers and profits. As Weinstein is also Jewish and was referenced as part of this same podcast, I was discussing with my producers the role of this guest in light of her allegedly antisemitic comments. Kelechi overheard that chat on our open Zoom link — with two minutes to airtime. I then directly talked to Kelechi about the allegations, standing by my queries, and said she could put her response across in the programme. She denied the allegations and hung up, choosing to no longer be part of the programme. I stand by my questions to my team and to Kelechi. I would have happily hosted her on the programme with a question on this issue.”

A BBC spokesman said: “During an off-air conversation ahead of the programme, Emma Barnett and the production team talked about a guest’s role in the discussion, and how to reflect some of the guest’s alleged previous comments and the issue of antisemitism as part of the Woman’s Hour discussion on the role of minority voices in the MeToo movement. This was also raised directly with the guest before going on air.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Whilst Kelechi Okafor clearly considers herself to be an activist against anti-black racism, we are not aware of her ever apologising for her appalling defence of the antisemitism of Reggie Yates, which we called out at the time. Emma Barnett was absolutely right to want to question her on the cause of her disgrace — indeed that is the only topic on which Ms Okafor should be interviewed on such a prestigious platform.”

The BBC has reportedly denied a request by the father of a teenage victim of an antisemitic terrorist attack to address the staff who broadcast a sympathetic interview with her murderer.

Arnold Roth, whose daughter Malki was murdered in the 2001 Sbarro Pizza terrorist attack in Jerusalem by the unrepentant antisemitic terrorist Ahlam Al-Tamimi, met with BBC executives after a sympathetic interview was broadcasted on the 8th October episode of BBC Arabic’s Trending. The attack took the lives of fifteen civilians, half of whom were children.

Ms Al-Tamimi is a Jordanian national who was convicted for the terrorist attack, which killed fifteen people, half of whom were children. She was also behind a previous failed terrorist attack. She has repeatedly expressed pride at her actions and never remorse; she was even disappointed that the death toll was not higher. Although she was given several life sentences, she was released as part of a prisoner deal that secured the release of the Israeli soldier Gilad Shalit from the genocidal antisemitic terrorist group Hamas. The sympathetic interview saw her appeal for the return of her husband – also a convicted terrorist – from Qatar to Jordan, where she resides and enjoys a celebrity status of sorts.

The families of numerous victims complained to the BBC, with an internal report finding that the Corporation had breached its own ethical guidelines.

The Director of the BBC World Service, Jamie Angus, apologised, calling the episode a “lapse in our editorial standards”, but Mr Roth reportedly criticised the apology as “empty, cruel and pointless”.

Mr Roth, who met with Mr Angus and the Head of BBC Arabic, Samir Farah, on 9th November, said that the episode went beyond a mere lapse in editorial standards, noting that the episode omitted reference to the victims and described Ms Tamimi’s crimes as allegations, and that the episode was promoted on social media with the hashtag “Ahalm Tamimi, your voice is loud and clear”. Mr Roth said that the episode was contrary to journalistic and ethical values.

It is believed that Mr Roth observed that the BBC Arabic anchorman presented the apology by saying “I read you a message from the BBC”, which he claimed showed that BBC Arabic was failing to take responsibility. The BBC apparently considered, to the contrary, that this introduction gave the apology more prominence.

It is understood that Mr Roth wished to speak with BBC Arabic’s Trending staff to present on the work of the Malki Foundation, named for his daughter, which works with disabled children of all faiths in Israel, and to record a segment for the programme outlining his criticism of the interview.

According to the JC, the BBC decided to “respectfully decline” his request.

A spokesperson for BBC Arabic reportedly said: “Airing an apology on live TV gives it the highest of prominence. The fact that BBC Arabic did this, and the breach in editorial guidelines acknowledged by the programme, is a reflection of the seriousness with which BBC Arabic dealt with it. The very clear apologies published online in both English and Arabic also show how seriously it is still taken.”

Ms Tamimi is wanted in the United States on terror charges.

The actor Keith Allen has defended Jeremy Corbyn over antisemitism, complaining of the “appalling treatment” meted out to the former Labour leader.

Mr Allen said in an interview with the Radio Times that Mr Corbyn had been treated “appallingly” by the media, which was “scared” of him.

Regarding Mr Corbyn’s antisemitism, Mr Allen said: “I don’t think for one moment that he’s an antisemite”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has lodged a complaint against Jeremy Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day of the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Celtic fans have unleashed a torrent of abuse at the club’s Israeli midfielder after a weekend derby saw a loss to rival Rangers.

Nir Bitton was called a “dirty Jew bastard” and a “Zionist rat” on social media after receiving a red card in the match. His wife also revealed that she has been subjected to abuse, including calls for her and her husband to be “hanged”. One post said: “Here you ya cow, you and yer husband deserve tae be hung on the streets. F**k you and yer wains.”

Their two children have also reportedly had abuse directed at them as well.

This is not the first time that Mr Bitton has disclosed the abuse he suffers from some of the club’s fans; in 2016 the police launched an investigation after a Celtic fan said that Mr Bitton should be gassed.

It is also not Celtic’s first brush with controversy over Jews or Israel, having been sanctioned by UEFA in the past over persistent problems. In the Scottish FA Cup final in 2016, for example, fans displayed a banner reading “end Zionism”. A Jewish former director of the club was also subjected to abuse by fans, including “Get this Ashkenazi c*** out of OUR club and take that other fake jew p**** Bitton with him [sic]”, and “He’s a Jew what do you expect”.

A spokesperson for Celtic FC said that it has passed its fans’ “vile” comments to Police Scotland and called for those responsible to be identified, adding that “all appropriate action should be taken”. The spokesperson added that “those responsible for such vile comments do not represent Celtic or Celtic supporters. They are faceless and nameless.”

Late last year, the Premier League and all of its constituent clubs bar Sheffield United adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “With this latest episode of antisemitic abuse, a group of Celtic FC’s fans have once again brought shame on their club with their appalling Jew-baiting. This antisemitism is even more astonishing when such abuse is directed at the team’s own players and staff. We commend the club for reporting these individuals to the police and would be happy to assist in identifying the perpetrators. We hope that the club will also follow the example of clubs south of the border which have adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.”

A seventeen-year-old has reportedly been charged in connection with a violent neo-Nazi-inspired terror plot involving printing firearms.

The teenager, who cannot be named for legal reasons, was arrested last week after police searches in Chelmsford and Brentwood in Essex in a “pre-planned, intelligence-led operation”.

It is alleged that he sought to produce plastic guns by a 3D printer, and is accused of drawing up plans for a storage bunker, providing instructions for the production of the firearms, and transferring money to a third party for materials to manufacture the weapons.

The defendant has been charged with preparing acts of terrorism, disseminating a terrorist publication and four counts of possessing material likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism.

He appeared before Westminster Magistrates’ Court via video link and will appear at the Old Bailey on 22nd January.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to urge the Jewish community to remain vigilant and welcomes the seriousness with which the police are treating the danger posed by the far-right.

A neo-Nazi with a history of disseminating antisemitic material has been sentenced to four years and two months in prison after admitting terrorist charges.

Luke Hunter of Newcastle was sentenced at Leeds Crown Court on 23rd December after admitting seven charges of encouraging terrorism and disseminating terrorist publications.

Mr Hunter, who is 23, was reportedly tied to the neo-Nazi Feuerkrieg Division, which is proscribed as a terrorist organisation.

According to Hope Not Hate, Mr Hunter apparently “produced hundreds of hours of podcasts, multitudes of graphic designs, and dozens of stylised fascist videos” which were disseminated across his websites, numerous Twitter accounts, YouTube, Instagram, Discord and Telegram, on which he had over 1,200 subscribers. Among the posts were material promoting the murder of Jews, non-white people and homosexuals.

A raid on his house – part of a wider investigation into neo-Nazi activity – reportedly revealed Nazi memorabilia, white supremacist texts, military training manuals and guides on guerrilla warfare.

Detective chief superintendent Martin Snowden, Head of Counter Terrorism Policing North East, reportedly said: “Hunter invested a lot of effort in maintaining his website, his online presence and his status among like-minded individuals. He saw himself as an influencer and even sought to widen his following by speaking at a right-wing conference in the UK. These actions are not simply the result of a young person simply seeking to explore and express their social or political views. Hunter promoted neo-Nazism to the widest possible audience and was reckless about the consequences.

“Through his pleas, Hunter accepts he was responsible for the hateful posts on his accounts, posts which glorified terrorism, promoted killing techniques and encouraged the killing of Jews, non-white races and homosexuals.

“Luke Hunter represents a threat to our society, not simply because of his mindset, but because of the considerable lengths he was prepared to go to in order to recruit and enable others in support of his cause.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to urge the Jewish community to remain vigilant and welcomes the seriousness with which the police are treating the danger posed by the far-right.

Image credit: Counter Terrorism Policing

Sir Michael Morpurgo has revealed that he will not be including The Merchant of Venice in a new collection of Shakespeare stories for children due to the play’s “antisemitic” attitudes.

The popular children’s author reportedly said of his upcoming Tales From Shakespeare that “I avoided Shylock because it worried me too much if I am honest about it…there are assumptions right the way through about what it is to be a Jew, and how Jews are thought of, which are so important for our society that, for me, it was best not to go there.”

Shylock, the titular character of the play, is infamous for embodying numerous antisemitic tropes, including avarice and usury, although some scholars note that the portrayal is more multi-dimensional than it seems, with the play’s Christian characters also exhibiting unsympathetic qualities.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The portrayal of Shylock in The Merchant of Venice is a sensitive topic best approached with context and guidance. Sir Michael Morpurgo is right to recognise that there are other Shakespeare plays more suitable for younger readers.”

A Jewish teacher has been told by his trade union that he is black, even as he insists that he is not.

Jason Wardill, a design technology teacher of Mediterranean and Jewish heritage, was invited by the National Education Union (NEU) to a meeting of black teachers and for a year since then has been trying unsuccessfully to correct his ethnicity.

The NEU claims that because he does not consider himself white, he had to be registered as black.

He reportedly told the Daily Mail: “It made me feel pretty helpless. BAME would be absolutely fine, as it encompasses everything.” He went on to note that when he joined the NEU, he ticked “mixed other” in the ethnicity box, as this was “the only option available for me”, adding: “Jewish was an option in the religion section only, which leads me to believe the NEU doesn’t recognise Jewish as a race. They only appear to recognise it as a religion.”

He observed that the ‘black’ category was no longer an ethnic marker but a political label. “They said they could put an asterisk next to black to show it was political. I said that shouldn’t make a difference, because I am not black. I don’t feel that a black member would necessarily want me down as a black member, and rightly so.”

A spokesman for the NEU reportedly said that it “uses the term ‘black’ when communicating about some union activities to members who self-identify as black, Asian or any other minority ethnic groups who do not identify as white. There are also other times and projects, events or policy initiatives where we would engage specific groups of members such as Asian women members, Jewish members or Roma groups.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “At the NEU, the once noble practice of identifying minorities in order to enable their advancement has now degenerated into an absurd and dangerous inverted form of Aryanism. Under the NEU’s contorted logic, ‘white’ and ‘black’ are no longer useful or meaningful categories of racial identity but are instead political labels used to promote a divisive agenda. Rather than lifting minorities up, these politicised tick-boxes belittle them, and they deny individuals, including Jews, their right to identify as they choose. The NEU must recognise that any policy that orders Jews to identify as black, regardless of whether they actually are, is discriminatory, and erases their true identity.”

The Professional Standards Authority (PSA) has asked the High Court to quash a decision of the General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC), over its decision in relation to Nazim Ali, a pharmacist who leads the annual “Al Quds Day” march through London.

Last month, the GPhC’s Fitness to Practise Committee, found that Mr Ali brought the pharmaceutical profession into disrepute, following a two-week hearing that culminated on 5th November arising from a complaint by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Following the GPhC’s ruling, Campaign Against Antisemitism made legal representations to the PSA asking it to use its statutory power to refer the matter to the High Court under the National Health Service Reform and Healthcare Professionals Act 2002, on the grounds that the decision made by the GPhC’s Fitness to Practise Committee was insufficient to protect the public because it was “irrational and perverse”.

The PSA has now made the referral that we requested. The High Court will now decide whether to quash the decision of the GPhC’s Fitness to Practise Committee, leading to the matter being re-opened.

In particular, we asked the PSA to review the GPhC’s ruling that Mr Ali’s statements were not antisemitic, including by attempting to distinguish between “antisemitism” and “antisemitic”. We have asked the PSA to consider the International Definition of Antisemitism adopted by the British Government, and the Guidance to all Judiciary in England and Wales produced by the Judicial College that makes clear that the word “Zionist” or “Zio” as a term of abuse has no place in a civilised society.

Furthermore, we argued that the ruling misapplied the law when asking whether a “reasonable person” would have considered the comments made by Mr Ali as being antisemitic. The GPhC’s Fitness to Practise Committee ruled that Jewish bystanders who saw the demonstration or watched the recording of it posted online could not be considered to be reasonable persons because of their “selective view of events”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism made its initial complaint to the GPhC related to Mr Ali’s actions in 2017, when he led the pro-Hizballah “Al Quds Day” parade for the controversial London-based organisation calling itself the Islamic Human Rights Commission, just four days after the Grenfell Tower tragedy in which over 70 people were burned alive.

Heading the parade, surrounded by the flags of Hizballah, the genocidal antisemitic terrorist organisation, Mr Ali shouted over a public address system: “Some of the biggest corporations who are supporting the Conservative Party are Zionists. They are responsible for the murder of the people in Grenfell, in those towers in Grenfell. The Zionist supporters of the Tory Party. Free, Free, Palestine…It is the Zionists who give money to the Tory Party to kill people in high-rise blocks. Free, Free, Palestine. From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free.”

At another point he told marchers: “Careful of those Rabbis who belong to the Board of Deputies, who have got blood on their hands, who agree with the killing of British soldiers. Do not allow them in your centres.”

The events were filmed by members of Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Demonstration and Event Monitoring Unit.

Mr Ali is the Managing Partner of Chelsea Pharmacy Medical Clinic. Campaign Against Antisemitism submitted a complaint to the GPhC, which confirmed that the matter “calls into question the pharmacy professional’s fitness to practise as a pharmacist.”

The Professional Standards Authority told Campaign Against Antisemitism: “The Authority has decided to refer the decision to the High Court because we considered that it may be insufficient to protect the public. The Authority was concerned that the Committee had erred in its approach to a charge that the comments made by Mr Ali were antisemitic. Those errors mean that it is not possible to know whether a different outcome would have been reached in the case had the correct approach been taken, and that therefore decision taken by the Committee was not sufficient to protect the public. For that reason the Authority, by its appeal, is asking the Court to quash findings made by the Committee and remit the case back to the Committee for reconsideration, applying the correct approach to the charge of antisemitism. The appeal has now been lodged with the court.”

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Since 2017, we have fought to ensure that Nazim Ali faces the consequences of his actions. As a pharmacist, he is bound by professional rules, and we are pleased that due to our complaint his regulator ruled that he brought his profession into disrepute.

“However, the ruling was deeply flawed, finding Mr Ali’s remarks not to be antisemitic, and considering Jewish bystanders not to be reasonable persons. This was irrational and perverse in the extreme, so we instructed lawyers to ensure that it cannot be allowed to stand due to the example that it sets. Not only that, but the decision to merely issue Mr Ali with a warning was insufficient to protect the public. That is why we asked the PSA to refer this matter to the High Court, and we are delighted that they have now done so.

“There was no way that we could allow this decision to stand due to the dangerous precedent that it set both for British Jews and the public which relies on healthcare professionals to be properly regulated.”

We are extremely grateful to Simon Braun, a partner at Perrin Myddelton solicitors, for acting pro bono for Campaign Against Antisemitism in this matter.

Campaign Against Antisemitism previously sought a criminal prosecution of Mr Ali. When the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) refused to prosecute him, we launched a private prosecution which the CPS disgracefully used its statutory powers to take over and discontinue, protecting Mr Ali from prosecution.

The Liberal Democrats have reportedly launched an investigation into the spokesperson for its Bromley branch after he made controversial comments about antisemitism in the Labour Party.

Jonathan Coulter, a former editor of the Liberal Democrats Friends of Palestine newsletter, reportedly declared at a non-Party event earlier this month that “fake antisemitism campaign against Labour is the worst single episode of misinformation I have ever witnessed”.

He also referenced “antisemitism smears” in a similar connection, repeating a popular trope that has been at the centre of Labour’s scandal institutional racism against Jews.

A spokesperson for the Liberal Democrats reportedly said: “The Party has received a complaint and in line with our processes an independent investigation has been opened.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Dubious disciplinary charges against a Jewish student who complained about antisemitism have been dropped by Warwick University.

The President of the Warwick Jewish Israeli Society submitted a complaint on behalf of a member against Dr Goldie Osuri for saying, in a lecture on 11th November 2019, that “the next time they say that the Labour Party is antisemitic, you know there are some people possibly that are possibly antisemitic, but this idea that the Labour Party is antisemitic is very much an Israeli lobby kind of idea.”

However, the complaint was rejected by the University, which backed the controversial academic, who doubled down on her outrageous claims. She also apparently emailed the entire class about the complaint and was absurdly portrayed by allies as being victimised because she is a “lecturer of colour”.

Dr Osuri then made two counter-complaints against the President of the Jewish Israeli Society, the first relating to the recording and publishing of her lecture and the second with regard to the University’s ‘Dignity at Warwick’ policy, which had allegedly been breached by supposed “harassment” of an academic and the “submission of a vexatious complaint”.

Warwick has now dropped the complaints, however, following representations from the student.

Throughout this saga, Warwick, which only grudgingly adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism after considerable pressure, has shown itself unwilling to address antisemitism. On this occasion, it has at least stopped short of punishing the victims.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been working with the student.

Previously, concerns were raised over the University’s failure to address a scandal over a group chat which gained national attention, in which antisemitic, misogynistic, abusive and threatening messages, including rape threats, were uncovered.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

The University of Oxford has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The adoption comes after a call from the Education Secretary for universities to adopt the Definition.

Recently, BirminghamLancasterCambridgeManchester Metropolitan and Buckingham New Universities have adopted the Definition.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities and public bodies. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Lawyers acting for Campaign Against Antisemitism have filed a criminal complaint with the Public Prosecution Service in the Netherlands, which is where grime artist Wiley was located when he launched his tirade against Jews.

Ron Eisenmann, a partner at Eisenmann & Ravestijn, filed documents on behalf of Campaign Against Antisemitism seeking Wiley’s prosecution in the Netherlands over his antisemitic incitement. We are extremely grateful to Mr Eisenmann and his firm for agreeing to represent Campaign Against Antisemitism on a pro bono basis.

On 24th July 2020, the rapper Richard Kylea Cowie, who is known as Wiley, spent days engaged in an escalating rant on social media against Jews. After likening Jews to the Ku Klux Klan and claiming that Jews had cheated him and were “snakes”, Wiley tweeted that Jews should “hold some corn”, a slang expression meaning that they should be shot. He added: “Jewish community you deserve it”. He then also called on “black people” to go to “war” with Jews.

Wiley repeatedly evoked conspiracy theories that Jews were responsible for the slave trade and that modern-day Jews are in fact imposters who usurped black people — a conspiracy theory that has incited acts of terrorism against Jews, such as a shooting in Jersey City and a stabbing attack in Monsey, NY during the festival of Chanukah last December.

In the days that followed, Wiley continued to rail against Jews on Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. Following discussions with Campaign Against Antisemitism, a major 48-hour boycott of Twitter and Instagram in which we participated, and our projection of antisemitic tweets onto Twitter’s London headquarters, which then went viral, Twitter, Facebook (which owns Instagram), Google (which owns YouTube) and TikTok agreed to remove Wiley from their platforms, depriving him of access to his nearly one million social media followers.

Campaign Against Antisemitism immediately reported Wiley to the Metropolitan Police Service, but in September the police force confirmed to us that Wiley was not in the UK at the time of his antisemitic tirade. Under Home Office rules, that means that the Metropolitan Police must give primacy to police in the jurisdiction where Wiley was at the time.

In anticipation of this development, Campaign Against Antisemitism had already appointed Mr Eisenmann and begun to prepare our case.

We are grateful to the Community Security Trust, which was able to provide us with evidence showing that Wiley was in Rotterdam at the time of his antisemitic abuse.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is continuing its response to this incident, including:

  • Filing our criminal complaint against Wiley in the Netherlands;
  • Continuing to meet with executives from Twitter, Facebook and Google to address their response to antisemitism on their platforms;
  • Working with the Cabinet Office’s Honours Forfeiture Committee to ensure that Wiley’s MBE is revoked;
  • Seeking a change in policy so that racists are automatically stripped of their honours in future (please help by signing our Parliamentary petition);
  • Urging the Government to bring forward legislation to regulate social networks and force them to remove racist incitement (please help by signing our Parliamentary petition), which has recently borne fruit; and
  • Working with the music industry to remove Wiley’s awards and ensure that he is shunned for his racism.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Wiley used his social media following to attempt to ignite a race war between black people and Jews. He accused Jews of ‘doing anything to ruin a black man’s life’ and called for them to be shot. His brazen calls for racist violence were made whilst on Dutch soil and we will use all of the means at our disposal to ensure that he answers to a Dutch judge. Antisemites do not stop at national borders and neither will we in pursuing them. We will always do whatever it takes to defend the Jewish community. It is why we are here.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has today made submissions to Plaid Cymru’s review into antisemitism in the Party.

Plaid Cymru’s internal review will reportedly be led by Liz Saville Roberts MP, the leader of the Party’s small contingent at Westminster, and it aims to ensure that there is “zero tolerance” of antisemitism in the Party.

The review was announced following the publication of the damning report into antisemitism in the Labour Party by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC). Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant in the EHRC’s investigation, having made the formal referral that prompted the launch of the unprecedented full statutory investigation.

Our submissions come on the same day that the EHRC has published new “Guiding Principles” for all political parties and other associations.

The core of the submissions relates to numerous cases that Campaign Against Antisemitism has compiled, with input from concerned Plaid members and other members of the public, to whom we are grateful. The cases can be reviewed here.

One of the cases concerns a former leader of the Party, Leanne Wood, who has courted controversy at least twice this year in relation to antisemitism. Another concerns repeat offender Sahar Al-Faifi against whom the Party has failed to take action.

Joe Glasman, Head of Political and Government Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We welcome Plaid Cymru’s announcement of a review into antisemitism in its ranks in the wake of the EHRC’s devastating investigation into anti-Jewish racism in the Labour Party, in which we were the complainant.

“Plaid Cymru has responded positively to our offer of representations, which we have submitted today, drawing attention to a number of very worrying cases, including a former leader of the Party. Among the cases there also appears to be a pattern of possible equality law breaches, similar to those laid out by the EHRC in its report on antisemitism in the Labour Party and which the EHRC has said apply to all political parties.

“Plaid Cymru is making the right decision to try to get ahead of this problem, but it will have to show that it is willing to act. Its recent decision not to take action against repeat offender Sahar Al-Faifi certainly shows that it has work to do to win the confidence of anyone who opposes racism.

“It appears that there are good people in Plaid Cymru who wish to address the challenge of antisemitism within the Party, but as with the Labour Party, the proof of their goodwill lies not in words, but in the actions they take to combat it.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) has today published new guidance for all political parties and associations, following a request by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

The ‘New Guiding Principles for all Associations and Membership Organisations’ comes following the EHRC’s devastating report on antisemitism in the Labour Party, which was found to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Now the EHRC has, following a request by Campaign Against Antisemitism, published guidance for other political parties and associations, drawing on its investigation and report into Labour.

The Guiding Principles cover what constitutes unlawful discrimination; the importance of setting standards of behaviour and creating an inclusive culture; and the role of leadership – which were all areas of failure for Labour and from which other parties should learn. The Guidance also emphasises the need for a clear and accessible complaints policy; training; and a clear, published social media policy, which it has also mandated for Labour in the agreed Action Plan published yesterday.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We welcome this guidance from the EHRC, which we requested. Labour, under the direction of the EHRC, must work to return to decency after its unlawful breaches of equality law, but political parties across the United Kingdom must also learn the lessons of Labour’s antisemitism scandal in their treatment of Jews and other minorities. This guidance is a useful resource in that effort, and we will also continue to hold all political parties to account over anti-Jewish racism.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Notorious antisemite Alison Chabloz appeared in court today to deny three new charges of sending by a public communications network an offensive, indecent message or material. The charges were brought following action by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Her defence counsel argued that the charges were “vague” and noted that some of the broadcasts in question were “done in the USA”, even though Ms Chabloz herself was in the UK when she appeared on the channels.

“She doesn’t actually appear to know what is grossly offensive,” the prosecution said, adding: “There are comments that may be grossly offensive, such as ‘Hitler was right’. There are hundreds of evidential exhibits in relation to the transcripts of the broadcasts.”

Ms Chabloz is a virulent antisemite and Holocaust denier who has an extensive record of using social media to publicise her hatred for Jews and to convert others to her views about Jewish people. Following a private prosecution by Campaign Against Antisemitism, which was later continued by the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), Ms Chabloz became the first person in Britain to be convicted over Holocaust denial in a precedent-setting case.

Ms Chabloz is fixated on the idea that the Holocaust did not occur, and that it was fabricated by Jews and their supporters as a vehicle for fraudulently extorting money in the form of reparations. This forms the basis for her second obsession, that Jews are liars and thieves who are working to undermine Western society. Ms Chabloz is also connected to extremist right-wing movements, at whose meetings she gives speeches and performs her songs, in the UK, France and North America. 

The three charges under section 127 of the Communications Act relate to two internet radio broadcasts featuring Ms Chabloz.

On 1st July 2019, we have alleged that Ms Chabloz was a guest on The Graham Hart Show, an internet radio show, with Graham Hart and Brian Smyth, both of whom are far-right extremists with antisemitic views. Mr Hart, who admits to admiring Hitler, was arrested in May following the presentation of evidence to the police by Campaign Against Antisemitism. During the show, Ms Chabloz said that “the police and the lower ranks, they will never get anywhere unless they become members of the local Freemason lodge, and that is basically the same as becoming a member of the synagogue”, and that “the Jews, they need to stop indoctrinating their children, you know their grandparents were gassed just because they were Jews. No wonder they grow up into psychotic maniacs. They are indoctrinated from birth with this bulls***, and they’ve been doing the same for centuries, even before the Holocaust. But the Holocaust is how most Jews identify themselves. That is the central pillar of Jewishness now, it’s the Holocaust: ‘Oh, we suffered so much’.”

On 5th May 2019, we have alleged Ms Chabloz was a guest on The Realist Report, an internet radio show hosted by John Friend, an American white-nationalist, antisemite and Holocaust-denier. During the show, in which Mr Friend endorsed Hitler’s treatment of European Jews, Ms Chabloz promoted the antisemitic conspiracy theory that the Jews control anything worth controlling; accused the Jewish people of inventing the Holocaust in order to profit financially; suggested that Hitler’s treatment of European Jews was caused by bad Jewish behaviour; insisted that there was nothing wrong with saying ‘Hitler was right’; claimed that the judge who convicted her had been intimidated by the ‘Jewish lobby’; and argued that Jews who did not conform to her idea of a member of Western society should be deported.

Appearing at Westminster Magistrates’ Court today, Ms Chabloz denied the charges. The trial is set for 30th March 2021 at Hendon Magistrates’ Court and is expected to last for two days.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We are pleased to see justice progressing in these cases. If convicted of these charges, Ms Chabloz must face a sentence with real teeth if the criminal justice system wishes to deter others from following her odious example.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The Labour Party has today published its Action Plan, entitled “Driving out antisemitism from the Labour Party”, as required by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) in its devastating report on antisemitism in the Party.

The Action Plan covers numerous areas, including the need for a culture change in the Party and an “Independent Antisemitism Complaints Handling Process”, as well as greater consultation with the Jewish community. Campaign Against Antisemitism has been calling for some of these steps for years and included them in recommendations to the EHRC, which has now mandated that Labour finally take them.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “The Action Plan authorised by the EHRC shows just how far Labour has fallen. Having found that the Party broke the law, the EHRC has rightly adopted a remarkably firm enforcement approach for two years, made all the more necessary by last month’s disgraceful expedited reinstatement of Jeremy Corbyn to the Party.

“We welcome this Plan, which includes numerous steps that we have demanded of the Party for years but which it is only now promising to implement after being ordered to do so by the EHRC. As the complainant in the EHRC’s investigation, we have been vindicated. We look forward to working with Labour to drive out antisemitism and restore the Party to its fiercely anti-racist past, but there is a long way to go.

“The Jewish community should be under no illusions: the Action Plan does not envisage an independent disciplinary process until a year from now. This extremely long delay is down to the Party’s refusal to hold a special conference of its membership to make the necessary changes to its rulebook sooner. Until then, our complaints against fifteen sitting MPs, including Mr Corbyn, will remain outstanding, and it will be impossible for British Jews to assess whether Labour is addressing antisemitism effectively.

“This document shows just how much Labour still needs to do to transform its culture and processes. The Action Plan provides a roadmap, but it is a very long road indeed.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has lodged a complaint against Jeremy Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day of the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The arch conspiracy theorist, Piers Corbyn, has reportedly distributed leaflets in Jewish neighbourhoods comparing the COVID-19 vaccines to the Auschwitz death camp.

Referencing a headline in the Evening Standard that the new COVID-19 vaccines are a “safe path to freedom”, the leaflets apparently showed the slogan atop the infamous gates to Auschwitz.

Mr Corbyn, the brother of the former Labour leader, is a vehement opponent of pandemic lockdowns and has spoken at numerous rallies against lockdown rules, including appearing alongside the antisemitic hate preacher David Icke.

Recently, the former BNP leader, Nick Griffin, also compared the lockdown to Auschwitz.

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Mr Corbyn has a history of controversy in relation to antisemitic conspiracy theories. He has previously retweeted @whiteknight0011, a notorious neo-Nazi who declared that “They will force Trump in to war What do you think happened to Hitler? Bilderberg CIA IMF Banker Gangsters They are the problem” along with four images. The @whiteknight0011 account has since been suspended. One image showed Lord Jacob Rothschild, the Jewish banker and philanthropist, against the background of a Nazi flag, claiming that he controls the world. A second showed Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu as a puppeteer controlling ISIS through Israeli intelligence agency Mossad, orchestrating the war in Syria and Paris attacks as Lord Rothschild and the Queen look on approvingly. A third image showed the faces of supposed Jewish conspirators who run the world to society’s detriment, proclaiming: “Know your enemy”. The last image showed a family photo of the Royal Family, claiming that they are in cahoots with these Jewish conspirators in committing “the worst genocides, invasions and theft in all history.”

Mr Corbyn has also claimed that “Zionists” were conspiring against his brother: when Jewish then-MP Louise Ellman complained of antisemitic attacks against her, Piers accused her of using it as a cover for political attack, tweeting: “ABSURD! JC+ All #Corbyns are committed #AntiNazi. #Zionists can’t cope with anyone supporting rights for #Palestine”.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Enforcement and Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Piers Corbyn is an arch conspiracy theorist who was among the first to claim Antisemitism allegations against his brothers were part of an Israeli plot. Comparing the lockdown to the Auschwitz death camp, as former BNP leader Nick Griffin and others have done, is despicable. To deliberately distribute leaflets making that comparison in Jewish areas is vintage Corbyn harassment and baiting of Jews, and demonstrates that this is not about protesting lockdowns: it is about trolling Jews.”

The Culture Secretary has announced today that social media companies will have a duty of care to users under new legislation, and that “criminal antisemitic posts will need to be removed without delay”.

Oliver Dowden made the announcement in an article for The Telegraph, in which he pledged to crack down on other online vices, such as terrorism, child sexual abuse, self-harm, cyber-bullying and indecent material.

Social media companies that fail their duty of care will face gargantuan fines of up to ten percent of their global turnover, and Parliament will reserve the right to introduce criminal sanctions for executives if these measures do not bring about change.

Campaign Against Antisemitism launched a petition in August, in the aftermath of the Wiley episode, calling for new legislation urgently to introduce a requirement for technology companies to remove racist incitement within set timeframes, a duty of care for social networks with personal liability for executives, and tighter requirements to provide evidence to police under warrant.

The petition can be signed here: https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/333146/

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “This is a big victory for those of us in the Jewish community who have urged the Government to compel social media companies to take responsibility for criminal content and racist incitement on their platforms. We are pleased that the Culture Secretary has taken these concerns on board and is proceeding with new laws to prevent criminals from operating online. Without this campaign by us and our allies, this announcement may not have come about, and we are grateful to all the other organisations, celebrities and activists who have pushed for this alongside us.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is submitting a complaint to Ofcom regarding a segment on Channel 4 News that aired last night that was devoted to criticism of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Speakers during the segment repeatedly stated that the Definition “silenced” debate about Israel, which is precisely the “Livingstone Formulation” that the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) confirmed was used to victimise Jews in the Labour Party to such an extent that it broke equalities law (Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant in the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party). In using this antisemitic formulation, the segment breached Ofcom’s guidance on harm and offence.

The failure to include a single representative from the mainstream Jewish community – in which there is a consensus in favour of widespread adoption of the Definition – represented a failure by Channel 4 News to show due impartiality in its programme, which is also a breach of Ofcom’s guidance.

The segment lasted almost ten minutes.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is extraordinary that Channel 4 News could have devoted an entire segment to discussing defining antisemitism without including a single representative of the mainstream Jewish community. If the programme had done, it might have realised that it was promoting the antisemitic ‘Livingstone Formulation’ that was used to such unlawful effect in victimising Jews in the Labour Party. It is precisely this sort of ignorance of what antisemitism looks like that makes widespread adoption of the Definition so important.

“We are submitting a complaint to Ofcom in respect of this outrageous segment, which serves only to confirm to the Jewish community that Channel 4 News is incapable of covering sensitive issues with due impartiality.”

Two colleagues of Prof. David Feldman’s at the Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism at Birkbeck have joined Campaign Against Antisemitism in slamming him for opposing the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Recently, our Chief Executive, Gideon Falter, documented how Prof. Feldman, who is the Director of the Pears Institute, “has been on the wrong side of the fight against antisemitism throughout the past several years,” including by dismissing concerns over rising antisemitism, participating in and defending the Chakrabarti Inquiry, allying with certain pro-Corbyn factions in the Labour Party and opposing the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Now, two of his colleagues at the Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism at Birkbeck have joined these criticisms. Writing for the JC, Prof. Philip Spencer and Dave Rich, respectively an Associate and an Associate Research Fellow at the Pears Institute, commented that Prof. Feldman’s article opposing the Definition “in our judgment not only does not take antisemitism seriously [and] may actually provide encouragement to those who have systematically denigrated Jews in this country”. They also accused their colleague of using a “line of argument [that] comes dangerously close to a classic antisemitic trope in which Jews are seen to be seeking to promote their own interests at the expense of others.”

Birkbeck University has recently confirmed to Campaign Against Antisemitism that it adopted the Definition on 27th November 2020. Evidently, even Prof. Feldman’s own institution is not convinced by his stale arguments.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, reiterated: “The Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism at Birkbeck should not be lending its credibility to a man who does so much to hinder the fight against antisemitism.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been at the forefront of the campaign for widespread adoption of the Definition, including by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

A man told a Jewish woman “You Jews killed the Christians” before screaming at her baby: “Your mum is a murderer”.

The incident took place on a 253 bus in Clapton Common, and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD6969 13/12/2020.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that close to two thirds of British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

A man shouted “I want to attack Jewish people” and “I will soon launch an attack” while chasing a Jewish man with glass bottles in Woodberry Down.

The incident took place outside a Sainsbury’s supermarket on Woodberry Grove, and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

The suspect was described as a black, slim, tall, muscular man.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: ref 4633159/20.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that close to two thirds of British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

Image credit: Google

The Labour Party’s Chanukah message on Facebook has been greeted with reams of antisemitic messages from the Party’s social media following.

The graphic read: “Happy Chanukah from all of us at the Labour Party”. The accompanying message was: “As Jewish communities across Britain light the first candle of the menorah this evening, the Labour Party would like to wish you a very happy Chanukah. Chanukah Sameach!”

The antisemitic messages in response to the greeting included: “66,5 million Brits ruled over by 245,000.”; “Unless you’re a left leaning Jewish person…then we’ll suspend you from the party. I think you missed that bit…”; “…Shouldn’t the party be above all devise [sic] things like race and religion, it just looks so pro Jewish it is becoming embarrassing.”; “but only the right kind of Jews”; “I think you mean: Happy Chanukah, from Labour, to everyone in the Jewish community that agrees with the land grab”; “The electorate has spent the last ten years telling the Labour Party that they don’t represent working class people any more — The Labour Party responds by making more of a hue and cry about circa 360,000 people than any other minority group…”; “We might as well say Happy whatever it is… Otherwise we are expelled….”; “Better watch out, Starmer’s Stasi will be looking to find socialists to expel. Don’t mention Apartheid Israel’s war crimes.”; and “Starmer is rebranding Labour. It will now be known as the Likud party.”

Among the 2,000 comments, there was also plenty of pushback against these and other racist remarks.

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently lodged a complaint against Jeremy Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Sir Keir Starmer is under pressure again after Diane Abbott reportedly shared a platform with a suspended Labour member.

Ms Abbott, the former Shadow Home Secretary under Jeremy Corbyn, shared a platform with Naomi Wimborne-Idrissi, the Media Officer of Jewish Voice for Labour, an antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation. Ms Wimborne-Idrissi was recently suspended from Labour after giving a speech in support of Mr Corbyn and criticising the “weaponisation” of antisemitism in the Party.

The two shared a platform at the a ‘Solidarity with Jeremy Corbyn Sunday Stroll’ in London Fields, Hackney over the weekend.

This is not the first time Ms Abbott has shared a platform with a suspended or expelled Labour member, but, although Sir Keir made a pledge during the leadership election campaign that he would suspend MPs who gave a platform to former Labour members suspended or expelled in the wake of antisemitic incidents, the Labour Party declined to take any action last time. It remains to be seen whether Sir Keir or the Party will take a different course this time.

Ms Abbott is herself the subject of a complaint by Campaign Against Antisemitism, submitted to the Labour Party, which is still pending.

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently lodged a complaint against Mr Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The former leader of the BNP, Nick Griffin, has compared Britain’s lockdown rules to Auschwitz.

In a tweet, Mr Griffin wrote: “‘Science can set us free’ – Matt Hancock. There’s a slogan to put over the main gate into the lockdown concentration camp as the doctors experiment on the inmates.”

The phrase “science can set us free” is an allusion to the infamous slogan atop the gates of the Auschwitz concentration camp, “Arbeit Macht Frei” (“Work sets you free”), and the camp is known not only for the murder of untold numbers of Jews but also the hideous scientific experiments carried out on inmates.

In case there was any doubt about Mr Griffin’s meaning, the tweet included a picture of Matt Hancock, the Health Secretary, signing a book of commitment to Holocaust education.

Comparisons of lockdown rules, regardless of politics, with the Holocaust are a form of minimisation of the Holocaust and an insult to the Jewish community and right-thinking people, and they do nothing to further the public debate.

A Labour frontbencher has compared the Prime Minister to the Nazi leader, Adolf Hitler.

Bill Esterson MP, who is Shadow Minister for International Trade, tweeted: “My dad’s family is Jewish. We have no idea how many of our relatives were murdered in the holocaust. I fear [Prime Minister Boris] Johnson’s actions are leading us to a very dangerous place.”

Political disagreements on Brexit or other policy matters are no justification for comparisons with Nazi Germany, and Mr Esterson must apologise for the grotesque analogy.

It is understood that Mr Esterson has deleted the tweet.

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently lodged a complaint against Jeremy Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

New antisemitic graffiti in Stamford Hill is believed to be the work of a serial offender.

The latest graffiti – “Heil Hitler” messages scrawled on an ambulance and bus stops – is believed to be the fourth time the same offender has committed property damage of this sort.

The recent incident took place on Manor Road, and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 2643 10/12/2020.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that close to two thirds of British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

Lawyers acting for Campaign Against Antisemitism have referred the General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC) to the Professional Standards Authority (PSA) over its decisions in relation to Nazim Ali, a pharmacist who leads the annual “Al Quds Day” march through London.

Last month, the GPhC’s Fitness to Practise Committee, found that Mr Ali brought the pharmaceutical profession into disrepute, following a two-week hearing that culminated on 5th November arising from a complaint by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

However, in our submission to the PSA, we have argued that the ruling of the GPhC’s Fitness to Practise Committee was “irrational and perverse”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s initial complaint to the GPhC related to Mr Ali’s actions in 2017, when he led the pro-Hizballah “Al Quds Day” parade for the controversial London-based organisation calling itself the Islamic Human Rights Commission, just four days after the Grenfell Tower tragedy in which over 70 people were burned alive.

Heading the parade, surrounded by the flags of Hizballah, the genocidal antisemitic terrorist organisation, Mr Ali shouted over a public address system: “Some of the biggest corporations who are supporting the Conservative Party are Zionists. They are responsible for the murder of the people in Grenfell, in those towers in Grenfell. The Zionist supporters of the Tory Party. Free, Free, Palestine…It is the Zionists who give money to the Tory Party to kill people in high-rise blocks. Free, Free, Palestine. From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free.”

At another point he told marchers: “Careful of those Rabbis who belong to the Board of Deputies, who have got blood on their hands, who agree with the killing of British soldiers. Do not allow them in your centres.”

The events were filmed by members of Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Demonstration and Event Monitoring Unit.

Mr Ali is the Managing Partner of Chelsea Pharmacy Medical Clinic. Campaign Against Antisemitism submitted a complaint to the GPhC, which confirmed that the matter “calls into question the pharmacy professional’s fitness to practise as a pharmacist.”

The PSA has the power to review the findings and refer the matter to the High Court under the National Health Service Reform and Healthcare Professionals Act 2002, and we have asked it to exercise its statutory power on the grounds that the decision made by the GPhC’s Fitness to Practise Committee was insufficient to protect the public.

In particular, we have objected to the ruling that Mr Ali’s statements were not antisemitic, including by attempting to distinguish between “antisemitism” and “antisemitic”. We have asked the PSA to consider the International Definition of Antisemitism adopted by the British Government, and the Guidance to all Judiciary in England and Wales produced by the Judicial College that makes clear that the word “Zionist” or “Zio” as a term of abuse has no place in a civilised society.

Furthermore, we have argued that the ruling misapplied the law when asking whether a “reasonable person” would have considered the comments made by Mr Ali as being antisemitic. The GPhC’s Fitness to Practise Committee ruled that Jewish bystanders who saw the demonstration or watched the recording of it posted online could not be considered to be reasonable persons because of their “selective view of events”.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Since 2017, we have fought to ensure that Nazim Ali faces the consequences of his actions. As a pharmacist, he is bound by professional rules, and we are pleased that due to our complaint his regulator ruled that he brought his profession into disrepute.

“However, the ruling was deeply flawed, finding Mr Ali’s remarks not to be antisemitic, and considering Jewish bystanders not to be reasonable persons. This cannot be allowed to stand due to the example that it sets, and the fact that the failure to properly understand the enormity of Mr Ali’s actions and their impact appears to have led to the decision to merely issue him with a warning, which is insufficient to protect the public. That is why we have asked the PSA to refer this matter to the High Court.”

We are extremely grateful to Simon Braun, a partner at Perrin Myddelton solicitors, for acting pro bono for Campaign Against Antisemitism in this matter.

Campaign Against Antisemitism previously sought a criminal prosecution of Mr Ali. When the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) refused to prosecute him, we launched a private prosecution which the CPS disgracefully used its statutory powers to take over and discontinue, protecting Mr Ali from prosecution.

The Financial Times has failed to recognise an antisemitic blood libel that it printed and has refused to apologise or provide any clarification in the article.

In an article published on 19th November about a visit by the U.S. Secretary of State to a winery in Psagot, the reporter wrote: “The fate of the Palestinian project has often been prey to the vicissitudes of US domestic politics. Barack Obama, during a 2013 visit to the Holy Land, visited the other side of the fence from the Psagot winery, meeting Palestinian leaders at a youth centre in the Arab community of al-Bireh. ‘We want to tell our fellow Americans, that when you drink [Psagot’s] wine, you are drinking the blood of the Palestinian people,’ said Abdel Jawad Saleh, an American citizen who has served as Mayor of al-Bireh.”

The quotation from the Mayor is highly inflammatory and invokes the centuries-old antisemitic blood libel which falsely accuses Jews of killing non-Jews for nefarious or ritualistic purposes and drinking their blood, in particular associating the victims with the blood of Jesus, whom the Jews were for millennia also accused of having killed. The blood libel has been the basis for the persecution and murder of Jews for centuries and, in new iterations, remains popular in certain parts of the world and even in some pockets of British society.

It also contravenes the International Definition of Antisemitism which states that “Using the symbols and images associated with classic antisemitism (e.g. claims of Jews killing Jesus or blood libel) to characterise Israel or Israelis” is antisemitic.

It is regrettable that the Mayor chose to express his political views in racist terms, but it is disgraceful that the Financial Times to have printed the statement without clarification that it is antisemitic.

The article was brought to our attention by a member of the public and we wrote to the Financial Times, which has now responded saying that the quotations was merely a “metaphor to refer to the Palestinians killed and wounded in occupied territories during decades of conflict”. Consequently, there was apparently nothing to apologise for nor was any context or clarification in the article necessary.

The Financial Times has totally failed to grasp the meaning of the words used – a severe and embarrassing shortcoming for journalists seeking to explain foreign conflicts and cultures to a domestic readership. The newspaper has printed a racist statement without even realising it has done so. Like its editors, the Financial Times’ readers may now conclude from this article that it is acceptable to express political opinions in antisemitic terms.

The newspaper is not a member of the Independent Press Standards Organisation (IPSO), apparently believing it is capable of upholding standards by itself. This episode suggests otherwise.

Campaign Against Antisemitism regularly contacts traditional media over antisemitism in coverage or workplaces. If you find media reportage that may need investigating, please contact us.

Today is the one-year anniversary of the Conservatives’ announcement of three antisemitism investigations. To date, the Tories have only disclosed that one has concluded, with those into Sally-Ann Hart MP and Lee Anderson MP apparently still outstanding. The Party must complete these investigations immediately and publish the outcomes.

In the closing days of the General Election in December 2019, the Conservative Party announced that it was commencing investigations into alleged antisemitism on the part of three Parliamentary candidates – Sally-Ann Hart, Lee Anderson and Richard Short – two of whom won their seats.

Only some of the allegations were reported at the time; others are still unknown.

We have received confirmation from the Conservative Party that the investigation into Richard Short has concluded, but while the Party has claimed to us some months ago that the investigation into Lee Anderson was near completion, we have not been provided with any further updates, nor has any public disclosure been made.

The investigations, during which the subjects were not suspended from the Party, have now taken a full year since they were announced, and there is still no indication of when the investigations might be formally concluded and the outcomes disclosed.

One of the MPs, Sally-Ann Hart, claimed in a television interview several months ago that a panel investigation relating to her had also been concluded and that she had attended social media training, but there has been no public announcement.

In the absence of any public disclosures by the Party, as far as we are concerned the investigations into Lee Anderson MP and Sally-Ann Hart MP are still open until the public is verifiably informed otherwise.

Ironically, since not all of the allegations have been made public, their gravity cannot be assessed, leaving the Party’s procedural failures in the spotlight.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Today we mark the one-year anniversary of an announcement of three investigations into antisemitism by the Conservative Party. One of them has concluded, but the Party has declined to disclose the progress in two of the others, which both relate to sitting MPs.

“These investigations were reassuringly announced by the Conservatives at the end of last year, in some cases before the allegations were even known to the public. But there is no justification for these investigations to be taking this long. These are not murder investigations, and the Tories now risk making their poor procedures and lack of transparency, rather than the allegations themselves, the real story. The Conservative Party must conclude these investigations immediately and finally publish the results.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The Roald Dahl Story Company has finally issued an apology for the author’s antisemitism as his estate has signed lucrative deals to adapt his work for the screen.

The famous children’s author is also well-known for inflammatory comments about Jews, such as: “There is a trait in the Jewish character that does provoke animosity… even a stinker like Hitler didn’t just pick on them for no reason.” He also said of the Jews that nobody had ever “switched so rapidly from victims to barbarous murderers,” an apparent breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism, which considers “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” to be an example of antisemitism.

He also claimed that the Jews owned the media and that positive American relations toward Israel was because of excessive Jewish power.

In 2014, the Royal Mint declined to issue a commemorative coin to celebrate the centenary of Mr Dahl’s birth because of his antisemitism.

Mr Dahl died in 1990, and the Roald Dahl Story Company has finally issued an apology for these sentiments.

In a discreet part of its website, the Roald Dahl Story Company wrote: “The Dahl family and the Roald Dahl Story Company deeply apologise for the lasting and understandable hurt caused by some of Roald Dahl’s statements. Those prejudiced remarks are incomprehensible to us and stand in marked contrast to the man we knew and to the values at the heart of Roald Dahl’s stories, which have positively impacted young people for generations. We hope that, just as he did at his best, at his absolute worst, Roald Dahl can help remind us of the lasting impact of words.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The admission that the famous author’s antisemitic views are ‘incomprehensible’ is right. For his family and estate to have waited thirty years to make an apology, apparently until lucrative deals were signed with Hollywood, is disappointing and sadly rather more comprehensible.

“It is a shame that the estate has seen fit merely to apologise for Dahl’s antisemitism rather than to use its substantial means to do anything about it.

“The apology should have come much sooner and been published less obscurely, but the fact that it has come at all – after so long – is an encouraging sign that Dahl’s racism has been acknowledged even by those who profit from his creative works, which so many have enjoyed.”

Sheffield United is the only football club of the Premier League’s twenty member clubs to refuse to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The Premier League and the other nineteen clubs adopted the Definition yesterday, but The Blades have declined to do so.

It is hoped that this adoption will enable the Premier League to identify and discipline anti-Jewish racism among players and employees, and will send a signal to fans that antisemitism has no place in football. Sheffield United’s decision not to adopt the Definition sends precisely the opposite message.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We and others have worked hard to ensure widespread adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism, with Lord Mann in particular campaigning vociferously for the Premier League and its constituent clubs to adopt it. Their decision to do so is a momentous day for everyone who opposes racism in sport.

“It is therefore all the more astonishing that Sheffield United alone would disgracefully decline to adopt the Definition. It sends absolutely the wrong message to fans and players, and undermines the growing consensus that racism has no place in football. Serious questions must now be asked of the owners and management of the club over this scandalous own goal.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities, public bodies and other institutions. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

The Premier League has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

It is hoped that this adoption will enable the Premier League to identify and discipline anti-Jewish racism among players and employees, and will send a signal to fans that antisemitism has no place in football.

Bill Bush, executive director of the Premier League, said: “The Premier League is committed to tackling any form of discrimination in football. Our adoption of the IHRA’s working definition will enable us to be more effective in dealing with any antisemitic behaviour targeting our clubs or personnel. We continue to work closely with clubs and relevant authorities to ensure that any incident of discrimination is dealt with appropriately. The adoption of the [International] Definition of Antisemitism is the latest step in the Premier League’s continued work to ensure that football is a welcoming environment for all.”

Lord Mann, the Government’s Independent Advisor on Antisemitism, has campaigned vociferously with football clubs for the adoption of the Definition in the sport. The anti-racism group Kick It Out  and the Jewish Leadership Council also contributed to the campaign.

Earlier this year, Chelsea became the first Premiership football club to adopt the Definition.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities, public bodies and other institutions. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

Two women were stabbed inside a Marks & Spencer department store in Burnley today amid claims that antisemitic rhetoric was shouted at the scene.

It is understood that a 57-year-old man has been arrested on suspicion of attempted murder. Although the incident is not currently being classed as a terrorist incident, counter-terrorism officials are involved in the investigation.

It is believed that various possible motivations and mental health issues are being examined.

One victim was a member of staff in her forties; the other was a shopper in her sixties. It is being reported that both are being treated in hospital for injuries that are not believed to be life-threatening. Neither victim is related to the suspect, and a knife was recovered at the scene.

Courageous shoppers and staff restrained the suspect as he allegedly shouted antisemitic comments – which is apparently what has prompted the involvement of counter-terrorism police in the investigation – before he was arrested.

Supintendant Stasia Osiowy said: “We recognise that this incident will have caused a great deal of concern in the community, and I would like to reassure people that we have a dedicated team of officers and staff carrying out inquiries and a number of extra patrols in the town centre as reassurance. This is not being treated as a terrorism incident, but due to some comments made at the scene, counter-terrorism detectives will be leading on the investigation. At this time we are keeping an open mind as to motivation, but what I can say is that we are considering the mental health background of the man we have arrested.

She continued: “I would like to appeal to members of the public who may have seen or filmed this morning’s incident, or who have information which could assist, to get in touch with us. I would like to thank those members of the public who acted very quickly, and without regard to their own safety, this morning in order to detain the attacker. Without their brave actions, this incident, while serious, could have been so much worse.”

Anyone with information is encouraged to contact the police on 101.

It is being reported that Naomi Wimborne-Idrissi has been suspended from Labour pending an investigation after a rebellious meeting of her local Chingford and Woodford Green Labour Party.

Ms Wimborne-Idrissi is the Media Officer of Jewish Voice for Labour, an antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, as well as the Vice-Chair of Chingford and Woodford Green Labour Party.

The recent meeting reportedly featured speeches from both the Chair, Gary Lefley, and Ms Wimborne-Idrissi criticising Sir Keir Starmer and General-Secretary David Evans over their response to the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s damning report into antisemitism in the Labour Party.

The Labour Party and many of its local branches have been in a state of confrontation over the past several weeks (if not months) over antisemitism issues and the suspension by the Party and rapid readmission of Jeremy Corbyn.

In her comments, Ms Wimborne-Idrissi allegedly said: “The cynical manipulation of Jewish fears and concerns is unforgivable and undermines all our work against racism of all kinds.” She also reportedly criticised the “weaponisation” of antisemitism, saying: “May I just say there are many Jews in the party, including me, who endorse 100 percent what Pippa said about the weaponisation.”

It is reported that these speeches by the Chair and Vice Chair encouraged other aggressive speeches, and that both Mr Lefley and Ms Wimborne-Idrissi have been suspended from Labour pending an investigation.

Recently, Ms Wimborne-Idrissi called for Labour members to “resist” Sir Keir Starmer’s efforts to address antisemitism in the Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently lodged a complaint against Mr Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

An SNP MP previously suspended for antisemitism and subsequently readmitted was yesterday selected at the Party’s conference to sit on its internal conduct committee.

Neale Hanvey was the SNP’s Parliamentary candidate for Kirkcaldy and Cowdenbeath in the 2019 General Election, but during the campaign it emerged that he had posted antisemitic comments on social media in 2016, in one case comparing Israeli policy to that of the Nazis, in breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism, and in another case sharing an image of the Jewish financier George Soros depicted as a puppet master controlling the world.

Upon the revelation, Mr Hanvey recognised the breach and issued an immediate apology, saying that he was “genuinely and deeply sorry”. The SNP nonetheless suspended him, despite the impact that this suspension could have on the Party’s chances in the marginal seat. Mr Hanvey remained on the ballot under the SNP’s name, however, because the deadline for nominations for electoral candidates had passed.

Local SNP activists continued to campaign for Mr Hanvey, however, despite the calls from Nicola Sturgeon, the SNP leader, for them to cease doing so and campaign for neighbouring candidates instead. Whether these calls were genuine or simply issued to appear to distance the Party from Mr Hanvey’s comments in the knowledge that the activists would ignore the calls anyway and help elect someone who appeared to be the SNP candidate is not known.

Mr Hanvey won the election but entered Parliament as an independent MP. After six months, he was readmitted. However, Campaign Against Antisemitism later discovered that on the day Mr Hanvey issued his original apology, he had “liked” a series of tweets that appeared to undermine the substance and purpose of his apology, bringing his sincerity into question. In June, we brought this to his attention, and he replied: “The past six months have been an important journey and learning process for me…I’ve developed my understanding of antisemitism in all its forms. I am now absolutely clear that, however unintentional, the social media posts I shared two years ago were antisemitic in nature. I have apologised unequivocally and I was grateful for the opportunity to reflect on my journey in a recent article for Jewish News. While I cannot undo mistakes in the past, I have learned from them and I am committed to using my role as an MP to challenge and promote a better understanding of antisemitism, racism and intolerance of all forms.”

Mr Hanvey quietly deleted the offending social media activity.

The SNP has also faced a deeper, related controversy in recent months when a Party official tasked with investigating Mr Hanvey on behalf of the Party was herself forced to resign after she described Israel as a “Nazi state”. It is likely that the Party therefore has more to do to eliminate antisemitism among its officials and members.

Mr Hanvey’s elevation to the conduct committee is not an appropriate move so soon after his readmission after a suspension for antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The University of Birmingham has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The adoption comes after a call from the Education Secretary for universities to adopt the Definition.

Recently, LancasterCambridgeManchester Metropolitan and Buckingham New Universities have adopted the Definition.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities and public bodies. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

King’s College London’s (KCL) branch of the University and College Union (UCU) has passed a motion calling on the University to revoke its adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism two years ago.

The motion noted the call by Education Secretary Gavin Williamson on universities to adopt the Definition and said that the branch was “gravely concerned” that KCL allegedly adopted the Definition “without concern for its grave implications on critical education and the college’s declared commitment to diversity and inclusion”. It described the Government’s policy (and other Government positions) as “detrimental to academic autonomy, academic freedom” and claimed that they “intimidate and suppress speech of union members and college faculty who work on…Palestine and Israel”.

The motion resolved “to defend and protect academic freedom and reject any attempt at adopting and enforcing the deeply flawed [Definition] and its ‘illustrative examples’. Some of these examples require us to deny or suppress matters of historical record and contemporary reality, which is a breach of the UK’s Equality Act and Human Rights Act.”

The motion also resolved to “defend and protect academics…who teach on Palestine and Israel from any attacks on their academic freedom” and to “urge KCL management” to “reaffirm KCL’s commitment to academic freedom, including freedom of speech…critical of Zionism and Israel” and to “coordinate with other [Higher Education Institutions] in the UK to defend academic freedom and student activism from external and politically motivated attacks, including anti-democratic and top-down directives from Government.”

Finally, the motion resolved to urge KCL to “revoke its adoption” of the Definition and “to submit to the national UCU a motion along the same line as this motion.”

The motion was tabled and passed on Friday.

One Jewish member of the branch reportedly said that “I am so exhausted with having to emotionally respond to people questioning what constitutes antisemitism,” and “that members of my union would go to the trouble of putting forward a motion to reject [the Definition is] quite confronting.” The member added that the motion made them “uncomfortable”.

The member in question had previously left UCU almost twenty years ago over matters relating to Israel and antisemitism but had re-joined since then in order to be represented by the union during pension strikes. It is regrettable that a union, whose primary purpose is to ensure that its members receive equitable treatment at work, has repeatedly found itself making campuses unpleasant for Jewish academics, workers and students.

UCU has a long history of controversy in relation to antisemitism, and has a very poor reputation in the Jewish community.

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “UCU strikes again. For the umpteenth time, this union has found itself at the centre of an antisemitism controversy. Its reputation in the Jewish community is in the gutter, and this latest motion by one of its branches will do nothing but confirm it as a unwelcoming place for Jews.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

A senior official at the United Nations has tweeted to ask whether a Labour Party politician pledging to a Jewish audience that she will fight antisemitism has also ‘offered solidarity to Palestinians’.

Mark Seddon is media advisor to the President of the General Assembly and has previously worked as a speechwriter for a former UN Secretary-General, as well as for Al Jazeera as its UN correspondent.

Mr Seddon was reacting to a report on Twitter that Labour’s Deputy Leader, Angela Rayner, told a Jewish group: “If I have to suspend thousands and thousands of members, we will do that. Because we cannot and we will not accept an injury to one, because an injury to one is an injury to all.” Ms Rayner was referring to attempts to address Labour’s scandal of institutional antisemitism.

Mr Seddon replied to the tweet saying: “Today is the International Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian People. Has Angela Rayner recorded her support and solidarity for those being oppressed? A genuine question.”

There is no interpretation of Mr Seddon’s question, given its context, other than that he sees efforts to combat antisemitism in the UK as somehow connected to or even contrary to certain stances on Middle Eastern politics, and that Ms Rayner had no moral authority to address a domestic Jewish group on antisemitism without also expressing a position on a foreign policy matter.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the State of Israel” is an example of antisemitism.

The Jewish community will not be surprised at all that UN officials hold these sorts of views. The media outlets that publish work by Mr Seddon should, however, think twice in future about doing so.

Lancaster University’s Students’ Union’s Black and Minority Ethnic Officer was told to “stop being a Zionist shill” and ““stop being a gay n*****r” in a feedback form.

Last Wednesday, Max Kafula contacted students inviting them to provide feedback on his work in his capacity as an officer in the Students’ Union, but he was forced to shut down the online portal following a spate a antisemitic, racist and homophobic abuse.

The responses quoted above came in reply to a question on the form: “If you said that you did not have confidence in me, what could I do to improve it?”

In another question, Mr Kafula asked for suggestions of what he could do in the remainder of his term in office. One response was: “Stop selling out to the illegitimate state of Israel.”

In a statement on social media, Mr Kafula wrote: “This is not only outright homophobic, racist and antisemitic, but it is also absolutely disgusting,” adding: “No one should even have these views.”

He has reported the comments to the police as a hate crime, reportedly saying: “No ifs, no buts, it’s a textbook hate crime.”

In a statement, the Students’ Union said it is “shocked, disgusted and disappointed to have to report that a member of its officer team has been subjected to horrific racist and homophobic abuse,” adding: “We do not expect anyone associated with us, either through work or volunteering, to be exposed to such horrid vitriol. We also do not expect such hate within our university community, but it’s a stark reminder of why it’s so important that we keep pushing for equality.”

Lancaster University recently adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism after a campaign by Jewish students.

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Antisemitic, racist and homophobic abuse is absolutely unacceptable. The perpetrators behind these cruel obscenities must be identified and sanctioned. Lancaster University recently adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism; sadly, it now has an opportunity to apply it.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Campaign Against Antisemitism has said that the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) is “ignoring Jewish victims” after it closed most police investigations into Labour antisemitism.

The Metropolitan Police has reportedly dropped fifteen of the 23 criminal investigations in relation to Labour antisemitism without charges. It is understood that the decisions in most of the cases were taken after the police asked the CPS for advice.

Seven cases are still under investigation, but there has only been one successful conviction in two years. In June, an expelled Labour activist, Mohson Rasool, 61, was convicted of sending a grossly offensive message online and given nine weeks’ community service.

The matter arose after the radio channel LBC and Campaign Against Antisemitism referred a secret dossier, which was compiled by the Labour Party and subsequently leaked, to the Metropolitan Police. Earlier this year, the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police came under pressure for taking so long to decide on how to proceed even on the few cases that the CPS determined might be actionable.

The CPS has now reportedly ruled that the cases still held by the police did not meet the threshold for prosecution.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “While the rest of British society has been appalled by the rampant antisemitism in the Labour Party, the CPS is living on another planet. We referred cases from Labour to the police more than two years ago. At the time, the cases were said by top police officials and criminal barristers to be clear cut, but the CPS has only charged one of them and has now told the police to close cases on ten more activists.

“This is just the latest failure of the CPS to prosecute antisemitic hate crime. The CPS must stop ignoring Jewish victims and take antisemitic crime seriously. After years of vile antisemitic abuse from within the Labour Party, the CPS seems determined to do nothing at all about it.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that almost half of British Jews believe that the CPS is doing too little to fight antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A supporter of the former Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn, who sent antisemitic abuse to Labour MPs had avoided jail.

Nicholas Nelson, 31, admitted to three charges of sending communications of an offensive nature in mid-2018. The communications were sent via telephone calls and e-mails to the Jewish women MPs Dame Margaret Hodge and Dame Louise Ellman, as well as Lord Mann, who was then a Labour MP and remains a prominent campaigner against antisemitism. All three Labour MPs were critics of Mr Corbyn.

Mr Nelson, who is from Norfolk, told Dame Margaret: “Margaret should f*** off, you f****** racist Zionist c***. You need to get out of the Party and I hope you die, you Tory c***.” In a telephone call on the same day, Mr Nelson reportedly added: “Margaret Hodge is an apartheid-supporting disgusting scumbag bitch.”

In a victim statement, the MP said: “I considered the emails to be threatening and was left feeling nervous and unsure about my personal safety. For the first time, I now feel under threat because of my Jewish identity.”

Dame Louise was told: “Louise Ellman is a hypocritical Tory c*** who is so thick she is trying to smear Corbyn with an event she herself attended.” Her Parliamentary assistant said that she felt “extremely uncomfortable and distressed” after reading an e-mail from Mr Nelson.

Lord Mann received a telephone message in September 2018 that said: “Kill yourself. When are you going to have a stroke?”

This conviction was not Mr Nelson’s first offence. In 2018, he was sentenced to twenty weeks in jail – suspended for a year – for harassing another two Jewish Labour MPs, Luciana Berger and Ruth Smeeth, both of whom were victims of significant levels of antisemitic abuse while in Parliament.

Westminster Magistrates’ Court’s Deputy Chief Magistrate, Tan Ikran, said: “I’m of the view that these offences are so serious that they cross the custody threshold. People should feel able to come forward and serve as MPs without fear of violence and threat. Certain communities have felt particularly under threat. And these courts will send a clear message to those who threaten members of those communities, who attack them because of their faith.”

However, while Mr Nelson was sentenced to 20 weeks in prison suspended for eighteen months, as well as a 30-day rehabilitation order, 240 hours of unpaid work and £200 in victim surcharge and costs, the magistrate said that if all the convictions had been sentenced at once, he would have sent Mr Nelson to jail, but “I have considered carefully whether I can suspend the sentences and I felt just about able to do so. That doesn’t take away the seriousness of the offences. That simply reflects we are now two years down the road, that there have been no further offences and that I see you are now seeking the assistance of a psychiatrist and dealing with issues you say were a feature of your life then.”

Mr Ikran said of Mr Nelson’s language that it is “the most vulgar, obscene, threatening vocabulary I can think of.” He added: “I took a very serious view in December 2018. I did so then and I do so now because there has been a significant increase in threats made to MPs – threats of violence, threats based on their faith and on race. It’s something I have not encountered previously, but over the last couple of years this has become commonplace.”

Mr Nelson’s counsel said that Mr Nelson is “ashamed of his conduct” and read a letter from the defendant saying: “I want to offer a full apology to Louise Ellman, Margaret Hodge and John Mann for the harm caused by my conduct.”

It is understood that Mr Nelson, who also sent antisemitic abuse to other Labour MPs, is no longer a member of the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A Parliamentary antisemitism watchdog has discovered that Alexa, Amazon’s smart speaker that provides answers to questions by reference to online resources, presents antisemitic conspiracies as truthful.

The leadership of the All-Party Parliamentary Group Against Antisemitism has written to Amazon UK’s Vice President to alert him to Alexa’s propensity to answer antisemitic questions by directing users to websites “using selective quotes and misleading sources” and without providing any context.

For example, when asked “Do Jews control the media?”, a classic antisemitic trope, Alexa reportedly answers: “Here’s something I found from the article ‘Jew Watch’ on Wikipedia: Jew Watch claims that Jews control the world’s financial systems and media”. Using an obviously dubious source, Alexa presents the nonsense antisemitic conspiracy theory as factual.

To the question “Was the Holocaust a hoax?”, Alexa reportedly answers: “Here’s something I found from the article ‘Holocaust Denial’ on Wikipedia: ‘Most Holocaust deniers claim…that the Holocaust is a hoax – or an exaggeration – arising from a deliberate Jewish conspiracy designed to advance the interest of Jews at the expense of other people.” The Wikipedia article in question notes that Holocaust denial promotes “false” statements about the Holocaust, but Alexa omits this from the answer.

The letter to Amazon, which can be read below, provides further examples.

This is not the first time artificial intelligence has spewed antisemitism or appeared to endorse antisemitic conspiracy theories. Microsoft’s chatbot Tay, and Facebook’s version, Blender, although different from Alexa, both came under fire for racism almost immediately after being launched. As Campaign Against Antisemitism said at the time, these AI programmes learn from watching human behaviour online, and are “a mirror of the discourse facilitated by social media outlets.”

The All-Party Parliamentary Group Against Antisemitism (APPG) has warned a group of Conservative MPs and peers against the use of the controversial phrase “cultural Marxism”, noting that the term could “inadvertently” act as a “dog-whistle for the far-right”, where the phrase is increasingly popular.

28 MPs and peers used in the phrase in a letter to The Telegraph regarding what they perceived to be the adverse politicisation of numerous cultural institutions, criticising a political slant that they described as “coloured by cultural Marxist dogma, colloquially known as the ‘woke agenda’.”

Andrew Percy, a Tory MP and co-Chair of the APPG, said that some of his colleagues were surprised at the popularity of the phrase on the far-right and undertook not to use it again.

The signatories included Sally-Ann Hart MP and Lee Anderson MP, both of whom were put under investigation by the Conservative Party over alleged antisemitism late last year. Campaign Against Antisemitism has previously criticised the Party for taking so long over the investigations, which we can only assume are still ongoing until the results are disclosed.

When the story of the letter broke, a spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Terms such as ‘cultural Marxism’ and ‘elitist bourgeois liberals’ can function as antisemitic dogwhistles, even if they are not always intended as such, while the dangers of promoting conspiracies about powerful minorities controlling society are obvious. The authors of this letter should endeavour to find less toxic language to promote their politics.

“We also note that two of the signatories – Sally-Ann Hart and Lee Anderson – are, to our knowledge, under apparently interminable investigations by the Conservative Party in relation to alleged antisemitism. Until the results of those investigations are made known, we can only assume that they are still in progress, which is unacceptable after so long. The Party must immediately explain what conclusions have been reached.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Manchester Metropolitan University and Buckingham New University have both reportedly adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Buckingham New University’s Vice-Chancellor Professor Nick Braisby reportedly said: “Antisemitism is repugnant. It is a form of racism, has no place within society and will not be tolerated at our University. Our decision to adopt the [International] Definition of Antisemitism demonstrates our commitment to be an inclusive community that welcomes and celebrates all of our members irrespective of their background or ethnicity. Adopting the Definition is an important step in our ongoing work towards eradicating racism, harassment, discrimination and prejudice.”

They join Lancaster University and the University of Cambridge as recent adopters of the Definition.

Recently, Gavin Williamson, the Education Secretary, called on universities to adopt the Definition.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities and public bodies. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Eric Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Labour’s Opposition Chief Whip, Nick Brown, has written to Jeremy Corbyn, the former Leader, urging him to apologise in return for a restoration of the whip.

Mr Corbyn was recently suspended for downplaying the extent of antisemitism in the Party but was then rapidly readmitted to the Party in a shambolic process that represented a con of the Jewish community. Under pressure, Sir Keir Starmer declined to restore the whip to Mr Corbyn, however, maintaining the suspension for three months and implying that the suspension would roll over repeatedly.

Now, Mr Brown has written to Mr Corbyn, urging him to “unequivocally, unambiguously and without reservation” apologise for his inflammatory comments and commit to cooperating with the Labour Party in its implementation of the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s (EHRC) recommendations.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “An apology is no substitute for justice. If Labour wishes to be taken seriously, it must investigate both of our major complaints against Jeremy Corbyn under an independent disciplinary process, as well as our complaints against other sitting MPs, and take decisive action. If our complaint against Mr Corbyn is upheld, he must be expelled. The Jewish community and the British public deserve justice from Labour, not more excuses. Labour’s offer to Mr Corbyn to apologise in return for a restoration of the whip is decidedly a step in the wrong direction.”

Previous research by Campaign Against Antisemitism has shown that Mr Brown, who also served as Opposition Chief Whip under Mr Corbyn, has had little to say on Labour’s antisemitism crisis over the past several years.

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently lodged a complaint against Mr Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A man charged with stirring up racial hatred with an antisemitic coronavirus hoax is understood to have appeared in court wearing a Nazi armband.

Matthew Henegan, 35, faces seven charges of publishing, distributing and possessing material in March and April that is likely to stir up racial hatred. It is also claimed that he distributed leaflets in Cambridgeshire, where he resides, and possessing a document titled “How To Make Armour Piercing Bullets”, which apparently contains information likely to be useful in terrorism.

Mr Henegan is currently on bail and reportedly appeared at a preliminary hearing at the Old Bailey wearing dark glasses, a hairband and an armband with a red swastika.

According to a report, the judge asked the defendant’s lawyer: “Can you see what he’s wearing?”, and ordered Mr Henegan to leave the courtroom. The defendant asked: “Are we done for the day then?” The judge replied: “We are not.” The defendant replied: “I have a right to freedom of expression, freedom of dress, freedom of religion. They are rights not for debate.” The judge instructed the lawyer to give his client advice and said: “Next time it will not be out in the public corridor.” Mr Henegan returned to the courtroom with a jacket, with the armband no longer visible.

A pre-trial hearing was scheduled for 12th March and a provisional trial date at the Old Bailey for 8th November. The defendant remains on bail.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years, continues to urge the Jewish community to remain vigilant and welcomes the seriousness with which the authorities are treating the danger.

Facebook is under pressure following the revelation that a network of 80,000 white supremacists is operating on its platform, as well as on Instagram, which is owed by Facebook.

The network reportedly includes more than 40 neo-Nazi websites, has links to the far-right in Britain and offers merchandise incorporating Nazi symbols. According to the Centre for Countering Digital Hate, which is based in London, these merchandise sales fund two far-right groups in the Ukraine, Azov Battalion and Misanthropic Division.

Azov Battalion is believed to have recruited far-right Britons to fight in the Ukraine, while a British man is facing twelve terror charges after being found in possession of material linked to Misanthropic Division. One of the Azov Battalion’s Facebook pages is called “Gas Chambers”, and visitors are directed to websites where imagery of white skinheads standing next to murdered Jewish and black men are featured, and products for purchase.

According to the Coalition for a Safer Web, Facebook was first warned of this network two years ago and failed to act, and it has only grown since then.

It is understood that after being contacted by The Observer, Facebook reportedly began removing the neo-Nazi material, and a spokesperson has reportedly said: “We have removed the content which violates our policies prohibiting dangerous organisations. We regularly work to improve our technology to find and remove this content faster, and, while there is more work to do, we are making progress. We’ve banned over 250 white supremacist organisations from Facebook and Instagram.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years, continues to urge the Jewish community to remain vigilant and welcomes the seriousness with which the authorities are treating the danger.

Lancaster University has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism after a campaign by Jewish students.

The University agreed to adopt the Definition at a meeting of the University Council on 20th November.

The University’s Vice Chancellor, Professor Andy Schofield, said: “This is one important element of the University’s wider commitment to ensure that the University is fair and inclusive. We will be continuing to work with our partners in both Israel and Palestine to increase our awareness and understanding of the major issues that affect our diverse community.”

Previously, Jewish students at Lancaster had protested perceived inaction by the University following a call from the Education Secretary for universities to adopt the Definition. The Jewish Society’s President had said: “We will not stop working until this Definition is adopted.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities and public bodies. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Eric Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

The Court of Appeal has halved the sentence of a convicted neo-Nazi terrorist.

Connor Scothern was convicted earlier this year of membership of the proscribed National Action neo-Nazi terrorist group. 

Mr Scothern, who was apparently a practicing Muslim and activist with the extremist anti-fascist group, Antifa, before joining National Action, had been given a sentence of eighteen months in a Young Offenders’ Institution.

He was convicted and sentenced with ‘Miss Hitler’ and other defendants in a case covered by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

As Mr Scothern was aged fifteen and sixteen during his membership of National Action in 2016-17 but nineteen when he was sentenced, his lawyers argued that he would have to serve two-thirds of his sentence before becoming eligible for parole whereas if he were sentenced for the same offence at the age that he committed it, he would have received a youth detention and training order lasting nine months before release under supervision. Accordingly, his eighteen-month sentence – double the sentence that his lawyers said that he ought to have received were he sentenced sooner – “was not only wrong in principle but was also unlawful”.

The Court of Appeal agreed with this reasoning, although the Court dismissed other arguments that factors mitigating the offence were not adequately taken into account at the sentencing. Aside from the particular point of law in the successful argument, “there could have been no criticism of the sentence imposed upon the appellant”.

The judgment, handed down last Friday, quashes the original eighteen-month sentence and replaces it with nine months’ detention in a Young Offenders’ Institution.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years, continues to urge the Jewish community to remain vigilant and welcomes the seriousness with which the authorities are treating the danger.

Image credit: West Midlands Police

According to recent reports, the Labour Party has lost tens of thousands of members since Sir Keir Starmer became leader, with the exodus apparently accelerating since the suspension of Jeremy Corbyn.

This is the first time since Mr Corbyn’s election as Leader that the Party’s membership has fallen below half a million, which was itself a staggering achievement for a British political party in the current era.

There was a great deal of concern over entryism during Mr Corbyn’s two leadership primary campaigns and, more generally, over the possibility that many of these new members were tolerant of or held far-left antisemitic views. These concerns appeared to be borne out over the course of Mr Corbyn’s tenure as Leader, and Campaign Against Antisemitism’s 2019 Antisemitism Barometer showed, based on analysis of polling conducted by YouGov, that people holding four or more antisemitic views were particularly attracted to Mr Corbyn.

Since Mr Corbyn’s resignation as Leader and the increasingly heated confrontation between different factions in the Labour Party, it has become evident that some of these pro-Corbyn members – some of whom were returning to Labour after decades outside of the Party and others who had joined the Party for the first time – were becoming disillusioned. Campaign Against Antisemitism has long been concerned about where some of these Labour members might go next.

Joe Glasman, Head of Political and Government Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We continue to urge other parties – especially, for obvious reasons, on the political Left – to be vigilant that anyone espousing antisemitic tropes not be made welcome in their parties. Antisemitism has no place in any political party, and the EHRC has rightly addressed the conclusions of its report into Labour to all political parties. It would be a tragedy for Britain if anti-Jewish racism were not only to persist in Labour but to reappear on such a scale in any other Party.”

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A man with a history of antisemitic harassment has been jailed over a video inciting terrorism.

Shehroz Iqbal, 29, has been charged on multiple occasions over antisemitic incidents with no custodial sentence, leading to strong protest from Campaign Against Antisemitism. He also reportedly had a history of posting antisemitic messages – including a poster saying “Jewish scum” – and harassing synagogue members in Gants Hill, and he apparently sent the synagogue a threatening e-mail after it posted a picture of him on its website.

However, Mr Iqbal, who is from Ilford in East London, has now been given a sentence of eight-and-a-half years in prison over a video he posted in a WatsApp group of over twenty like-minded users called From Dark To Light on 11 March. The video was claimed to have incited a terror attack on London’s Royal Festival Hall with the words “Attack, attack”. He has previously shared propaganda on social media portraying Islamic State terrorist fighters. The sentence also includes time for drugs-related charges.

The Old Bailey heard during the trial that the posts had been discovered on his mobile phone after he was pulled over in that month for drug possession.

The prosecutor described him as “volatile and prone to act on his extremism”, and Judge Philip Katz QC said: “You have a long history of unpleasant, antisemitic threats and harassment.”

Plaid Cymru has seen two former leaders at odds over antisemitism, with one appearing to endorse conspiratorial denials of antisemitism in the Labour Party and another calling for no tolerance of anti-Jewish racism.

Leanne Wood, who served as leader of the Welsh Nationalist Party until 2018, appeared to endorse tweets by a controversial American journalist that read: “I’ve never seen a more flagrant, repellent and cynical exploitation of antisemitism in my life than its disgusting use to smear [Jeremy] Corbyn because of a lack of alternatives for how to defeat him. Nothing has trivialized this cause more than what British Blairites have done.”

A further tweet in the thread said: “Jeremy Corbyn is a better human being by a multiple of about 1,000 than all of the Oxbridge cretins in politics and media who have united to cynically smear him with accusations they know in their rotted souls are false.”

This is not the first time that Ms Wood has waded into the Labour antisemitism scandal, coming to the apparent defence of Rebecca Long-Bailey, who was sacked from Labour’s Shadow Cabinet earlier this year after she promoted an article containing an antisemitic conspiracy theory.

Plaid Cymru, after a recent antisemitism scandal, has announced that it is holding a review into antisemitism in its Party, to which Campaign Against Antisemitism shall be making submissions. The review will be led by the Party’s Westminster leader, Liz Saville Roberts MP.

Commenting on the review, Lord Wigley, who led Plaid Cymru in the 1980s and 1990s, said: “I cannot comment in detail, but it’s absolutely clear that Plaid Cymru cannot tolerate antisemitism or any other form or racism. Liz Saville Roberts is a first-class MP and I have no doubt she will come to the right conclusions.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “It is evident from our research, media reports, and contact from ordinary Plaid Cymru members and members of the public that there are divisions within the Party as to how to address antisemitism. On one side are culprits, enablers and defenders, and on the other are those fighting to eradicate it. We hope the Party’s review into antisemitism, to which we shall be making submissions, will aid the right side of that internal conflict.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Lord Desai has resigned from the Labour Party over its antisemitism crisis, and in particular over Jeremy Corbyn’s rapid and controversial readmission following the former Leader’s suspension.

In a letter to The Times Lord Desai, an economist who was made a peer in 1991, wrote: “Sir, You are right to be worried about the likelihood of success of the policies of the leader of the Labour Party to fight antisemitism. I agree with you that this makes the persistence of antisemitism more likely than not. I have submitted my resignation from the Labour Party after 49 years of membership.”

Mr Corbyn was suspended for downplaying antisemitism in the wake of the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s (EHRC) damning report into anti-Jewish racism in the Labour Party last month, but was readmitted less than three weeks later, using a fast-track disciplinary process that the EHRC had declared unfit for purpose. Sir Keir Starmer has, however, not restored the whip to Mr Corbyn, from which he will be suspended for three months.

Lord Desai also said of this series of events: “It was a very peculiar decision to allow him back without any apology. He has been refused the party whip in the House of Commons for a few months, but that is a very lame response to a very big crisis,” adding: “I have been very uncomfortable and slightly ashamed that the party has been injected with this sort of racism. Jewish MPs were abused openly, and female members were trolled. It is out and out racism.”

Lord Desai’s resignation is the first over antisemitism under Sir Keir’s leadership, and is reminiscent of the MPs and peers who resigned from the Party over antisemitism when Mr Corbyn was Leader.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Lord Desai’s principled resignation from the Labour Party over antisemitism is the first such departure since Sir Keir Starmer became leader. It is a courageous decision reminiscent of those MPs and peers who quit the Party under Jeremy Corbyn in disgust. Lord Desai’s decision comes after Labour conned the Jewish community by suspending Mr Corbyn and then readmitting him under a specially-fast tracked hearing using a disciplinary process that the EHRC had ruled was unfit for purpose. Lord Desai saw what the entire Jewish community saw: a déjà vu return to the revolving door approach to antisemitism instead of the just and fair due process that Sir Keir promised and the EHRC demanded.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently lodged a complaint against Mr Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

There has been a dramatic rise in the number of teenagers and children referred to the Government’s counter-terrorism programme over their alleged far-right links, according to Home Office figures.

682 children were referred over such alleged links in 2017-18, rising from 131 in 2014-15. Moreover, the 2017-18 figure includes 24 children under the age of ten. The data was obtained via a Freedom of Information request by Sky News.

Looking at the figures across all age ranges, it is believed that this is the first time since the data began to be recorded that there was an equal balance in cases linked to the far-right and those connected to Islamist radicalism.

There is concern that youth are being drawn to the far-right by content designed to appeal to a younger demographic, a development previously reported by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others.

Two youths have been sentenced over far-right terror charges in just the past few weeks, one of whom was an A-star student. Last year, another young person was jailed for life over a neo-Nazi terror plot.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to urge the Jewish community to remain vigilant and welcomes the seriousness with which the police are treating the danger posed by the far-right.

Image credit: Hope Not Hate

Users of social media have reacted to a visit by Sir Keir Starmer to a synagogue earlier this week with grotesque antisemitism.

The Labour leader was participating in a Jewish charity event in his constituency, and users of social media responding to pictures of the event accused him of “bending to the Jewish lobby”, being a “slave to Israel”, being financed by people opposed to “helping palestine [sic]”, accepting donations in return for “[promises] to support Zionism” and “doing his pay masters bidding [sic]”.

Others asked him (using inflammatory language) whether he called for similar kindness from the local Jewish community to be “extended to [those] being oppressed, tortured and murdered by the Zionist apartheid state of Israel”, while other racist accusations were made against the Jewish community using antisemitic tropes, including claiming that the Jews have “wealth”, “power” and “influence”, as well as references to the “Rothschilds” who “funded the majority of conflicts”.

Antisemitic online abuse targeting Sir Keir and the Jewish community has been commonplace in pro-Corbyn Facebook groups over the past year, as previously documented by Campaign Against Antisemitism. Labour has even asked Facebook in the past to remove such groups.

Meanwhile, Dame Margaret Hodge, a prominent Jewish Labour MP, has shared some of the reactions she has received to calling for action against antisemitism in the Party, including: “I hope she dies soon. Dumb bitch. Member of a rich and powerful Jewish dynasty. Mossad agent. Liar. Rat. Old c***. Snake. Nazi. Traitor. Zionist stooge. Evil personified. Cancer. Zionist hag. Pig. Infiltrator. Racist witch. Controlled and funded by Israel. Palestinian child murderer.”

“This abuse,” she stated, “is not normal. This is why zero tolerance matters. This is why people have to take responsibility for their actions.”

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Graffiti with the antisemitic phrase “Jewish Lies Matter” was discovered in at least two locations in Brighton this week, and subsequently removed by concerned residents.

Activist Fiona Sharpe, who lives in Brighton, said on Twitter: “The clearly political nature of this graffiti is very concerning. It was sprayed on a wall just down the road from one synagogue and within five minutes’ walk from two others.”

Sussex Police is investigating the racist vandalism, with a spokesperson reportedly saying: “I understand the distress and concern that this incident will cause, this matter is being dealt with as a hate crime and I want to offer reassurance and say that we take criminality of this nature very seriously. We are doing everything we can to progress this investigation. We continue to closely monitor Hate incidents, it remains a priority for us to identify and hold those responsible to account. I would ask the public to remain vigilant please report any incidents of hate crime to us without delay.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Sussex Friends of Israel

In response to our petition calling for the Government to bring forward its Online Harms Bill, we have received confirmation that there will be a debate in Parliament today on “regulation and prevention of online harms”.

The subject of the debate was determined not by the Government, however, but by the Backbench Business Committee.

Specifically, the debate is on a motion that proposes “that the House recognises the need to take urgent action to reduce and prevent online harms and urges the Government to bring forward the Online Harms Bill as soon as possible”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism launched a petition in August, in the aftermath of the Wiley episode, calling for new legislation urgently to introduce a requirement for technology companies to remove racist incitement within set timeframes, a duty of care for social networks with personal liability for executives, and tighter requirements to provide evidence to police under warrant.

The petition can be signed here: https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/333146/

More and more evidence is emerging that Labour’s disciplinary process remains a politicised shambles almost a month after the Equality and Human Rights Commission slammed it in a damning report and demanded that the Party introduce an independent system.

Item: Campaign Against Antisemitism submitted a complaint against Kate Linnegar, Labour’s Parliamentary candidate for North Swindon in the 2019 General Election, but was told by the Party that “this person is not a member of the Labour Party.” Given that Ms Linnegar still features prominently on the North Swindon Constituency Labour Party’s website, there appears to be some confusion as to whether she is a member or not.

Naturally, this raises questions about the coherence of the Party’s processes. But a couple of years ago, Labour Against Antisemitism alleged that Labour might be letting some subjects of antisemitism complaints off the hook by claiming that the Party could not find evidence that they were members of the Party and therefore could not take the complaints forward. The conclusion appears to be that either the Party’s membership system is still a shambles or its operation remains politicised.

Item: Gurinder Singh Josan, a member of Labour’s ruling National Executive Committee (NEC), was reported to have been on the panel that readmitted Jeremy Corbyn following his recent suspension, and that the panel’s decision was unanimous. However, Mr Josan has now cast doubt on the smoothness of the process and the matter of unanimity, complaining of the dissemination of “false information”. He has also stated that he has “written to the General Secretary informing him I shall forthwith not be volunteering to be part of any further disputes panels until concerns I have raised are fully addressed.” Further, he has called for the Party to “expedite an independent complaints process”. Evidently, the factionalism that dominated the complaints procedures during Mr Corbyn’s tenure as leader of the Party has not remotely disappeared.

Indeed, a snap poll by YouGov has showed that, while half of Britons agreed that Sir Keir Starmer was right not to restore the whip to Mr Corbyn (with only a fifth disagreeing), Labour voters were split 38% in favour to 32% opposed. The Labour Party is as divided as ever on whether and how to address antisemitism.

Item: Although Sir Keir’s election seemed to herald an end to the factionalism and politicisation that has prevailed in Labour for the past several years in relation to antisemitism, there are now reports that Mr Corbyn’s non-apology, his expedited NEC hearing and readmission to the Labour Party were part of a deal cooked up between Sir Keir’s office and far-left union allies of Mr Corbyn. It has even been suggested that Sir Keir was prepared to restore the whip to Mr Corbyn and only balked under pressure from some of his MPs.

At best, Mr Corbyn’s suspension and rapid readmission is a shambles that demonstrates that incompetence, factionalism and politicisation remain the hallmarks of Labour’s disciplinary process, even a month after the EHRC called for an independent process, over half a year since Sir Keir became leader, and almost a year since he promised to introduce an independent process. At worst, with this series of inconclusive developments, Sir Keir has tried to con the Jewish community.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has submitted two major complaints against Mr Corbyn and further complaints against other sitting Labour MPs, which must be investigated by the Party under an independent disciplinary process.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has reacted to Sir Keir Starmer’s statement that he is withholding the whip from Jeremy Corbyn, who was yesterday readmitted to the Labour Party by the same processes that the Equality and Human Rights Commission had declared unfit for purpose.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We have been conned. We did not go to the lengths of asking the EHRC to investigate the Labour Party only to return to the days of opaque, arbitrary decisions by panels that are unfit for purpose.

“Withholding the whip from Jeremy Corbyn is offering the Jewish community crumbs. The EHRC ruled that Labour’s disciplinary processes were unfit but Sir Keir allowed Mr Corbyn to be tried under them. Not only that, but Mr Corbyn should never have been suspended merely for his response to the EHRC’s damning report, but for the responsibility he bears for the Labour Party being found guilty of committing unlawful acts of antisemitism by the EHRC.

“Sir Keir needs to get a grip of his Party and ensure that Mr Corbyn is held to account for what he did to Britain’s Jews. Who is in charge of the Labour Party? Today, we have submitted a second complaint against Mr Corbyn, calling for him to be held to account not by a sham panel but by an independent disciplinary process, as required by the EHRC. Sir Keir must suspend him pending that process, and, if our complaint is upheld, Mr Corbyn must be expelled.”

Earlier today, Campaign Against Antisemitism lodged a further complaint against Mr Corbyn, alleging that he bears personal responsibility for the Party’s institutional antisemitism and must be held to account. We previously submitted a complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs which the Labour Party has yet to acknowledge, let alone investigate, and now we have submitted a further complaint against Mr Corbyn.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Today, Campaign Against Antisemitism has filed a further complaint against the former Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn, over his personal responsibility for the Party being found guilty of unlawful acts of antisemitism, for which he must be held to account.

Mr Corbyn was suspended over remarks he made in reaction to the damning report issued by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC), but less than three weeks later he was yesterday readmitted to the Party by the same processes that the EHRC had declared unfit for purpose. Alarmingly, the decision was made by a panel of Labour’s National Executive Committee, its ruling body, on which allies of Sir Keir Starmer have a majority.

We previously submitted a complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs which the Labour Party has yet to acknowledge, let alone investigate, and today’s complaint against Mr Corbyn is additional to that earlier complaint.

In the letter, which had extensive input from expert legal counsel, Chief Executive Gideon Falter and Head of Political and Government Investigations Joe Glasman wrote: “Given the seriousness of the conduct complained of, Campaign Against Antisemitism requests that Mr Corbyn be suspended pending the outcome of an investigation of the complaint under the independent disciplinary and complaints machinery that the EHRC requires must be established. That process is likely to require independent determination of when conduct is ‘prejudicial, or…grossly detrimental to the Party.’ Campaign Against Antisemitism requests that in the event the complaint is upheld, the appropriate sanction should be expulsion from the Labour Party.”

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We have been conned. We did not go to the lengths of asking the EHRC to investigate the Labour Party only to return to the days of opaque, arbitrary decisions by panels that are unfit for purpose.

“Withholding the whip from Jeremy Corbyn is offering the Jewish community crumbs. The EHRC ruled that Labour’s disciplinary processes were unfit but Sir Keir allowed Mr Corbyn to be tried under them. Not only that, but Mr Corbyn should never have been suspended merely for his response to the EHRC’s damning report, but for the responsibility he bears for the Labour Party being found guilty of committing unlawful acts of antisemitism by the EHRC.

“Sir Keir needs to get a grip of his Party and ensure that Mr Corbyn is held to account for what he did to Britain’s Jews. Who is in charge of the Labour Party? Today, we have submitted a second complaint against Mr Corbyn, calling for him to be held to account not by a sham panel but by an independent disciplinary process, as required by the EHRC. Sir Keir must suspend him pending that process, and, if our complaint is upheld, Mr Corbyn must be expelled.”

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

In a shambolic development, Jeremy Corbyn has been readmitted to the Labour Party following a decision by a panel of Labour’s ruling National Executive Committee (NEC).

Labour’s former leader was recently suspended from the Party after making inflammatory remarks about the report into Labour antisemitism by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) and the submission of a complaint against him, cataloguing his long history of antisemitism, by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Earlier today, Mr Corbyn issued a statement trying to clarify his recent remarks about the EHRC, doubtless in anticipation of this hearing by the NEC panel.

That panel, a majority of which, reportedly, were pro-Corbyn activists, has now lifted Mr Corbyn’s suspension and readmitted him to the Party. The panel was selected by the NEC, on which allies of Sir Keir Starmer have a majority.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The shambolic suspension and readmission of Jeremy Corbyn appears to have been nothing more than a media stunt to blunt the blow of the EHRC’s report last month, which forensically analysed the hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument we submitted as complainant. That report condemned Mr Corbyn and his allies for presiding over the institutionalisation of antisemitism in the Labour Party.

“By readmitting Mr Corbyn, the Labour Party has once again excused antisemitism and proved itself unwilling to address it. Mr Corbyn’s suspension should have remained in place until all of our complaints against him were investigated, but no investigation has been undertaken. Once again, we see the impact of Labour’s failure to implement an independent disciplinary process as demanded by the EHRC and Sir Keir Starmer’s leadership pledges that have now gone unfulfilled for almost a year.

“The Jewish community has been conned. Mr Corbyn must be resuspended immediately pending investigation of our complaint against him under the new independent process mandated by the EHRC. Britain is watching.”

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Jeremy Corbyn, Labour’s former leader who was recently suspended from the Party, has issued a statement “clarifying” his inflammatory remarks about the report into Labour antisemitism by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC). However, he has not addressed his own long history of antisemitism, which was recorded in a complaint made by Campaign Against Antisemitism shortly before he was suspended.

Mr Corbyn was suspended two weeks ago after Campaign Against Antisemitism submitted a detailed disciplinary complaint against him and other sitting MPs, and just hours after the publication of the EHRC’s report after he appeared to downplay the extent of antisemitism in the Party. At the time, he said: “One antisemite is one too many, but the scale of the problem was also dramatically overstated for political reasons by our opponents inside and outside the party, as well as by much of the media. That combination hurt Jewish people and must never be repeated.” This was not the first time that Mr Corbyn (or his allies) had tried to undermine confidence in the EHRC’s report.

Now, Mr Corbyn has issued a new statement, in which he said: “We must never tolerate antisemitism or belittle concerns about it. And that was not my intention in anything I said this week. I regret the pain this issue has caused the Jewish community and would wish to do nothing that would exacerbate or prolong it. To be clear, concerns about antisemitism are neither ‘exaggerated’ nor ‘overstated’. The point I wished to make was that the vast majority of Labour Party members were and remain committed anti-racists deeply opposed to antisemitism. I fully support Keir Starmer’s decision to accept all the EHRC recommendations in full and, in accordance with my own lifelong convictions, will do what I can to help the Party move on, united against antisemitism which has been responsible for so many of history’s greatest crimes against humanity.”

He went on to thank “the many thousands of Labour party members, trade unionists, and supporters in Britain and around the world, who have offered their solidarity.” Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring the solidarity that Mr Corbyn has received, and there are reports now of optimism on Labour’s far-left that Mr Corbyn will be reinstated.

However, in his statement, Mr Corbyn only referred to his remarks about the EHRC, which represented only one of some eighteen incidents of antisemitic discourse in which Mr Corbyn has been involved. The Labour Party must undertake a full investigation of all of these incidents before Mr Corbyn’s suspension can possibly be lifted.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Mr Corbyn’s statement today seeks to recast his comments gaslighting the Jewish community when the EHRC’s report into Labour antisemitism was released. This is a desperate attempt to have his suspension lifted and reveals that he still believes that suspensions are something that happen on the whim of the Leader as it did during his tenure, and not as a result of any due process. If the Labour Party wants to build on the positive step of suspending Mr Corbyn, it must investigate the entirety of our complaint against him under the independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has mandated, and do so within six months. Reinstating Mr Corbyn now would only show that Labour is not serious about tackling antisemitism, or is incapable of doing so.”

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The suspension of Jeremy Corbyn following the publication of the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s report into Labour antisemitism and the submission of a complaint against Mr Corbyn and other MPs by Campaign Against Antisemitism appears to have spurred a confrontation within the Party between several Constituency Labour Parties (CLPs) and the Labour Party headquarters.

Among the CLPs to express support for or solidarity with Mr Corbyn are BatterseaBristol North WestBristol WestBlyth ValleyCamarthen East and DinefwrCardiff NorthCarlisleHastings and RyeIslington North (Mr Corbyn’s CLP), Leeds EastLiverpool WaltonNewton AbbottPendlePutney, and South Thanet.

Various other local branches of the Party have also passed motions of solidarity or expressed support for the suspended former leader.

The motions and expressions of support came only a few days after the Party’s General-Secretary, David Evans, warned CLPs not to discuss disciplinary cases. A few months ago he also warned them to avoid discussion of sensitive issues relating to antisemitism.

Apparently as a result of these motions and other inflammatory tweets, the Chair and co-Secretary of Bristol West and other members of that CLP have been suspended from Labour.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

It has been reported that a co-founder of a neo-Nazi terrorist group has set up an online business selling inflammatory t-shirts.

Ben Raymond co-founded National Action as a student with Alex Davies in 2013 but, according to The Independent, distanced himself from the group after it was proscribed by the British Government following repeated calls by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others. He has never been prosecuted for his involvement, while others have been convicted and imprisoned. It is believed that he went on to produce designs for other splinter groups since the ban on National Action, for which he also worked on designs.

It is understood that Mr Raymond operates an online shop specialising in t-shirts and posters with neo-Nazi designs, including swastikas, swords, guns and other Nazi symbols and occult Nazi tropes. The online retailer is called Blackguard.

Apparently, when asked if Blackguard’s Twitter account was operated by Mr Raymond, he replied “yes” from his personal handle. Mr Raymond apparently did not respond to requests for comment from The Independent.

According to one academic specialist, the website is “smuggling symbols and images through in a way that you might get away with…It’s striking but it’s not necessarily immediately obvious what you’re looking at,” unless you are a white supremacist familiar with the motifs.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

A man has been arrested and charged with racially aggravated assault and assaulting a police officer after he yelled antisemitic abuse at a Jewish victim and then attacked a local neighbourhood patrol volunteer and a policeman.

The suspect is alleged to have shouted “F*** Jews, you vote for Trump, go to Hitler – he should kill you!”

A volunteer with Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol, then intervened, as did a police officer, and they were both allegedly set upon by the suspect.

The attack took place on Craven Park Road in Stamford Hill on 13th November.

The suspect has been remanded in custody and will appear at Highbury Magistrates Court today. Shomrim volunteers are supporting the victim.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD2818 13/11/2020.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “This sort of antisemitic abuse is far too common, particularly in Stamford Hill, and this is also hardly the first time that violence has been involved. We applaud Shomrim and the police for their persistent vigilance and wish full recoveries to all of the victims. The suspect, if convicted, must face the full force of the law, otherwise these attacks will only get worse.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Shomrim

Yet another figure at Islamic Relief Worldwide has resigned over alleged antisemitism in the third such incident in just six months.

It has now emerged that Tayeb Abdoun, a former interim-CEO at the charity who has worked there for 25 years, resigned on 14th October after being confronted over a picture he reportedly posted on Facebook of a knife with a thumbs up and wrote: “Lay the bodies of the Jews on the top of the mountains, so that no dog in Palestine must suffer hunger.” Other controversial posts were also uncovered, and Mr Abdoun resigned after the Swiss newspaper Tages-Anzeiger confronted him.

In a statement, Islamic Relief Worldwide reportedly said: “We continue to work as an organisation to root out anyone that does not meet our core values as a respectful, faith-sensitive, non-discriminatory and principled charity.”

Back in August, the entire board of Islamic Relief Worldwide resigned after a new trustee-director was discovered to have a history of antisemitic posts on social media. He had been appointed to replace another trustee who had previously resigned after his history of antisemitic social media posts was uncovered.

This is therefore the third such incident to rock Britain’s largest Muslim charity in just six months, making our representations to the Charity Commission all the more urgent.

Following the second incident, Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to the Charity Commission. In our letter to the Charity Commission, we wrote: “The episode has shown that IRW’s processes are defective. Given the size of the charity and the severity of the breach, we are writing to invite you to open a statutory investigation into how IRW has been operating and whether the racist views and negligence of some of its trustees have impacted its activities. We believe that the Commission must intervene to chart a new course for IRW, rebuild the public’s trust in its work. This matter has caused considerable concern amongst members of the Jewish community who have sought our support and it is important that the Commission is seen by them to be investigating this matter thoroughly and taking action where it is needed.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “This third incident of alleged antisemitism at Islamic World Relief in just six months, which follows the resignation of the entire trustee board, reinforces the impression that Islamic Relief Worldwide’s processes are defective and makes all the more urgent our call for a statutory investigation by the Charity Commission into how the charity has been operating and whether the racist views and negligence of several of its trustees have impacted its activities. The Commission must chart a new course for the organisation in order to rebuild the public’s trust in the charity’s work.”

It is understood that an independent commission will review the charity’s processes for vetting trustees and directors and its code of conduct, while the organisation’s leadership will receive antisemitism training. The commission will be chaired by the former Attorney-General, Dominic Grieve.

Tony Greenstein has been ordered by the High Court to pay £67,886 to Campaign Against Antisemitism after his attempt to sue us for calling him a “notorious antisemite” humiliatingly backfired.

Several days ago the High Court struck out Mr Greenstein’s libel claims against us, ruling that it was permissible for us to call him a “notorious antisemite” in articles on our website.

Mrs Justice Tipples denied Mr Greenstein leave to appeal, although Mr Greenstein is still able to petition the Court of Appeal directly.

Campaign Against Antisemitism was represented by Adam Speker QC, instructed by solicitors Keith Mathieson and Alex Wilson of RPC, and advised pro bono by solicitor Dr Mark Lewis who is an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Neo-Nazi graffiti was found in a park in Woodstock, including a swastika, the number 88 (denoting HH, for ‘Heil Hitler’) and other symbols.

The graffiti in the Oxfordshire park was reported to the police as criminal damage and a hate crime.

Town Councillor Sharone Parnes is understood to have urged the town council to issue a “strongly worded” notice expressing “disgust” at the graffiti and calling for the perpetrators to turn themselves in, but is appalled by the council’s apparent reticence to do so before further consultation.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has contacted the Mayor for comment.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Cllr Sharone Parnes

The controversial councillor, Jo Bird, is understood to be under investigation by the Labour Party for the third time in recent years after reportedly suggesting that antisemitism is being privileged over other forms of racism.

Last week, Cllr Bird reportedly told a meeting of the far-left faction ‘Don’t Leave, Organise’: “As a Jew, I worry about racism against Jewish people. I also worry about privileging the racism faced by Jewish communities in this country as more worthy of resources than other forms of discrimination such as against black people, Palestinians, Muslims and refugees. Abuses of power are measured in detentions, deportations and deaths. Privileging one group over another group is divisive. It’s bad for the many, as well as bad for the Jews.”

Cllr Bird represents the Bromborough Ward on Wirral Council and has a long history of controversy relating to Jews, including renaming ‘due process’ in the Labour Party as “Jew process”, for which she was suspended; supporting the expelled Labour activist and friend of Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, Marc Wadsworth, who was thrown out of the Party after a confrontation with Jewish then-MP Ruth Smeeth; and worrying about the “privileging of racism against Jews, over and above — as more worthy of resources than other forms of racism.”

Elected to Wirral Council in August 2018, Cllr Bird is a member of Jewish Voice for Labour, the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, and she has described Labour’s institutional antisemitism as based on mere “accusations, witch-huntery and allegations without evidence”. She recently failed in her bid for election to Labour’s ruling National Executive Committee.

Cllr Bird rejoined the Labour Party in 2015, when Jeremy Corbyn was running for the Party’s leadership, and last year she had previously been tipped to become a candidate to replace Dame Louise Ellman, a Jewish MP who quit Labour prior to the election due to antisemitism.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A swastika was found graffitied with red paint on a hall of residence popular with Jewish students at the University of Leeds.

The word “Nazi” was also painted beside the swastika on a wall in the Charles Morris Hall building.

The University confirmed that the graffiti, found over the weekend, has been removed.

A spokesperson for West Yorkshire Police reportedly said: “This is being treated as a hate crime and will be investigated accordingly. Officers are working with the university to identify suspects and anyone with information can contact police on 101, or by using the options on the West Yorkshire Police website. The crime reference is 13200552418.”

It is understood that the University suspects that this represented a “one-off indiscriminate act of vandalism by intruders” and that it was “unaware of any direct threats made to anyone living in the halls of residence”. Security patrols have apparently been increased at halls.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Concerns have been raised following the announcement that former Labour MP Ruth George has been selected as a candidate for the Party in upcoming local council elections, despite a complaint against her having recently been submitted by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

The complaint was submitted on the day that the report into Labour antisemitism by the Equality and Human Rights Commission was published, and details of the incidents relating to Ms George can be found here.

Despite the complaint being outstanding and Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer’s pledge to tear out antisemitism “by its roots” from the Party, Ms George has served as a County Councillor for Whaley Bridge and Blackbrook for the last nine months (she lost her seat in Parliament in the 2019 General Election) and has now been selected for as a candidate for the County Council election in May.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The continued service of Ruth George as a Labour councillor and now her selection as a candidate for the coming elections, while our complaint against her relating to antisemitism remains outstanding, is difficult to square with Sir Keir Starmer’s pledge to tear out antisemitism ‘by its roots’. That complaint, along with the other complaints we have submitted against sitting and former MPs and other officeholders, must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process and concluded within six months.”

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

An A-star student said to have fallen down “the rabbit hole of the internet” to become a neo-Nazi has been sentenced after pleading guilty to fourteen terror charges and two charges of possessing indecent images of children.

Harry Vaughan, who is eighteen, was given a two-year prison sentence suspended for two years. He was also ordered to attend a rehabilitation programme.

Mr Justice Sweeney, handing down the sentence at the Old Bailey, said: “You are a dangerous offender.”

Mr Vaughan is said to have begun taking an interest in Satanic neo-Nazism at the age of fourteen, unbeknownst to his parents, who were bewildered when he was arrested some years later.

He had “every advantage that could have been afforded to him,” according to his barrister, having been educated at a prestigious grammar school and received four A-star grades in summer exams.

In 2018, he applied to join the System Resistance Network, a white supremacist successor to National Action, which the Government proscribed as a terrorist organisation in 2016 following a long campaign by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others. He wrote at the time that “there is nothing I wouldn’t do to further the cause”.

He was arrested at home on 19th June last year in a counter-terrorism operation against a far-right online forum called Fascist Forge. His laptop was seized, revealing documents relating to antisemitism, Satanism and neo-Nazism, as well as as far-right terrorist book, bomb-making manuals and materials from the Sonnenkrieg Division, a neo-Nazi organisation that was proscribed by the Government this year.

Police also discovered videos of child abuse, leading to the charges of possession of indecent images of children.

The Head of the Metropolitan Police’s Counter Terrorism Command reportedly said that the case “illustrates it is possible for any young person to be susceptible to radicalisation,” adding: “Harry Vaughan is an intelligent young man who was predicted A-star grades and aspiring to study computing at university. Yet, online, he was an enthusiastic participant of right-wing terrorist forums.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Image credit: Metropolitan Police

The Welsh nationalist party, Plaid Cymru, has announced that it is holding a review into antisemitism in its Party.

The announcement follows the publication of the damning report into antisemitism in the Labour Party by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC). Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant in the EHRC’s investigation, having made the formal referral that prompted the launch of the unprecedented full statutory investigation. 

Plaid Cymru’s internal review will reportedly be led by Liz Saville Roberts MP, the leader of the Party’s small contingent at Westminster, and it aims to ensure that there is “zero tolerance” of antisemitism in the Party.

However, the announcement comes shortly after the Party showed that it has no intention of actually tackling antisemitism after deciding not to take action against repeat offender and prospective Welsh Assembly candidate Sahar Al-Faifi.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has details of other concerns relating to antisemitism in Plaid Cymru, and intends to submit representations to the review.

Plaid Cymru leader Adam Price reportedly told BBC Wales: “I think this is a watershed moment, and I think no part of society is immune from it. The Welsh Labour Party is not immune from it, Plaid Cymru is not immune from it…It’s absolutely certain that we are seeing a rising tide of antisemitism, it’s endemic.” He added: “I can’t involve myself for the very good reasons set out in the EHRC report in individual disciplinary cases, but it is my responsibility to ensure our culture, our structures, our processes, do actually fulfil a zero-tolerance approach to antisemitism and any other form of religious prejudice.” He also disclosed that Plaid Cymru election candidates are to undergo training on combating antisemitism.

Joe Glasman, Head of Political and Government Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We welcome Plaid Cymru’s announcement of a review into antisemitism in its ranks, in the wake of the EHRC’s damning report into anti-Jewish racism in the Labour Party, instigated after we referred Labour to the EHRC. Plaid Cymru has welcomed our offer of representations, including incidents involving Party members, and we shall make these submissions shortly.

“Plaid Cymru is making the right decision to try to get ahead of this problem, but it will have to show that it is serious. Its recent decision not to take action against repeat offender Sahar Al-Faifi certainly shows that it has work to do to win the confidence of anyone who opposes racism.”

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

After years of pressure from Campaign Against Antisemitism, the conspiracy theorist and antisemitic hate preacher David Icke has finally been banned from Twitter.

Twitter’s decision follows similar moves by YouTube and Facebook several months ago. Mr Icke had some 382,000 followers on Twitter.

These decisions by the leading social media companies to remove Mr Icke from their platforms come after years of promoting the antisemitic commentator, much of whose website traffic is directed from social media. Despite extensive dossiers having been provided to the tech giants by Campaign Against Antisemitism in the past detailing Mr Icke’s racist claims about Jews, it has taken this long to ban him – and in each case it was not even related to antisemitism.

Instead, Mr Icke’s YouTube channel and Facebook page – and now his Twitter handle – were removed because of his misinformation campaign regarding the COVID-19 pandemic (although as part of this campaign he has also claimed that Israel was using the COVID-19 crisis to “test its technology”).

Mr Icke uses social media, his books and his stage performances to incite hatred. His preaching is so absurd that since the 1990s he has been dismissed as a crank, but because he is dismissed, there has been no major opposition to him and he has built up a following of thousands upon thousands of disciples whom he has persuaded to adamantly believe that the world is in the grip of a conspiracy run by the “Rothschild Zionists”. His repertoire includes conspiracy myths and tropes classified as antisemitic according to the International Definition of Antisemitism. Campaign Against Antisemitism has successfully persuaded some venues to pull out of hosting his events. Last month, Ofcom sanctioned the television channel London Live for airing an interview with Mr Icke on COVID-19.

Campaign Against Antisemitism will continue to press social media companies and other outlets to bar Mr Icke and other antisemites from their forums.

A teenager from Rugby linked to neo-Nazi groups has been jailed for terror offences.

Paul Dunleavy, who is seventeen, was given a sentence of five years and six months in jail after being found guilty of preparing acts of terrorism at Birmingham Crown Court.

The judge ruled that Mr Dunleavy can be named, and reportedly described his terrorist efforts as “inept”, adding: “Your autism impacts on your maturity and understanding.”

Mr Dunleavy had pleaded not guilty, but it was alleged that he had joined the neo-Nazi Feuerkrieg Division group, which the Home Office plans to proscribe.

The court had been told that he had to pass a test to prove his hatred of Jews and that he had “graphic” video footage of a terrorist attack on his telephone and had searched the internet for information about guns, including how to convert a gun that fires blanks into a live weapon.

He had also apparently praised the terrorist who carried out the mass shooting last year in Christchurch, New Zealand, describing such perpetrators as “saints”.

Jurors had been told that he had adopted the “twisted ideology” of Nazis and white supremacists and had participated in far-right chat groups online, where he shared the information about firearms that he had learned.

In one of the messages, the defendant said that he was an administrator of a group called ‘League of Nationalists’, and also said: “Whatever happens I’m going to have a local unit. I’m working on the propaganda and the weapons. I need men.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Image credit: West Midlands Police