Today, during party conference season, Campaign Against Antisemitism releases its review of the state of Britain’s major political parties vis-a-vis antisemitism, with particular focus on relevant developments over the past twelve months.

This review of the parties (ordered alphabetically) supplements our ongoing Antisemitism in Political Parties monitoring project, which documents specific cases of antisemitic conduct and how the parties have addressed them.

These findings are based not only on publicly available information but also on our own investigations and dealings with the parties (where those dealings have not been on a confidential basis), except in the case of the Labour Party, which is the only party that refuses to engage with us.

Conservative and Unionist Party

There have been a number of cases over the past year where the Conservatives have sought to kick allegations of antisemitism into the long grass, promising investigations and then conducting them in secret, if at all, over long periods, seemingly in the hope that the problem is forgotten and enabling the Party to issue a mere slap on the wrist to the parliamentarians or councillors in question. We at Campaign Against Antisemitism do not forget, however, and we continue to call out the Conservatives over these failures.

Beyond the disciplinary processes themselves, concerns have been raised over the past year in relation to the use of certain tropes about ‘elites’ which, while not inherently antisemitic, have been used to stoke anti-Jewish sentiment within far-right circles in Britain, Europe and the United States. We continue to urge Conservative politicians to employ responsible language and make the context of their views clear to listeners, so that their remarks cannot be construed or misunderstood as endorsements of far-right positions.

At times, there can also be a mismatch between the national Party and local branches, with, for example, ministers repeatedly calling for local authorities to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism but Conservative-led local councils falling behind in doing so.

Shortcomings notwithstanding, the Conservatives – both in their capacity as the party of Government and among backbenchers in Parliament – have been at the forefront of the fight against antisemitism in Britain and abroad, including being the first national government in the world to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism and threatening the funding of local authorities and universities that do not adopt it, as well as proscribing the neo-Nazi terrorist group National Action and the antisemitic genocidal terrorist organisation Hizballah, both following urging by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others.

We continue to work with the Government to advance the security of the Jewish community and to call out shortcomings in the Conservative Party.

Green Party of England and Wales and Scottish Greens

The Green Party is the only major political party in England and Wales not to have adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism, and its sister branch in Scotland, the Scottish Greens, is likewise the only political party not to have done so north of the border. While the Green Party’s outgoing leaders have supported its adoption, both in private conservations with Campaign Against Antisemitism and in their capacity as local councillors in London (where both their councils have adopted the Definition), the membership as a whole has failed to endorse the measure at a Party conference, as is required under Party rules.

While we continue to hold discussions with the Party’s leadership, its disciplinary structures are amateurish and utterly deficient. It has minimal professional infrastructure and, unlike in other major parties, its members retain considerable control over policy. Its constitution has failed to keep up with the Party’s electoral rise. One symptom is the failure to adopt the Definition; another is the Party’s woeful disciplinary process, which we have experienced firsthand. We have submitted numerous complaints to the Party over officeholders and candidates, only to find that the complaints are ignored for long periods of time and then adjudicated against arbitrary standards or dismissed for novel constitutional reasons. The effect is that the Party has failed to take any real action against prominent members who have expressed antisemitic sentiments, including the Party’s recent Equalities and Diversity Coordinator who now holds the International Coordinator portfolio. Finding redress for racism against Jews in the Green Party is thus extremely difficult, and all the more worrying as the Party is also particularly vulnerable as a possible destination for far-left Labour members expelled over antisemitism.

These shortcomings do not go unnoticed by the Jewish community. Our Antisemitism Barometer survey of British Jews late last year found that the Greens were second only to Labour in how many respondents felt that the Party was too tolerant of antisemitism (43%).

The Greens are currently holding a leadership election, with candidates taking different positions on whether and how to fight antisemitism in the Party. We continue to monitor this primary with interest, but we are mindful that unless the Party’s internal procedures change, it may have a problem ever winning the trust of the Jewish community.

In Scotland, the Scottish Greens hold more expressly virulent positions which we have publicised. In 2015, the Party adopted a motion, which has never been rescinded, condemning “Israel’s claim to be ‘the Jewish State’” and “Zionism as a racist ideology.” According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour)” is an example of antisemitism.

The motion also committed the Party to opposing “Aliyah” (Jewish immigration to Israel, including by British Jews) and Israel’s Law of Return, the Jewish state’s answer to centuries of persecution of diaspora Jewry. The motion further called for the removal of Hamas, an antisemitic genocidal terrorist organisation, from its designation by the British Government as a terrorist organisation, and supported the BDS movement — the campaign to boycott the Jewish state — the tactics of which an overwhelming majority of British Jews find intimidating.

The debate on this motion was held on a Saturday, when observant Jews would be unable to participate, and it passed easily. It became Party policy and remains so even as the Scottish Greens recently joined the Scottish devolved Government for the first time. Indeed, it is the first time that a Green Party has joined any Government in the United Kingdom. We remain deeply concerned about these policies of the Scottish Greens and call for the Party to rescind them immediately in order to reassure the Jewish community of its good faith.

Labour Party

The Labour Party is the only political party to have been found to be institutionally racist against Jewish people by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC), following a statutory investigation in which we were the complainant. It is thus in a category of its own when it comes to assessing its record on racism against Jews over the past year.

The Parliamentary Labour Party and Shadow Cabinet comprise politicians who either actively supported an antisemitic leader — and Sir Keir Starmer himself is on record as having given his “100% backing” to Jeremy Corbyn — and those who did nothing as their principled and courageous colleagues quit the Party or, in the case of several Jewish MPs, were hounded out of it. Winning back the trust of the Jewish community — which, historically, has been very supportive of the Party that recently betrayed it — was always therefore going to take real and compelling action.

There have been examples of such action over the past year, including Mr Corbyn’s ongoing suspension from the Parliamentary Labour Party (even as his suspension from the Labour Party was disgracefully short-lived and he is now eligible to attend the Party’s annual conference); proclamations by Labour’s General-Secretary to Constituency Labour Parties to avoid discussing antisemitism; the proscription of the antisemitism-denial group Labour Against the Witchhunt and the disgraced former Labour MP Chris Williamson’s so-called “Resist” faction, with all of their members threatened with automatic expulsion from the Party; the expulsion of Ken Loach; the ruling National Executive Committee’s (NEC) resolution to introduce (subject to approval at Labour’s annual conference) a semi-independent disciplinary process; and, at the local level, the good record of Labour-controlled local authorities of adopting the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Nevertheless, positive steps have been slow, incremental and at times undermined by contradictory maneuvers. For example, Mr Corbyn’s suspension from the Labour Party was inexplicably lifted using precisely the disciplinary process that the EHRC had just ruled was unfit for purpose; numerous MPs and officeholders have not been sanctioned for sharing platforms with members suspended or expelled over antisemitism, despite Sir Keir’s leadership election pledge to do so; and disciplinary actions in other high-profile cases have been reversed, the disciplinary process remains a mess and, when first published, Labour’s proposed complaints handbook was a joke. Furthermore, the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, Jewish Voice for Labour, has not yet been proscribed. Neither, for that matter has the pro-Corbyn Momentum faction, whose co-Chair denied that a Jewish MP was hounded out of the Party, while Young Labour’s controversies are ignored and the Palestine Solidarity Campaign, which a past investigation by Campaign Against Antisemitism found was riddled with bigotry, has been positively welcomed by the Party.

Moreover, the goodwill and trust between Labour and the Jewish community that did build up in the months since Sir Keir won the leadership of the Party was wasted during the conflict between Hamas and Israel, when Labour MPs and councillors, though not alone, were too often involved in stoking communal division, ignoring displays of antisemitism at rallies and on some occasions even joining in with them.

We have also lodged a complaint against Mr Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if our complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day of the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs, including Deputy Leader Angela Rayner. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and indeed there have been reports that our complaint against Ms Rayner has been dismissed without so much as an acknowledgement (contrary to the Party’s new complaints handling policy), let alone an investigation.

Not only have our complaints not been acknowledged almost one year since they were submitted, but Sir Keir has also repeatedly refused to engage with us, despite our being the complainant in the EHRC’s investigation into antisemitism in his Party. Indeed, Labour is the only major political party that has not been willing to work with us when approached.

All of this has been noted by the Jewish community. Our latest Antisemitism Barometer, published at the start of the year (with polling conducted after Mr Corbyn’s suspension and well before the conflict between Hamas and Israel), showed that British Jews feel that the Labour Party is more than twice as tolerant of antisemitism than any other political party. Remarkably, compared to the previous year’s figures (polled while Mr Corbyn was still leader of the Party), Labour performed worse, with 88 percent of respondents considering that the Party was too tolerant of antisemitism under Sir Keir compared with 86 percent the year before under Mr Corbyn, perhaps due to disappointment caused by the evaporation of Sir Keir’s bold promises. At times, this sentiment has spilled into the open.

The Party now faces its next test at its annual conference. The contours of the Party’s internal struggle are clear, with Jewish Voice for Labour due to hold a fringe event; Labour Against the Witchhunt to hold parallel events; Welsh First Minister Mark Drakeford scheduled to speak at a concurrent conference alongside Mr Corbyn and Mr Loach; pro-Corbyn members intending to push a motion to restore the whip to the former leader; and attendees due to be asked to approve mandatory changes to the Party’s disciplinary committee that almost one third of the Party’s ruling National Executive Committee nevertheless still thought fit to oppose.

Even if the leadership succeeds in redirecting the Party and recasting its rules, in the background is Labour’s vast membership, over two thirds of which believe that the problem of antisemitism in the Party has been “exaggerated” or that there is not a serious problem (findings similar to those in a poll conducted shortly after the 2019 General Election), and the Parliamentary Labour Party, too much of which remains populated by Mr Corbyn’s allies and acolytes, who hold similar views to him in relation to the Jewish community. The real challenge — to which our complaints speak — will be applying the new direction and rules to those in the Labour Party who supported or enabled the unlawful victimisation of Jewish people.

We continue to encourage the Labour Party in its positive steps and fulfilment of the Action Plan agreed with the EHRC, but we will also continue to pressure the Party on its failures and inconsistencies, and ultimately expect to see our complaints investigated and upheld so that the Jewish community gets justice.

Liberal Democrats

Whether as a result of their reduced size, lack of media interest or a genuine willingness to tackle antisemitism when it arises — and there is evidence of the latter — the Liberal Democrats appear to have performed rather well over the past year in relation to antisemitism in Britain. The Party has improved markedly since the days of David Ward and Jenny Tonge (who mercifully retired from the House of Lords, where she sat as an independent, earlier this year).

The Party has generally moved quickly to investigate allegations when they have arisen, and even dropped a prospective London mayoral candidate after her past comments emerged — although as the Party’s own leader admitted, questions remain about how she was permitted to stand in the first place.

However, the Party still has something of a blind spot regarding antisemitism abroad. For example, in a debate earlier this year on antisemitism in Palestinian Authority textbooks, one of the Party’s veteran MPs appeared to imply that the issue does not really matter. Meanwhile, at its recent annual conference, the Party adopted a motion about the Middle East that made explicit reference to the Palestinian Authority’s and Hamas’s persecution of the “LGBT+ community and women” but, disappointingly, made no mention of their antisemitism. This was particularly concerning given the surge in antisemitism in Britain during the conflict between Hamas — which is an antisemitic genocidal terrorist group — and Israel earlier this year. The Party did condemn that antisemitism at the time.

We look forward to continuing to work with the Liberal Democrats over the coming year, both to build upon their improvements in dealing with domestic antisemitism and to engage them on the issue of anti-Jewish racism abroad.

Plaid Cymru

Plaid Cymru, the Welsh nationalist party, made a great deal of its internal review into antisemitism, to which we made submissions. The review came following the devastating report into antisemitism in the Labour Party by the EHRC. However, for all the Plaid Cymru report’s worthy conclusions — including that the Party should update its definition of antisemitism to conform precisely to the International Definition of Antisemitism — the Party has taken no real steps at all to deal with its rather public antisemitism problem.

The report made recommendations to improve the Party’s disciplinary process, but these have yet to be implemented. Moreover, the Party showed no willingness to prevent a candidate from standing for election despite her disgraceful record. The Party has also repeatedly failed to update us on the states of complaints that we have submitted. The report and its recommendations are only as useful as the Party’s willingness to tackle the problem of anti-Jewish racism, and the Party’s actions in the months since the review was announced and published give cause for concern.

There is a conflict within the Party as to whether and how to tackle antisemitism. For example, former leader Leanne Wood appeared on Twitter to endorse the claim that antisemitism has been “exploited” to “smear” Jeremy Corbyn and to defend Rebecca Long-Bailey, who was sacked from Labour’s Shadow Cabinet after she promoted an article containing an antisemitic conspiracy theory. Meanwhile, another former leader of Plaid Cymru, Lord Wigley, asserted that “it’s absolutely clear that Plaid Cymru cannot tolerate antisemitism or any other form or racism.”

Late last year, our Antisemitism Barometer surveyed whether British Jews felt that any political parties were too tolerant of antisemitism. Plaid Cymru saw the largest increase compared to the previous year, with a rise from 9% to 23%. Although this year’s figure is still lower than that for other major parties, given Plaid Cymru’s limited geographical focus compared to national parties and its lesser media exposure, the Party should take no comfort from this statistic.

We continue to work with allies within Plaid Cymru to improve the Party’s position on racism against Jews.

Scottish National Party (SNP)

Numerous SNP politicians have been revealed over the past year to have irresponsibly compared their political opponents to Nazis, which we have repeatedly called out, usually leading to apologies. Another MP has also made regrettable comments about antisemitism in Palestinian Authority textbooks. Also this year, an SNP MP previously suspended from the Party over allegations of antisemitism and subsequently readmitted was selected to sit on the Party’s internal conduct committee (the MP has since left the Party for unrelated reasons).

The leader of the SNP and First Minister of Scotland, Nicola Sturgeon, recently sought to reassure the Jewish community that she “understood the community’s anxieties” and is “committed to tackling” antisemitism. It was therefore disappointing that she struck a deal with the Scottish Greens, despite their policies on certain sensitive issues for the Jewish community. Ms Sturgeon now finds herself under pressure over the arrangement.

However, there are also bright spots. The first local authority in Scotland to have adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism is the body controlled by the SNP, namely the Scottish Government. It is important, however, that Ms Sturgeon and the SNP — and indeed all parties — recognise that adoption of the Definition must be followed by its application in disciplinary cases, and that reassuring words must be accompanied by principled action against anti-Jewish racism.

We continue to monitor and cooperate with the SNP in tackling antisemitism in its ranks and within Scotland, where the SNP is the party of Government.

Summary

Joe Glasman, Head of Political Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “There is antisemitism in all political parties, be it expressed, enabled or ignored. But not all parties are equal offenders, with some improving over the years and others moving in the wrong direction. Others still try to tick boxes and say the right things but fail at times to take real action.

“Growing concerns about the Green Party notwithstanding, Labour remains the only major party with a problem of institutional racism, as confirmed by the EHRC following our referral. It is astonishing that, despite being the complainant in the EHRC’s investigation, the Labour Party is alone among national political parties in refusing to engage with us. Under its current leadership, Labour has taken welcome steps to tackle the Party’s racism, but progress has been slow and unsteady. This year’s annual conference could be make-or-break for the Party, with the Jewish community and all decent Britons watching to see what kind of party Labour wants to be.

“We will continue to monitor, expose and cooperate with all parties to educate on and stamp out antisemitism from our public life.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Jewish delegates have reportedly been warned that they may face heckling at this year’s Labour Party conference, which begins this weekend.

The reports are particularly concerning given what has transpired at recent Labour conferences, for example in 2017 the historicity of the Holocaust appeared to be up for debate, in 2018 a Jewish Labour MP needed police protection, and in 2019 antisemitic posters and pamphlets were displayed and distributed. There was no physical conference in 2020 due to the pandemic.

It is understood that veteran Jewish Labour MP Margaret Hodge has also been offered security advice by the Party, and additional protection has been offered to those who may need it.

Tension is building around a vote to approve a new semi-independent disciplinary process, which Labour’s ruling National Executive Committee recently endorsed (albeit with eight members voting against and eighteen in favour). The pro-Corbyn Momentum faction has apparently instructed its delegates to vote against the changes, even though they are legally mandatory as part of the Labour’s Action Plan agreed with the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC), which found the Party to be institutionally racist toward Jewish people following an investigation in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant.

There are also reports that some attendees have been distributing leaflets about the “exaggerated claims on antisemitism” at entrances to the Brighton Centre, where the conference is taking place. Sir Keir Starmer has previously said that those who deny the scope of antisemitism in the Labour Party are part of the problem, and Jeremy Corbyn was briefly suspended from the Party for making similar claims.

There are also more positive reports emerging from the conference, however, confirming the internal divisions in the Party membership which have grown increasingly evident in recent months. One example came this weekend when Labour’s General Secretary, David Evans, a close ally of Sir Keir, asked delegates why they joined the Labour Party, only to be heckled with chants of “Oh Jeremy Corbyn”. He was nevertheless confirmed to his role in a vote of 59 percent to 41 percent.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The only thing more outrageous than the prospect of Jewish delegates facing heckles and possibly requiring security at Labour’s annual conference is that there is not more outrage about it. If any other ethnic or religious minority faced such treatment by the membership of a major political party in Britain, the media and police would give it the utmost attention. It is a testament to how far we have sunk as a nation that we have become so de-sensitised to antisemitism in the Labour Party that this news barely registers.”

The Labour Party was found by the EHRC to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Eight members of the Labour Party’s ruling National Executive Committee (NEC) voted against rule changes mandated by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC).

Eighteen members of the NEC voted in favour of the semi-independent disciplinary process that Labour is required to implement under its Action Plan agreed with the EHRC, outweighing the eight who opposed the measure. It is not clear how the minority expected their Party to fulfil the EHRC’s legally-mandated conditions had the vote failed.

It is understood that the eight to vote against were Mish Rahman, Gemma Bolton and Nadia Jama, who represent Constituency Labour Parties (the Party’s grassroot local branches); Ian Murray of the Fire Brigades Union; Andi Fox of the TSSA union; Yasmine Dar, the pro-Corbyn former chair of Labour’s disputes panel who did not believe that the Party has a problem of institutional antisemitism even as her brother was suspended over antisemitism allegations; Mick Whelan of the ASLEF union; and Andy Kerr of the Communication Workers Union.

Meanwhile, a new poll by Yonder (formerly Populus) for Labour Uncut shows that just over a quarter (26%) of non-Labour voters would consider voting for the Party at the next election, but six in ten of this group (60%) said that they would be more likely to vote for the Labour Party if Jeremy Corbyn is expelled if he fails to apologise over antisemitism.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We have been calling for the expulsion of Jeremy Corbyn for a long time over his Party’s institutional antisemitism and his own. This poll shows that the public agrees with this stance, as ordinary decent people recognise that Labour cannot return to its anti-racist legacy while Jeremy Corbyn and his acolytes retain such influence.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has lodged a complaint against Mr Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day of the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

An alleged co-founder of the proscribed neo-Nazi National Action group has denied seven terror offences.

Ben Raymond, 32, appeared at Bristol Crown Court to enter a plea of not guilty against the charge of membership of a proscribed organisation contrary to Section 11 of the Terrorism Act.

National Action was banned in the UK in 2016 following pressure by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Mr Raymond also pleaded not guilty to six counts of possessing a document or record of use to a terrorist contrary to Section 58 of the Terrorism Act.

The material allegedly includes documents titled “Ethnic Cleaning Operations”, “2083 – European Declaration of Independence by Anders Breivik”, “Homemade Detonators by Ragnar Benson”, “TM 31-210 Improvised Munitions Handbook”, “Homemade Molotov Cocktail” and “Cluster Bomb”.

Mr Raymond’s trial is expected to begin on 1st November and last for three to four weeks, with the defendant released on conditional bail until then.

Last year, members of the proscribed National Action group were sentenced to prison, having engaged, amongst other activities, in far-right stickering and recruitment campaigns.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years.

The Liberal Democrats have passed a motion that makes explicit reference to the Palestinian Authority’s and Hamas’s persecution of the “LGBT+ community and women” but makes no mention of their antisemitism.

Motion “F39: Towards a Lasting Peace in Israel and Palestine”, which has been passed at the Liberal Democrats’ annual Party conference this week, condemns the Palestinian Authority, Hamas and Israel and pushes for “trade [to be] used as a tool for peace and shared prosperity”, among other resolutions.

However, although the motion calls on the British Government to “Apply pressure on the Palestinian Authority and Hamas, where appropriate, to halt persecution of or discrimination against marginalised groups, including the LGBT+ community and women, civil society organisations and democratic opposition,” the motion makes no mention of the rampant antisemitism in the territories controlled by the Palestinian Authority and Hamas. Anti-Jewish racism is sadly central to the ideologies, policies, educational materials and civil society activities of these entities.

Hamas in particular is an antisemitic genocidal terrorist organisation, and its recent conflict with Israel was a pretext for an outpouring of hate towards Jews in Britain and around the world. It is therefore extraordinary that, in light of Hamas’ very real impact in this country, the Liberal Democrats failed to call out its (and the Palestinian Authority’s) antisemitism.

Although the Party has condemned antisemitism in the UK – including Layla Moran MP, the Party’s Spokesperson for Foreign Affairs who moved the motion – nevertheless it is disappointing that this motion failed to mention the point, despite its gravity and indeed centrality to the motion’s subject matter.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A conspiracy theorist has admitted defacing seventeen bus stops in London with graffiti, including the words “Jews and gays are aliens”.

Nicholas Lalchan, 47, has admitted criminal damage, causing £100 worth of damage to each stop and to the windows of an accountancy firm. However, he denied any religious or racial motivation, in spite of what he wrote on the bus stops in heavily-Jewish neighbourhoods such as Finchley, Hendon and Edgware.

The prosecutor told jurors that the graffiti “encouraged people to make searches on the internet” which would lead them to “think badly” of Jewish people. He added that “they were seen by Jewish people and non-Jewish people who were distressed by what they saw and reported it to the police.”

A still image of the vandal was recognised by a community support officer and he was arrested at his home in Edmonton. A search of his home reportedly revealed leaflets, pens and a memory stick holding material referencing Jewish people and conspiracy theories.

When he was charged, Mr Lalchan allegedly said: “New world order. The fourth Reich. We will see.”

Mr Lalchan was charged with racially and religiously aggravated criminal damage and with possessing a marker pen with intent to cause criminal damage and stirring up racial hatred, and his trial continues at Aldersgate House in the City of London, a Nightingale court opened to speed up the backlog of cases caused by the pandemic.

The antisemitic former leader of the Labour PartyJeremy Corbyn, is scheduled to appear at an event with an actor who tweeted about Jewish toddlers having their “cute little horns filed off”.

Numerous past comments by Rob Delaney have surfaced in advance of his event on 4th October with Mr Corbyn, organised by the People’s Assembly to protest the Conservative Party’s annual conference.

Mr Delaney wrote in 2009: “When I think of adorable Jewish baby boys getting circumcised AND having their cute little horns filed off, I get so sad!”

In 2011, he tweeted: “Somebody probably has the phone number 1-800-JEW-FART.” Jews are often subjected to crude flatulence references to the gas chambers, where many of the six million victims of the Holocaust were murdered. 

In 2012, he joked about wishing to atone on Yom Kippur, the most solemn day in the Jewish calendar, “for the weeks I’ve wasted on chubby naked Jewish girls on bikes dot com”, and described a song by Van Halen as being “worse than 3 holocausts”.

Some social media users defended the tweets as satire, and Mr Delaney, a Catholic who reportedly attended a Jewish nursery school, has previously that he “wouldn’t even think of living somewhere that wasn’t swarming with Jews.”

Mr Corbyn has often been mocked for his denials of anti-Jewish racism despite his long record of appearing alongside extremely dubious figures, with the former Labour leader sometimes being dubbed the ‘unluckiest anti-racist’ for so often finding himself in the company of these people while insisting on his own blamelessness.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has lodged a complaint against Mr Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day of the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The co-Chair of the pro-Corbyn pressure group Momentumv is alleged to have previously claimed that the former Labour Party MP, Luciana Berger, was “disingenuous” about antisemitism in the Party.

In a message on Facebook, Gaya Sriskanthan responded to an interview in which Ms Berger revealed that six people had been convicted of antisemitic hate crimes against her, by saying that Ms Berger “disingenuously conflats the increase in antisemitism across the country (and Europe) with the Labour Party.”

She went on to insist that “Labour has nothing to do with the broader trend, which is in fact being driven by the rise of the far-right. The best reemdy for the far-right and the racism that comes along with it, is a strong united Left. Therefore the actions of the ‘Independent Group’ [which Ms Berger had helped to launch following her departure from Labour] actually further right-wing extremism.”

The comments allegedly appeared on the Labour International Left Alliance Facebook group in March 2019.

Ms Berger was hounded out of the Labour Party due to antisemitism. Her departure from the Party followed years of harassment abuse and death threats from far-left Party activists, particularly those who supported Jeremy Corbyn.

It is understood that a complaint has been submitted to the Labour in respect of Ms Sriskanthan’s remarks. She was elected co-Chair of Momentum last year.

A spokesman for the Labour Party said: “The Labour Party takes all complaints of antisemitism extremely seriously and they are fully investigated in line with our rules and procedures, and any appropriate disciplinary action is taken.”

Earlier this year, Mr Corbyn himself also asserted that “Luciana was not hounded out of the Party; she unfortunately decided to resign from the Party”, despite Ms Berger being one of a number of MPs who quit the Labour Party in protest at its institutional antisemitism.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Four men from Blackburn have been charged in connection with the alleged antisemitic abuse shouted from a ‘Free Palestine’ convoy in North London in May.

Participants in the convoy were caught on video allegedly shouting through a megaphone “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” as they drove through Jewish neighbourhoods waving the flag of the Palestinian Authority, during fighting between Hamas and Israel.

The incident took place a stone’s throw from a synagogue in West Hampstead and continued into St John’s Wood. The convoy had previously and provocatively passed through other Jewish neighbourhoods as well, including Hendon and Golders Green.

The abuse was condemned by the Prime Minister and Home Secretary.

In a statement, the Metropolitan Police Service admitted that they had failed so badly to monitor the convoy that it took hours to find the car in question, which was identified from photographs taken by a Jewish member of the public who had the presence of mind to capture images of the vehicles’ licence plates.

Later that day, the Met made four arrests, and today the police force has announced that it has charged Mohammed Iftikhar Hanif, 27; Jawaad Hussain, 24; Asif Ali, 25; and Adil Mota, 26, all from Blackburn, with using threatening, abusive or insulting words, or behaviour, with intent, likely to stir up racial hatred.

They were charged on 16th September and are due to appear at Westminster Magistrates’ Court on 6th October.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “This was an extremely distressing incident. Jewish families have told us that they were sent running in fear as a convoy of cars drove through London flying the flag of the Palestinian Authority and shouting ‘F*** the Jews…rape their daughters’. We are pleased that suspects have now been charged but the convoy should never have been allowed in the first place and there remain many other unsolved crimes committed against British Jews from that same period of fighting between Hamas and Israel. The perpetrators in these cases must be brought to justice.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to the Home Secretary calling on her to proscribe Hamas in full in the UK, and has urged all MPs to do the same.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The image on this article has been partially obscured due to legal restrictions on the reporting of active criminal cases.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has published a new teachers’ guide on antisemitism for non-denominational schools, to complement our existing guides designed for Church of England and Catholic Schools which have been endorsed by BBC Teach.

The new guide, Love Your Neighbour, is, like the other two guides, intended for use with an accompanying student-friendly PowerPoint presentation, which is also available on our website and through BBC Teach.

Our existing guides – Love Thy Neighbour, designed specifically for Church of England schools, and Love Your Neighbour, for Catholic schools – have also been updated to cover new cultural developments and manifestations of anti-Jewish racism, including with reference to the social media platform TikTok, Black Lives Matter and the antisemitic grime artist Wiley.

These guides, like so many of our projects, represent the hard work of our dedicated expert volunteers, who have poured their wealth of experience in education and teaching antisemitism to young people into these guides.

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We are extremely proud of our teachers’ guides, which, thanks to the efforts of our tireless volunteers, have enabled countless schoolchildren of all ages to learn about antisemitism from their own teachers. These guides provide teachers with accessible resources to teach a complex topic and satisfy important requirements of the national curriculum. Following the success of our guides in the Church of England and Catholic school systems, we are delighted to launch our non-denominational guide for wider use in schools across the country. We continue to pursue innovative ways to discharge our mandate to educate society, including our youth, about the dangers of antisemitism and what they can do to stand up against it.”

You can download the guides here or visit BBC Teach here

The candidates for the leadership of the Green Party have elaborated on their views on tackling antisemitism in the Party.

Jewish Greens, a Jewish faction within the Green Party of England and Wales, provided each of the five candidate teams (three pairs and two individuals) with a questionnaire to survey their views.

Candidates were asked whether they agree to the following pledges, and were also asked further questions for responses in prose.

  • Would you support the Guidance on Antisemitism being included in the Framework for Ethics and Conduct? (inclusion of the “Antisemitism: A Guidance” document is to be debated at the Party’s conference next month)
  • Would you commit to the principle of “nothing about us, without us” when talking publicly about issues relating to liberation groups?
  • Would you attend antisemitism training and support its role out across the Party?

The leadership ticket of current Deputy Leader Amelia Womack and Tamsin Omond agreed to all three pledges, as did the Carla Denyer and Adrian Ramsay partnership.

In their fuller responses, Ms Womack and Ms Omond said that “tackling both intentional and unintentional discrimination and prejudice is essential to building an accessible, inclusive, and representative movement” and observed that the Party’s leadership has a responsibility to use its influence to “tackle discrimination of all kinds, including antisemitism.”

They declared that “we will support efforts of members to introduce a definition of antisemitism in our members’ Code of Conduct to establish clear guidelines of what does and does not constitute antisemitism, so that we can begin to educate our members on how to spot antisemitic tropes, and how to avoid further propagating them themselves. This will also give the Disciplinary procedures within our party the confidence they need to ensure that those who perpetuate antisemitism, prejudice, and hate within our party are held accountable.”

They added that “We will also encourage the use of external specialist advice for complex and technical disciplinary cases, to ensure that nobody is denied the justice they deserve,” which is particularly welcome, in view of our experiences with the Green Party’s disciplinary processes.

Carla Denyer and Adrian Ramsay declared that “We have a particular priority in our first 100 days to support the Party’s liberation and policy groups to facilitate workshops and training (e.g. the Jewish Greens’ antisemitism training roadshow)” and that “We also believe that it is important that liberation groups are consulted on policy,” pointing to Ms Denyer’s having co-proposed a motion to this year’s Party conference that “would give liberation groups the right of reply on conference motions that affect their members.”

Former Deputy Leader Shahrar Ali (who is running alone) agreed to the second and third pledges but not the first, likely because the “Antisemitism: A Guidance” document includes the International Definition of Antisemitism, which he opposes. Mr Ali erroneously described the Definition in his response as “a bad definition of antisemitism [which] could disproportionately affect Palestinians, or their allies, as well as Jews – precisely because it would be counterproductive on its own terms and not help to tackle genuine antisemitism by conflating legitimate political criticism.” Mr Ali supports the adoption by the Green Party of the Jerusalem Declaration, which he describes as a “good definition” but which is actually a wrecking document intended to undermine the globally recognised Definition.

Mr Ali also singled out Campaign Against Antisemitism “which promotes adoption of the highly problematic IHRA [International Definition of Antisemitism].” We are indeed a leading and proud advocate of the internationally-recognised Definition, which enjoys consensus support in the British Jewish community and has been adopted by all major political parties except the Green Party.

Martin Hemingway and Tina Rothery, another leadership pair, declined to answer the first two questions, insisting that they required a more “nuanced” response, but agreed to the third. In their replies to further questions, they stated that “We think real antisemitism in the Party i.e. hatred or distrust of Jewish people is very rare. We are concerned about the potential for what might be called ‘definitional antisemitism’ to create differences where these are not real. For this reason we think it is important that the Party thinks carefully about how it is to define antisemitism.” They prefer the Jerusalem Declaration to the International Definition of Antisemitism but “ideally both would be available on the Party’s ‘Framework for Ethics & Conduct’, and we need to work together to ensure that this happens.”

The final candidate, Ashley Gunstock was, according to the Jewish Greens, advised by the Electoral Returning Officer “to refuse to answer yes/no questions”, therefore he did not respond to the pledges. In his replies to questions, however, he stated that “the Green Party should be condemning all antisemitic and racist groups and campaign for any such to be removed from social media,” although it is not clear what standard he would expect to be used to identify antisemitic discourse. Several of the other candidates also expressed concern over antisemitism and hate on social media.

The full responses of all the candidates to all of the questions can be accessed here.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has extensively documented alleged antisemitism among officers of the Green Party of England and Wales, including the Party’s former Equalities and Diversity Coordinator who now holds the International Coordinator portfolio, on which the Green Party has failed to act.

We continue to monitor the Green Party’s leadership contest and the candidates’ policies on antisemitism within the Party and wider society.

Recently, we revealed how certain policies of the Scottish Greens (the Green Party branch in Scotland) are cause for concern for the Jewish community, including the Party’s opposition to the International Definition of Antisemitism and other controversial items. Consequently, Scotland’s First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon, is under growing pressure over the SNP’s recent deal with the Scottish Greens.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Jeremy Corbyn’s controversial liaison to the Jewish community is under investigation by the Labour Party in connection with alleged antisemitism-denial.

Heather Mendick’s appointment to the role by Mr Corbyn in 2019 was criticised by Jewish groups due to her views, which included that antisemitism claims had been “weaponised” and opposition to Labour’s adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism. She also joined disgraced MP Chris Williamson on his “Democracy Roadshow” and expressed “solidarity” for Jenny Manson, a Chair of Jewish Voice For Labour (JVL), an antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation. Ms Mendick even signed a letter in The Guardian claiming that Mr Corbyn was a “formidable” opponent of antisemitism after Luciana Berger resigned from Labour over its institutional antisemitism.

Ms Mendick was a member of Momentum, the pro-Corbyn campaign group, and worked as a research consultant and Secretary of Hackney South Labour Party. Despite her unfitness, Mr Corbyn appointed her to the role, which reportedly involved working in his office one day a week.

She now faces scrutiny by the Labour Party over a litany of claims that she has made in relation to antisemitism, which have been set out in a letter to her. According to the letter, she is alleged to have described antisemitism allegations as a “smear” and a “false narrative”, among other outrageous claims.

The letter to Ms Mendick is part of a wider crackdown by the Labour Party on members who have affiliated to proscribed factions or expressed views that are either antisemitic or deny the Party’s institutional antisemitism problem. This crackdown has affected members of various factions, including JVL and Labour Against the Witchhunt, the latter of which has been proscribed.

JVL is reportedly planning a fringe event at Labour’s conference later this month called “Labour in Crisis – Tackling Racism in the Party”. Previous JVL fringe events have been forums of controversy. This latest planned event comes after numerous JVL members have found themselves threatened with expulsion from the Party.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

For the second time in two weeks, Campaign Against Antisemitism will be writing to an auction house over the selling of Nazi memorabilia.

Earlier this month, Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to Tennants auctioneers expressing dismay and outrage at the sale, which they have readily agreed not to replicate in future.

However, Easy Live Auction continues to sell an assortment of Nazi memorabilia that includes weapons, coins, medals, and clothing, which appears to amount to a staggering 172 lots.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “These items belong in a museum, not in the hands of sick collectors acquiring them from an auction house that stands to profit from these sales. We shall be writing to the auctioneers to inquire why they are offering for sale memorabilia and mementos from a genocide.”

Recently, a BBC Bargain Hunt expert apologised after it was revealed that Nazi memorabilia was due to be sold at his auction house.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

A trial date has been given for a man accused of creating the website “Radio Aryan” in order to upload antisemitic and racist podcasts.

James Allchurch, 49 from Pembrokeshire, appeared at Haverfordwest Magistrates’ Court last month where he denied all fifteen counts of distributing a sound recording stirring up racial hatred.

Mr Allchurch reportedly wore a mask, visor and sunglasses, and asked that people refer to him as “Sven Longshanks”. When asked why Mr Allchurch wished to be called Sven Longshanks, he allegedly replied: “This is my life’s work that is on trial and that’s the name that my work is published under.”

The court reportedly heard that Radio Aryan had been running since 2015 and that twelve of the charges related to material allegedly offensive to people from black or ethnic minority communities while three relate to podcasts accused of being antisemitic.

On Wednesday, Mr Allchurch appeared at Swansea Crown Court where he reportedly denied fifteen charges of distributing a sound recording stirring up racial hatred on or before 17th May, 2019, to on or before 18th March, 2021. He allegedly only spoke to say his name and “not guilty” in response to each of the charges that were read out.

The charges allege that Mr Allchurch distributed recordings that included the titles “Rivers Of Blood”, “Banned In The UK”, “The Leftist Supremacist Mindset”, and “The Usual Suspects”. The alleged offenses were said to have taken place in Gelli, a village in south Wales.

Judge Paul Thomas released the defendant on unconditional bail, stating: “Your trial will be on 27th June but there will be a further hearing either in March or April.”

A Labour Party councillor has been reported to the Party after video footage emerged that seemingly showed him partaking in the antisemitic “from the river to the sea” chant at an anti-arms rally in Liverpool.

Sam Gorst, Labour councillor for Liverpool’s Cressington ward, is believed to have been one of the protesters leading the crowd on Saturday. At one point, the crowd can be heard chanting “from the river to the sea, Palestine will be free”.

The chant, “from the river to the sea, Palestine will be free”, only makes sense as a call for the destruction of the world’s only Jewish state – and its replacement with a State of Palestine – and is thus an attempt to deny Jews, uniquely, the right to self-determination, which is a breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Labour Against Antisemitism said on Twitter that in light of Mr Gorst’s alleged behaviour at Saturday’s demonstration, as well as his reported membership in the now-proscribed Labour fringe groups, Labour Against the Witch-hunt (LAW) and Labour in Exile Network (LIEN), the group has reported the Labour councillor.

Mr Gorst released a statement on Twitter in response to the backlash of his supposed appearance at the rally which stated that his record “stands for itself” and that “bullies will always be bullies”. He added: “They will not break me with their nastiness especially when all I am doing is showing opposition to injustices of the world.”

Dame Louise Ellman, the former MP for Liverpool Riverside – who was allegedly branded a “disgrace” by Mr Gorst for quitting the Labour Party due to antisemitism – condemned Mr Gorst’s reported involvement and said: “I was appalled to see a Labour councillor singing Hamas chants about annihilating Israel. This brings the Labour Party into disrepute.”

It has also been reported that Mr Gorst was recently reinstated after being suspended from the Party for twelve months, though the reason is not publicly known. In 2019, Mr Gorst was cleared of antisemitism accusations, later claiming that he was the victim of a “smear campaign”.

Video footage also appeared to show the antisemitic former Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn marching at the front of the crowd, and it was reported that he spoke at the demonstration.

It is understood that other speakers included former Shadow Chancellor and Labour Party MP John McDonnell, who it is believed used the occasion to call again for the whip to be reinstated to Mr Corbyn it was removed from him last year, and Maxine Peake, the controversial activist-actress who promoted an antisemitic conspiracy theory last year.

In May, Mr McDonnell tweeted a photo of an antisemitic sign which was featured at a rally that he himself attended. Last year, Mc McDonnell was accused of sharing a platform with expelled Labour members at the Labour Representation Committee’s Annual General Meeting, namely Jackie Walker and Tony Greenstein, but he claimed that it was “ridiculous” to suggest that as it was an open meeting and that he could not control who spoke. He remains the Honorary President of the controversial group.

One of the main organisers of the Liverpool rally is believed to have been Audrey White, an activist who is being investigated for claims of antisemitism. At one point during the rally, Ms White reportedly said that “socialists in our Party, like me, like Chris Williamson” were being “witchhunted” as a result of the Party’s recent proscription of far-left groups.

We reported earlier this month that the Leader of Calderdale Council has refused to act against a fellow councillor who organised an anti-Israel rally where the same antisemitic chant was allegedly present, and in July, Hastings Council also reportedly refused to condemn the same antisemitic “from the river to the sea” chant.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Image credit: Twitter via the JC

A man has been charged after a series of antisemitic, hateful, and racist tweets were identified by Chelsea Football Club.

After an investigation by the Metropolitan Police, Nathan Blagg, 21, of Retford in Nottinghamshire has been charged with seven counts of sending by public communication network an offensive/indecent/obscene/menacing message/matter which violate the Malicious Communications Act.

The charges refer to seven tweets sent between 5th February, 2020 and 3rd February, 2021. Mr Blagg was reportedly arrested in February of this year and is due to appear before Westminster Magistrates’ Court on 8th October.

In April, Chelsea Football Club announced that it had banned an abusive online troll from its matches for ten years after he hounded a Jewish journalist who came forward and received support from Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

700 Muslims from around the world, led by the divisive British politician Salma Yaqoob, rapper Lowkey and leaders of the controversial CAGE activist group, have signed an open letter claiming that Prof. David Miller is being censored from criticising Israel.

The letter states that “as British Muslims” the supposed “orchestrated pile-on by pro-Israel groups, politicians and public figures against Professor David Miller is a tactic we recognise very well.”

Prof. Miller, a Professor of Political Sociology at the University of Bristol, is a conspiracy theorist with a history of controversy relating to Jewish students. In his latest outburst, which is under investigation, he asserted that “Zionism is racism”, declared his objective “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world” and accused the Bristol University Jewish Society of being part of a worldwide Zionist conspiracy, adding that it is “fundamental to Zionism to encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”. At the same online event, Prof. Miller also observed that the Jewish Society and the Union of Jewish Students are Zionist, thereby implying that Jewish students (and the wider Jewish community) inherently “encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”.

He also portrayed the International Definition of Antisemitism as an attack on free speech and accused the Israeli Government of engaging in an “all-out attack” on the global Left as part of an “attempt by the Israelis to impose their will all over the world”. In comments reminiscent of the darkest years of the United Nations, Prof. Miller insisted that “Zionism is racism” and asked how “we defeat the ideology of Zionism in practice”, “how is Zionism ended” and about the way “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world”.

The letter goes on delusionally to declare that Prof. Miller’s “work on Islamophobia is among the most highly respected in the world” and that “the campaign against Professor Miller is about censoring speech on Islamophobia and Israel. This campaign is carefully calibrated to muddy the waters between anti-Zionism (opposition to a dangerous, racist political ideology) and hatred of Jews. The attacks on Professor Miller are an example of how the IHRA Working [International] Definition of Antisemitism is being weaponised by supporters of Israel and by Islamophobes.”

The letter is a fine example of the ‘Livingstone Formulation’, by which allegations of antisemitism are dismissed as malevolent and baseless attempts to silence criticism of Israel. In its report on antisemitism in the Labour Party, the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) found that suggestions of this nature were part of the unlawful victimisation of Jewish people in the Party.

Moreover, according to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour)” is an example of antisemitism.

The letter ends by demanding that the University of Bristol releases a statement in support of Prof. Miller and meets with activist groups who back him. The letter comes in spite of (indeed because of) the united revulsion of the Jewish community towards Prof. Miller and the University’s failure to discipline him. The University insists that its investigation into Prof. Miller is ongoing.

The leading signatory of the letter is Ms Yaqoob, the former Respect Party leader and now member of the Labour Party who unsuccessfully ran for Mayor of the West Midlands this year. She has her own deeply troubling record in relation to the Jewish community. In a 2013 tweet that she has since deleted, Ms Yaqoob stated: “Iceland arrests 10 Rothschild bankers…wow”, and linked to an article making this false claim and featuring a prominent image of the banker and philanthropist Lord Jacob Rothschild. The article linked in turn to a longer piece on the “Political Vel Craft” website, which is known for disseminating extreme conspiracy theories.

Other signatories include staffers from the controversial groups Interpal, Muslim Engagement and Development (MEND) and CAGE, the latter two of which have previously been criticised for promoting problematic or extreme views, which they deny. They do not advocate violence.

Just last month, the Chief Executive of MEND was revealed to have compared Israel to Hitler in a Facebook post. According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

Another signatory is the rapper Kareem Dennis, known as Lowkey. Mr Dennis is a patron of the Palestine Solidarity Campaign (PSC). A month-long investigation by Campaign Against Antisemitism in 2017 exposed extensive antisemitic bigotry amongst PSC supporters on social media. Mr Dennis has previously described Israel as a “racist endeavour” in direct and deliberate contravention of the International Definition of Antisemitism, described Zionism as “antisemitic”, spoken of the “Zionist lobby” in the context of global capitalism, has reportedly backed the disgraced former Labour MP Chris Williamson and has repeatedly supported the antisemite Jeremy Corbyn.

A further signatory of the letter is Tariq Ali. It is not clear if it is the same Tariq Ali who has previously tried to link Israel to the killing of George Floyd and declared that some Israelis “have learnt nothing from what happened in to them in Europe. Nothing. They talk a lot about saying all those marching for Palestine are antisemites. This of course isn’t true, but I will tell you something, they don’t like hearing. Every time they bomb Gaza, every time they attack Jerusalem – that is what creates antisemitism. Stop the occupation, stop the bombing and casual antisemitism will soon disappear.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

It was reported that a man who is alleged to have verbally abused Jewish people attending a synagogue was arrested for a hate crime and possession of cocaine in East London.

The suspect is alleged to have subjected members of the Jewish community to a “torrent of racist abuse” which included “Kill you Jews, F**k Jews” and invoking Adolf Hitler’s name.

The alleged incident took place on Clapton Common and was reported on 10th September by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 4717 10/09.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Stamford Hill Shomrim

Concerns have been raised over ignorance surrounding the Holocaust amongst teachers in England, including those charged with educating schoolchildren on the subject.

Although researchers from University College London’s (UCL) Centre for Holocaust Education said that there have been improvements since a similar study was conducted in 2009, nevertheless there remain significant causes of concern.

The research found that most teachers did not know where or when the Holocaust began or what proportion of the German population in 1933 was Jewish. Less than half of the teachers surveyed knew what the response of the British Government was to hearing about the genocide of European Jewry, and about a fifth of those with recent experience of teaching about the Holocaust had received no formal specialist training.

The result, according to Dr Andy Pearce of UCL, is that pupils could be developing “skewed and fundamentally erroneous impressions of this period.” He added: “If one of the aims of teaching and learning about the Holocaust is to prevent the repetition of similar atrocities in the future, then we need to have secure knowledge and understanding of why this particular genocide happened. As a society, we should have no tolerance for misunderstandings, myths and mythologies about the Holocaust. That can be a breeding ground for conspiracy theories and for revisionism and for denial and distortion. There are real-world consequences for these misconceptions and misunderstandings.”

The study was based on focus groups and a survey of 1,077 teachers, 964 of whom had recently taught the Holocaust.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has published curricula dealing more broadly with the topic of antisemitism. The curricula can be accessed here.

Tennants has assured Campaign Against Antisemitism that they will not put Nazi items up for auction again in future, after we contacted the auction house in connection with an auction of Third Reich items last week.

In a message, Tennants auctioneers replied to us to say that “As a family business, our deep-rooted friendships with the Jewish community are our number one priority and I can confirm we are no longer handling or selling any such items.”

Tennants describes itself as “the UK’s largest family-owned fine art auctioneers, and a market leader with offices in North Yorkshire and London.”

The company was auctioning numerous Third Reich artefacts, including a tin of Third Reich machine gun magazines for £120-£180, a Third Reich SS Officer’s visor cap for £800-£900, a collection of Nazi medals for £100-£150, two Nazi Party badges for £100-£150, a “small quantity of German Third Reich related books” for £60-£80, various articles of Waffen-SS uniforms and a lot more.

Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to Tennants expressing dismay and outrage at the sale, which they have readily agreed not to replicate in future.

Recently, a BBC Bargain Hunt expert apologised after it was revealed that Nazi memorabilia was due to be sold at his auction house.

A man convicted of repeatedly punching a pregnant Jewish woman has been sectioned.

Keith Gowers, 59, appeared at Thames Magistrates’ Court on Friday where he admitted one count of assault by beating.

On 18th March, Mr Gowers followed Beilla Reis down Manor Road in Stamford Hill at approximately 18:30 before placing a black pillowcase over her head and punching her several times in the face and torso. Ms Reis, 20, was 27 weeks pregnant at the time. She had her glasses broken and suffered a cut lip and thumb. Mr Gowers then fled the scene, leaving behind the pillowcase, while Ms Reis was taken to hospital.

The attack was initially reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol, and Mr Gowers was arrested on 22nd March.

District Crown Prosecutor Varinder Hayre, from the north London Crown Prosecution Service, said: “This was an unprovoked and shocking attack on a woman who was six months pregnant at the time. It is fortunate that her unborn child suffered no serious harm. The victim had never encountered Keith Gowers before and was left incredibly shaken.

“The prosecution case included CCTV footage of the disturbing attack on the lone victim which clearly identified Gowers as the attacker. He also admitted to being the person caught on camera. The CPS takes crimes against women extremely seriously and we will always work with the police and community to find and prosecute offenders.”

Speaking outside the court, Mr Gowers’ solicitor Jose Grayson said: “Although people at the time thought it was an antisemitic attack, it has been accepted by the Crown it was not racially motivated.”

Deputy Judge Richard Hawgood said: “It is obviously a very deeply unpleasant and serious matter. It is about as serious as a common assault allegation can be. All options will be considered by the court, including a custodial sentence.”

Mr Gowers has since been sectioned and released on bail on the condition he does not contact Ms Reis directly or indirectly, or visit Manor Road. He is due to be sentenced at Thames Magistrates’ Court on 1st October.

A former Chairman of a parish council has come under investigation over alleged antisemitic and discriminatory remarks.

Dr Chris Clews is accused of having made antisemitic, racist, homophobic, and sexist remarks in emails to former council colleague Philip Bond. It was also alleged that he insulted parishioners and held views that amounted to Holocaust denial, which would be a breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

It was reported that Dr Clews was initially reluctant to resign, but after mounting pressure from angry parishioners, he was forced to step down. In his resignation letter, he wrote: “I do talk a lot, but at least there is some thought to what I say”, and lamented that “it appears we are no longer entitled to express in private, alternative thoughts or ask questions about some matters and events”.

A council spokesman said: “There has been a thorough investigation which established that a significant proportion of the most offensive emails written by Mr Clews were done so privately over a long period of time with the complainant. The finding, after a significant investigation, was that they were not sent in his capacity as a councillor. The sanctions available to local authorities in England in cases where a councillor is found to have breached their code of conduct is restricted by law. In effect the strongest form of sanction available in most situations is censure – in other words a letter of rebuke. This was made clear to all complainants at the start of the process.”

Warwickshire Police confirmed that they are currently investigating the situation.

Scotland’s First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon, is under growing pressure over the SNP’s deal with the Scottish Greens due to the Party’s opposition to the International Definition of Antisemitism and other controversial policies revealed by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others.

In 2015, the Scottish Greens adopted a motion, which has never been rescinded, condemning “Israel’s claim to be ‘the Jewish State’” and “Zionism as a racist ideology.” According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour)” is an example of antisemitism.

The motion also committed the Party to opposing “Aliyah” (Jewish immigration to Israel, including by British Jews) and Israel’s Law of Return, the Jewish state’s answer to centuries of persecution of Diaspora Jewry. The motion further called for the removal of Hamas, an antisemitic genocidal terrorist organisation, from its designation by the British Government as a terrorist organisation, and supported the BDS movement—the campaign to boycott the Jewish state—the tactics of which an overwhelming majority of British Jews find intimidating.

The debate on this motion was held on a Saturday, when observant Jews would be unable to participate, and it passed easily. It became Party policy and remains so even as the Scottish Greens recently joined the Scottish devolved Government for the first time. Indeed, it is the first time that a Green Party has joined any Government in the United Kingdom. The two leaders of the Scottish Greens—Patrick Harvie and Lorna Slater—are now ministers in Ms Sturgeon’s Government.

Although the agreement between the SNP and the Scottish Greens excludes international relations, as one journalist has pointed out this is the worst of both worlds, as it means that the two parties and their politicians can speak freely on the subject, allowing the Scottish Greens to promote their Party’s positions without the hindrance of collective responsibility.

Prior to inviting the Scottish Greens into her administration, Ms Sturgeon sought to reassure the Jewish community that she is “committed to tackling” antisemitism after the recent surge in racism against Jews in the UK.

Now, Ms Sturgeon is under pressure over her agreement with the Scottish Greens, with the Conservatives calling on the SNP to scrap the deal. Campaign Against Antisemitism remains deeply troubled by the aforementioned policies of the Scottish Greens, the Green Party’s branch in Scotland.

In a statement, the Scottish Greens said: A spokesman for the Scottish Green Party said: “The Scottish Green Party abhors antisemitism. There is absolutely no place for any anti-Jewish prejudice in society. Green politics is rooted in environmentalism, peace, social justice and democracy. Our party’s position on international affairs, including Palestine and Israel, is guided by these pillars. We will continue to raise our voice in support of a human rights based outcome that allows everyone in the region to live in peace, free from oppression or occupation.”

A spokesman for the Scottish Government said: “We remain absolutely committed to action to address antisemitism, which is utterly unacceptable. There is no place for it in Scotland.”

Joe Glasman, Head of Political Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “The positions adopted by the Scottish Greens in 2015 and not since rescinded are abhorrent to British Jews and to opponents of antisemitism everywhere. All decent Scots will have been appalled by the surge in racism against the Jewish community during the recent conflict between Hamas and Israel, which saw demonstrations featuring antisemitic chanting and the display of the Hamas insignia. Now, as campaigns for Hamas to be proscribed in full by the British Government are in full swing, a Party whose stated policy is the very opposite now sits in the Scottish Government.

“The Party’s rise to national prominence in Scotland demands immediate review of its position on Zionism, ‘aliyah’ and Hamas. With the privilege of participation in national government comes the responsibility to govern on behalf of all Scotland, including its minorities.

“Nicola Sturgeon, who invited the Scottish Greens into her administration, must also urgently clarify the policy of the Scottish Government. If she fails to control the extremist elements of her new governing partner, she will be to blame for elevating those views into Scotland’s national conversation and giving such views standing within the UK polity.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has extensively documented alleged antisemitism among officers of the Green Party of England and Wales, including the Party’s former Equalities and Diversity Coordinator who now holds the International Coordinator portfolio, on which the Green Party has failed to act. We are also monitoring the Greens’ leadership primary, where differences on whether and how to address antisemitism have arisen.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

In a fawning obituary, The Guardian has omitted the antisemitic beliefs of self-avowed antisemite, Mikis Theodorakis.

Mr Theodorakis, the Greek composer known for writing the scores to Zobra the Greek and Serpico, said on television in 2011 that he was “anti-Israel and antisemitic.” He also said that “everything that happens today in the world has to do with the Zionists” and that “American Jews are behind the world economic crisis that has hit Greece also.” It was reported that in November 2003, he branded Jews “the root of evil” and in 2004, it was alleged that he claimed that Jews owned the world’s banks and media. Mr Theodorakis allegedly later apologised for these comments.

While The Guardian does not mention his self-reported hatred for Jews in its obituary of nearly 2000 words, it does describe his politics as “firebrand” that may have been “naïve”. The article also states that “he was criticised for his politics, his music, his private life,” but leaves out specifically Mr Theodorakis’ perpetuation of antisemitic conspiracy theories. The Times also produced an obituary but included the composer’s record of antisemitism.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Mikis Theodorakis was a self-described antisemite who unashamedly spouted racist rhetoric on television. It is inconceivable that The Guardian would omit his views were they directed at any other minority, and sadly unsurprising that it has whitewashed his self-confessed antisemitism. The newspaper must apologise and amend the obituary to give a fuller picture of Mr Theodorakis.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected]

An outrageous website that compares Israeli policies to the Holocaust has now chosen to attack Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Shoah.org.uk, a website that launched in 2011 and joined Twitter earlier this year, says that its “aim is to give a voice to the millions of ordinary people around the word who want to end to the ‘Zio-Nazi’ oppression, environmental destruction of Palestine.”

The Shoah is the Hebrew name of the Holocaust, the genocide of six million Jewish men, women and children at the hands of the Nazis and their collaborators.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

It is believed that the website is managed by Sammi Ibrahem, a former council candidate for the Birmingham Workers Party and may now be a member of the Communist Party. He has also reportedly been praised by the antisemite Gilad Atzmon, who has previously been forced to make a humiliating apology to Campaign Against Antisemitism following defamation proceedings.

According to the JC, a Twitter profile with a picture matching the logo of the website tweeted last year: “inshalla [G-d-willing] we see another Holocaust so will be no Zionist at all [sic].”

The website reportedly responded to the JC’s request for comment saying: “The views in our articles are those of the authors and not necessarily reflect those of shoah.org.uk.”

This week, the website republished an article recycling criticisms of Campaign Against Antisemitism common on the far-left. The article was originally published in 2018 on a different website.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is sometimes said that one is known by one’s adversaries. If our organisation is despised by people who equate Israel with Nazis, make light of the Holocaust and fraternise with those who call for another genocide of the Jewish people, then we must be doing something right.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

The Hon. Piers Portman, the youngest living son of the 9th Viscount Portman and heir to 110 acres of West End real estate, has been found guilty of calling Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Chief Executive “Jewish scum” in a confrontation at a courthouse in 2018.

Mr Portman, 50, was prosecuted after approaching Gideon Falter, Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Chief Executive, at Westminster Magistrates’ Court on 14th June 2018 following the sentencing of Alison Chabloz, a notorious Holocaust denier and antisemite. Campaign Against Antisemitism had brought a private prosecution against Ms Chabloz which the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) took over, and which ultimately led to a conviction and landmark legal precedent. Mr Falter had testified against Ms Chabloz, who has since been repeatedly sent to prison over her antisemitic statements, including denying the Holocaust and claiming that Holocaust survivors had invented their suffering for financial gain.

Mr Portman followed Mr Falter out of the courtroom and confronted him in the lobby of the court building. He extended his hand to Mr Falter, who refused to shake it because the building was filled with what he told Southwark Crown Court was a “Who’s Who of Holocaust deniers, neo-Nazis and far-right extremists”. As Mr Portman extended his hand, Mr Falter replied, concerned that Mr Portman might be part of Ms Chabloz’s entourage: “I’m very sorry but I can’t shake your hand because I don’t know who you are.”

At this point, Southwark Crown Court heard that Mr Portman became “very enraged”, coming close to Mr Falter and saying: “I’m Piers Portman. I have written to you before. Come after me, you Jewish scum. Come and persecute me. Come and get me.” Mr Portman was then told to leave by security staff at Westminster Magistrates’ Court. When police arrived, Mr Portman had left the area.

Campaign Against Antisemitism then checked our systems for e-mails received from anyone with the name Piers Portman, finding a 1,527-word screed in which Mr Portman denounced his former wife and her divorce lawyer, Baroness Fiona Shackleton each as a “greedy, grasping and lying manipulator of the system that happens to be Jewish.” He accused his former wife of “playing the Talmud inspired ‘Tyrant posing as a victim.’” Noting that he had a “Harrow Public School education”, Mr Portman defended the term “Holohoax”, writing that “I fail to see how the fabricated word has anything to do with hating anyone. Surely it is merely an expression created by people that believe they have been lied to,” and questioning how the terms “Jew” and “Jewboy” could be antisemitic.

He concluded his e-mail by taunting Campaign Against Antisemitism to “Come and pick on me…come and have a do with me…come and perform your charity on me.”

Under cross examination by Crown Prosecutor Notu Hoon, Mr Portman said that he had been attending Ms Chabloz’s case — the only criminal proceedings he said he had attended — in order to “learn more about my own circumstances”, claiming that he was being “persecuted by Jewish tyrants posing as victims”.

Mr Portman claimed that he felt that the conviction in June 2018 of Ms Chabloz was “unfair”. Ms Chabloz, who has been imprisoned over various crimes since, had been convicted on that occasion over songs in which she claimed: “Now Auschwitz, holy temple, is a theme park just for fools, the gassing zone a proven hoax, indoctrination rules.” In another lyric referring to Jews, she sang: “History repeats itself, no limit to our wealth, thanks to your debts we’re bleeding you dry. We control your media, control all your books and TV, with the daily lies we’re feeding.”

At one point during his testimony, His Honour Justice Gregory Perrins had to tell Mr Portman to stop talking about his divorce from his ex-wife as he was breaching a court injunction against doing so.

Mr Portman hired one of the UK’s most expensive criminal barristers, Lewis Powers QC to defend him. Mr Powers at one point was called out by the judge over his baseless statements to the jury. The defence case was that Mr Falter and a colleague, Mr Orkin, had in fact “fabricated” the fact that Mr Portman had said “Jewish scum”.

Mr Portman was accompanied throughout the proceedings by conspiracy theorist Matthew Delooze, who appeared to be his only supporter in the public gallery. Mr Delooze is the author of various essays entitled: “The Conspiracy to Rule the World: From 911 to the Illuminati” and “Reasons To Believe We Are Enslaved By The Serpent”.

In a majority verdict, ten out of twelve jurors at Southwark Crown Court today found Mr Portman guilty of causing racially aggravated harassment, alarm and distress. Mr Portman will be sentenced next month.

His Honour Justice Perrins warned: “I am not ruling any sentence out”. The CPS has confirmed that it will be seeking a hate crime sentence uplift.

Campaign Against Antisemitism wishes to thank the Community Security Trust (CST) for once again providing specialist protection officers to keep our personnel safe at court.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “This is a good result for British justice and British Jews. This despicable, unrepentant antisemite instructed his lawyer to tell the court that he is an honourable man being framed by lying Jews. The jury saw straight through Mr Portman, whose hatred of Jews speaks for itself. This verdict reaffirms my belief in the justice system of our country. It shows that even the wealthiest and most privileged cannot escape British justice and will face the consequences of their anti-Jewish racism.”

Sati Dhadda, from the CPS, said: “Antisemitism has no place in our society and will not be tolerated. Piers Portman’s conduct was disgraceful and utterly audacious in a courthouse. No-one should be subjected to such abuse based on their race or religion.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image: Piers Portman, right, leaves Southwark Crown Court with conspiracy theorist Matthew Delooze

Campaign Against Antisemitism will be writing to Tennants auctioneers over its sale of a trove of Nazi memorabilia, including medals, weapons, books, uniforms, badges and cutlery.

Tennants describes itself as “the UK’s largest family-owned fine art auctioneers, and a market leader with offices in North Yorkshire and London.”

As the company claims that it “has the knowledge and experience clients can trust,” it cannot rely on ignorance to explain how it has come to be selling numerous Third Reich artefacts, including a tin of Third Reich machine gun magazines for £120-£180, a Third Reich SS Officer’s visor cap for £800-£900, a collection of Nazi medals for £100-£150, two Nazi Party badges for £100-£150, a “small quantity of German Third Reich related books” for £60-£80, various articles of Waffen-SS uniforms and a lot more.

Recently, a BBC Bargain Hunt expert apologised after it was revealed that Nazi memorabilia was due to be sold at his auction house.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “These items belong in a museum, not in the hands of sick collectors acquiring them from an auction house that stands to pocket thousands of pounds from these sales. We shall be writing to the auctioneers to inquire why it is offering for sale memorabilia and mementos from a genocide.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

A controversial councillor infamous for using the term “Jew process” and a leading union boss have reportedly received warnings of auto-expulsion from the Labour Party.

Jo Bird, a councillor for the Bromborough Ward on Wirral Council, reportedly faces expulsion due to her alleged association with antisemitism-denial group Labour Against the Witchhunt, a faction that Labour’s ruling National Executive Committee (NEC) resolved to proscribe several weeks ago. Last month its members began receiving letters of automatic expulsion.

Cllr Bird re-joined the Labour Party in 2015, when Jeremy Corbyn was running for the Party’s leadership, and has a long history of controversy relating to Jews, including renaming ‘due process’ in the Labour Party as “Jew process”, for which she was suspended. She was suspended a second time but was readmitted on both occasions. She was apparently investigated for a third time after reportedly suggesting that antisemitism is being privileged over other forms of racism.

Cllr Bird is also a member of Jewish Voice for Labour, the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, and she has described Labour’s institutional antisemitism as based on mere “accusations, witch-huntery and allegations without evidence”. She failed in her bid for election to the NEC, and had been tipped to succeed Dame Louise Ellman, a Jewish MP who quit Labour prior to the election due to antisemitism, as the MP for the constituency.

Cllr Bird apparently intends to appeal the possibility of expulsion.

Recently, it was reported that Labour Against the Witchhunt suggested to its members that they may lie about their political affiliation to avoid being kicked out of the Labour Party, although there is no evidence to indicate that Cllr Bird will avail herself of this advice. Indeed, she has reportedly expressed her pride at speaking at a Labour Against the Witchhunt event.

Also reportedly facing expulsion for alleged association with a proscribed group is Ian Hodson, the elected president of the Bakers, Food and Allied Workers Union (BFAWU). The union has 17,000 members and is apparently threatening to break away from the Party in protest at the threat to its boss.

It has not been reported which of the banned factions – Labour Against the Witchhunt, the disgraced former Labour MP Chris Williamson’s Resist group, Socialist Appeal and Labour In Exile Network – he is alleged to be associated with. However, it has been reported that in 2017 Mr Hodson promoted an article that claimed that Labour’s Jewish affiliate had been “implicated” in the “efforts of the Israeli embassy to damage a Corbyn-led Labour Party with confected allegations of antisemitism.”

It has also been reported that a criminal defence solicitor and Campaigns Officer at Liverpool Riverside Constituency Labour Party has been suspended from the Labour Party for 24 months following an investigation into allegations involving antisemitism.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A 28-year-old man has appeared at Thames Magistrates’ Court accused of attacking five people in Stamford Hill last month.

Abdullah Qureshi, from Dewsbury in West Yorkshire, has been charged with one count of racially or religiously aggravated wounding or grievous bodily harm, four counts of racially or religiously aggravated common assault and one count of racially or religious aggravated criminal damage.

The charges relate to five incidents on 18th August investigated by Metropolitan Police’s Central East Command Unit. Goups including Campaign Against Antisemitism and Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol, put out witness appeals following the incidents, as three of the five alleged incidents were caught on video.

In one incident at 18:41, an Orthodox Jewish man was struck in the face with what appeared to be a bottle. In another at 19:10, a child was slapped on the back of the head, and in yet another at 20:30, a 64-year-old victim was struck and left unconscious on the ground, suffering facial injuries and a broken ankle.

It is understood that two further incidents have been alleged.

A trial has been scheduled for 1st October at Snaresbrook Crown Court.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “These attacks were not ‘random’ in the usual sense: these victims were chosen because they are Jews. We applaud the police for their swift investigation and expect the authorities to ensure that justice is done for the victims of these violent hate crimes.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The Leader of Calderdale Council has refused to act against a fellow councillor who organised an anti-Israel rally last month, where it was reported that antisemitic chanting and a sign bearing a swastika were present, causing outrage.

Labour Party Cllr Tim Swift was urged by members from both the Conservatives and the Liberal Democrats to take action against councillor and Cabinet member Jenny Lynn, who organised the event in Halifax, and who was allegedly filmed raising her fist in the air while the crowd chanted “from the river to the sea, Palestine will be free”.

The chant, “from the river to the sea, Palestine will be free”, only makes sense as a call for the destruction of the world’s only Jewish state – and its replacement with a State of Palestine – and is thus an attempt to deny Jews, uniquely, the right to self-determination.

It was also said that a sign depicting swastikas alongside former Israeli Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, on a wanted poster was present.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, which Calderdale Council has adopted, “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination” and “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” are both examples of antisemitism.

It is understood that one of the invited speakers at the event was the disgraced conspiracy theorist Rev. Dr Stephen Sizer who, in 2015, was ordered by the Church of England to stop using social media after he claimed that an Israeli conspiracy was behind 9/11, which the Church denounced as “clearly antisemitic”.

Holly Lynch, the Labour MP representing Halifax, was also due to speak but said on Twitter that “upon seeing the speaker list” for the rally, she was “very clear” that she would “not share a platform with one of the speakers” and refused to attend.

Mr Swift was contacted by Liberal Democrat leader Cllr Baker and Conservative group leader Steven Leigh, who both urged him to take action.

Cllr Baker said: “Last year the whole council agreed to adopt the IHRA definition of antisemitism. Some of the views expressed by speakers at this event would clearly be seen as antisemitism under this definition. We are pleased to see Holly did not share a platform with them but it’s not acceptable that a Labour councillor and Cabinet member was involved in organising this.”

Ms Lynn appeared to deny any wrongdoing, stating: “There is nothing incompatible about my role as chair of a community based organisation – Halifax Friends of Palestine – and my role in supporting all our communities and I will stand on my record on that. There is nothing antisemitic about standing up for the rights of Palestinian people.”

Lord Austin, an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism who quit the Labour Party in opposition to antisemitism, said: “Of course Cllr Lynn cannot be the Cabinet member for Communities and take part in events like this. The council leader needs to act.”

However, Mr Swift declined to take action on Cllr Lynn, saying that “Councillor Lynn has a long track record of working for equality and cohesion in Calderdale, both as a community activist and a councillor, and has a proven record of working in harmony with people of all faiths and none”.

In July, Hastings Council reportedly refused to condemn the same antisemitic “from the river to the sea” chant.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Image credit: Twitter via the JC

Campaign Against Antisemitism is deeply troubled by certain policies of the Scottish Greens, the Green Party’s branch in Scotland which as of this week sits in the Scottish Government.

In 2015, the Scottish Greens adopted Policy Motion 2 (which has never been rescinded), which “condemn[ed] Israel’s claim to be ‘the Jewish State’” and “condemn[ed] Zionism as a racist ideology based on Jewish supremacy in Palestine.” The motion went on to declare that “Israel’s claim to be a Jewish and democratic state, the home of all Jews in which non-Jews have inferior rights, constitutes apartheid and is unacceptable. It is not supported by the Scottish Green Party.”

The Party also “call[s] on Israel to repeal its ‘law of return’ as this is incompatible with the full exercise of human rights and is discriminatory” and the Scottish Greens pledge to “work towards…repeal of Israel’s law of return (Aliyah).”

The motion also called for “the removal of Hamas from the designation as a terrorist organisation” and supported the BDS movement—the campaign to boycott the Jewish state—the tactics of which an overwhelming majority of British Jews find intimidating.

Hamas is an antisemitic genocidal terrorist organisation, and Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to the Home Secretary calling on her to proscribe Hamas in full, and has urged all MPs to do the same.

The debate on Policy Motion 2 was held on a Saturday, when observant Jews would be unable to participate, and it passed easily. It became Party policy and remains so even as the Scottish Greens join the Scottish devolved Government for the first time. Indeed, it is the first time that a Green Party has joined any Government in the United Kingdom.

Recently, Scotland’s First Minister Nicola Sturgeon, who invited the Scottish Greens into her administration, sought to reassure the Jewish community that she is “committed to tackling” antisemitism after the recent surge in racism against Jews in the UK. The Scottish Greens are currently led by Patrick Harvie and Lorna Slater.

Although the agreement between Nicola Sturgeon’s SNP and the Scottish Greens excludes international relations, as one journalist has pointed out this is the worst of both worlds, as it means that the two parties and their politicians can speak freely on the subject, allowing the Scottish Greens to promote their Party’s positions without the hindrance of collective responsibility.

Joe Glasman, Head of Political Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “The positions adopted by the Scottish Greens in 2015 and not since rescinded are abhorrent to British Jews and to opponents of antisemitism everywhere. All decent Scots will have been appalled by the surge in racism against the Jewish community during the recent conflict between Hamas and Israel, which saw demonstrations featuring antisemitic chanting and the display of the Hamas insignia. Now, as campaigns for Hamas to be proscribed in full by the British Government are in full swing, a Party whose stated policy is the very opposite now sits in the Scottish Government.

“The Party’s rise to national prominence in Scotland demands immediate review of its position on Zionism, ‘aliyah’ and Hamas. With the privilege of participation in national government comes the responsibility to govern on behalf of all Scotland, including its minorities.

“Nicola Sturgeon, who invited the Scottish Greens into her administration, must also urgently clarify the policy of the Scottish Government. If she fails to control the extremist elements of her new governing partner, she will be to blame for elevating those views into Scotland’s national conversation and giving such views standing within the UK polity.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has extensively documented alleged antisemitism among officers of the Green Party of England and Wales, including the Party’s former Equalities and Diversity Coordinator who now holds the International Coordinator portfolio, on which the Green Party has failed to act. We are also monitoring the Greens’ leadership primary, where differences on whether and how to address antisemitism have arisen.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Harry Kane, the captain of England’s football team, has reported that he suffered antisemitic abuse at a match in Hungary yesterday.

England defeated Hungary 4-0 in the Budapest qualifier match for the World Cup, with Mr Kane, who plays for Tottenham Hotspur, reporting that he received antisemitic abuse at the game, possibly due his connection with his Premier League club’s long association with Jewish fans.

Mr Kane called on UEFA, the umbrella body for European football, to take action in response to the appalling abuse that he and his teammates received, particularly England’s black players.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson also called on FIFA, football’s global body, to “take strong action” against those attendees at the match who behaved shamefully.

Mr Kane has previously suffered antisemitic abuse in England.

Antisemitism and racism have no place in sport, which should bring nations, communities, ethnicities and those of all faiths and none together.

English football’s governing body, the Football Association (FA), has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

A 28-year-old man has been arrested in connection with a series of assaults in Stamford Hill on 18th August.

The Metropolitan Police’s Central East Command Unit has been investigating, with groups including Campaign Against Antisemitism and Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol, putting out witness appeals.

The suspect is being held at an East London police station on suspicion of five racially aggravated assaults.

Three of the five alleged incidents were caught on video, including one at 18:41 when an Orthodox Jewish man was struck in the face with what appeared to be a bottle, another at 19:10, when a child was slapped on the back of the head, and yet another at 20:30, when a 64-year-old victim was struck and left unconscious on the ground, suffering facial injuries and a broken ankle.

It is understood that two further incidents have been alleged, but the victims have not yet contacted the police directly.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “These attacks were not ‘random’ in the usual sense: these victims were chosen because they are Jews. We applaud the police for their swift investigation and expect the authorities to ensure that justice is done for the victims of these violent hate crimes.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

BBC Bargain Hunt expert Tim Weeks has apologised after it was revealed that Nazi memorabilia was due to be sold at his auction house.

Some of the items that were listed in Mr Weeks’ Wessex Auction Rooms auction included a £2,000 Third Reich banner, a £300 swastika and a collection of badges. The items have since been removed from the auction which is being held today.

Mr Weeks apologised for the incident, stating: “Upon learning that a number of Third Reich items are listed for auction I have contacted the head of our militaria department to withdraw them immediately from sale as we would never wish to cause any offence. We apologise if any has unintentionally been caused.”

A former De Montfort University student who downloaded nearly 70,000 documents pertaining to neo-Nazism and bomb-making has been spared jail, and instead was told to read classic literature.  

Ben John, 21, was convicted by a jury at Leicester Crown Court on 11th August of possessing information likely to be useful for preparing an act of terror – a charge that carries a maximum jail sentence of fifteen years.

Ben Lloyd, prosecuting, told the court at the sentencing yesterday that Mr John had previously failed to heed warnings by counter-terrorism officers.

The court heard that Mr John was labelled a terror risk only days after his eighteenth birthday. He was referred to the Government’s counter-terrorism scheme, Prevent, but continued to download “repellent” right-wing documents, which included the Anarchist Cookbook, a guide to making bombs and illegal drugs at home, written during the 1970s. The author of the book has since stated that he was motivated by anger at the time of writing and said that the “basic premise behind the Cookbook is profoundly flawed”.

In addition to this, the court also heard that in January 2018, Mr John had come to the attention of, and had meetings with, Prevent officers. In May 2018, Mr John wrote a letter called “Eternal Front”, where he claimed to be a member of the Lincolnshire Fascist Underground and railed against gay people and immigrants. This prompted further meetings with Prevent officers and a psychiatric evaluation.

It was said that by April 2019, Mr John had accumulated over 9,000 right-wing and terror-related documents, which by August 2019 had increased by 2,600. In January 2020, he was arrested and charged with offences under the Terrorism Act, including possessing documents on combat, homemade weapons and explosives.

Eventually, Mr John had collated 67,788 documents which contained a large quantity of National Socialist, white supremacist and antisemitic material, as well as information relating to a Satanic organisation.

Lincolnshire Police said that Mr John “had become part of the Extreme Right Wing (XRW) online, and was studying Criminology with Psychology in Leicester when he was arrested”.

Counter Terrorism Policing East Midlands (CTP EM) Detective Inspector James Manning, who led the investigation in partnership with regional and national agencies, said: “The terrorist material he was found in possession of is extremely dangerous, and he acquired this to further his ideology. It indicates the threat that he and other followers of this hateful ideology pose to National Security. It was not light reading, or material most would concern themselves with for legitimate reasons. This has been a long and complex investigation over the course of eleven months.” 

Judge Timothy Spencer QC said he believed that Mr John’s crime was likely to be an isolated incident and “an act of teenage folly”. He labelled Mr John as a “lonely individual with few if any true friends” who was “highly susceptible” to recruitment by others more prone to action. Judge Spencer went on to say that he was “not of the view that harm was likely to have been caused”.

However, stating that the material was “largely relating to Nazi, fascist and Adolf Hitler-inspired ideology” as well as “a substantial quantity of more contemporary material espousing extreme right-wing, white-supremacist material”, he rejected Mr John’s assertion at his trial that the material was “mere academic fascination”. “My view is that to a significant degree you have aligned with these ideologies and to a significant degree have adopted the views expressed as your own,” said the judge.

Harry Bentley, the barrister for Mr John, said that “violence is the necessary ingredient of terrorism. It is not the prosecution case he was planning a terrorist attack.” He added: “[Mr John] was fascinated by extreme right-wing views and shared those views himself. He was a young man who struggled with emotions, however he is plainly an intelligent young man and now has a greater insight. He is by no means a lost cause and is capable of living a normal, pro-social life.” Mr Bentley also said that the whole case was “really about not deleting items on a computer”, an argument which the judge dismissed as an “over-simplification” of the case.

Speaking directly to Mr John, Judge Spencer asked him: “Have you read Dickens? Austen? Start with Pride and Prejudice and Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities. Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night.”

The judge told the defendant to “think about Hardy. Think about Trollope”, before adding: “On 4th January you will tell me what you have read and I will test you on it. I will test you and if I think you are [lying to] me you will suffer. I will be watching you, Ben John, every step of the way. If you let me down you know what will happen.”

“He has by the skin of his teeth avoided imprisonment,” the judge told Mr Bentley.

Mr John will have to return to Judge Spencer every four months in order to be tested on his reading. In addition, he was handed a two-year jail sentence suspended for two years plus a further year on licence, monitored by the probation service.

Mr John was also given a five-year Serious Crime Prevention Order requiring him to stay in touch with the police and let them monitor his online activity and up to 30 days on a Healthy Identity Intervention programme.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is inexplicable that a man who collected nearly 70,000 neo-Nazi and terror-related documents could avoid a maximum jail term of fifteen years and leave court with no custodial sentence whatsoever. Instead, the judge has let off Ben John with a mere suspended sentence and some English homework. Yet for all the novels that the judge has ordered Mr John to peruse as he enjoys his unearned freedom, it was notable that Crime and Punishment was not among them. Perhaps the judge himself ought to review that classic as he reflects on the risk that his sentence poses to the public.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

The Welsh First Minister is under fire for agreeing to appear at an event with the suspended Labour MP Jeremy Corbyn and the outspoken filmmaker Ken Loach, who was recently expelled from the Labour Party.

Mark Drakeford is among the speakers at The World Transformed event in Brighton next month, timed to coincide with the Labour Party conference being held in the city.

The ticketed event is billed as a “welcoming space for a new generation of young activists who supported Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership” but feel “increasingly alienated” by the Party under current leader Sir Keir Starmer.

Mr Corbyn was suspended from the Labour Party after downplaying the Party’s antisemitism crisis after the publication of the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s (EHRC) report. Campaign Against Antisemitism has two outstanding complaints with Labour against Mr Corbyn, who was permitted back into the Party but remains suspended from the Parliamentary Labour Party.

Mr Loach was recently expelled for his association with the newly-proscribed Labour Against the Witchhunt. The proscribed group intends to stage its own parallel events in Brighton as well. 

The World Transformed event is also due to feature John McDonnell MP, the controversial former Shadow Chancellor who is also President of the Labour Representation Committee, as well as Zarah Sultana MP, who has a long record of inflammatory comments relating to the Jewish community and against whom Campaign Against Antisemitism has an outstanding complaint with the Party, and Jon Trickett MP, a close ally of Mr Corbyn’s.

Sir Keir has previously pledged to sanction Labour politicians and members who appeared on platforms with former members expelled in relation to antisemitism.

Meanwhile, at the conference itself, a number of activists have announced their intention to distribute pamphlets describing Labour’s antisemitism scandal as a “scam”. The suggestion that Jews concoct allegations of antisemitism for ulterior purposes is itself antisemitic and was recognised by the EHRC as an example of unlawful victimisation of Jewish people.

After the meme “#ItWasAScam” trended on Twitter – with the social media company predictably failing to do anything about it – the activists have produced a hard copy pamphlet that claims that “Antisemitism accusations have been used as a weapon against the Left” and declares that “the antisemitism smearing industry must now be held to account for its fraudulent accusations.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is extraordinary that the First Minister of one of the nations of this union could believe it appropriate to share a platform with figures like Jeremy Corbyn and Ken Loach. This year’s Labour Party conference will be one of the most important moments yet in Labour’s struggle against its own institutional antisemitism, with evidence mounting of how far antisemitism-deniers are prepared to go to prevent the Party making progress. Mark Drakeford’s decision will do nothing but undermine those in Labour trying to steer the Party back to its anti-racist roots.”

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Naomi Wimborne-Idrissi has claimed that her suspension from the Labour Party has been lifted.

Ms Wimborne-Idrissi is the Media Officer of Jewish Voice for Labour, an antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation. She was also previously the Vice-Chair of Chingford and Woodford Green Constituency Labour Party (CLP) before reportedly being removed earlier this year.

She was suspended from the Party, it is believed, following a rebellious meeting of her CLP late last year.

Ms Wimborne-Idrissi reports that a panel of Labour’s ruling National Executive Committee has lifted her suspension but given her a “reminder of conduct”, which will remain on her Party record for twelve months. She described this sanction as “explicit threats to keep our heads down and stay in line – simply not acceptable in a party that claims to represent values of democracy, justice and freedom.”

In reality, the reminder of conduct is a slap on the wrist, and we agree with Ms Wimborne-Idrissi that it is an unacceptable outcome to the investigation into her conduct. However, we consider that much more stringent sanctions would have been appropriate for her and Jewish Voice for Labour.

Ms Wimborne-Idrissi reveals that one of the testimonials in her defence was provided by the controversial actress Miriam Margolyes, who has, for example, previously claimed that former Labour Leader Jeremy Corbyn was “forced” to resign due to “a conspiracy within the Party motivated from Israel”.

Ms Wimborne-Idrissi recently lost the first stage of a libel lawsuit brought by John Ware, the maker of the BBC Panorama documentary “Is Labour Antisemitic”.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Jewish Voice for Labour is an antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation. To give one of its leaders a mere ‘reminder of conduct’ is a slap on the wrist and entirely the wrong message to send to a faction that has no place in the Labour Party if it wants to return to its anti-racist roots.”

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A well-known Jewish journalist was left “shaken” after being subjected to antisemitic abuse on Shabbat afternoon on his way to synagogue in North London.

James Marlow was holding a siddur when he was accosted by a passer-by described as “Asian”, according to the Jewish Weekly newspaper, for which Mr Marlow writes.

The incident came just hours after Mr Marlow was physically attacked on the way to a different synagogue that morning in Hendon by a woman on a scooter, who punched him, causing minor injuries. The police informed Mr Marlow that the woman is known to the force and has a medical condition.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Google

The manager of a mosque has prompted outrage after reportedly comparing Israel to the Nazis and praising the Taliban.

Saddique Hussain, the general manager of Birmingham’s Central Jamia Mosque Ghamkol Sharif mosque, reportedly shared a clip of Taliban fighters showing off assault rifles whilst reciting quotes from the Quran and wrote: “How beautiful and civilised and no ‘I’. May Allah SWT guide us on to His beautiful religion.”

It was said that Mr Hussain also shared a post which said that Israeli soldiers kill Palestinian children “for fun”. He allegedly shared a video clip from the news outlet TruNews, which has been described as a “far-right conspiracy theory and fake news website”, and according to the ADL has “increasingly featured antisemitic and anti-Zionist content, and also has a long record of disseminating radical Islamophobic and anti-LGBTQ messages”. The clip in question was from Rick Wiles, a pastor who has previously labelled Jews as “deceivers” who “plot” and “lie”, in which Mr Wiles compared Israel to the Nazis.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

Mr Hussain allegedly shared another clip which stated that “Zionist lobbying” could have a Sky News video that reported on Israeli military actions removed if they wanted, while another shared video reportedly contained text that said: “I am Israel – I have the power to control American policy. My American Israel Public Affairs committee can make or break any politician of its choosing.”

According to the Definition, “Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy or of Jews controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions” is an example of antisemitism.

The group Muslims Against Antisemitism denounced Mr Hussain’s posts, stating: “Promoting views and associations between ‘media control’ and depicting ‘Zionists’ as having ‘control’ shows the conspiratorial mindset of the person in question. Focussing on Israel and blaming Israel for actions that it is not even associated with, shows the frothing and foaming nature of the antipathy that some hold.”

After a police warning, Mr Hussain claimed that he “does not and never has supported the Taliban”.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “These posts clearly contravene the International Definition of Antisemitism and are integral to the broader Islamist ideology that has fuelled antisemitism on the streets of Britain in recent months. For such material to be promoted by anyone in a position of responsibility is deeply concerning, especially when they have already come under investigation over extremist views quite recently. These revelations should cause the Charity Commission serious concern and urgent action must be taken.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 showed that over eight in ten British Jews consider the threat from Islamists to be very serious.

Image credit: Facebook screenshot via the JC

Graffiti of a swastika was found outside of Ajex House in Stamford Hill, a block of sheltered housing that is tailored towards Jewish people with priority given to ex-servicemen and their families.

The incident was reported yesterday by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

Hackney Police are reportedly investigating. If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 3103 30/08/21.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The Green Party held a hustings for leadership candidates earlier this week, which revealed differences of opinion on whether and how the Party should tackle antisemitism within its ranks.

As Campaign Against Antisemitism has recently reported, antisemitism is a very real and serious issue in the Green Party, which has consistently failed thus far to address it.

The hustings on 23rd August was the first opportunity for Party members to question the five tickets (some of the candidates are running as a pair, as outgoing Leaders Jonathan Barltey and Sian Berry did).

The participants were Tamsin Omond (who is running with current Deputy Leader Amelia Womack); Martin Hemingway (who shares his ticket with Tina Rothery); and Carla Denyer (who is running alongside Adrian Ramsay); former Deputy Leader Shahrar Ali (who is running alone) and 2019 election candidate Ashley Gunstock (also running alone).

The issue of antisemitism – raised in a question about “antisemitism and transphobia” – was one of the most contested in what were otherwise considered cordial hustings, moderated by Baroness Bennett (former Party Leader Natalie Bennett).

Mr Gunstock emphasised the need for education to tackle anti-Jewish racism, recounting his work with schoolchildren organising anti-Israel protests and his advise to them not to conflate the Israeli Government with Jewish people.

Ms Denyer observed that antisemitism within the Party would not be fixed overnight but insisted that “we need to take a clear and consistent line against antisemitism” and to ensure that the Party is more welcoming and inclusive, with workshops for members and a better resourced disciplinary committee to review antisemitism complaints. She also reiterated her and Mr Ramsay’s support for a motion at Party conference to include antisemitism guidance in the Party’s constitution. That guidance would include the International Definition of Antisemitism but, controversially, also other definitions.

Ms Osmond said that she and Ms Womack would reach our to communities, listen to their experiences and build trust. She also stressed their commitment to establishing new accountability processes in the Party to tackle hate speech, which would include panels of minority groups who could regularly be consulted on issues affecting them.

Mr Hemingway, representing himself and Ms Rothery, denied that antisemitism was a major issue within the Party, arguing that it was largely limited to whether the Party should adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism instead. He announced his preference for the Jerusalem Declaration on Antisemitism, a wrecking document intended to undermine the globally recognised International Definition of Antisemitism.

Mr Ali, who has a record of controversial statements and against whom Campaign Against Antisemitism has previously submitted a complaint to the Party, reportedly claimed that allegations of antisemitism were sometimes being used to stop people from criticising Israel. Such claims are an example of the Livingstone Formulation, which asserts that when Jews make allegations of racism against them it is a dishonest attempt to prevent legitimate criticism of Israel and is named for the disgraced former Mayor of London, Ken Livingstone.

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues to monitor the Green Party’s leadership contest and the candidates’ policies on antisemitism within the Party and wider society.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Leah Levane and Graham Bash have both reportedly received Notices of Possible Auto-exclusion from the Labour Party.

Ms Levane is a co-Chair of Jewish Voice for Labour (JVL), an antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation. She is also a councillor at Hastings Borough Council, where she was reportedly the only councillor present at a vote to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism to abstain. In 2017, Ms Levane reportedly commented on Facebook on an item titled “Austria’s neo-Nazis find friends in Israel”, writing that it was “not surprising”. She also claimed online: “Jews are often agents rather than instigators of exploitation.”

Among the questions asked of Ms Levane in the Notice were for her explanation for having signed an open letter from Labour Against the Witchhunt to Rebecca Long-Bailey in January 2020. Last month, Labour’s ruling National Executive Committee (NEC) resolved to proscribe Labour Against the Witchhunt and earlier this month its members began receiving letters of automatic expulsion.

Ms Levane was also asked about her attendance and speaking at a Labour In Exile Network virtual conference in February 2021. Labour In Exile Network was another of the four factions proscribed by the NEC.

Ms Levane has defended herself by claiming that “in any normal setting, speaking at an event, signing a petition or signing an open letter, are not indicators of support for an organisation,” and that the Party’s request is “logically impossible” because “you are asking me to prove a negative, that I am not a supporter”.

Recently, it was reported that Labour Against the Witchhunt suggested to its members that they may lie about their political affiliation to avoid being kicked out of the Labour Party, although there is no evidence to indicate that Ms Levane is availing herself of this advice.

Graham Bash is JVL’s political officer and the partner of the antisemite Jackie Walker, and has been accused in his Notice of membership of Labour Against the Witchhunt.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Twitter has made it more difficult for its partners, including Campaign Against Antisemitism, to report racist hate on its platform.

Last summer, Twitter invited Campaign Against Antisemitism to become a ‘Twitter partner’, allowing us to report problematic material directly through the company’s ‘partner portal’ to Twitter personnel (rather than machines) for review. Following our experience to date, we recently published a damning report, which prompted major national media coverage, showing how Twitter fails to implement consistently its own policies on hate.

However, Twitter appears to have reacted by making it even harder for us and its other so-called ‘partners’ to report hateful material to the company, in two ways.

First, reference numbers for reports are now not expressly connected to the specific tweets reported, making it impossible to report multiple tweets over short periods, which is precisely what partners are supposed to be empowered to do.

Second, Twitter has removed the option for ‘hate directed at a group’ as the basis for reporting a tweet. Although it remains possible to submit reports through other, less relevant options, the apparent removal of the hate option is a regressive step that makes reporting hate on Twitter more difficult and indicates that Twitter is not prioritising tackling racism on its platform.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Twitter has an endless capacity to lower the bar when it comes to antisemitism. Not only has it abjectly failed to tackle anti-Jewish racism on its platform, contrary to its nicely-worded statements and policies, and to listen to our advice or agree to offers or antisemitism training for staff, but now it has made it more difficult for third parties to monitor and report hate by other users. There comes a point when apathy becomes complicity, and Twitter is very quickly reaching it.”

Recently, Oliver Dowden, the Culture Secretary, has reiterated his call on social media companies to take action against hate on their platforms. “They must face up to their responsibilities, clean up their sites immediately and need not wait until they are forced to act by the government,” he said, adding: “I will continue to work closely with community leaders to hold the feet of social media companies to the fire so they deliver on their promises.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms. We also continue to make representations to the Government on this matter.

A Grenfell Tower volunteer coordinator has today appeared in court charged with two counts of publishing written material in order to stir up racial hatred, which was reported to police by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Tahra Ahmed, who was running a volunteer network to assist victims of the fire, is alleged to have made inflammatory comments about supposed Jewish involvement in the Grenfell fire tragedy.

Westminster Magistrates’ Court declined jurisdiction, sending the case up to the Old Bailey.

Today’s hearing identified the defendant and addressed case management. A plea hearing is expected later this year.

Video footage released yesterday shows yet another attack on a religious Jew in North London.

The suspect can be seen walking towards an Orthodox Jewish man and then striking him in the face with what appears to be a bottle.

The incident took place at 18:40 last Wednesday and was reported yesterday by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

The suspect is believed to be the same assailant who is thought to be responsible for the two attacks that made headlines earlier this week, both of which also occurred last Wednesday.

Like the man in each of the videos of the previous attacks, this man is also dressed in religious Muslim garb with a black beard, dark skin and dark and thick-rimmed glasses. He was wearing a dark green bomber jacket, white kufi and thawb.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 6513 22/08/21. Hackney Police are reportedly investigating it as a hate crime.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

It was reported on Thursday that a man in Wales has been jailed for nine months after daubing swastikas and racist slogans on the side of a hairdressers.

David Elwyn Richards, 52, admitted to shouting abuse and racially harassing Reece Nash in Johnstown, Wrexham on 14th December. Mr Richards also admitted to racially aggravated damage after he painted the hairdressers that Mr Nash resided above with swastikas and racist slogans.

It was also reported that Mr Richards had Nazi-related tattoos on his body, and when police visited his home, they found that his bedroom was covered in “racist and antisemitic symbols and slogans”.

Judge Niclas Parry reportedly had to send Mr Richards out of the courtroom during the sentencing due to multiple disruptions.

Addressing the defence’s suggestion that a rehabilitation activity programme may be a more effective means of addressing Mr Richards’ issues, Judge Parry disagreed, stating: “This is a case about blatant ugly racism. It must be understood that racism will not be allowed to flourish.”

“This display of hateful behaviour was not merely verbal, it was painted on the front of a respectable business and left a scar on that community,” said Judge Parry, before adding that it was “grossly offensive, disgusting racial abuse.”

Mr Richards was also given a restraining order, until a further order, not to contact Mr Nash or Brenda Coulter, the owner of the hairdressers. He was also forbidden from entering Merlin Street, where the hairdressers is located and where Mr Nash resides.

Image credit: North Wales Police

It has been reported that the Chief Executive of the controversial organisation Muslim Engagement and Development (MEND) compared Israel to Hitler in a Facebook post.

MEND claims to seek to “encourage British Muslims within local communities to be more actively involved in British media and politics.”

In a 2014 Facebook post, Azhar Qayum, MEND’s Chief Executive, is alleged to have written: “So generous, push four million Palestinians off their land, then relinquish a tiny corner of it, whilst maintaining a crippling blockade even on that, invade every few months killing a thousand or two at will…Israel’s generosity is like the ‘generosity of Hitler’.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis is an example of antisemitism.”

The comment was reportedly made in a Facebook debate in relation to the 2014 conflict between Israel and Hamas, and is it is understood that he made the comments before he joined MEND.

Mr Qayum reportedly addressed the post, saying: “I used the word as you would of any nation that had recently used its armed forces to kill thousands of unarmed civilians and NOT as an insult to any people. Having had a huge amount of anti-racism training in my MEND years I would now not use the word ‘Hitler’ in this context, particularly as I now know how some have made antisemitic comments when making comparisons to Nazi Germany.

“However, it was never intended in any way to be antisemitic and any insinuation that it was will be challenged. I will continue to work with all communities, including the Jewish community, to challenge all types of racism and bigotry, including antisemitism.”

Police are investigating after a spate of physical attacks against religious Jews in North London, all apparently at the hands of one assailant.

At least two of the attacks against religious Jews in the heavily Jewish neighbourhood of Stamford Hill have been caught on video.

One incident took place at 19:10 on 18th August on Holmdale Terrace, where the suspect slapped the back of the head of a child (crime reference number CAD6568 20/08/2021).

Another incident took place at 20:30 on the same day at the junction with Colberg Road, where the 64-year-old victim was on his way to synagogue before being struck and left unconscious on the ground. He suffered facial injuries and a broken foot (crime reference number CAD4492 20/08/2021).

Both incidents were reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

The suspect in each video is a man dressed in religious Muslim garb with a black beard, dark skin and dark and thick-rimmed glasses. He was wearing a dark green bomber jacket, white kufi and thwab.

The Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, condemned “this appalling attack,” adding: “Let me be clear, racist abuse and hate crime, including antisemitism, have absolutely no place in our city.” He urged anyone with information to contact the Metropolitan Police.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting the relevant reference number (listed above).

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “These attacks are not ‘random’ in the usual sense: these victims were chosen because they are Jews. Violent antisemitic crimes have surged in recent months, but they have already been prevalent against religious Jews for some time, particularly in Stamford Hill. We applaud the Shomrim for reporting these incidents and urge the police to act swiftly to apprehend the assailant and deliver justice for the victims.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Scottish First Minister and Scottish National Party (SNP) Leader Nicola Sturgeon has reportedly said that she is “committed to tackling” antisemitism.

It was reported last week that Ms Sturgeon met with The Scottish Council of Jewish Communities and Glasgow Jewish Representative Council to discuss the rise in antisemitism, where it was said that she “understood the community’s anxieties” and seemingly expressed a desire to meet with university representatives to help tackle on-campus antisemitism.

Ms Sturgeon said afterwards that the meeting had been “incredibly useful” before adding that “antisemitism will not be tolerated in Scotland and we remain committed to tackling it”.

It is noteworthy, however, that so far this year, three reports have surfaced of SNP members making gratuitous comparisons between a major political party to the Nazis.

In April, an SNP candidate apologised after comments from 2017 emerged in which she had reportedly compared tactics by the Conservatives to Hitler and the Holocaust. Two weeks later, it had been revealed that another SNP candidate posted a comment on Facebook comparing the Labour Party’s political strategy in Scotland to that of the Nazi propagandist Joseph Goebbels.

Last month, an SNP MP apologised for, and deleted, a tweet in which he wrote that “Murdering babies wasn’t on the Nazi manifesto.” However, another tweet in which he appeared to compare the Conservative Party to the Nazis still remains on his Twitter account.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

It was reported yesterday that multiple Jewish graves have been toppled over in Layton, Blackpool.

Photographs posted on Twitter showed the graves lying on their sides and smashed. The graves are believed to belong in the Jewish section of Layton cemetery. The Twitter user wrote that one of the graves was “destroyed and filled with litter”.

It is not yet known whether this was an intentional act or not.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The Australian pop-punk band, The Spazzys, has stated that the band is “shocked and saddened” after it was reported that one of its former band members was involved in posting neo-Nazi hate speech.

An article published on Tuesday alleged that Alice McNamara, the real name of the former band member who performed under the name Ally Spazzy, had “been posting neo-Nazi and anti-lockdown propaganda under an online alias”. The article stated that Ms McNamara was a musician but did not specify her as a member of The Spazzys.

Kat Spazzy, the band’s lead singer, took to Instagram on behalf of both her and Lucy Spazzy, her sister and fellow band member, to voice their joint condemnation of their former band member.

In the comments section of writer Tom Tanuki’s Instagram post, in which he stated that the Alice McNamara named in the article was indeed the former member of The Spazzys, Kat wrote: “It has come to my attention this morning, that Ally Spazzy, a former member of our band, is alleged to have been involved in posting online hate speech. Ally’s views had become increasingly odd, irrational and conspiratorial over recent years, indeed, that is the reason why The Spazzys have not been able to play together for some time.

“We are shocked and saddened to now discover that she is alleged to have been anonymously posting in support of neo nazi beliefs. Lucy Spazzy and I condemn such views in the strongest possible terms. They are abominable and offensive to us. They do not reflect that attitude and character of the band either before or after Ally was a member.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Greater Manchester Police has begun rolling out a virtual reality project which allows its officers to experience what it is like to be the victim of a hate crime.

The first-of-its-kind project is designed to help officers sympathise with hate crime victims.

Officers run through three scenarios with three different victims, all based on true incidents that took place in Manchester but which were not reported to police.

One scenario focuses on antisemitism with elements of misogyny, while the other two cover disability and transgender hate crime.

The antisemitism scenario begins in a synagogue, where the victim – a young woman – tells the wearer of the virtual reality goggles about her experience and how it made her feel. The scene then shifts to a reconstruction of the incident, with the wearer becoming the victim in the scenario, including taking on their height and stance.

In the case of the disability scenario, the wearer also adopts the visual impairment of the victim as well.

The final stage of the scenario keeps the wearer in the position of the victim, but this time in conversation with police officers, one who re-enacts a response that received good victim feedback and the other whose response could be improved.

According to the police force, antisemitic and transgender hate crimes were included because of the surge in the number of incidents, while disability was included because it is considered to be significantly underreported. The fact that all three incidents were not reported is a reminder that many hate crimes and hate incidents go unreported.

Campaign Against Antisemitism was one of a number of organisations that provided input into the various scenarios, and we applaud Greater Manchester Police for its ingenuity in training officers about hate crimes.

Earlier this week, Campaign Against Antisemitism reported on very positive feedback from Cornwall and Devon Police following an antisemitism training series that we provided to the force.

It has been reported that people inside of a vehicle threw a Red bull can at a Jewish pedestrian in Stamford Hill, and then proceeded to yell racist abuse at him.

The reported incident was said to have occurred directly beneath Hackney Council’s number 64 CCTV camera at 23:18 on Tuesday.

The incident is believed to have taken place outside 21 Amhurst Park and was reported today by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123. Hackney Police are reportedly investigating it as a hate crime.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Google

The proscribed group Labour Against the Witchhunt has reportedly told its members to lie about their political affiliation to avoid being kicked out of the Labour Party.

This news comes amidst reports that members of Labour Against the Witchhunt have begun receiving letters of automatic expulsion from Labour for their association to the antisemitism-denial faction.

Last month, Labour’s ruling National Executive Committee (NEC) resolved to proscribe Labour Against the Witchhunt and the disgraced former Labour MP Chris Williamson’s Resist group, as well as two further far-left groups, paving the way for automatic expulsion of their members. It is believed that Labour Against the Witchhunt will be holding events in Brighton during Labour’s conference in the city. 

On its website, Labour Against the Witchhunt writes that some members who are expecting the Labour Party to bring forth charges of association with the banned group have considered saying: “I am not now nor have I ever been a member of Labour Against the Witchhunt.”

Labour Against the Witchhunt adds that its steering committee does not “consider this kind of response to be a betrayal of the comrades’ support for our organisation” but rather “quite the opposite”. It adds: “Comrades should not feel under any moral obligation to tell the truth to the witch-hunters, who have lied, sabotaged and smeared thousands of us. Much better comrades are able to continue the fight against the right wing inside the Labour Party – if they can stomach it.”

It has also been reported that that members of Labour Against the Witchhunt may form a new political party after being purged by the Labour Party.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is pleased to report on very positive feedback to a training series on antisemitism recently delivered to Cornwall and Devon Police.

After engaging with the police force on a particularly difficult case, in which we continue to support the victim, we were invited to deliver a programme of training.

The force observed that the imagery used in the presentation “was very useful,” as were the explanations of why certain videos and songs are offensive to Jewish people. Officers from the Diverse Communities Team described the training as “excellent”, particularly because it drew on the “personal perspectives” of the course leaders, and noted that the training “will support officers and staff in providing the best service to victims.” The Head of Equality, Diversity and Human Rights described the sessions as “highly informative”.

The Assistant Chief Constable found the training “extremely insightful, interesting and eye-opening,” noting that the presenters were “very approachable in their willingness to answer questions,” while the force’s Engagement Officer said that the course “gave me a deeper understanding of the issues faced by the Jewish community.”

One officer said: “I would recommend this training to anyone who wants to know more about antisemitism and for anyone who thinks that there is no longer a problem with hatred against Jews.”

The force submitted requests for additional training.

We are grateful to Devon and Cornwall Police officers for their positive engagement with the training and are confident that they will apply insights into their policing.

Campaign Against Antisemitism regularly provides antisemitism training to regulators, police forces, public bodies, university societies and other institutions, free of charge.

If you would like to arrange antisemitism training for your association, please e-mail [email protected].

A man is facing trial after being accused of creating the website “Radio Aryan” in order to upload antisemitic and racist podcasts.

James Allchurch, 49 from Pembrokeshire, appeared at Haverfordwest Magistrates’ Court yesterday where he denied fifteen counts of distributing a sound recording stirring up racial hatred. He was bailed to appear at Swansea Crown Court on 15th September.

Mr Allchurch reportedly wore a mask, visor and sunglasses, and asked that people refer to him as “Sven Longshanks”. When asked why Mr Allchurch wished to be called Sven Longshanks, he allegedly replied: “This is my life’s work that is on trial and that’s the name that my work is published under.”

The court reportedly heard that Radio Aryan had been running since 2015, and that twelve of the charges related to material allegedly offensive to people from black or ethnic minority communities while three relate to podcasts accused of being antisemitic.

Mr Allchurch reportedly pleaded not guilty to all charges.

It has been reported that at a demonstration held outside Westminster yesterday, an anti-vaccination protester claimed that wearing the yellow star that was forced upon Jews during the Holocaust was the “ultimate tribute” to Holocaust victims.

The protester, identified as Jeff Wyatt, wore a yellow star armband with the words “Not Vaccinated” written below, as well as the German translation of “Nicht Geimpft”. “It’s the ultimate tribute – because where we are heading is where the Jews went,” Mr Wyatt reportedly said.

He added: “Bear in mind in the 1930s, the Nazis didn’t just suddenly become the tyrants they were – they slowly had their evil way over the public of Germany. And the Jews, for years and years, said ‘just do what they say’ – and eventually they gassed them.”

The individual is believed to be the same Jeff Wyatt as the former Deputy Leader of the For Britain Movement who stood as a UKIP candidate in Milton Keynes. The For Britain Movement has been described as a “far-right UKIP splinter group” and has been accused of antisemitism and racism.

On a video uploaded to the official YouTube account for UKIP Cambridge & SE Cambs, Mr Wyatt can be seen talking to the camera at an anti-lockdown rally from last year whilst holding a sign that reads “No Gestapo Policing”.

This is not the first time that the yellow star or comparisons to the Nazis have been used by anti-vaccination demonstrators.

In April, protesters at an anti-vaccination rally held in London were pictured wearing the yellow star. Comedian David Baddiel took to Twitter to share a photo of a woman wearing the yellow star, accompanying it with the caption: “Take. That. Off.”

Footage taken on 13th July showed Piers Corbyn comparing vaccinations to Nazi policy outside the Houses of Parliament, despite being arrested after a similar incident in February. The video shows Mr Corbyn and another man standing in front of a sign which reads “No Nazi forced jab” and yelling “arrest Matt Hancock” through a megaphone. 

The inflammatory and misleading comparison has also been used among international anti-vaccination and anti-lockdown circles.

Earlier this week, we reported that antisemitic protest signs have prompted hate speech and incitement of violence investigations in France. In addition to this, several people have been spotted wearing yellow stars. In March, organisers of an anti-vaccine demonstration in the city of Avignon were described as “brainless” by Eric Ciotti, the Deputy (parliamentarian) for the region, for using the Nazi yellow star in their protest. Joseph Szwarc, a Holocaust survivor, spoke out against these acts, saying: “You can’t imagine how much that upset me. This comparison is hateful. We must all rise up against this ignominy.” With tears in his eyes, Mr Szwarc added: “I wore the star, I know what that is, I still have it in my flesh. It is everyone’s duty to not allow this outrageous, antisemitic, racist wave to pass over us.”

The comparison has been made across the world, including in the United States, Canada, Ukraine and elsewhere.

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

On Tuesday, demonstrators campaigned outside of the headquarters of the actors’ union, Equity, alleging that the union helped to escalate the “upsurge in antisemitism in the UK”.

The protesters, wearing sashes that read “Equity’s Inequity”, said that they represent 300 “usually anonymous theatre-goers, who sit in the dark and applaud” and delivered an open letter to the union condemning its reported association with London’s anti-Israel rallies in May, which were revealed to have been infested with antisemitic chants and signs.

Judith Ornstein, one of the protest’s organisers, said: “How can we enjoy the theatre knowing there are creatives on stage and behind it whose union Equity has made them unsafe?”

Speaking of the “vile antisemitism and violence” that occurred at some of the anti-Israel rallies, Ms Ornstein said that “A union should protect and support its members. All its members.” She added that Paul Fleming, Equity’s General Secretary, “should have made that his priority.”

Ms Ornstein stated that the demonstrators called upon Mr Fleming and Equity President Maureen Beattie “to acknowledge how ill-judged and partisan their intervention has been, and also its role in escalating the upsurge in antisemitism in the UK”.

The open letter said that both Mr Fleming and Ms Beattie should “undertake antisemitism awareness training and rebuild bridges with those union members they have let down”. 

In a video uploaded to Twitter by Ms Ornstein, the protesters can be seen outside Equity headquarters. Speaking to the camera, fellow demonstrator Dany Louise said: “It was very predictable that there would be a lot of antisemitism at that rally, and indeed there was. It was blatant, naked antisemitism on the streets of London. Equity was there, and Equity did not call it out, and we feel that this does a real disservice to its members who will not all agree with that position, and indeed, several have left as a result.”

In May, Dame Maureen Lipman, who was a member of Equity for 54 years before leaving after the union voiced its support for the anti-Israel demonstrations, warned Jewish members to “get the hell out”, adding: “I didn’t join a political union. I joined a union to protect its members. You don’t dictate to artists what they believe in, and don’t incite them to join a mob.”

The actress and columnist, Tracy-Ann Oberman, was another leading figure who criticised Equity, asking on Twitter: “How are UK Jewish performers and friends meant to feel safe?”

Demonstrators are seen in the video delivering the open letter to staff at Equity headquarters, before Ms Ornstein states how the anti-Israel demonstrations were “poisoned by antisemitism”. She said: “Paul Fleming should have known that five days before his call [urging Equity members to attend another anti-Israel rally], a convoy of cars displaying Palestine flags drove through Jewish areas of London. Through a megaphone, they shouted ‘f**k their mothers, rape their daughters’. Paul Fleming should have known that Jewish women had to lock themselves into their homes. Paul Fleming should have known the rallies were tainted.”

“We have done what we were going to do. We have seen Equity’s inequity. We don’t know what difference it will make but they need to know that we’re not going anywhere,” Ms Ornstein added.

Dany Louise is also a former councillor who bravely resigned from the Labour Party in 2019 and spearheaded the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism in Hastings Borough Council.

Ms Louise gave an impassioned speech at the meeting, saying: “In the last few years, antisemitism has entered the national public discourse in a truly frightening and morally repugnant way. Where once it was the preserve of the far right, it has now become commonplace on the left as well. Shockingly, there has been widespread denial of this fact, with far too many people somehow casting it as yet another Jewish conspiracy theory. The denial itself has become another form of antisemitism, enthusiastically entertained by many who would otherwise call themselves part of the Community of the Good.”

She also rightly noted that the eleven examples “are indivisible from the Definition”, and that any “modified version” of the Definition is “no longer the…Definition”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to all MPs calling on them to ask the Home Secretary to proscribe the Hamas terrorist group in its entirety in the UK under the Terrorism Act 2000.

Last month, we provided Priti Patel with a dossier making the case for the proscription of the genocidal antisemitic terrorist organisation. We have also now made the dossier available to MPs from all parties, urging them to write to the Home Secretary.

There exists a loophole in British law that allows Hamas to operate in the UK. Following the recent record-breaking surge in antisemitism in Britain during the conflict between Hamas and Israel, the time has undoubtedly come to close the loophole: it is time to proscribe Hamas in its entirety.

Hamas’ ideology and activities are Islamist, nationalist, antisemitic, misogynistic and homophobic. Many also consider its militant teachings to be a corruption of Islam.

Currently, the UK only proscribes the Izz al-Din al-Qassam Brigades — the so-called ‘military wing’ of the terrorist group — relying until now on the European Union’s proscription of the entirety of Hamas as a de facto ban in the UK. Following the UK’s exit from the European Union, however, this reliance is no longer tenable, and the UK must now act to proscribe the entirety of Hamas.

There is no material distinction between the supposed ‘wings’ of Hamas, which share the same personnel and where political leaders launch military operations. However, because of this loophole, Hamas flags can be flown, its ideology can be promoted, funds can be raised, material can be disseminated, and its representatives can operate in the UK.

Over the years—and particularly in the last couple of months—our Demonstrations and Events Monitoring Unit has found evidence of support for Hamas on British streets, and this is undoubtedly tied to the recent surge in domestic antisemitism.

The proscription of the Islamist terrorist group Hizballah in its entirety in 2019 can serve as a case study for a similar ban of Hamas. Just as the proscription of Hizballah in its entirety, following a long campaign by CAA and others, sent a powerful message to the Jewish community — and Islamists — that antisemitism and terrorism will not be tolerated in the UK, so would the proscription of Hamas, particularly at a time of a record-breaking surge in antisemitism in Britain.

The first ever poll on the subject, conducted by Campaign Against Antisemitism last year, showed that an overwhelming 91% of British Jews want the Government to proscribe Hamas in its entirety.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is intolerable that Hamas representatives and supporters can operate in the UK on the pretence that they only back the group’s supposed ‘political wing’. There is no distinction between the units of this Islamist, antisemitic, misogynistic and homophobic terrorist organisation. Support for Hamas is tied to the recent surge in anti-Jewish racism on British streets. The Home Secretary must move to protect British Jews by banning Hamas in its entirety in the UK.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds Labour Party councillors in Bassetlaw after they apologised for ‘liking’ a fellow councillor’s Facebook post which compared the Conservative Party to Adolf Hitler’s SS.

The SS, the abbreviation of Schutzstaffel, was the leading paramilitary organisation under Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party.

Ian Ampleford, a Momentum activist, shared a Facebook post explaining that he had been banned from a Facebook group because he “made an innocent post comparing the Tories to the SS”. He added sarcastically: “I would like to take this opportunity to apologise unreservedly to anyone who voted for a German military organisation at the last general election.”

It is understood that Mr Ampleford’s original message, leading to his ban from the group, stated that his SS grandfather “would be proud of what the Tories have done to Britain”. This post was reportedly “liked” by Claire Plevin, a councillor for the ward of East Retford North.

Following this, East Retford West councillor, Jim Anderson, added to the inflammatory comparison with a post of his own, in which he stated that he was not surprised that Mr Ampleford had been “blackshirted”. He added: “Surely most self respecting SS thinkers would be appalled at being linked in such a way.” This post was then “liked” by Cllr Clarkson, the current Mayor of Retford.

Campaign Against Antisemitism called on the councillors to apologise. A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism told the Daily Express: “There is no reasonable basis for this offensive compariason. Such trivial equations of today’s politics with the darkest period in human history diminish the meaning and memory of the Holocaust. This is the opposite of the example politicians are supposed to be setting, both about Holocaust education and how to conduct public debate. Labour councillors must apologise.”

All three councillors were criticised by their Labour colleagues and fellow councillors, and were reportedly approached for comment by the media.

Cllr Clarkson said: “I would like to make an unreserved apology. I hold my hands up for innocently and naively liking a post by Jim Anderson as I was flicking through Facebook. I did not read the actual post, so did not know the context. I was merely liking a picture of what I assumed was Jim sat with a glass of wine and a copy of Private Eye whilst he was on holiday. That is my mistake and one which I will certainly learn from.”

He added: “I wholeheartedly support the Campaign Against Antisemitism’s comment that there is no excuse for comparing modern day politicians to the Nazis. Indeed, those with whom I have worked and been acquainted with over many years know that I would never sink to make these kind of comparisons and/or refer to Nazism or the Holocaust in any way other than within its historical context. Once again, I give my unreserved apology for any hurt that may have been caused by my flippant liking of an image on social media without reading the text associated with it.”

Cllr Plevin said: “My actions were wrong and inappropriate, and I apologise unreservedly.”

We applaud Cllr Clarkson and Cllr Plevin for recognising the impropriety of their endorsements of the inflammatory posts and apologising. No apology from Cllr Anderson – who posted one of the inflammatory comments himself – has yet been reported, and we call on him to follow his colleagues’ example.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The notorious antisemite Alison Chabloz has today humiliatingly been sent back to prison for seven weeks after losing her own appeal last week.

The appeal was against her conviction under section 127 of the Communications Act for sending by a public communications network an offensive, indecent message or material. That conviction was secured following action by Campaign Against Antisemitism, which has been pursuing justice against Ms Chabloz for years.

Ms Chabloz had been held on remand since the two-day hearing before Judge Martin Beddoe at Southwark Crown Court ended last Friday, with sentencing due to take place on Monday. However, the court had not yet heard from the probation service about which elements of Ms Chabloz’s original sentence – nine weeks in prison (half of an eighteen week sentence), 180 hours of unpaid work and twenty days of Rehabilitation Activity Requirement (RAR) – had been served. The prosecution noted on Monday that “it’s a concern of the prosecution that she will do exactly the same thing again,” that Ms Chabloz has an “obsession” with Jewish people and Judaism and is “incapable of not abusing Jewish people,” and therefore should be sentenced accordingly. Without a complete update from the probation order, the court adjourned until this morning.

Today, the probation officer took the stand and revealed that, after serving her custodial sentence, Ms Chabloz had only served 43 of the 180-hour unpaid work requirement and only four days of RAR. Ms Chabloz had disputed part of this testimony, with Judge Beddoe, sitting today with magistrates, cautioning her: “If you don’t shut up, I’ll have to send you downstairs. Please be quiet. Just stop. This is the last order!”

“These records have a lot to be desired,” Judge Beddoe observed, noting that he would need to make adjustments to his anticipated sentence. After a brief adjournment, Judge Beddoe reminded Ms Chabloz that “you knew when you lodged the appeal and persisted that the sentence would be at large should it fail.” This is because defendants convicted in magistrates’ court, as Ms Chabloz was, are usually given leave to appeal their cases to a crown court, but with the risk that, if their appeal is dismissed, there is a possibility that their sentence may be increased.

Judge Beddoe noted that “the first of the offences was barely one month after the suspended sentence order and the second for the same thing was two months after that” and denied Ms Chabloz’s earlier claim that hate crimes do not generate violence, adding that the court’s experience was “that they very much do.”

Ms Chabloz presented herself as a victim of online trolling, claiming also that she lost her job in 2014 after someone wrote to her employer about her antisemitic views. Judge Beddoe dismissed these contentions, observing that this was the result of her behaviour, and that if she changed her ways, the supposed trolling would likely cease. He concluded that “there’s no mitigation that we can find.” Observing further that “there’s no remorse on your part, simply defiance,” he concluded that the enhanced sentencing is “entirely a consequence of your actions.”

Ms Chabloz was sentenced to 32 weeks in prison, which represents both an uplift from the original eighteen-week sentence and the re-imposition of part of the suspended sentence that Ms Chabloz received in her first conviction in 2018. That verdict arose from a private prosecution by Campaign Against Antisemitism that was later continued by the Crown Prosecution Service and set a major legal precedent, as Ms Chabloz became the first person in Britain to be convicted over Holocaust denial.

She must serve half of this 32-week sentence, i.e. sixteen weeks, of which she has already served nine, leaving seven weeks of the custodial sentence to be served. There is no criminal behaviour order, because the court did not consider that such an order would prevent Ms Chabloz from re-offending, but she must pay the court £1,800. Judge Beddoe warned her that, if she is convicted again, the sentence will be “merely more severe next time.”

On leaving court, Ms Chabloz was heard calling out: “I hope to have a jury trial next time.”

Ms Chabloz’s conviction arose on the basis of the previous landmark precedent secured against her by Campaign Against Antisemitism over her obsessive Holocaust denial used to hound Jews. Some of the offences of which Ms Chabloz was convicted in her more recent case arose from comments that she made on Graham Hart’s internet radio show. Since her earlier conviction and incarceration, Mr Hart, who called Jews “filth” and asked listeners for a gun, pleaded guilty to eight charges under the Public Order Act 1986 after investigations by Campaign Against Antisemitism, and was sentenced to 32 months in prison, of which he will serve half.

Ms Chabloz is a virulent antisemite and Holocaust denier who has an extensive record of using social media to publicise her hatred for Jews and to convert others to her views about Jewish people. She is fixated on the idea that the Holocaust did not occur, and that it was fabricated by Jews and their supporters as a vehicle for fraudulently extorting money in the form of reparations. This forms the basis for her second obsession, that Jews are liars and thieves who are working to undermine Western society. Ms Chabloz is also connected to extremist right-wing movements, at whose meetings she gives speeches and performs her songs, in the UK, France and North America. 

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Six years ago, we watched in horror as Alison Chabloz made liberal use of social media to abuse and harass the descendants of Holocaust victims, accuse Jews of endorsing paedophilia and murdering Christian children and bait rabbis with tweets that exonerated Hitler. We decided then that, however long it took and whatever obstacles were put in our way, we would ensure that British Jews were protected against her virulent antisemitism.

“With this enhanced custodial sentence that draws together her numerous convictions, she is now reaping the rewards of her own hateful behaviour. Jew haters like Ms Chabloz and the recently-convicted radio host Graham Hart now know that we will not rest in our defence of the Jewish community. Others with similar views should take note.”

In separate proceedings also resulting from action by Campaign Against Antisemitism, Ms Chabloz is due back in court on 1st September to be tried for further alleged offences under the Communications Act (the original charges have been downgraded to this lesser offence). 

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

John Ware, the maker of the BBC Panorama documentary “Is Labour Antisemitic”, has won the first stage of his libel lawsuit against two members of the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, Jewish Voice for Labour (JVL).

The libel action concerns comments made by Naomi Wimborne-Idrissi, one of the group’s founders and its Media Officer, on Jeremy Vine’s BBC Radio 2 show, in which she claimed that Mr Ware allegedly had a “terrible record of Islamophobia, far-right politics” and that the BBC had in the past had to “apologise” for his journalism and discipline him.

The claims were then repeated on the JVL website, and JVL’s Web Officer, Richard Kuper, is also a defendant. Mr Kuper is the founder of Pluto Press, which was previously the publishing arm of the International Socialists, now known as the Socialist Workers Party.

Mr Ware denies the claims made by Ms Wimborne-Idrissi.

The programme, which was televised in July 2019, showed former Labour Party employees speaking out publicly to reveal Jeremy Corbyn’s personal meddling in disciplinary cases relating to antisemitism. The programme explained how senior Labour Party staffers, some of whom Campaign Against Antisemitism has known for years, used to run Labour’s disciplinary process independently, but soon after Mr Corbyn’s election as Party leader found themselves contending with his most senior aides, who were brazen in their efforts to subvert due process. During the programme Labour’s press team made claims that the staffers featured had political axes to grind and lacked credibility, and the whistleblowers and Mr Ware commenced libel proceedings against the Labour Party.

At a preliminary hearing to determine the ordinary meaning of Ms Wimborne- Idrissi’s words, she argued that they were just “honest opinion.” However, Mrs Justice Steyn ruled that reasonable listeners would have understood the comments as statements of fact, namely that Mr Ware had “engaged in Islamophobia and extreme, far right politics, as a consequence of which the BBC has had to apologise for his conduct,” and that there were “reasonable grounds to suspect” that Mr Ware “has an extensive record of Islamophobia and of involvement in extreme, far’right politics.”

Mr Ware has observed that he has never been disciplined on any matter by the BBC, has no “record of Islamophobia” and has never promoted “extreme far-right politics”. Following this ruling, Ms Wimborne-Idrissi will have to prove that these assertions of fact are true, which is a higher threshold than showing that they are mere honest opinions.

Mr Ware said: “I’m pleased to have prevailed at this first stage of the proceedings and look forward to clearing my name from these very hurtful and false allegations that they have made against me. They need to understand that there’s a high price to pay if you go around making false claims. The accusations that I am an ‘Islamophobe, racist and engaged in far-right politics’ are grossly offensive. The Court will decide whether they are lies.”

Mr Ware’s cases have been brought by Mark Lewis, a highly esteemed media lawyer who is also an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Mr Lewis said that “the case will now fight on to trial so that John can prove that these allegations were completely baseless. It’s one thing to hold a different opinion but you can’t have different facts.”

Several weeks ago, Ms Wimborne-Idrissi was reportedly removed from Chingford and Woodford Green Constituency Labour Party’s executive committee.

Mr Ware is also reportedly suing the editor of the Press Gang blog, Paddy French, over claims made by Mr French that the Panorama documentary “bent the truth to breaking point” and that Mr Ware was a “rogue reporter.” Last February, Mr Ware won the first stage of that libel action as well, leaving Mr French having to defend his statements as assertions of fact.

Previously, in explaining why he was commencing these libel lawsuits, Mr Ware said: “It was an unwritten code amongst we journalists that we don’t sue because free speech is sacrosanct, but the world has changed thanks to social media.  You either accept and shrug your shoulders when people call you a liar and say you fabricated evidence and deliberately promoted falsehoods – as the Labour Party did – or you decide to do something about it. So I decided to do something about it.”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Police are investigating an assault on a Jewish pensioner that occurred outside a theatre in London’s West End.

Ronnie Phillips, 72, was leaving a performance of Leopoldstadt, a play about the Holocaust, at Wyndham’s Theatre last Thursday when he was “slapped round the head and his kippah thrown to the ground”, according to his wife Emma.

The Metropolitan Police said that officers attended “Charing Cross Road, WC2 shortly before 22:10hrs on Thursday 12th August to reports of a religiously-aggravated assault. Officers spoke to the victim. He was not injured during the incident. Enquiries are ongoing, no arrests. Anyone with information should call police on 101 or tweet @MetCC quoting 7778/12Aug.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Ken Loach has been expelled from Labour Party.

Writing on Twitter, the controversial filmmaker said: “Labour HQ finally decided I’m not fit to be a member of their party, as I will not disown those already expelled. Well, I am proud to stand with the good friends and comrades victimised by the purge. There is indeed a witch hunt. [Sir Keir] Starmer and his clique will never lead a party of the people. We are many, they are few. Solidarity.”

Among the MPs calling for the outspoken director to be reinstated to the Party are the members of the Socialist Campaign Group, which includes former Party leader and antisemite, Jeremy Corbyn, former Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell, former Shadow Home Secretary Diane Abbott, former Shadow Justice Secretary Richard Burgon, former Shadow Education Secretary Rebecca Long-Bailey, and backbench MPs Apsana BegumTahir Ali and Zarah Sultana. The Group described Mr Loach as “an outstanding socialist and a fierce opponent of discrimination in all its forms” whose films embody that values of “solidarity, compassion, equality”.

Mr McDonnell also tweeted: “To expel such a fine socialist who has done so much to further the cause of socialism is a disgrace. Ken’s films have exposed the inequalities in our society, have given us hope for change & inspired us to fight back. I send my solidarity to my friend and comrade.”

Mr Loach’s voice has been among the loudest of those who attempt to dismiss Labour’s antisemitism crisis as non-existent and a right-wing smear campaign. He claimed that Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn was subjected to a “torrent of abuse” that was “off the scale” and that regardless of what he did, the “campaign” of antisemitism accusations was “going to run and run”. He described the BBC’s Panorama investigation into Labour antisemitism as “disgusting because it raised the horror of racism against Jews in the most atrocious propagandistic way, with crude journalism…and it bought the propaganda from people who were intent on destroying Corbyn.”

He was also reportedly behind a motion passed by Bath Labour Party branding the Panorama programme a “dishonest hatchet job with potentially undemocratic consequences” and asserting that it “disgraced the name of Panorama and exposed the bias endemic within the BBC.” John Ware, the programme’s reporter, is apparently considering legal action against Mr Loach for his comments.

In 2017, Mr Loach caused outrage when, during an interview with the BBC, he refused to denounce Holocaust denial. The International Definition of Antisemitism states that “denying the fact, scope, mechanisms (e.g. gas chambers) or intentionality of the genocide of the Jewish people at the hands of National Socialist Germany and its supporters and accomplices during World War II (the Holocaust)” is a manifestation of antisemitism. Although Mr Loach later sought to clarify his remarks, he has continued to make inflammatory and provocative statements about Labour’s antisemitism scandal.

While speaking at a meeting of the Kingswood Constituency Labour Party, Mr Loach advocated the removal from the Party of those Labour MPs, some of whom are Jewish, who have taken a principled stand against antisemitism. Shortly after that incident, the Labour Party announced that it would no longer use Mr Loach as a producer of their election broadcasts.

There were also reports that members of Labour Against the Witchhunt have begun receiving letters of automatic expulsion from Labour for their association to the antisemitism-denial faction.

Last month, Labour’s ruling National Executive Committee (NEC) resolved to proscribe Labour Against the Witchhunt and the disgraced former Labour MP Chris Williamson’s Resist group, as well as two further far-left groups, paving the way for automatic expulsion of their members. It is believed that Labour Against the Witchhunt will be holding events in Brighton during Labour’s conference in the city. 

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “The apparent expulsion of Ken Loach is welcome news. He has been at the forefront of denying the scale of antisemitism in the Labour Party and gaslighting its Jewish victims. Labour cannot restore its anti-racist legacy with people like Mr Loach as members, so this, along with the reported automatic expulsion of members of Labour Against the Witchhunt, are a steps in the right direction.”

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Lancashire Police are looking into an incident of vile abuse that was reportedly sent from an Asda employee.

Yesterday, a Twitter user shared a screenshot revealing a torrent of abusive messages that they had received from someone on Facebook. The messages included calling the individual a “dirty Jew” that needed “gassing”, as well as a “Jewish c*nt”.

Accompanying the screenshot, the Twitter user wrote: “@AsdaServiceTeam @asda This disgusting, hate-filled antisemite states, on Facebook, that they work for you… @LancsPolice Please investigate this individual.”

Three hours later, Lancashire Police responded on Twitter, writing: “Hi there, thank you for raising your concern about this. We were made aware of this incident earlier today and can assure you that we are dealing with it appropriately. Thanks.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

Image credit: Google

Notorious antisemite Alison Chabloz has humiliatingly been sent back to prison on remand, pending sentencing on Monday, after losing her own appeal.

The appeal was against her conviction under section 127 of the Communications Act for sending by a public communications network an offensive, indecent message or material. That conviction was secured following action by Campaign Against Antisemitism, which had been pursuing justice against Ms Chabloz for over four years.

In a two-day hearing at Southwark Crown Court on Thursday and Friday, Ms Chabloz, 57, sought to have her conviction overturned, having already served nine weeks in prison, representing half of her original eighteen week sentence. Defendants convicted in magistrates’ court are usually given leave to appeal their cases to a crown court, but with the risk that, if their appeal is dismissed, there is a possibility that their sentence may be increased. This looks likely to happen on Monday, after Ms Chabloz’s appeal was dismissed on Friday and she was held on remand, pending sentencing on Monday.

Judge Martin Beddoe said that he made his judgment in accordance with “standards of an open and multiracial society,” and that “the prosecution is proportionate in response to a pressing social need.” He also stated that there are consequences for being found guilty of being grossly offensive, as Ms Chabloz has been.

In his remarks, Judge Beddoe highlighted Ms Chabloz’s “hostility to people of Jewish extraction” and her “irrational” views and “misguided beliefs.” He said that he was quite sure that her grossly offensive statements were “deliberately said.”

Over the course of the hearing, Ms Chabloz said that she was upset that “an English court is applying the dictatorship of opinion imposed by Zionist organisations”, on several occasions also mentioning Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Director of Investigations and Enforcement by name.

Ms Chabloz, whose conviction arose on the basis of a previous landmark precedent secured against her by Campaign Against Antisemitism over her obsessive Holocaust denial used to hound Jews, also told the court this week that Jewish people turn their children into “psychopathic maniacs” by teaching them about the Holocaust, which she described as “frantic babble”.

She added that “English Zionists work together in their own group interests” and at one point declared that she would like English people to “remain the majority in my country.” Judge Beddoe asked her “Who is English? How do you distinguish?” She answered: “By identity and ethnicity.” The judge pressed her, “Are Jewish people in your view English?” to which she responded: “They may be half-English or a quarter English.”.

In her defence, Ms Chabloz claimed that she has Jewish collaborators in her work, has taught Jewish songs to children and that she received support from Jewish people while she was in prison. Scarce evidence was provided to support most of these contentions.

Her testimony was rambling, with the judge castigating her for failing to answer questions and even her own counsel urging her at times to focus. Despite this, she continued to insist that “the Holocaust narrative” is fraudulent, referring to “all the fake survivors who survived” and accusing the Auschwitz Museum of being “a fraudulent enterprise.”

She also repeated her claim that “the Holocaust is a state religion here and in the West,” and accused Jews of being “the main group behind clamping down on freedom of expression.”

Some of the offences of which Ms Chabloz was convicted arose from comments that she made on Graham Hart’s internet radio show. Since her earlier conviction and incarceration, Mr Hart pleaded guilty to eight charges under the Public Order Act 1986 after investigations by Campaign Against Antisemitism, and was sentenced to thirty-two months in prison, of which he will serve half.

Ms Chabloz is a virulent antisemite and Holocaust denier who has an extensive record of using social media to publicise her hatred for Jews and to convert others to her views about Jewish people. Following a private prosecution by Campaign Against Antisemitism, which was later continued by the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), Ms Chabloz became the first person in Britain to be convicted over Holocaust denial in a precedent-setting case. Ms Chabloz previously spent a short time in custody for breaching the conditions of her sentence, but this will be her first substantial period in prison.

Ms Chabloz is fixated on the idea that the Holocaust did not occur, and that it was fabricated by Jews and their supporters as a vehicle for fraudulently extorting money in the form of reparations. This forms the basis for her second obsession, that Jews are liars and thieves who are working to undermine Western society. Ms Chabloz is also connected to extremist right-wing movements, at whose meetings she gives speeches and performs her songs, in the UK, France and North America. 

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Alison Chabloz’s repulsive opinions about Jews can be traced back to the beer halls of 1930s Germany. The dismissal of her appeal affirms the just decision of the magistrates’ court and its decision to incarcerate her, signaling that the judiciary is united in its disgust of people who make a vocation out of denying the Holocaust and baiting Jews. The likely enhancement of her sentence, which is entirely of her own making, is nothing less than she deserves.

“This decision comes on the heels of the imprisonment of Graham Hart, on whose radio show Ms Chabloz made some of the comments that lead to her conviction. We will continue to ensure not only that individual antisemites are brought to justice, but that their networks of indoctrination are disrupted as well.”

In separate proceedings also resulting from action by Campaign Against Antisemitism, Ms Chabloz is due back in court on 1st September to be tried for further alleged offences under the Communications Act (the original charges have been downgraded to this lesser offence). 

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds Moorlands Collegefor adding a ground-breaking explanatory note to its editions of Kittel.

The Theological Dictionary of the New Testament, edited in part by Gerhard Kittel and known colloquially as “Kittel”, is a reference book openly available in Christian seminaries. While we recognise that it is a useful resource, we are also acutely aware that its editor and some early contributors, for example K.G. Kuhn, were supporters and propagators of Nazi ideology. Mr Kittel and Mr Kuhn were particularly engaged with the “Jewish Question” and actively developed and encouraged antisemitic ideology and conduct. The former claimed that Christianity should act “not as a protector of the Jew but as an effective anti-Jewish force”, while the latter, who supported Hitler’s SS, was a member of the Committee for Jewish Atrocity Propaganda, which arranged the 1933 boycott of Jews. There is no shortage of evidence of their worldview.

The particular issue with Kittel is not merely the views of its editors and contributors, but that their views subtly but significantly impact its content, and therefore it behoves educational institutions to make their students aware of this influence when they consult the resource.

As Prof. Maurice Casey warns in his article, Some Antisemitic Assumptions in the Theological Dictionary of the New Testament (1999): “The frames of reference never lie on the surface of the articles: they are buried in apparently historical statements. It follows that this dictionary should be used only with the utmost care. Students should be warned of this hidden menace, and all readers should consult it only with their critical wits sharpened to the highest degree.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has accordingly written to numerous seminaries to inquire as to whether they make Kittel available to their students and, if so, urge them to include an explanatory note, which will assist both their students’ wider awareness of the historical influences on the resources that they use and also contribute to positive communal relations between Christians and Jews in the next generation.

Moorlands College, which has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism, is the first institution holding Kittel to respond positively to our inquiry and request for an explanatory note. Moorlands College has willingly agreed to add the following ground-breaking explanatory note to its editions of Kittel:

“Readers of this multi-volume Dictionary should be aware that its first and main editor, Gerhard Kittel (1888-1948) was a member of the Nazi Party in Germany from 1933-1945. During this time, he wrote and lectured publicly on the so-called Judenfrage or ‘Jewish Problem’, repeating Nazi-fuelled antisemitic tropes and supporting the Nuremberg Racial Laws, which stripped Jews of German citizenship and various other rights. There is some debate about the precise degree to which Kittel’s Nazism affected his own exegetical work, but his associate and fellow Nazi K.G. Kuhn contributed this Dictionary’s entry on ‘Israel, Judah and Hebrews’ in Vol. 3. That entry was critiqued by Maurice Casey in a 1999 Novum Testamentum article (41:3, 280-91) for falsely suggesting that in the Intertestamental and NT era ‘Jew’ was used by some Jewish sources in a self-hating manner – a notion used by the Nazis to bolster their antisemitic propaganda. Casey also highlights the comments on Persistence in Prayer by W. Grundmann in Vol. 3 (kartereo etc) as suggesting that Jesus consistently rejected Jewish models of prayer, when this was not the case; Grundmann was a member not only of the Nazi Party, but of the SS.

“While many other entries in the Dictionary bear no obvious trace of antisemitism, and while later volumes were produced after Kittel’s death, readers are encouraged to approach it with this background in mind, and with their critical faculties suitably sharpened. Moorlands College has fully adopted the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA) Working Definition of Antisemitism and utterly repudiates antisemitism as contradicting the Gospel of Jesus Christ and the College’s Basis of Faith.”

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We are incredibly proud of Moorlands College for acting as a model to other seminaries and educational institutions of all kinds for honouring its commitment to its students by giving them the fullest background of the resources they use and by instilling in them the importance of positive relations between faith communities. At Campaign Against Antisemitism, we try to act by the same principles, and I am indebted to our Christian colleagues for leading on this project. We now call on other seminaries to follow Moorlands’ example and add similar explanatory notes to their editions of Kittel.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism works to raise awareness of antisemitism among all faith and minority communities.

It was reported this week that the Labour Party is investigating Jenny Manson over comments she had made in an interview on BBC2’s Newsnight in November.

Ms Manson is the Co-Chair of Jewish Voice for Labour (JVL), the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation.

The interview began by discussing the antisemitic former Party leader Jeremy Corbyn’s reaction to the report into Labour antisemitism by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC), remarks that saw him get suspended from the Labour Party. Mr Corbyn had said: “Anyone claiming there is no antisemitism in the Labour Party is wrong. Of course there is, as there is throughout society, and sometimes it is voiced by people who think of themselves as on the left. Jewish members of our party and the wider community were right to expect us to deal with it, and I regret that it took longer to deliver that change than it should. One antisemite is one too many, but the scale of the problem was also dramatically overstated for political reasons by our opponents inside and outside the party, as well as by much of the media. That combination hurt Jewish people and must never be repeated.”

When asked on Newsnight immediately after the suspension why Mr Corbyn did not apologise, Ms Manson responded by saying: “Because, many of us know that these claims have been exaggerated.” Later in the interview she reiterated the sentiment, stating: “A lot of us would say, like he said, that the allegations were over-exaggerated, partly by the media.”

This week, Ms Manson reportedly confirmed that she has been issued a “notice of investigation” in an e-mail owing to her comments made during the programme.

Sir Keir Starmer has previously declared that anyone who thinks that accusations of antisemitism in the Labour Party are “exaggerated or a factional attack…are part of the problem” and “should be nowhere near the Labour Party”.

Last month, we reported that Naomi Wimborne-Idrissi, JVL’s Co-founder and Media Officer, had been removed from Chingford and Woodford Green constituency Labour Party’s (CLP) executive committee.

The Labour Party was found by the EHRC to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Two men have allegedly assaulted two Jewish customers at a bicycle shop in Bournemouth.

Two men, who were returning their bicycles after a rental session, unleashed a tirade, which continued for some time, telling them: “F*** all the Jews, Allah will kill you all” and “Free Palestine”.

The two Jewish customers, who were speaking to the owner of the shop about renting bicycles, reported that, based on the assailants’ body language and hand gestures, they believed that the assailants were going to attack them physically. Legally, an assault is an attack in which violence is feared, even if it does not materialise.

The victims took photographs of the two alleged suspects.

The alleged incident took place at 15:55 on 3rd August at outside Front Bike Hire at Bournemouth beach and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: 5521 0129 860.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “This is just the latest incident in a record-breaking surge of anti-Jewish racism in Britain in the wake of the war between Hamas and Israel. Jewish people should be as free to live and holiday in Bournemouth without racist harassment as anyone else. There are clear photographs of the suspects so we expect a swift investigation.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 showed that three in five British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

Bedfordshire Police have removed a Nazi skull and crossbones flag flying outside a private home.

The flag bore the symbol of the SS-Totenkopfverbände (SS-TV), or ‘Death’s Head Units’, which were responsible for administering concentration camps and death camps in Nazi-controlled territories.

The flag was reported to the police, who visited the residence and issued a Community Resolution Order requiring the owner to remove it, which they did. The case was reported as a hate incident, as flying that flag is not a crime.

A spokesperson for Bedfordshire Police told the Bedford Independent: “Officers visited the resident who claimed it was his right to fly the flag. It was not a criminal act and was dealt with by way of a Community Resolution Order with the resident agreeing to take it down.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A Pro-Corbyn faction within the Labour Party is reportedly planning to present a motion at the Party’s conference in September to reinstate the whip to Jeremy Corbyn.

The proposal, drafted by the Campaign for Labour Party Democracy, would hand power over Labour’s disciplinary process as it affects MPs to members, enabling them to restore Mr Corbyn to the Parliamentary Labour Party (PLP), from which he is indefinitely suspended.

The move is seen as a challenge by the far-left within the Party against Sir Keir Starmer, but Party sources have apparently dismissed the threat, insisting that Mr Corbyn has the power to return to the PLP himself by apologising. Motions that are legally impracticable can be prevented from coming forward at conference.

Last month, Labour’s ruling National Executive Committee (NEC) resolved, in line with Labour’s Action Plan agreed with the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC), to put forward a semi-independent disciplinary system for a vote at this year’s Party conference. The proposal is still subject to approval at conference, and it remains to be seen whether Labour’s leadership is capable of implementing it in practice.

The NEC also voted to proscribe Labour Against the Witchhunt – an antisemitism-denial group – and the disgraced former Labour MP Chris Williamson’s Resist group, as well as two further far-left groups, paving the way for automatic expulsion of their members. It is believed that Labour Against the Witchhunt will be holding events in Brighton during Labour’s conference in the city.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has lodged a complaint against Jeremy Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day of the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is regrettable that pro-Corbyn factions in Labour are looking to use the Party’s conference to sabotage the Action Plan agreed between Labour and the EHRC, which calls for an independent disciplinary process. Far from having the whip restored, Jeremy Corbyn should be expelled from the Party. Antisemitism-denial groups also intend to hold parallel events alongside the conference, which is part of the same enterprise to continue denying the scale of anti-Jewish racism in the Labour Party and stymie any progress in reversing the trend. This autumn will see a fight for Labour’s soul, and all eyes will be on the Party’s leadership to see whether it has the courage to win it.”

The Labour Party was found by the EHRC to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Barely one year after his antisemitic social media rampage, Wiley has been accepted back on Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

On 24th July 2020, the rapper Richard Kylea Cowie, who is known as Wiley, spent days engaged in an escalating rant on social media against Jews. After likening Jews to the Ku Klux Klan and claiming that Jews had cheated him and were “snakes”, Wiley tweeted that Jews should “hold some corn”, a slang expression meaning that they should be shot. He added: “Jewish community you deserve it”. He then also called on “black people” to go to “war” with Jews.

Wiley repeatedly evoked conspiracy theories that Jews were responsible for the slave trade and that modern-day Jews are in fact imposters who usurped black people — a conspiracy theory that has incited acts of terrorism against Jews, such as a shooting in Jersey City and a stabbing attack in Monsey, NY during the festival of Chanukah last December.

In the days that followed, Wiley continued to rail against Jews on Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. Following discussions with Campaign Against Antisemitism, a major 48-hour boycott of Twitter and Instagram in which we participated, and our projection of antisemitic tweets onto Twitter’s London headquarters, which then went viral, TwitterFacebook (which owns Instagram), Google (which owns YouTube) and TikTok agreed to remove Wiley from their platforms, depriving him of access to his nearly one million social media followers.

However, it appears that all is forgiven as Wiley is once again active on Twitter, Instagram and YouTube in what is just the latest example of social media platforms not taking antisemitism seriously.

A few weeks ago, newly returned to Twitter, Wiley tweeted: “In all my years on earth I realised everyone wants you to care about their stuff like Holocaust etc but not one of them give a f*** about the enslavement and f***ery of black people so it’s hard for me to care for them knowing they don’t care for us #YaGetIt #JusSayin”

Recently, we published a major report that shows how Twitter fails to implement consistently its own policies on hate. The report showed how Twitter appointed Campaign Against Antisemitism as a partner to monitor anti-Jewish racism on its platform and promised regular meetings, only to cease those meetings and ignore offers of antisemitism training after we began alerting the company to the inconsistent application of its policies by personnel.

Not only were phrases like “f*** the Jews” not considered to breach Twitter’s rules, but other phrases such as “Hitler was right” were sometimes permitted and sometimes removed, without any form of coherent reasoning. Moreover, one of the few areas where Twitter has in the past said that it would take action is over Holocaust denial, pledging to remove “attempts to deny or diminish” violent events such as the Shoah. Our report, however, shows that Twitter personnel repeatedly raised no objection to phrases such as “#Holohoax” and other, more elaborate tweets of Holocaust denial.

A separate study revealed that 90% of antisemitic social media posts remain on Facebook and Twitter even after being reported. The Center for Countering Digital Hate (CCDH) conducted the study of 714 antisemitic posts across Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and TikTok. Its research found that 84% of antisemitic posts remained, with 90% remaining on Facebook and Twitter specifically. The findings from the CCDH noted that in particular, the social media giants’ response to tackling racist conspiracy theories was particularly disappointing. They ignored 89% of antisemitic conspiracy theories and addressed only 5% that blamed Jewish people for the COVID-19 pandemic. Only one in 20 posts that attacked Jewish people directly were removed. In situations where a post had clear links to violence or neo-Nazism, 30% of posts were removed.

Recently, Campaign Against Antisemitism called on the New World Fest music festival to drop the unrepentant antisemite Wiley from its line-up. The grime artist was due to appear at the festival last weekend, however, it was reported that he did not show up.

At the time of Wiley’s original antisemitic tirade, Campaign Against Antisemitism immediately reported Wiley to the Metropolitan Police Service, but in September the police force confirmed to us that Wiley was not in the UK at the time of his antisemitic tirade. Under Home Office rules, that means that the Metropolitan Police must give primacy to police in the jurisdiction where Wiley was at the time. Lawyers acting for Campaign Against Antisemitism have filed a criminal complaint with the Public Prosecution Service in the Netherlands, which is where grime artist Wiley was located when he launched his tirade against Jews.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “One year after his antisemitic social media rampage, why on earth is Wiley back on Twitter, Instagram and YouTube? Not only have social media companies abjectly failed to take antisemitism on their platforms seriously, as evidenced by our recent report and other findings, but to permit Wiley back on their networks despite their pledges barely a year ago adds insult to injury. They have no shame.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms. We also continue to make representations to the Government on this matter.

A policewoman who has been praised for confronting lockdown protesters is now alleged to have posted inflammatory social media messages and was reportedly in contact with a suspected Jihadist in Syria.

An urgent investigation has commenced into Ruby Begum, 26, who joined the Metropolitan Police in 2016 and has inspired others as a young officer wearing a hijab on the frontline of police work.

However, she is now alleged to have posted social media messages in 2014 comparing Israel to Nazis, in breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism, and referred to non-Muslims as “kuffars”.

The officer from the Met’s Taskforce, a unit which deals with public order, is alleged to have written on Twitter in January 2015: “It’s alright when Israel does it #HolocaustRemembranceDay,” as well as “Zionists have no hearts! They’ll get what’s coming to them subhanallah [glory be to God]” and “Dirty Zionist. Jahannam [hell] is awaiting.”

In 2014, on the anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, she allegedly wrote: “Must be stupid if you think I’m gonna do 2mins silence for 9/11.” On the 2019 anniversary, by which time she was working in the Met, she is claimed to have written: “Omg it’s 9/11 today? Jokes, I only noticed.”

Ms Begum has also reportedly written, “Kuffar lips have been all over my mug there is no way I’m using that thing again” and is claimed to have described Pakistanis as “p***s”.

She is further believed to have communicated for many months with a woman thought to have left Europe for the ISIS caliphate in Syria in 2014, and Ms Begum also reportedly disclosed without explanation that her own passport had been confiscated for a month, raising serious questions about the Met’s vetting processes. It is understood that there is no indication that Ms Begum ever tried to join ISIS or travel to Syria herself, and that some of her tweets express disgust at the terrorist group’s activities.

The Independent Office for Police Conduct has apparently launched an investigation after The Mail on Sunday drew attention to the case, with Ms Begum placed on “restricted duties”.

In a statement, the Metropolitan Police is reported to have said: ‘There is no place within the Met for any racist, homophobic or otherwise hateful attitudes and officers and staff can expect robust action should they be found to hold or express such views. The information provided by The Mail on Sunday regarding a police constable’s social media posts is concerning and is being treated very seriously. Following that assessment, the Met made a voluntary referral to the Independent Office for Police Conduct who determined that the matter should be investigated locally. The Directorate of Professional Standards will now conduct a thorough investigation to establish the full circumstances behind the social media posts. The officer has been notified of the investigation and placed on restricted duties.”

Recently, the Metropolitan Police saw one of its own convicted for far-right terrorism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is calling on the New World Fest music festival to drop the unrepentant antisemite Wiley from its line-up. The grime artist is due to appear at the festival this weekend, despite launching into an antisemitic tirade last summer.

On 24th July 2020, the rapper Richard Kylea Cowie, who is known as Wiley, spent days engaged in an escalating rant on social media against Jews. After likening Jews to the Ku Klux Klan and claiming that Jews had cheated him and were “snakes”, Wiley tweeted that Jews should “hold some corn”, a slang expression meaning that they should be shot. He added: “Jewish community you deserve it”. He then also called on “black people” to go to “war” with Jews.

Wiley repeatedly evoked conspiracy theories that Jews were responsible for the slave trade and that modern-day Jews are in fact imposters who usurped black people — a conspiracy theory that has incited acts of terrorism against Jews, such as a shooting in Jersey City and a stabbing attack in Monsey, NY during the festival of Chanukah last December.

In the days that followed, Wiley continued to rail against Jews on Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. Following discussions with Campaign Against Antisemitism, a major 48-hour boycott of Twitter and Instagram in which we participated, and our projection of antisemitic tweets onto Twitter’s London headquarters, which then went viral, TwitterFacebook (which owns Instagram), Google (which owns YouTube) and TikTok agreed to remove Wiley from their platforms, depriving him of access to his nearly one million social media followers.

Campaign Against Antisemitism immediately reported Wiley to the Metropolitan Police Service, but in September the police force confirmed to us that Wiley was not in the UK at the time of his antisemitic tirade. Under Home Office rules, that means that the Metropolitan Police must give primacy to police in the jurisdiction where Wiley was at the time.

Lawyers acting for Campaign Against Antisemitism have filed a criminal complaint with the Public Prosecution Service in the Netherlands, which is where grime artist Wiley was located when he launched his tirade against Jews.

Ron Eisenmann, a partner at Eisenmann & Ravestijn, filed documents on behalf of Campaign Against Antisemitism seeking Wiley’s prosecution in the Netherlands over his antisemitic incitement. We are extremely grateful to Mr Eisenmann and his firm for agreeing to represent Campaign Against Antisemitism on a pro bono basis.

We are grateful to the Community Security Trust, which was able to provide us with evidence showing that Wiley was in Rotterdam at the time of his antisemitic abuse.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is continuing its response to this incident, including:

  • Filing our criminal complaint against Wiley in the Netherlands;
  • Continuing to meet with executives from Twitter, Facebook and Google to address their response to antisemitism on their platforms;
  • Working with the Cabinet Office’s Honours Forfeiture Committee to ensure that Wiley’s MBE is revoked;
  • Seeking a change in policy so that racists are automatically stripped of their honours in future;
  • Urging the Government to bring forward legislation to regulate social networks and force them to remove racist incitement which has recently borne fruit; and
  • Working with the music industry to remove Wiley’s awards and ensure that he is shunned for his racism.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is extraordinary that a festival would think it appropriate to try to rehabilitate an unrepentant antisemite on its stage. One wonders whether a musician who had targeted another minority would have been feted in this way. The festival must drop Wiley and explain how this racist came to be invited in the first place, especially as prosecutors consider our case against him.”

The Director of a charity has been suspended and reported to the Charity Commission after allegations of antisemitism have surfaced.

Bus Users UK, a charity that works to ensure transport is more inclusive and accessible, lists Hugh Jaeger as a Trustee, Director, and “Chair of Bus Users Oxford and an active campaigner for bus services” on its website. However, yesterday they took the decision to suspend him after a history of inflammatory tweets were revealed.

In a 2019 post, Mr Jaeger reportedly wrote that “In 1948 Zionists copied the Nazis to liquidate several villages” and also shared an inflammatory cartoon along with the caption: “Pic of an Israeli Magav border police thug sums up why Zionism is evil & why Palestinians must resist.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

In another post, Mr Jaeger allegedly condemned “racist Israel”, while in different one, he said that it was founded by “State terrorists who massacre, steal land, apply apartheid, murder children and commit war crimes have ruled Israel ever since.” He also defended the controversial Labour candidate Lisa Forbes, despite her deeply problematic social media activity.

In a blog post from December 2019, Mr Jaeger reportedly wrote that “No one has proved that antisemitism is any more common in Labour than it is in UK society as a whole.”

Taking action on Mr Jaeger’s surfaced tweets, Bus Users UK wrote from their Twitter account: “Hugh Jaeger has been asked to step back from his duties as a trustee of Bus Users while the Board considers his position. Bus Users is not a political organisation and is not aligned to any political viewpoint. We are a charity campaigning for accessible transport for everyone.”

Mr Jaeger was also reported to the Charity Commission by the GnasherJew Twitter account.

Larry Sanders, the former Green Party Spokesperson on Health and Social Care and brother to former Presidential candidate, Bernie Sanders, drew criticism for tweeting: “Hugh Jaeger is not antisemitic.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms. We also continue to make representations to the Government on this matter.

Professor David Hirsh, a lecturer at Goldsmiths, University of London who was appointed as the Chairman of a panel that oversaw an antisemitism-related complaint at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), has said that SOAS could be institutionally antisemitic.

The incident relates to last year’s complaint from a former student at SOAS who sought to have his fees refunded after he was forced to leave the University due to a ”toxic antisemitic environment”.

Noah Lewis was called a “white supremacist Nazi” and accused of covering up war crimes when he proposed to write a dissertation on bias against Israel at the United Nations. He said that fellow students labelled him and other Jews pejoratively as “Zionists” and left antisemitic slurs on lockers, desks and toilet walls.

The student, originally from Canada, matriculated in 2018 but lodged a formal complaint in May 2019 after finding his mental health adversely affected by the stress and extreme discomfort caused by the “toxic antisemitic environment” which ultimately led him to quit the University and return home.

In July 2019, the University offered an apology for the “emotional trauma…experienced due to the perceived antisemitic discrimination which he had to endure” and recommended compensation of £500.

Mr Lewis appealed the decision with assistance from UK Lawyers for Israel (UKLFI), however, and in March 2020 the appeal panel determined that the original decision “had not been adequate” and recommended an external investigation, even if the University reached a settlement with Mr Lewis.

A settlement was reportedly reached, with Mr Lewis refunded £15,000 in full in December 2020. However, the panel’s recommendation for an external investigation has since been ignored, Prof. Hirsh laments.

In a recent open letter, Prof. Hirsh reportedly stated: “The panel I chaired made clear and unanimous determinations which have so far been completely ignored. This is further prima facie evidence that there is a problem of institutional antisemitism at SOAS. It is clear enough by now that SOAS does not take the claim that it has a problem with institutional antisemitism seriously enough to do anything about it. Good practice requires that an institution is not well placed to make that kind of determination about its own culture, but that is what SOAS has done.”

Prof. Hirsh said that he believed SOAS’ reluctance to carry out the external investigation was due to its belief that the student’s complaint was a “bad faith move relating to politics around the conflicts between Israel and Palestine”.

Professor Hirsh added: “Since the summer of 2019, two new cohorts of students, some of them Jewish students, will have been at SOAS for a considerable period of time. SOAS owes those students a duty of care. It has not been carrying out that duty. It is further true that SOAS has a reputation, deserved or not, in particular amongst Jews, for being a place that has a toxic antisemitic environment that is tolerated and protected by the institutional practice and culture of the School itself…I do not feel that it would be right for me to keep what I know about this issue at SOAS secret.”

The University issued a public response to Prof. Hirsh that both defended its current statement on antisemitism and criticised the lecturer for speaking out. The statement read: “The route we have chosen to take to tackle discrimination goes well beyond the requirements placed on universities and other public institutions. We have spent many months since January engaging with our staff and student community to develop a comprehensive and widely-supported response to these challenges in drawing up our Charter on Discrimination which is formally titled our ‘Charter on Racism, Antisemitism and All Forms of Cultural, Ethnic and Religious Chauvinism’.”

The Charter in question stands in place of the International Definition of Antisemitism, which the University refuses to adopt. The Charter says: “We stand for anti-racism, and against antisemitism and all other forms of cultural, ethnic and religious chauvinism…We therefore welcome the renewed attention to discriminatory practices and the multiple separate calls to take a stand against racism, antisemitism, religious and cultural intolerance, xenophobia and the like.”

However, the Charter also states that “advocates of political causes may use academic freedom to articulate hateful words against other human beings and to advance racism and ethnic and cultural chauvinisms of any kind. Political advocacy may use the legitimate demands of anti-racism and calls against antisemitism, religious and cultural intolerance, to deflect from critical academic and political scrutiny. This occurs across the political, cultural and religious divide. Religious fundamentalists may equate religion and state, and demand not only acquiescence from all those within their nations who oppose their agendas but also silence others including scholars and journalists who subject their actions and words to critical reflection and scrutiny.”

Continuing in its response to Prof. Hirsh, SOAS’ statement said: “This Charter is now a mandatory policy for all individuals and stakeholders at SOAS and it comprehensively addresses the issues which have been raised in relation to antisemitism and other forms of discrimination. We stand firm against antisemitism, as we do against all forms of discrimination. Most importantly, we do this in a manner which is consistent with the principles of academic freedom. Our student community – newly arriving students and returning – can be assured that this charter will be applied rigorously and without fear or favour so that we genuinely address and tackle antisemitism, alongside action to address all forms of racism.”

Addressing Prof. Hirsh’s letter that criticised the University, SOAS wrote: “We note this story has arisen now (August 2021) after the Chair of a complaints panel that was held last year shared publicly with the press an email to a fellow panel member. We are disappointed that the chair of a properly constituted confidential student complaints panel should seek to publicly press for a particular action to be taken forward, and in the process draw into the public domain fellow members of the panel. We have a robust investigation process into complaints which makes recommendations confidentially to be considered by SOAS. This process relies on due confidentiality and respect for the process and for fellow panel members. We are disappointed that the chair of panel has chosen to act in this manner.”

SOAS has long been a hotbed of antisemitism among UK campuses. Last September, a professor at the University labelled Israel as a “virus” and said that it “exploited the Holocaust” for its own political agenda.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

A Hitler-loving radio host has today been sentenced to prison after pleading guilty to eight counts of inciting racial hatred after action by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Following an investigation by Campaign Against Antisemitism that was acted upon by Devon and Cornwall Police, Graham Hart, 68, of Penponds, Camborne, was charged earlier this year with five counts incitement to racial hatred. The charges related to “using offending words or behaviour in a programme involving threatening, abusive or insulting visual images or sounds which was included in a programme service, intending thereby to stir up racial hatred or, having regard to all the circumstances, whereby racial hatred was likely to be stirred up.”

Three further charges were subsequently added following a further investigation by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Mr Hart is an amateur singer-songwriter from Cornwall who has hosted numerous controversial figures on his online radio show, including the notorious antisemite Alison Chabloz, who was sentenced to eighteen weeks in prison in March of this year for offences committed during an interview with Mr Hart. Mr Hart also previously courted controversy after a local rugby team banned his music due to concerns about a Holocaust-denial song of his that was circulating on the internet.

An investigation by Campaign Against Antisemitism revealed that Mr Hart repeatedly claimed that Jews are “filth”; questioned whether six million Jews were really murdered in the Holocaust; praised Adolf Hitler as “the greatest man of the twentieth century”; said that “is isn’t just the white people who hate the Jews…it’s everyone hates the Jews. Everyone”; claimed that the Jews “run everything”, are “evil” and are “not of this world”; and argued that the Jews have “got to go down, they’ve just got to go down”.

Among numerous other inflammatory statements, he said: “To be honest, I get more and more pissed off every day at what I find out about the Jews. It just gets worse and worse and worse. And I have to say the more I find out, the more I hate you and the more I spread the word.”

The three further charges arose from comments that Mr Hart made on this radio show in late December, including: “Let’s get rid of the Jews. It’s time for them to go…I’ve had enough of these people now … the chaos that they cause”; and “it’s always these same people that are behind everything. So, they’ve got to go. That’s the bottom line. How we’re going to do it…I don’t know”.

Other comments included: “I can’t think what else we can do. I don’t want to go with bloodshed but if that’s what it’s going to take, let’s get it done” and “I’m not armed….I wish I was. If anyone in the chatroom or any of the listeners want to send me a gun, it would be nice.”

Invoking another antisemitic trope, he also compared Jews to vermin, saying: “‘Ah but they’re children… they’re children.’ Yeah I know. They’re like a rat. If you’ve got a rat with four babies, you don’t kill the babies because they’re cute, aren’t they? You just kill the mother. Well, guess what. If you don’t kill those babies, if you just leave them, they’ll grow up to be big rats. So, I hope you go…you go as well. Screw you, you’ve taken too many of our people. We’ve got to start looking after our own.”

He has also said: “I’m a little bit over the top but I say wipe them all out” and “So, if you’re listening out there Mr Jew, we’re coming to get you.”

Mr Hart has also referenced Campaign Against Antisemitism, saying: “I’m involved with the Campaign Against Antisemitism. I’ve got my own little thing going on there and when I’m ready, I’ll pounce. And I’m not far from it either. I’m not far from it. I’ve had enough of these people, guys. Call them out. They run the bloody world and it’s got to stop. And we’ve got to stop talking. That’s why I say … Can we get organised?”

Mr Hart appeared in Truro Crown Court on 26th April for a hearing but was held on remand after refusing to engage with the court or appoint legal counsel. He subsequently did so and appeared on 7th June in Truro Crown Court for the pre-trial hearing, where he entered pleas of guilty on all counts.

Today at the same venue, Judge Robert Linford sentenced Mr Hart to sixteen months in prison, which comprises two years’ imprisonment on the first five counts and 32 months for the remaining three counts to run concurrently and of which he will serve half. He was also sentenced to a criminal behaviour order of ten years, prohibiting him from engaging in similar activities on the internet, as well as a forfeiture order allowing the police to destroy the equipment that they seized. The sentence reflects the one-third discount for Mr Hart’s guilty pleas.

Mr Hart’s counsel had argued that Mr Hart was a victim of reading things on the internet that he came to believe, and that his twelve days’ incarceration (while he refused to engage with the court earlier this year) brought him to his senses and that he no longer holds any of the beliefs he expressed. Judge Linford rejected these arguments.

The Judge was visibly angry as he delivered his judgment, telling Mr Hart that “you set out to whip up feelings of hatred of people of the Jewish faith”. He pointed out that Mr Hart’s activities continued while he was already under investigation, and the judge considered that this showed a total unwillingness on Mr Hart’s part to reflect on his behaviour. Judge Linford added that Mr Hart’s performance in interviews with the police was almost as bad as his radio shows, and that police found further troubling evidence of entrenched antisemitic feeling in his home. The judge determined that the offending was far too serious for anything other than an immediate custodial sentence.

Campaign Against Antisemitism wishes to commend Devon and Cornwall Police — and in particular officers DC Sean McDonnell and DI Daniel Massey — for their tireless commitment to seeing Mr Hart face justice.

It was regrettable that, once again, the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) was not nearly as proactive as the police in this case. It took an intervention by one of our honorary patrons, Lord Austin, for the CPS to issue charges thirteen months after the CPS received the file from the police. We do, however, commend the CPS for its diligence once it agreed to pursue the case, appointing the same counsel who recently prosecuted a neo-Nazi police officer in the Metropolitan Police.

In a statement, Detective Inspector Daniel Massey said: “The sentencing of Graham Hart brings an end to a lengthy and difficult investigation. Hart’s antisemitic views are completely unacceptable in every way and have caused considerable distress to the Jewish community and many other people over the years. His behaviour towards the Officer in the Case was also an issue at times and shows Hart’s complete disregard for anyone who dares to challenge his views or actions, however, I am grateful for the hard work, dedication and professionalism that brought about this conviction.

“I am also grateful to the Campaign Against Antisemitism, which initiated this investigation and has remained positively engaged throughout a protracted enquiry. Additionally, I would like to thank the CPS for its support and guidance in prosecuting this challenging case. This sends a strong message to Graham Hart, and those who share these types of views, that antisemitic behaviour and all hate crime will be dealt with robustly.”

Nick Price, Head of the Special Crime and Counter Terrorism Division in the CPS, said: “Graham Hart used his position to influence people as a radio host to stir up racial hatred and incite violence against the Jewish race. I am pleased that he has been brought to justice and we have put an end to his abusive and insulting broadcasts. The CPS are committed to prosecuting hate crime and will continue to work as an independent body to ensure justice is served.”

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Thanks to the diligence of officers DC Sean McDonnell and DI Daniel Massey, who acted on our investigations, Graham Hart will be in prison and restricted from reoffending for the next ten years. The offences he committed constitute some of the most extreme hatred towards Jews that we have ever encountered. It is vital that the Jewish community is protected from this man, which this sentence achieves. It also sends a necessary message to like-minded people that hate towards British Jews will not be tolerated.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A teenager has admitted to shouting “I f***ing hate the Jews” at a Jewish man inside Oxford Circus Underground station.

The seventeen-year-old admitted to the charge of a religiously aggravated public order offence after the Jewish man was targeted with antisemitic abuse inside Oxford Circus Underground station on 4th July. It was reported that the teenager handed himself in to the police on 11th July and on 23rd July, he was charged with the offence.

Prosecutor Valerie Benjamin told Highbury Corner Youth Court on Monday that the victim had been wearing “distinctive Jewish attire”, and that “the defendant said ‘I f****** hate Jews’ while banging on the side of the escalator.” Ms Benjamin added that the victim was now too anxious to use public transport and was incurring significant costs due to having to take taxis instead.

It was also alleged that the defendant yelled “take off your hat”, although the teenager has denied this claim.

The defendant allegedly said during his police interview that he yelled the abuse as he thought “it might have been funny at the time”, but that he now knows that “it was stupid and offensive.”

Mohammed Zeb, defending, told the court that the defendant had “done the right thing” by handing himself in, but acknowledged that he “made a stupid comment for no reason”. Mr Zeb added: “He told me ‘I’ve got no problem with anybody, I’m not into religion, it was spur of the moment’.”

The defendant told District Judge Susan Williams: “I didn’t really think through [the comment], it just came out, and I just left and ran.” He added that he understands that the victim must have been frightened. “Especially as he was by himself – I think I would have been scared as well,” the defendant said.

Judge Williams told the teenager: “There is nothing wrong with a bit of friendly rivalry but we have fought a world war about this sort of racial discrimination, dreadful things were done and this sort of thing leaves scars on people’s memories. You don’t know if [the victim] lost a grandfather or a father or half his family in a concentration camp because of who he is.”

The judge continued: “That is the kind of memories that you are stirring up when you attack him about who he is…you give the beautiful game a bad name.”

It was also said that the teenager has previous convictions for theft and driving offences.

“You have got to take a serious decision about which way you are going in life – do you mind your manners, mind your mouth and mind the way you drive?”, the judge added. “Either cut [drinking] down or cut it out, or you are going to find yourself in serious trouble.”

The defendant is due to be sentenced on 3rd September. It has been reported that he has been granted bail on the condition that he does not “attend or loiter outside Wembley Stadium regardless of the event taking place inside”, in addition to any stadium where either Millwall or England are playing.

In a statement after the incident on 4th July, British Transport Police said: “We’re aware of a video posted online of…antisemitic behaviour on a London Underground escalator. We take such incidents very seriously and are investigating. If anybody has any information contact us on 0800 405040 or text 61016 quoting ref 90 of 4 July 2021.”

Immediately following the incident, Campaign Against Antisemitism released a statement thanking the victim’s brother for publicising the incident. The statement added: “We will be following up privately, but for those reading the thread [on Twitter] we wanted to note that police investigations have now been opened and we are in touch with police and Transport for London. #ZeroTolerance”

Earlier on in the night of the committed offence, the same Jewish man reported a separate incident of antisemitic abuse, in which an aggressive passenger can be heard threatening him and saying: “I’ve got a shank, I will slit your throat for Palestine” and “I’ll beat the s**t out of you.”

The passenger was then ordered off the bus, where he proceeded to swear at the Jewish man and bang on the doors of the bus.  

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently launched an appeal for information about the suspect in the earlier incident.

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently met with Transport for London as part of work to improve the response to antisemitic incidents on public transport.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A lawyer has reportedly been struck off the roll after allegedly making racist and sexist comments.

Complaints were reportedly brought by three women against Victor Stockinger, 61, of Bloomsbury. He is reported to have blamed their concerns on “wokeism”, but a panel of the Solicitors’ Disciplinary Tribunal found the evidence against him to be “entirely sincere”, leaving with him legal costs of £41,850.

Among the comments attributed to Mr Stockinger at a work event at the High Court, held by the Solicitors’ Association of Higher Court Advocates in 2019, was a question to a Jewish lawyer on whether she really was Jewish. He also allegedly made inflammatory remarks to a procurement boss of African heritage, as well as numerous sexist comments.

The Solicitors’ Regulatory Authority (SRA) argued that Stockinger’s remarks were racially, ethically, and religiously motivated. The Chair of the Tribunal observed that solicitors must conduct themselves in a way “which reflects everyone’s personal characteristics” and they should “embrace the qualities of equality, diversity and inclusion,” in contrast to Mr Stockinger, who had made “stereotypical assumptions and been patronising.”

Mr Stockinger had claimed that his comments were mere “icebreakers”, but the Tribunal found that “the depth of hurt, humiliation and anger felt, even two years later by the young and diverse legal professionals to whom Mr Stockinger misspoke at that meeting was plain by their evidence to us, which we found entirely sincere. People should not be expected to tolerate this on the basis that in the past people did so.”

Mr Stockinger was also reportedly found guilty of dishonesty – a more serious allegation – by misleading the regulator over a client complaint. He had denied all of the charges.

Mr Stockinger was struck off after 31 years of practice, and reacted to the verdict saying “I’m traumatised”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is inviting Jewish students who studied at the University of Bristol in the academic year 2020-21 to join a lawsuit against the University over Prof. David Miller’s alleged harassment of Jewish students.

Lawyers working with Campaign Against Antisemitism have begun the pre-action process ahead of commencing litigation against the University.

The prospective lawsuit is being prepared over statements made by Prof. David Miller, who is employed by the University.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is issuing a call for additional students to come forward and add their names to the legal action by e-mailing [email protected].

The case against the University concerns alleged unlawful harassment on the basis of Jewish ethnicity and Judaism, amounting to breaches of the Equality Act 2010, as well as breaches of contract.

Much has been written about Prof. Miller, who has recently added to his record of inflammatory statements about the Jewish community, with the assertion earlier this year that “Zionism is racism” and a declaration that his objective is “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world”. Prof. Miller has also suggested that people associated with Zionism should not be engaged in dialogue but “must only be faced and defeated,” that the “Zionist Movement” is “the enemy” that must be engaged, that it is “the enemy of world peace,” and that those associated with Zionism, including Jewish students on Bristol campus, “must be directly targeted”. Taken together, the implication of Prof. Miller’s remarks is that all decent people who support “world peace” should view Bristol Jewish Society and the Union of Jewish Students, and Jewish people, including those who identify with those bodies, and the vast majority of Jewish students as an “enemy” that must be “directly targeted”.  Prof. Miller has said that interfaith work between Jewish and Muslim groups is “a trojan horse for normalising Zionism in the Muslim community”.  Perhaps equally egregiously, he also suggested that Jewish students, by virtue of being Zionist, “encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”.

Prof. Miller’s statements and the University’s failure to condemn them and take swift action against him have been the subject of a great deal of attention from the Jewish community as well as hundreds of academics and Parliament, including a written question by Lord Austin, as well as a recent intervention from Robert Halfon MP.

The legal claim contends that Prof. Miller’s statements sought to create a hostile environment for Jewish students. It further alleges that the University is liable for Prof. Miller’s conduct, and is further liable in its own right, for unlawful conduct in breach of the Equality Act, and for its breach of its contract with students.

We are asking additional students to step forward and add their names to the legal action to hold the University of Bristol to account for Prof. Miller’s conduct, and its own. If you are or were a student at the University of Bristol in the academic year 2020-21, please e-mail your name and telephone number to [email protected]ntisemitism.org.

Pre-action correspondence has been exchanged with the University, which has refused even to set a date for completion of its already extended investigation of Prof. Miller.

A previous complaint against the University, concerning Prof. Miller’s conduct, did not report publicly and it is still unclear, two years later, what the outcome was.

Solicitors from Asserson Law Offices are acting, and have instructed barristers Derek Spitz of One Essex Court and Benjamin Gray of Littleton Chambers.

Asserson Law Offices and Derek Spitz were also instructed in our groundbreaking referral of the Labour Party to the Equality and Human Rights Commission. Benjamin Gray is an expert in employment and discrimination law who is currently instructed on workplace discrimination claims that Campaign Against Antisemitism is helping individuals to pursue.

The case is the latest step by Campaign Against Antisemitism to defend the rights of individual Jewish students. We believe that universities and students’ unions must be robustly held to account when they fail to defend Jewish students or when they allow their lecturers to discriminate against or harass them.

A man who admitted to defacing a Welsh war memorial with antisemitic graffiti has been spared jail, it was revealed earlier this week.

The graffiti on the memorial in Rhyl, Wales was discovered in February and included swastikas and vile messages which refer to the murder of Jews and gassing of soldiers.

The graffiti also contained the line, in German, that “the time has come for a Reich [empire]: we must exterminate the Jews.”

Gareth Bradley, 31, confessed last month to committing the act of hateful vandalism. He also pleaded guilty to defacing his prison cell with graffiti of a swastika in April. 

After taking the defendant’s mental health into consideration, Judge Recorder Wyn Lloyd Jones handed him an eighteen-month sentence that has been suspended for two years for this offence, in addition to several other offences, which included racially abusing policing officers. Mr Bradley was also told to carry out a 50-day rehabilitation requirement.

Frances Wilmott, defending, told Caernarfon Crown Court: “None of the offences are sophisticated…they are the product of someone suffering ill mental health.”

The judge, taking Mr Bradley’s psychiatric reports into consideration, said: “It’s obvious he has serious mental health issues which go back to a very early age. His behaviour is disgraceful but anyone reading those documents will understand why he behaves the way he does.”

He added: “You clearly have long standing mental health problems which is a very important consideration in this case – a very difficult childhood clearly affected you in later life but I accept you are now remorseful for what you did.

“I have to consider and to decide what is best for society and what is best for you – it seems to me, having regard to your accommodation, your change of attitudes, possibly because of medication, there is a realistic prospect of rehabilitation…that’s why I’ve suspended the sentence. Your mental health is at the heart of this case and I’ve tried to have regard to that at every stage.”

Image credit: Richard Kendrick

Campaign Against Antisemitism will be writing to talkSPORT to demand a live on-air apology after two of the radio show’s presenters allowed a hateful comment from a caller about Tottenham Hotspur’s chairman, Daniel Levy, to go unchallenged.

The show’s segment was presented by Perry Groves, a football pundit and former footballer, and Jordan Jarrett-Bryan, a reporter for Channel 4 News, and included a discussion about Tottenham Hotspur player Harry Kane.

Mr Jarrett-Bryan asks the caller: “Are you saying Spurs should get the fee that they feel he’s worth, and if they don’t get that, he’s not going anywhere?”

Referring to Mr Levy, the caller responds: “He’s a Jew, he’s not gonna let him go for nothing, is he?”

The presenters, visibly shocked, then cut off the caller and tried to swiftly move the conversation on without acknowledging the comment that had just been made.

This is not the first time talksSPORT has been involved in controversy relating to inflammatory comments. Phil Brown, the football player turned manager, issued a heartfelt apology in 2018 to Campaign Against Antisemitism after referring to Chelsea Football Club midfielder Tiemoue Bakayoko as having had a “Holocaust of a game” on the radio show.  

Last year on talkSPORT, Mr Groves made a nearly identical remark when he referred to goalkeeper Mat Ryan’s performance in the match, saying that the player “had a Holocaust of a game.”

Mr Levy has received antisemitic abuse in the past. One incident in April saw a tweet that was said to have contained several antisemitic tropes removed and reported to the police.

In a separate incident, a user wrote: “Them 3 fat AMERICAN C***S YOU F***ING BASTARDS. And as for that Jew levy your family should have been gassed. Inters owners also ruined the cal champions. Perez is in the f***ing mafia”.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Perry Groves and Jordan Jarrett-Bryan must apologise live on air for their failure to call out a remark by a caller disparaging Daniel Levy because he is Jewish. Perry Groves has his own inflammatory record to redeem, while, for Jarrett-Bryan, whose pinned tweet is all about stamping racism out of football, it is particularly disappointing that he missed the opportunity to do his part in achieving that aim. TalkSPORT’s listeners deserve better.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

A freelance journalist formerly employed by Bloomberg has posted a tweet claiming that a witness against Roman Abramovich and other prominent Jewish businessmen may have changed his story in exchange for “a few shekels”.

The tweet relates to a recent case in the High Court, in which three prominent Jewish businessmen – Roman Abramovich, Mikhail Fridman and Petr Aven – have asserted that a book by author Catherine Belton makes defamatory claims about them.

Following last week’s hearing, one of the sources in the book, Sergei Pugachev, whose statements are central to Mr Abramovich’s High Court case, gave an interview about what he had and had not said to the author. In the interview, Mr Pugachev appeared to distance himself from some of the claims attributed to him in the book.

Responding to this interview, Jason Corcoran, a freelance journalist formerly at Bloomberg, tweeted: “Talk about throwing Belton under a trolleybus. What has Pugachev to gain? A few shekels from an oligarch or is he trying to curry favour with the Kremlin after burning his bridges years ago.”

The notion that someone takes ‘treacherous’ action in return for “shekels” is a classic trope going back millennia. It is particularly poignant, given that Mr Abramovich and his fellow claimants, to whom Mr Pugachev is supposedly endearing himself by allegedly backtracking, are Jewish. The Shekel is the currency of the State of Israel.

The trope was recently used by Labour Party MP Barry Sheerman, who claimed that two wealthy British Jewish businessmen missed out on seats in the House of Lords because there had been “a run on silver shekels”, before apologising.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Suggestions that wealthy Jewish businesspeople induce treachery by others in return for the payment of ‘shekels’ is about as old a trope as one could find. However passionately Jason Corcoran may feel about this court case, it is no justification for his appalling comment. He must apologise immediately, before any media outlet agrees to collaborate with him again.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

Piers Corbyn has suggested that “troublemakers” in Jewish areas posted leaflets created and distributed by Mr Corbyn, which compared the COVID-19 vaccines to the Auschwitz death camp, through their own doors in a “plot” to portray him as antisemitic.

Referencing a headline in the Evening Standard that the new COVID-19 vaccines are a “safe path to freedom”, the leaflets showed the slogan atop the infamous gates to Auschwitz.

In an interview clip from the Marwan Riach Podcast, which was uploaded to Twitter on Sunday, Mr Corbyn discussed the leaflets that he distributed last December, an incident that saw him arrested.

At one point during the interview, the interviewer, Mr Riach, held up a leaflet and said: “This was accused of being antisemitic,” to which Mr Corbyn responded by saying that he and his team were attacking the Evening Standard headline.

Mr Corbyn added: “We were then accused of being antisemitic, but that is insane. We were anti-Nazi. We’re against what the Nazis were doing.”

When asked “Why was it leafleted in Jewish areas?”, Mr Corbyn replied: “It wasn’t specifically leafleted in any particular areas. That is a lie made up by the media. Or, some troublemakers leafleted it through their own doors, I suspect, and then came forward.”

“To try and portray you as antisemitic?”, Mr Riach asked, to which Mr Corbyn responded “Yes, yes.” When Mr Riach asked whether it was a conspiracy or not, Mr Corbyn replied: “Well, certainly a plot.”

Mr Corbyn also stated that he was arrested before the police allegedly returned his leaflets and dropped the charge of “giving out leaflets of malicious intent.” Mr Corbyn then went on to reiterate that “there’s no justification whatsoever” that the leaflets were antisemitic.

Responding to his arrest in the past, Mr Corbyn absurdly argued that he could not be antisemitic because he had been married to a Jewish woman and once employed a Jewish person who was a “superb worker.” Mr Corbyn reportedly protested: “The idea we’re antisemitic in any way is completely absurd. I was married for 22 years to a Jewess and obviously her mother’s forebears fled the Baltic states just before the war because of Hitler or the Nazis in general. I’ve worked with Jewish leading world scientists over the last 30 years. I’ve also employed Jewish people in my business Weather Action, one of whom was a superb worker.” 

Recent footage showed Mr Corbyn comparing vaccinations to Nazi policy outside the Houses of Parliament. The video showed Mr Corbyn and another man standing in front of a sign which reads “No Nazi forced jab” and yelling “arrest Matt Hancock” through a megaphone. 

On 20th July, Mr Corbyn, alongside other anti-vaccination protesters, showed their support at a far-left demonstration that was held outside of Labour Party headquarters. Speaking about the COVID-19 vaccination and the lockdown, Mr Corbyn said: “You know what happened in Germany. The left there, they were begging Hitler to support them. They believed in Hitler. You know what happened. The rest is history…the Jews were labelled as a danger and were locked up.” Mr Corbyn also gave an interview at the demonstration in which he denied that he, or his brother Jeremy Corbyn, were antisemites.

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Mr Corbyn has a history of controversy in relation to antisemitic conspiracy theories. He has previously retweeted @whiteknight0011, a notorious neo-Nazi who declared that “They will force Trump in to war What do you think happened to Hitler? Bilderberg CIA IMF Banker Gangsters They are the problem” along with four images. The @whiteknight0011 account has since been suspended. One image showed Lord Jacob Rothschild, the Jewish banker and philanthropist, against the background of a Nazi flag, claiming that he controls the world. A second showed Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu as a puppeteer controlling ISIS through Israeli intelligence agency Mossad, orchestrating the war in Syria and Paris attacks as Lord Rothschild and the Queen look on approvingly. A third image showed the faces of supposed Jewish conspirators who run the world to society’s detriment, proclaiming: “Know your enemy”. The last image showed a family photo of the Royal Family, claiming that they are in cahoots with these Jewish conspirators in committing “the worst genocides, invasions and theft in all history.”

Mr Corbyn has also claimed that “Zionists” were conspiring against his brother: when Jewish then-MP Louise Ellman complained of antisemitic attacks against her, Piers accused her of using it as a cover for political attack, tweeting: “ABSURD! JC+ All #Corbyns are committed #AntiNazi. #Zionists can’t cope with anyone supporting rights for #Palestine”.

90% of antisemitic social media posts remain on Facebook and Twitter even after being reported, a new study has revealed.

The Center for Countering Digital Hate (CCDH) conducted the study of 714 antisemitic posts across Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and TikTok. Its research found that 84% of antisemitic posts remained, with 90% remaining on Facebook and Twitter specifically.

Imran Ahmed, the Chief Executive of CCDH, said that the study showed that social media was a “safe space for racists to normalise their conspiracies and hateful rhetoric without fear of consequences.”

He added: “This is not about algorithms or automation; our research shows that social media companies allow bigots to keep their accounts open and their hate to remain online, even when human moderators are notified.”

The findings from the CCDH noted that in particular, the social media giants’ response to tackling racist conspiracy theories was particularly disappointing. They ignored 89% of antisemitic conspiracy theories and addressed only 5% that blamed Jewish people for the COVID-19 pandemic.

Only one in 20 posts that attacked Jewish people directly were removed. In situations where a post had clear links to violence or neo-Nazism, 30% of posts were removed.

A spokesman for Facebook, which also owns Instagram, said: “These reports do not account for the fact that we have taken action on fifteen times the amount of hate speech since 2017, the prevalence of hate speech is decreasing on our platform and, of the hate speech we remove, 97 percent was found before someone reported it.”

A Twitter spokesman said: “We strongly condemn antisemitism. We’re working to make Twitter a safer place, and improving the speed and scale of our rule enforcement is a top priority. We recognise that there’s more to do.”

It was reported that TikTok said in a statement that “it condemns antisemitism and proactively removes accounts and content that violate its policies,” while it was said that YouTube “made significant progress” in removing hate speech over the past few years.

Recently, we published a report which revealed that Twitter invited Campaign Against Antisemitism to become a “Twitter partner”, allowing us to report problematic material directly through the company’s “partner portal” to Twitter personnel (rather than machines) for review, only for the platform to cease contact with us after we had flagged up hundreds of antisemitic tweets. Following the news of this report, Twitter has reportedly declined to respond.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms. We also continue to make representations to the Government on this matter.

A teenage neo-Nazi has been spared jail after the presiding judge was told that he could get all As in his A-level exams, it was reported last week.

It was said that police found images of the seventeen-year-old boy performing Nazi salutes, along with memes that glorified the Norwegian neo-Nazi terrorist Anders Breivik. It was also said that the boy had downloaded several terrorist manuals.

Kelly Brocklehurst, prosecuting, told the court how thousands of images depicting a “concerning level of commitment to an extreme ideology” were found by investigating officers. Ms Brocklehurst added that the boy had shown interest in James Mason’s “Siege Culture”, a collection of neo-Nazi writings which was found in his bedroom during the police raid.

Bristol Youth Court was also told that the teenager had swastikas, a noose, and the letters “DOTR” carved into his bedroom desk, a reference to the Day of the Rope ideology that advocates the mass lynching of all those considered to be “race traitors”. Detailed methods of how to murder someone were also allegedly found on his phone by Gloucestershire Police.

The teenager admitted eleven counts of collecting material of use to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism contrary to section 58 of the Terrorism Act 2000, it was reported.

Stephen Donnelly, defending, was reportedly adamant that there was an “air of optimism for the future and the way [the youth] can be confronted by his actions in the past,” adding that the teenager is “very much loved.”

“The court can take assurance from the fact there is that network of support in the future,” Mr Donnelly said. He added: “He is still on course to achieve high grades if allowed to complete his A-level studies next year. That should be a pointer for the court. Rehabilitation outside the custodial environment is the best course.”

Chief Magistrate and Senior District Judge Paul Goldspring handed the boy, who was fifteen and sixteen-years-old at the time of the committed offenses, a twelve-month referral order at Bristol Youth Court for terror offences, after changing his mind about giving him a twelve-month custody sentence.

Senior District Judge Goldspring said: “My initial view was to send you into custody for twelve months, I have taken a step back, I am satisfied I don’t need to do that…it is really important that you take this opportunity to pause and think. I have to be honest there will be almost no way out if I see you in court again.”

He added: “You clearly work very hard in school and are obviously very, very intelligent. Although, I don’t want anyone to get the impression that someone less intelligent should be treated less well.”

Detective Superintendent Craig McWhinnie, Head of Counter Terrorism Policing South West, said: “Whilst there was no risk to the county, individuals such as this who promote dangerous extremist views and content have no place in our society. We will continue to seek them out and prosecute them.

“The entrenched views and hatred displayed by this young person combined with their consumption of violent and disturbing literature remain deeply concerning. This investigation is another stark reminder of the hateful and damaging material found online that for all of us, is only a few clicks away. This material creates a very real risk to the young and vulnerable in our communities, in our schools and indeed, in our own homes. This is especially true over the course of the pandemic where young people spend more time online, often alone and unsupervised.

“We would encourage those who care for young persons to have honest and frank conversations about online activity, to look out for the signs that indicate a potential shift in beliefs or attitude and to be intrusive on occasion to ensure they are safe online. The Act Early website has a wealth of information for anyone with concerns to help them understand what radicalisation looks like and provides advice on what to do in the first instance.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Twitter has reportedly declined to respond to a major report by Campaign Against Antisemitism that shows how the social media giant fails to implement consistently its own policies on hate.

The report, published a few days ago, showed how Twitter appointed Campaign Against Antisemitism as a partner to monitor anti-Jewish racism on its platform and promised regular meetings, only to cease those meetings and ignore offers of antisemitism training after we began alerting the company to the inconsistent application of its policies by personnel.

Not only were phrases like “f*** the Jews” not considered to breach Twitter’s rules, but other phrases such as “Hitler was right” were sometimes permitted and sometimes removed, without any form of coherent reasoning.

Moreover, one of the few areas where Twitter has in the past said that it would take action is over Holocaust denial, pledging to remove “attempts to deny or diminish” violent events such as the Shoah. Our report, however, shows that Twitter personnel repeatedly raised no objection to phrases such as “#Holohoax” and other, more elaborate tweets of Holocaust denial.

To the extent that this is because Twitter staff are unschooled in recognising Holocaust denial or anti-Jewish racism, it is all the more disappointing that Twitter has failed to take up offers of antisemitism training for its personnel by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Twitter reportedly told The Times, when confronted with Campaign Against Antisemitism’s findings, that “all online abuse — including antisemitic abuse — has no place on Twitter [and] is prohibited by our rules”. However, as the report shows, whatever the policies may or may not say is largely irrelevant when they are inconsistently applied. During the period of our partnership with Twitter, at no time did Twitter adequately explain to us the parameters for removing or permitting tweets or who is reviewing hateful material or how they have been trained.

The reality is that, contrary to Twitter’s stated position, antisemitic abuse very much has a “place on Twitter”. Twitter’s abysmal record and apparent disinclination to improve reveal that it is either incapable or unwilling to regulate itself, underscoring the need for Government legislation to compel it — and other social media companies — to do so.

On the publication of the report, Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We do not have confidence in Twitter’s capacity to address the rampant antisemitism on its platform. As Twitter’s partner in trying to combat anti-Jewish hate, we have not come to this conclusion lightly. But the opacity of Twitter’s parameters, its inconsistent implementation of its own policies, its lack of interest in our offers of training for its personnel, and its decision ultimately to stop engaging with us at all, are not the actions of a company that takes antisemitism seriously.

“If Twitter brought us on as a partner as some sort of fig leaf for its inaction, we are now laying bare the true picture of the company. Having cut off contact with us after we provided clear evidence that Twitter’s policies on hateful material are failing, it is clear that the company is neither capable nor interested in tackling antisemitism, and it must now fall to an independent regulator to assume that role instead. We continue to urge the Government to take action now to stem the tide of antisemitic hate online.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms. We also continue to make representations to the Government on this matter.

The children’s charity Barnardo’s is investigating one of its staffers for reportedly sharing inflammatory social media posts, including an image that resulted in Naz Shah MP’s suspenion from the Labour Party in 2016.

Rubina Halim, a Barnardo’s teacher, shared an image on Facebook that situates Israel in the middle of the United States and calls for the relocation of Israel to America. She added the comment: “The perfect solution to the Israel-Palestine conflict.”

This was the same image for which Naz Shah MP apologised and was suspended from the Labour Party in 2016 under then Labour Leader Jeremy Corbyn. Labour’s Deputy Chair of Newham Council, Cllr Nazir Ahmed, was also suspended for sharing the same image earlier this year.

Ms Halim made the inflammatory post on Facebook. In a separate post, she stated that Israel has “governments around the world in their pockets” and alluded to how Israel “controlled and manipulated” the media.

“Think about their spyware – can they not hack anyone anywhere? Think about how [Israel] have governments around the world in their pockets,” the Facebook post read. It continued: “Think about how the media is controlled and manipulated.”

Ms Halim’s posts were not limited to Facebook, however, as it appeared that she had shared several more on LinkedIn, including one that depicted an American dollar bill, folded into the shape of a Star of David. On a separate post, another comment written by Ms Halim read: “Are you surprised that the UK government have been bought by Israel.”

Ms Halim also appeared to endorse a controversial post that was shared by a user who went by the name of Mohammed Sadat Ali, in which he shared an article titled “Jewish Faith, Talmud, and Zionist in Islamic Review”. Mr Ali wrote that the article explained “why the Jewish state of Israel is referred to as a racist, chauvinistic, theocratic, conservative and highly dogmatic state,” a post that Ms Halim shared and added: “Need to read this!”

In response to the criticism surrounding her post, Ms Halim said: “I am not antisemitic and truly do not recognise how my post could be described as antisemitic. My sincerest apologies if my post has offended you in any way.”

In a statement, Barnardo’s said: “We would like to assure the public that these are strictly the personal views of the staff member and do not represent the views of Barnardo’s. Barnardo’s does not tolerate any kind of racism, including antisemitism and all our staff and volunteers are required to adhere to strict codes of conduct and policies on equality and diversity. The individual has been instructed to remove the offending content immediately and firm action has been taken pending a full and thorough investigation.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

Sam Tarry has reportedly cited flooding as a pretext for his withdrawal from an event with an activist from Jewish Voice for Labour (JVL), the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation.

The Labour Party MP for Ilford South announced that he was not attending Monday’s online launch of the Redbridge branch of the Palestine Solidarity Campaign (PSC), due to recent flooding in his constituency. Research by Campaign Against Antisemitism has found the Palestine Solidarity Campaign to be riddled with bigotry.

Among the speakers at the launch event was Diana Neslen, a JVL activist with a history of inflammatory statements, including calling Israel a racist endeavour, in breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Ms Neslen is also understood to have been one of a group of Labour activists – styled “Labour Activists For Justice” – who unsuccessfully sued the Party, arguing that Labour had broken its contractual agreement to treat the group fairly during disciplinary investigations. Not all members of the group of eight activists were investigated over antisemitism allegations.

Meanwhile, reports of Labour’s financial woes continue to grow, with The Times alleging that the Party has spent some £2 million on antisemitism-related cases, and an additional £1 million to address a backlog of complaints. A significant drop in membership numbers – reportedly from 550,000 when Sir Keir Starmer was elected leader to 430,000, at a rate of 250 a day – has also impacted finances.

Earlier this week, members of Labour Against the Witchhunt – an antisemitism-denial group that was proscribed by the Party last week – claimed that the “biggest party in Britain today is the ex-Labour Party. People who’ve been expelled, people who’ve been suspended.” The likely inaccurate observation was made in the context of a discussion about forming a new far-left Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

There are reports that members of Labour Against the Witchhunt may form a new political party after being purged by the Labour Party.

Last week, Labour’s ruling National Executive Committee (NEC) voted to proscribe Labour Against the Witchhunt – an antisemitism-denial group – and the disgraced former Labour MP Chris Williamson’s Resist group, as well as two further far-left groups, paving the way for automatic expulsion of their members.

It is understood that the NEC members to have voted against proscribing Labour Against the Witchhunt were Laura Pidcock, a pro-Corbyn former MP who recently spoke at an anti-Israel rally that featured antisemitic chanting; Yasmine Dar, the Corbyn-backed chair of the NEC’s disputes panel who previously claimed that the Party did not have a problem of institutional antisemitism even as her brother was suspended over antisemitism allegations; Gemma Bolton; Nadia Jama; Mish Rahman; Jayne Taylor; Andy Kerr; Mick Whelan; Andy Fox; and Ian Murray.

They also reportedly released a statement claiming that the proscriptions represented “a continuation of the destructive, factional behaviours from the leadership of the Party which have marked the last year. This isn’t just about the organisations we are being asked to consider [at the NEC meeting] on Tuesday it is about setting a precedent; proscribing these organisations as a forerunner to proscription of more and more groupings on the left of the party, to ultimately expel large sections of the Labour left.”

Following the proscription, there are reports that Labour Against the WItchhunt members are considering setting up their own political party. Over the weekend, some of the group’s members met for a virtual meeting during which they apparently also claimed that the “biggest party in Britain today is the ex-Labour Party. People who’ve been expelled, people who’ve been suspended.”

Labour Against the Witchhunt has previously said that it intends to hold an event in Brighton during the Labour Party conference in the city in late September.

Meanwhile, a group called Defend the Left has launched a petition whose signatories have reportedly left comments that blame “Zionazi Blairites” and Party Leader Sir Keir Starmer’s supposed “allegiance” to “foreign countries” for the proscription of the groups.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has for some time been monitoring the exodus of Labour members – particularly in the context of antisemitism allegations – and the prospect of a new political party or infiltration of another existing party by those former Labour members.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

A former nurse who had reportedly described the NHS as the “new Auschwitz” last year is now under investigation after comparing NHS workers to Nazis at an anti-vaccination rally on Saturday.

Kate Shemirani was removed from the nursing register after she was suspended as a registered nurse for eighteen months last July, pending an investigation into her past alleged comments on COVID-19 and 5G conspiracy theories.

However, it was reportedly decided last month by the NMC Fitness to Practise Committee that she would be permanently struck off from the register. Ms Shemrani can appeal this ruling in five years. In the meantime, however, she will be unable to practice as a registered nurse.

Ms Shemirani, a leading figure in the anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination movement, spoke at a rally on Saturday in which she allegedly called for the names of NHS workers before comparing them to Nazis, saying: “At the Nuremberg trials, the doctors and nurses stood trial and they hung.”

London Mayor Sadiq Khan condemned the comments on Twitter, writing: “This is utterly appalling, and I have raised it directly with the Met Police. Our NHS staff are the heroes of this pandemic and Londoners from across this city roundly reject this hate.”

A spokesperson for the Metropolitan Police stated: “We are aware of [a] video circulating online showing a speech that occurred during a rally in Trafalgar Square on Saturday 24th July. Officers are carrying out enquiries to establish whether any offences have been committed. No arrests have been made.”

Ms Shemirani’s comments have also been condemned by both the Prime Minister and the Labour Party Leader, Sir Keir Starmer.

A spokesperson for Boris Johnson said: “The Prime Minister absolutely condemns those comments. Doctors and nurses have done a truly heroic job throughout this pandemic and continue to do so. Any violence, threats or intimidation is completely unacceptable,” while Sir Keir reportedly told the radio channel LBC that “some of the things that are said and done, in the names of some of these protests, I think are an affront to all of us that believe in everything the NHS and the frontline are doing.”

Last year, Ms Shemirani led protests against mask-wearing and lockdown restrictions, defending her use of comparisons to Auschwitz and Nazis. Ms Shemirani said at the time: “When I likened this to Auschwitz and the cattle trucks – you tell me the difference? Because the only time in history I could find where the doctors and nurses were able to end people’s lives was the nurses of the Third Reich. The nurses of the Third Reich are here today. I don’t care if they find it offensive. I find it offensive that our elderly have been murdered in care homes. Stop being a special snowflake and saying you’re offended. They are killing our elderly, our most vulnerable.”

It has also been reported that Ms Shemrani is a follower of the “Committee of 300” conspiracy theory, which over a century ago laid the foundations for the antisemitic fabrication, The Protocols of the Elders of Zion.

Ms Shemirani said: “Can I state the obvious. There is no COVID-19. It’s a scam. There is however contaminated vaccines, contaminated tests and a lovely direct energy weapon system being primed to activate those nano particles you have injected, ingested and inhaled.”

She has also claimed: “Without the help of the doctors and nurses, the extermination of Jews, gypsies, homosexuals, blacks, disabled… in the Holocaust could not have been executed…”

According to the JC, Ms Shemirani has also made frequent reference to the Jewish financier, philanthropist and controversial political activist, George Soros, who is often the target of antisemitic conspiracy theories.

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Jemima Goldsmith has called out a leading Pakistani politician for making an antisemitic comment about Ms Goldsmith’s children.

Pakistani Prime Minister and former cricketer Imran Khan, who has two sons with his former wife, Ms Goldsmith, recently spoke at a rally in Kashmir in which he made reference to the son of Maryam Nawaz, the Vice-President of the Pakistani Muslim League and daughter of former Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif. Mr Khan accused Ms Nawaz’s family of corruption, attacking her son for playing polo at the University of Cambridge in the UK, saying: “The common man cannot play polo – a kings’ sport. You need a lot of money to keep a horse and play polo. So tell us where this dear grandson [of the former Prime Minister] got this money from. It’s the people’s money.”

Ms Nawaz responded by noting that her son is the team captain and brings honour to his country, adding: “He is Nawaz Sharif’s grandson, not Goldsmith’s, and he is not being raised in the lap of Jews.”

Ms Goldsmith reacted on Twitter saying “I left Pakistan in 2004 after a decade of antisemitic attacks by the media & politicians (& weekly death threats & protests outside my house). But still it continues” 

Responding on Twitter, Ms Nawaz said: “I have absolutely no interest in you, your sons or your personal lives because I have better things to do and say but if your ex drags in families of others out of spite, others will have nastier things to say. You have only your ex to blame.”

Earlier this year, Pakistan’s Foreign Minister was accused of casually peddling an antisemitic trope live on CNN.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

“Threatening and antisemitic” messages were reportedly sent by a London hospital staff member to a fellow employee, it was revealed last week.

Police are investigating the messages that were reportedly sent to a critical care staff member at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery in Bloomsbury.

In light of the event, senior officials at the University College London Hospitals Trust circulated a letter acknowledging that members of the neurological care team “had reported to have received unpleasant, threatening and antisemitic messages which appear to be sent from within the team.”

The letter continues: “As a team we do not tolerate antisemitism, homophobia, racism, transphobia or any other actions or behaviours which discriminate against others.

“Should we become aware of staff sending such messages this will be investigated as a serious disciplinary matter in line with our Disciplinary Policy.

“Where appropriate we will refer matters to the Metropolitan Police for their investigation to ensure that individuals responsible are held accountable for their actions.

“It is important that we all play our part in taking a stand against antisemitism and all discriminatory behaviour, and we ask that anyone who is subject to, sees or witnesses such behaviour raises their concerns to a member of the senior team below.”

An employee of the hospital said: “I went into the medical profession to care for people regardless of creed or colour, it’s upsetting to think that someone working in a hospital would choose to be antisemitic.”

“What’s happened has been really distressing. But it’s reassuring that the Trust are taking it seriously, even if it has taken them a long time, it’s good they’re saying they won’t tolerate antisemitism,” said another member of staff.

In May, Campaign Against Antisemitism reported that Jewish patients and a staffer had been targeted in multiple antisemitic incidents at two London hospitals.

We also welcomed a statement released by the British Medical Association (BMA) condemning antisemitism and racism.

Over the summer of last year, the British rapper Wiley delivered a multi-day antisemitic tirade over several social media networks, leading to a mass, online walkout. Following a protest by Campaign Against Antisemitism at Twitter’s London headquarters and interventions from the Prime Minister and Home Secretary, Twitter was finally forced to acknowledge the scale of antisemitic hatred on its platform and commit to addressing it. 

Within weeks, Twitter invited Campaign Against Antisemitism to become a “Twitter partner”, allowing us to report problematic material directly through the company’s “partner portal” to Twitter personnel (rather than machines) for review. We were led to understand that these personnel were trained to identify antisemitism. 

As well as submitting material for review on a regular basis, we also collated and summarised the material in monthly reports, which we submitted to Twitter at the end of December, January and February.

In aggregate, we submitted a selection of 1,000 of the most horrendous antisemitic tweets to Twitter incorporating classic antisemitic tropes, Holocaust denial and anti-Jewish incitement. Among them were numerous tweets incorporating the hashtag #HitlerWasRight or the phrase “Holohoax” and references to “fake Jewish Holocaust”, conspiracies about Jewish power and control, blood libels against Jews, calls to “Gas the Jews” and other extreme antisemitic hate speech and abuse.

The following is a sample of tweets from just one day – 4th December 2020 – all of which Twitter deemed acceptable for its platform.

  • “Wow. Biden’s now over 81 million votes? It’s like the Holohoax: you can just keep making up numbers” [complaint ticket 0183098131]
  • “G-d forbid anyone running for office condemn Israel for what they did and are currently doing to the Palestinians. They wouldn’t get elected considering Jews control our government, MSM [mainstream media], social media, Hollywood, financial institutions” [complaint ticket 0183100735]
  • “Except Hitler was right” [complaint ticket 0183140200]
  • “It’s probably the same useless junk that is in any other vaccines. All vaccines were created by Jews to control the population of the goyim. (((Jonas Salk)))” [complaint ticket 0183100251]
  • “What the f*** is this joke man???? What year are we living? THIS F***IN[‘] PROVES ZIONIST JEWS R PART OF THIS. WHY? VERY SIMPLE. THEY CONTROLLING THE WORLD. THEY CONTROL MEDIA. YET NOTHING IS GOING ON. THEY ENJOYING JUST LIKE THEY ENJOYED 1915 ARMENIAN GENOCIDE. SO F*** U ALL! [sic]” [complaint ticket 0183099274]
  • “3 baby Jew rats. 1 will grow up and Rob empires. 1 will go up committing sex act. 1 will grow up and become a Rabbi and will commit Jewish Talmudic Hebaric Terrrorism [sic]” [complaint ticket 0183140615]

This sample of tweets from just one single day showcases the variety of antisemitic tropes and the diversity of Anglophone Twitter users promoting them. But the degree of anti-Jewish racist vitriol on Twitter is well-established, and it has only intensified during the pandemic. What was remarkable, however, was that all of these tweets – and hundreds of others like them – were brought to Twitter’s attention over the course of several months by Campaign Against Antisemitism but were expressly deemed by the company to be acceptable on its platform.

Astonishingly, about 60 percent of the tweets that we submitted were not deemed to have breached Twitter’s policies on hate. For example, in December we reported 239 tweets, of which only 43 were found to be in violation of Twitter’s rules.

Meanwhile, although 194 of those tweets were found not to have violated the rules, the material in permitted and prohibited tweets was often the same. Moreover, 37 of the permitted tweets were subsequently reversed on re-submission or escalation, a token gesture that raised further questions about the consistency of Twitter’s implementation of its own rules: Why are some tweets removed while others incorporating the same antisemitic content are permitted to remain? Why do some Twitter operators deem certain tweets to be antisemitic but other operators take a different view on the same tweets?

At no time has Twitter adequately explained to us the parameters for removing or permitting tweets or who is reviewing hateful material or how they have been trained. Campaign Against Antisemitism’s offers of training for Twitter staff have been ignored.

After we raised concerns about the implementation of Twitter’s policies – following the grime artist Wiley’s antisemitic rampage on social media last summer – Twitter agreed to meet with us monthly to discuss progress. However, after the first meeting in December, notwithstanding that we continued to send reports over the ensuing months, Twitter cancelled further meetings. The tech giant welcomed the continued submission of the reports but asserted that the monthly meetings – of which only one had taken place – could not proceed. Although we continued to send reports, these have no longer been acknowledged or acted upon. In short, Twitter cut off contact with us after we provided clear evidence that their policies on hateful material were failing.

Remarkably, it was Twitter that invited Campaign Against Antisemitism to become its partner on tackling antisemitism on its platform, and it was Twitter that suggested monthly meetings to progress matters. But when its own partner alerted the social media giant to the scale of anti-Jewish hatred and the inconsistency of the implementation of its own rules, Twitter decided not to proceed at all. These are not the actions of a company interested in addressing antisemitism on its platform.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We do not have confidence in Twitter’s capacity to address the rampant antisemitism on its platform. As Twitter’s partner in trying to combat anti-Jewish hate, we have not come to this conclusion lightly. But the opacity of Twitter’s parameters, its inconsistent implementation of its own policies, its lack of interest in our offers of training for its personnel, and its decision ultimately to stop engaging with us at all, are not the actions of a company that takes antisemitism seriously.

“If Twitter brought us on as a partner as some sort of fig leaf for its inaction, we are now laying bare the true picture of the company. Having cut off contact with us after we provided clear evidence that Twitter’s policies on hateful material are failing, it is clear that the company is neither capable nor interested in tackling antisemitism, and it must now fall to an independent regulator to assume that role instead. We continue to urge the Government to take action now to stem the tide of antisemitic hate online.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms. We also continue to make representations to the Government on this matter.

A teenager has been charged with a religiously aggravated public order offence after a Jewish man was targeted with antisemitic abuse inside Oxford Circus Underground station on 4th July.

The seventeen-year-old suspect is due to appear at Highbury Corner Magistrates’ Court on 2nd August.

The boy in question is believed to have been involved in an incident where a person shouted “I f***ing hate the Jews” at a Jewish man whilst he was travelling down the escalators at Oxford Circus station.

In a statement, British Transport Police said: “We’re aware of a video posted online of…antisemitic behaviour on a London Underground escalator. We take such incidents very seriously and are investigating. If anybody has any information contact us on 0800 405040 or text 61016 quoting ref 90 of 4 July 2021.”

Immediately following the incident, Campaign Against Antisemitism released a statement thanking the victim’s brother for publicising the incident. The statement added: “We will be following up privately, but for those reading the thread [on Twitter] we wanted to note that police investigations have now been opened and we are in touch with police and Transport for London. #ZeroTolerance”

Earlier that night, the same Jewish man reported a separate incident of antisemitic abuse, in which an aggressive passenger can be heard threatening him and saying: “I’ve got a shank, I will slit your throat for Palestine” and “I’ll beat the s**t out of you.”

The passenger was then ordered off the bus, where he proceeded to swear at the Jewish man and bang on the doors of the bus.  

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently launched an appeal for information about the suspect in the earlier incident.

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently met with Transport for London as part of work to improve the response to antisemitic incidents on public transport.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A lay magistrate in Scotland is alleged to have promoted an antisemitic video.

According to the JC, a video from 2016 remains visible on the Facebook profile of Amjid Bashir, a broadcaster and Justice of the Peace, which contains a link to a five minute video that claims that the Rothschild family – common protagonists in antisemitic conspiracy theories – “maintains its control through the US Federal Reserve”.

The video’s accompanying caption read: “Not really one for conspiracies but this is interesting on how 5 ultra wealthy families have some [sic] much power.”

A Judician Communications spokesperson reportedly said that “this matter is now under consideration by the Judicial Office for Scotland,” adding: “All judicial office holders receive training about, and are bound by, the Statement of Principles of Judicial Ethics, and must uphold high standards of professional conduct.”

Mr Bashir reportedly wrote on social media last week that he stood “against all hate and discrimination #islamophobia #racism #antisemitism #hate”.

Image credit: JC

Labour Party panel conducting an internal review into the Party’s local operations in Liverpool was reportedly “presented with evidence of a history of antisemitism that already has led to expulsions and suspensions.”

The review was launched after allegations arose of “bullying”, “misogyny” and a “toxic culture” in the Labour Party in the city. The panel received 77 written submissions and conducted 53 interviews with 60 individuals, concluding that “Nothing less than a full reset of the Labour Party in Liverpool is needed.”

Included amongst the various problems were allegations of antisemitism, with the panel recommending compulsory antisemitism training for all elected officeholders, from MPs to branch officers. The panel has also recommended that such training should be mandatory for all candidates as well, a policy that Labour’s ruling National Executive Committee (NEC) endorsed this week.

During the period of Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership of the Labour Party, two Jewish women MPs from Liverpool – Luciana Berger and Dame Louise Ellman – were hounded from the Party, amid other local controversies relating to antisemitism.

The revelation came in the week of a major meeting of Labour’s NEC, in which it take numerous significant steps in the fight against antisemitism in the Party.

Those steps, however, come following weeks of support by Labour MPs and officeholders of anti-Israel rallies that featured antisemitic chanting and placards and strained relations with the Jewish community yet further. Just this week, another such rally, in Newcastle, was exposed, in which one NEC member and former Labour MP, Laura Pidcock, Cllr Ann Schofield and Daniel Kebede, the Senior Vice President of the the controversial National Education Union, spoke. At the rally, the chant “Khaybar, oh Jews” was heard, a reference to the antisemitic “Jews, remember Khaybar, the army of Muhammad is returning” chant. The “Khaybar” chant is a classic Arabic battle cry referencing the massacre and expulsion of the Jews of the town of Khaybar in northwestern Arabia, now Saudi Arabia, in the year 628 CE. The chant has been heard in numerous anti-Israel rallies in Britain and abroad.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Neo-Nazi Andrew Dymock has been jailed for seven years, with a further three years on extended licence, for terror and hate crimes.

Andrew Dymock, a 24-year-old politics graduate from Aberystwyth University who was accused of creating and running the website of the neo-Nazi System Resistance Network group, was found guilty of fifteen terrorism and hate charges last month.

During the trial at the Old Bailey, the court heard that Mr Dymock wrote and shared several antisemitic and hate-motivated articles through the website. He was being prosecuted for fifteen offences including encouraging terrorism through the use of propaganda.

One article was allegedly titled “Join your local Nazis”, while another, “The Truth about the Holocaust”, said that “the only guilt felt by the Germanic race in regard to the Holocaust should be that we did not finish the job.” The article reportedly went on to say that Jews were a “cancer on this earth…that must be eradicated in its entirety”. Numerous antisemitic stereotypes and tropes were also said to have been included, such as conspiracy theories about Jewish control of the banks and the Government.

Another article reportedly written by Mr Dymock read that white people needed to “wake up and bring slaughter to Europa, cleansing it of the unclean filth that pollutes her lands”.

System Resistance Network is the successor to National Action, which the government proscribed as a terrorist organisation in 2016 following a long campaign by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others.

Mr Dymock was convicted of a total of fifteen offences, which include five counts of encouraging terrorism, four of disseminating terrorist publications, two of terrorist fundraising, one of possessing material useful to a terrorist, one of possessing racially inflammatory material, one of stirring up racial hatred, and one of stirring up hatred on the grounds of sexual orientation.

During the trial, Mr Dymock denied all charges, stating: “I’m doing my dissertation on the rise of nationalism and why, and how, ranging from moderate to extreme. I kind of thought I might as well start preparing for my third year in advance.”

Mr Dymock told jurors “thank you for killing me” as they delivered their verdicts.

Detective Chief Superintendent Martin Snowden, Head of Counter Terrorism Policing North East, the group that led the investigation into Mr Dymock, said: “Dymock represented a threat to our society, not simply because of his mindset but because of the considerable efforts he exerted spreading his ideology and misusing his abilities.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Image credit: Crown Prosecution Service

Earlier this week, Metropolitan Police Commissioner Dame Cressida Dick said that she expects those behind the antisemitic attacks in May to be held responsible and face justice.  

In May, incidents of antisemitism in Britain skyrocketed after clashes erupted between Israel and Hamas, the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group. These incidents included signs that featured antisemitic themes at rallies, a rabbi in Essex being assaulted and hospitalised, and a convoy of cars that drove down the Finchley Road shouting “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” through a megaphone.

Dame Cressida said that her officers “still have a number of investigations to complete” while adding that she expects her team will be “bringing people to justice.”

It was confirmed that the allegations that are currently under investigation so far include “a very offensive placard” and “somebody who was shouting vile abuse as they were driving along.”

“Antisemitic attacks are obviously vile – we all wish they didn’t happen,” the Commissioner said. She added: “We are working really hard to make sure we get ahead of the problem…we saw, yes a spike, a high in reported antisemitic crime.”

Commissioner Dick noted that “a fair proportion of reported crime was online” but also added that this “does not excuse it.”

Speaking on the anti-Israel demonstrations where several antisemitic signs and chants were present, Commissioner Dick said: “Policing those protests was challenging, although the amount of disorder associated with those protests was very much less than on the last two occasions when tensions had been particularly high in that region.”

Following a complaint from Campaign Against Antisemitism, the Metropolitan Police Service is investigating multiple police officers over their participation in antisemitic protests whilst in uniform.

Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to Commissioner Dame Cressida Dick after two videos emerged, one showing a uniformed police officer embracing protestors and chanting “Free, free Palestine,” with another showing officers at the same demonstration greeting and shaking hands with the drivers of a convoy of cars that displayed Palestinian flags.

The protests were characterised by some of the worst incidents of antisemitism seen on the streets of London in recent years. Swastikas and pictures of Adolf Hitler as well as calls for Jews to be murdered and Jewish women to be raped were all accompanied by the constant beat of the same words that were chanted by the officer who appears in the first video.

The Chair of the Labour Party, Anneliese Dodds MP, has hailed Labour’s ruling National Executive Committee (NEC) as having “acted decisively to put our own house in order” after it passed a serious of significant measures in the fight against antisemitism in the Party.

In its marathon nine-hour meeting yesterday – the last before the Party’s annual conference in September – the NEC voted to proscribe Labour Against the Witchhunt – an antisemitism-denial group – and the disgraced former Labour MP Chris Williamson’s Resist group, as well as two further far-left groups (Socialist Appeal and Labour In Exile Network), paving the way for automatic expulsion of their members.

The NEC has also resolved, in line with Labour’s Action Plan agreed with the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC), to put forward a semi-independent disciplinary system for a vote at this year’s Party conference. It is understood that an Independent Reviews Panel and an Independent Appeal Board will be formed, to deal with complaints involving protected characteristics, such as allegations of antisemitism. The Appeal Board will reportedly comprise four lawyers, four lay members, and four HR experts, with panels of 3 – including one from each category – hearing cases. It is believed that the process will only be “semi-independent” because, for reasons of cost and protection of the rights of members, it would not be feasible to outsource the complaints process entirely to an independent body.

Ms Dodds described the proposal as “the fairest, most robust process of any political party that we know of.” The National Constitutional Committee will continue to deal with complaints that do not involve protected characteristics. However, the proposal is still subject to approval at conference, and it remains to be seen whether Labour’s leadership is capable of implementing them in practice.

Another rule change to be proposed at conference, as agreed at yesterday’s NEC meeting, is that all Labour candidates seeking public office will need to undertake antisemitism training provided by Labour’s Jewish affiliate, in line with a requirement of the Action Plan.

The NEC was also apparently forced to agree to around one hundred redundancies due to the Party’s poor financial state, which is reportedly due in part to the legal ramifications of the raft of antisemitism cases that it has been involved in.

The Party’s General-Secretary, David Evans, also reportedly agreed to release “by the autumn” part of the Forde report into the leak of a spurious Party report into antisemitism conducted during the final weeks of Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership.

These steps are undoubtedly to be welcomed. However, much remains to be done. For example, organisations such as Jewish Voice for Labour, an antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, have not been proscribed. Neither has the Labour Representation Committee, a pro-Corbyn pressure group with a long history of belittling claims of antisemitism and publishing extremely disturbing articles, where the former Shadow Chancellor, John McDonnell, serves as President. Numerous individual councillors and members with records of antisemitic conduct are also yet to be disciplined.

Moreover, several of the key positive measures, including the independent disciplinary process and antisemitism training for all candidates, must be approved at Labour’s annual conference in autumn. Whilst this was expected, it is a reminder that the hardest step is yet to come. Even yesterday’s virtual NEC meeting was protested by a contingent of far-left activists, including “notorious antisemite” and expelled Labour member, Tony Greenstein, and the conspiracy theorist Piers Corbyn (brother of Jeremy). It is believed that Labour Against the Witchhunt will be holding events in Brighton during Labour’s conference in the city.

Then there is the problem of the far-left MPs in Labour’s Parliamentary Party. In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates. On the day of the publication of the EHRC’s report, we submitted a major complaint against Jeremy Corbyn and other sitting MPs, which are yet even to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated only by an independent disciplinary process once it is installed. The incidents in those complaints were recently exacerbated by the involvement of numerous MPs in anti-Israel rallies that were addressed by antisemitic speakers and where antisemitic placards were seen and antisemitic chanting was heard. That period has strained relations between the Labour Party and the Jewish community even further.

Yesterday’s NEC meeting represented the revolt of those who have enabled the far-left over the past several years, including Sir Keir Starmer, who backed the antisemite Jeremy Corbyn “100%” even as Jewish MPs were hounded from the Party and others courageously left in solidarity with them. The enablers themselves have much to answer for, but yesterday’s meeting was a step in the right direction.

Joe Glasman, Head of Political Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Throwing out the cranks, which no decent political party should have tolerated in the first place, is a positive step, but it is not a cure for a Party that became institutionally antisemitic. The problem is less the bad apples than the culture that enabled them to grow and rot. A new disciplinary process and mandatory training are part of the remedial process. The NEC has spoken, but now the Party must decide at conference, which means the hardest part is yet to come.

“The Parliamentary Labour Party must also confront those in its ranks who have made antisemitic comments, both within and beyond its Corbynist contingent. The indefinite suspension of Jeremy Corbyn was a start, but just as it was wrong for Labour to have tolerated Mr Corbyn over all his years on the backbenches, so it would be intolerable to ignore other MPs facing allegations of antisemitic conduct. We have outstanding complaints against many of these MPs, several of whom also recently endorsed rallies that featured antisemitic placards and chanting while the Party’s leadership stayed silent.

“Today’s announcement is a welcome step on what remains a long road to the possibility of Labour’s rehabilitation, which, given the Party’s record to date, is not a certainty.”

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.