The Metropolitan Police Service has confirmed to Campaign Against Antisemitism that Wiley was not in the UK during his antisemitic tirade in July. Under Home Office rules, that means that the Metropolitan Police must give primacy to police in the jurisdiction where Wiley was at the time.

In anticipation of this development, Campaign Against Antisemitism has already appointed lawyers in that jurisdiction and we will pursue justice abroad. At this time we will not give further details.

On 24th July, the rapper, whose name is Richard Kylea Cowie but who is known as Wiley, spent days engaged in an escalating rant against Jews. After likening Jews to the Ku Klax Klan and claiming that Jews had cheated him and were “snakes”, Wiley tweeted that Jews should “hold some corn”, which is a slang expression meaning that they should be shot. He added “Jewish community you deserve it”. He also called on “black people” to go to “war” with Jews.

Wiley repeatedly evoked conspiracy theories that Jews were responsible for the slave trade and that modern-day Jews are in fact imposters who usurped black people — a conspiracy theory that has incited acts of terrorism against Jews, such as a stabbing attack in Monsey in New York in December.

In the days that followed, Wiley continued to rail against Jews on Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. Following discussions with Campaign Against Antisemitism, a major 48-hour boycott of Twitter and Instagram in which we participated, and a viral stunt in which we projected antisemitic tweets onto Twitter’s London headquarters, Twitter, Facebook (which owns Instagram), Google (which owns YouTube) and TikTok agreed to remove Wiley from their platforms, depriving him of access to his nearly one million social media followers.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is continuing its response to this incident, including:

  • Filing a criminal complaint abroad against Wiley;
  • Continuing to meet with Twitter, Facebook and Google to address their response to antisemitism on their platforms;
  • Working with the Cabinet Office’s Honours Forfeiture Committee to ensure that Wiley’s MBE is revoked;
  • Seeking a change in policy so that racists are automatically stripped of their honours in future (please help by signing our Parliamentary petition);
  • Urging the Government to bring forward legislation to regulate social networks and force them to remove racist incitement (please help by signing our Parliamentary petition); and
  • Working with the music industry to remove Wiley’s awards and ensure that he is shunned for his racism.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “At this stage we are able to confirm that the Metropolitan Police Service has closed its investigation due to jurisdictional issues and that we have instructed lawyers abroad to pursue this matter. When antisemites incite hatred against Jews, we will pursue them, including across borders if necessary. We will provide further details at a later date.”

Two Labour councillors in Cumbria are reportedly being investigated over alleged antisemitic comments that they posted online.

The investigations into the two Copeland Borough Council councillors – Tom Higgins of Egremont ward and Graham Calvin of Moor Row and Bigrigg ward – follow the expulsion of former Councillor Bill Kirkbride from the Labour Party over “offensive” social media posts.

It is reported that a Facebook account appearing to belong to Cllr Higgins referred to Israel and its “co-conspirators in the USA”, while Cllr Calvin apparently made a comment about Jewish donors to the Labour Party, although he reportedly told the BBC that his remarks were making a point about party funding and were not targeted at Jewish people.

A Labour spokesman said: “The Labour Party takes all complaints of antisemitism extremely seriously and they are fully investigated in line with our rules and procedures.” The Copeland Labour group reportedly said that it could not comment on individual cases.

Apparently a third investigation is also underway, into Cllr Dave Banks, who objected in a Council meeting in February to the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by the local authority, saying that “antisemitism is not an attack on Jews or the Jewish faith; it is an attack on the Israeli state.” He did, however, vote in favour of adoption and has since apologised for his comments, apparently telling a later Council meeting that he had gotten them “all wrong”.

Copeland Borough Council adopted the Definition but without explicitly including the integral examples.

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently published its first Audit of Local Authorities, documenting the campaign for widespread adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by local authorities.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Image Credit: Copeland Borough Council

Two teenagers who are suspected of arson and graffitiing swastikas in Borehamwood have been arrested.

The graffiti was found on Monday evening, the day after Rosh Hashanah, in several locations, including The Campions, Retford Close and Sawtry Way, and was reported by a local councillor, Jeremy Newmark.

Hertfordshire Constabulary reportedly said: “Police were called at around 8pm on Monday 21 September to report that two men were acting suspiciously near a van in Stapleton Road, Borehamwood. Officers attended and discovered the van had been broken into and a small fire had been started nearby. Graffiti was also discovered on a number of garages and vehicles in the area. A 18-year-old man from Borehamwood was arrested on suspicion of arson, criminal damage to a vehicle, racially aggravated criminal damage, going equipped, interference with a motor vehicle and burglary (non-dwelling). A 16-year-old boy from Borehamwood was arrested on suspicion of arson, interference with a motor vehicle, criminal damage, burglary (non-dwelling) and racially aggravated criminal damage.”

The graffiti has been cleaned.

Cllr Newmark reportedly said that he was “appalled to receive multiple reports from concerned residents about a spate of antisemitic graffiti on Council garages and street furniture in and around that area,” adding: “Together with other Ward Councillors I’ve previously called for action on the growth of antisocial behaviour around this lovely neighbourhood.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Cllr Jeremy Newmark

A suspended nurse who has led protests against mask-wearing and lockdown restrictions has defended her use of comparisons to Auschwitz and Nazis.

Kate Shemirani has reportedly described the NHS as the “new Auschwitz” and claims that the Government’s policies to control the pandemic are reminiscent of “Nazis”.

In a recent protest in London, however, she defended the comparisons, saying: “When I likened this to Auschwitz and the cattle trucks – you tell me the difference? Because the only time in history I could find where the doctors and nurses were able to end people’s lives was the nurses of the Third Reich. The nurses of the Third Reich are here today. I don’t care if they find it offensive. I find it offensive that our elderly have been murdered in care homes. Stop being a special snowflake and saying you’re offended. They are killing our elderly, our most vulnerable.”

According to the JC, Ms Shemirani has also made frequent reference to the Jewish financier, philanthropist and political activist, George Soros.

She has been suspended as a registered nurse for eighteen months pending an investigation into her past alleged comments on COVID-19 and 5G conspiracy theories.

The Guardian has confirmed to Campaign Against Antisemitism that, following our complaint, its obituary for the late Jewish United States Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has been corrected to clarify that she remained a proud Jew throughout her life.

The obituary originally claimed that Justice Bader Ginsburg had “abandoned her religion” in her teenage years and reiterated in reference to her “Jewish religion” that she “had given [it] up 46 years earlier.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to The Guardian to alert the editors to the error, saying that although Justice Bader Ginsburg “did abandon the religious dimension of her Jewish upbringing, she did not abandon her Jewish identity, which she never hid over the course of her career, and which American Jews long celebrated.” We asked that the obituary be corrected to clarify this distinction.

The corrected relevant sentences now read: “she nevertheless remained deeply committed to her Jewish identity” and “Ginsburg’s Jewish identity…”.

The article also notes: “This article was amended on 22 September 2020 to clarify that while Ruth Bader Ginsburg moved away from strict religious observance at 17, her Jewish identity remained important throughout her life.”

We are grateful to The Guardian for promptly corrected the obituary, both for Justice Bader Ginsburg’s legacy but also because, for wider perceptions of Jews, it is vital that the public understands that the religious dimension of Judaism is only one element of Jewish identity. Unlike some other religions, Jewish identity is not limited to religious practice and beliefs; Jewish identity can be felt and expressed in ethnic, national and cultural ways as well. Even if a Jewish individual is not religiously observant, he or she can still express Judaism (and be a victim of antisemitism) in other ways.

We are also grateful to others, such as CAMERA, who also submitted complaints to The Guardian.

A graffitied swastika was discovered over Rosh Hashanah on a wall in Preston.

The Nazi symbol was removed on Monday morning, the day after the conclusion of the Jewish New Year festival.

It had been found on Saturday by Cllr Pav Akhtar, who told the JC that several Jewish residents contacted him. Cllr Akhtar reportedly said: “I live in an area with a small Jewish population. The threat of the far right and neo-Nazi symbols repeatedly appearing is really worrying.”

The police are investigating.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Cllr Pav Akhtar

Campaign Against Antisemitism is excited to announce the international expansion of our unrivalled coverage of antisemitism in the UK.

This significant initiative follows requests from both our British supporters wishing to learn more about antisemitism in other parts of the world and also our growing international audience interested in reading more about antisemitism in their own countries and elsewhere.

Like many of our projects, this international coverage will be volunteer-led, and we are grateful to our new volunteers — men and women of all ages, nationalities and creeds — who have joined Campaign Against Antisemitism to help make this happen. We are also keen to recruit additional volunteers with knowledge of other jurisdictions, fluent readers of foreign languages, and those with writing experience who may be interested to join our growing team.

We are also interested in hearing from you, our supporters, over the coming weeks about how you think this coverage is developing. We hope you find our international coverage of antisemitism informative and useful, and that it motivates you and others to raise awareness and help combat these latest manifestations of the world’s oldest hatred.

A visibly Jewish couple had a foreign object thrown at their car in Stamford Hill.

The attack took place on Warwick Grove on 17th September and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD2611 17/09/2020.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A Shadow Minister has reportedly endorsed a candidate for the Labour Party’s ruling National Executive Committee who said that antisemitism is a “smear” promoted by the “Israeli diplomatic service”.

Lyn Brown, the MP for West Ham and Shadow Minister for Prisons and Probation, backed Roger Silverman in an email to local members.

Mr Silverman, who is a member of Jewish Voice for Labour, the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, has reportedly written: “The charge that the Labour Party and specifically Jeremy Corbyn are soft on antisemitism is outrageous. It is the latest and most bizarre of a series of monstrous smears by the right-wing establishment…I wouldn’t blame the Israeli diplomatic service for promoting such accusations; it is their job to use every means at their disposal to avoid the election of a British government sympathetic to the Palestinian cause. In this case the smear campaign has been taken up by the British establishment.”

He also wrote in 2016: “Zionism today is one of the most virulent manifestations of racism.”

Nevertheless, Ms Brown said in her email that Mr Silverman’s candidacy “encapsulate[s] the truth” and that she was “hopeful” that he would be nominated.

According to the JC, Mr Silverman was suspended by Labour in 2016 over his alleged involvement with Militant and online comments about the direction of the Party, but was reinstated by Jeremy Corbyn. He apparently become involved in Jewish Voice for Labour and also backed the disgraced then-MP Chris Williamson.

A spokesperson for Ms Brown, told the JC: “Lyn was not aware of any complaints about Roger Silverman and wrote the email in an inclusive way to support members of her local party. She would never support anyone who holds antisemitic views.”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A court has fined two men for racially aggravated disorderly behaviour after they shouted “go back to where you came from” at a group of Jews on a Carlisle train.

The defendants, Paul Biaylock and Ian Routledge, admitted to making the comments on a journey between Newcastle and Carlisle in February.

The victims were visibly Jewish, owing to their skullcaps.

“The group were talking and laughing among themselves and both defendants could be heard making racially abusive comments,” Carlisle’s Rickergate Court was told.

Neither defendant was represented by a lawyer, and the sentences took into account the admissions of guilt. Mr Blaylock and Mr Routledge were fined £200 and £250 respectively, with both incurring additional costs and a victim surcharge. The fines were higher owing to the racial element of the offences.

Recently, Campaign Against Antisemitism reported that police were investigating antisemitic abuse shouted on Church Street in Carlisle.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

With the Jewish New Year upon us, Campaign Against Antisemitism marks the sixth anniversary of our launch and reflects on some key moments and achievements of the past year.

It seems like an age ago that almost half of Anglo-Jewry was considering leaving the country, with considerable fear that the antisemite, Jeremy Corbyn, could become Prime Minister of Britain.

Our campaign to raise awareness of antisemitism in politics included exposing how Mr Corbyn’s allies were placing a cast of Jew-baiters in dozens of constituencies and culminated with the publication of our Antisemitism Barometer 2019, which showed that voters who held antisemitic views were particularly drawn to Mr Corbyn and that far-left antisemitism had overtaken the antisemitism of the far-right. We also began publishing our case files exposing antisemitism in political parties, which showed that Mr Corbyn was personally responsible for 24 incidents of involvement in antisemitic discourse and that Labour Party candidates for Parliament accounted for a frightening 82% of incidents across all parties.

We gave voice to the concerns of the Jewish community at our star-studded #TogetherAgainstAntisemitism rally in Parliament Square in December 2019, featuring Robert Rinder, Tracy Ann Oberman, Tom Holland, the President of the Hindu Forum of Britain and the founder of Muslims Against Antisemitism. It was the largest Anglo-Jewish demonstration against antisemitism since our rally outside the Royal Courts of Justice six years ago.

We carefully monitored the Labour Party primary, documenting the records of all the candidates so that Party members could make informed choices. Once Sir Keir Starmer was elected, we have held him to his election pledges on antisemitism, praising him for his successes, such as sacking Rebecca Long-Bailey for sharing an antisemitic conspiracy theory, and criticising his failures, such as refraining from taking action against Diane Abbott and Bell Ribeiro-Addy after they shared a platform with expelled Labour members. We also published a first-of-its-kind analysis of the records of every member of the Shadow Cabinet on antisemitism – what they said and did over the past five years and, more revealingly, what they did not.

As the complainant in the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s full statutory investigation into the Labour Party, which was launched following a formal referral by Campaign Against Antisemitism, we continued to make detailed legal submissions to the Commission and defended the integrity of its investigation in the face of repeated attempts to undermine it by Mr Corbyn and his allies, including through a contrived and dangerous leaked internal Labour Party report.

We have also been at the forefront of fighting antisemitism across all political parties, including the Conservatives, the Liberal Democrats, the Green Party, the Scottish National PartyPlaid Cymru and the Brexit Party, and in local politics.

We have exposed antisemitic memes relating to COVID-19, and over the summer we shone a spotlight on antisemitism in the Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement and changed the conversation overnight, even in the face of threats to our safety, and highlighted how real Civil Rights heroes like Martin Luther King Jr knew that we must unite to beat hate and declared that we would not let the voices of division within BLM trample their legacy. Meanwhile, we have continued to confront antisemitism on the far-right, with new charges against notorious antisemites.

Our efforts to tackle anti-Jewish racism on social media were perhaps best showcased in our response to grime artist Wiley’s multi-day antisemitic tirade. We immediately called for Wiley to prosecuted, for his MBE to be revoked – and the Cabinet Office has confirmed to us that it has opened a case – and for his 2019 Ivors Inspiration Award to be rescinded. We also joined the #NoSafeSpaceForJewHate 48-hour walkout from social media in protest at inaction by technology companies, whom we continued to call out and with whom we were in constant contact until Wiley was removed from each platform in turn. We even literally shone a light on racism at Twitter’s London headquarters to successfully pressure the company to act. We also launched two Parliamentary petitions: one calling for racists like Wiley to be stripped of their MBEs, which can be signed here, and the other calling for the Government to bring forward Online Harms Bill this year, which can be signed here.

This Rosh Hashanah, we wish all of our supporters, Jewish and non-Jewish, a happy, healthy, safe and successful year ahead, and ask for your help to continue our vital work.

Whatever next year brings, together we will do whatever it takes to defend against antisemitism. Shana tova!

It has been reported that teenage members of a neo-Nazi group are using Instagram to recruit and promote propaganda.

The group, called the British Hand, uses a skull and crossbones logo combined with rifles over a Union Jack as its logo and launched in July on the popular social media platform, Instagram, which is owned by Facebook. The official account has been shut down multiple times, but members continue to use their personal accounts to disseminate the group’s message.

The British Hand is led by an individual believed to be fifteen who lives with his mother in Derby and attends school. He has claimed to be planning a terrorist attack, according to Hope Not Hate. Other members have reportedly pledged to infiltrate the army in order to acquire training in the use of firearms.

The report says that children as young as twelve as being groomed online by neo-Nazis, whose leader describes the group as “ultranationalist” and its goal as “to get rid of Islam and those little BLM [Black Lives Matter] f***ers.”

Once recruited, the members join an encrypted Telegram chat room. It is believed there are fifteen core members in their teenage years or early twenties.

Facebook, which owns Instagram, reportedly said: “We ban groups and individuals that engage in hateful and violent activities and remove content that represents, praises or supports them – including the content brought to our attention by The Sunday Times. Between April and June, we removed more than four million pieces of content related to dangerous organisations across Facebook and Instagram.”

Police believe that the far-right poses the fastest-growing terrorist threat.

It comes as it emerged that the fascist New British Union was also seeking to recruit teenagers on social media, and a few months after several members of the proscribed neo-Nazi National Action terrorist group were convicted. Earlier this year, a teenager from Durham was also convicted of terrorism offences.

Concerns have been raised that the New IRA is courting and being armed by Hizballah, an antisemitic genocidal terrorist group.

The New IRA is apparently seeking weapons and financing from the Middle East terrorist group, according to an assessment by MI5. Apparently, it was established in 2017 that contact had been made between the two groups, but although security services in Northern Ireland and Ireland suspect that mortars and assault rifles have been imported, the weapons have not yet been found.

Representatives of the New IRA apparently visited the Iranian Emabssy in Dublin to sign a book of condolences for the Iranian General Qasem Soleimani, who masterminded Iran’s deadly military operations across the Middle East and was assassinated by the United States.

Hizballah is an Iranian terrorist proxy.

The New IRA is considered to be the largest republican terror group and is responsible for a series of attacks on police and the murder of journalist Lyra McKee.

Last year, following a gruelling effort over several years by Campaign Against Antisemitism and our allies, Hizballah was finally proscribed completely by the then-Home Secretary, Sajid Javid, with the support of the then-Foreign Secretary, Jeremy Hunt. Ensuring that the Government completely proscribes Hizballah has been an important objective for Campaign Against Antisemitism since our charity was established.

Maxine Peake, the controversial activist-actress who shared an antisemitic conspiracy theory earlier this year, has reportedly attended the annual conference of Jewish Voice for Labour (JVL), the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation.

The conference featured numerous controversial figures, including the notorious antisemite and expelled Labour member Jackie Walker; as well as senior JVL figures such as co-Chair Jenny Manson, Media Officer Naomi Wimborne-Idrissi, and Secretary Glyn Secker; Cllr Jo Bird, infamous for comments about “Jew process”; and Graham Bash, who is Ms Walker’s partner and has been investigated by Labour over comments about “Jewish exceptionalism”.

It is understood that on leaving Sunday’s AGM, Ms Peake remarked that “this has been just wonderful. Thank you all so much. I sadly have to leave, but feel inspired and educated.” Glyn Secker, said: “Thank you very much, Maxine.” Another attendee apparently remarked: “Great to have you on board.”

There was reportedly some controversy at the meeting over the involvement of non-Jews in the organisation. Cllr Bird apparently said: “Please could solidarity members respect that this meeting is a rare and valuable space for Jewish members to debate with each other. Your observations would be welcome later.” She later feared that such ‘solidarity members’ were continuing to “prioritise their contributions over Jewish members.” Two attendees apparently complained that as “non-Jews” JVL’s constitution prohibited them from voting.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has previously urged the BBC to take Ms Peake off the air for promoting an antisemitic conspiracy theory.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Sir David Attenborough has reunited the families of two Jewish refugee sisters who were cared for during WWII by his parents.

Irene and Helga Bejah fled Nazi Germany on the Kindertransport, aged thirteen and twelve, in August 1939, as part of the operation that brought 10,000 refugee children to Britain.

Their mother had died years before and their father was deported to Auschwitz. Another sister was too old to be eligible for the Kindertransport and was left behind but reportedly survived the Holocaust.

Mary and Frederick Attenborough took in the girls, who lived with them and their three sons in Leicester for seven years and became like “sisters” to Sir David and his two brothers.

One of the brothers, Richard, the late filmmaker who became Lord Attenborough, also commented in the past how his mother involved her sons in the decision to take in the girls, knowing that it might impact the attention that she was able to give them. “My parents,” he said, “always stood up and were counted wherever they saw an injustice being done.”

After the War, the sisters moved to New York City to join their uncle.

Sir David has now revealed that last July he hosted a reunion for the sisters’ descendants, describing it as “an unforgettable afternoon” and saying “it’s a credit to my parents”.

Helga’s daughter, said: “I think the gravity of the visit really didn’t hit me or David until we were saying goodbye and hugging, because he was very modest and saying, ‘It’s really my parents’, and was not taking any type of accolade or responsibility. I think when he looked at all of us leaving, it hit him that we would probably not have existed if it was not for the humanitarian kindness of his family.”

Helga’s daughters have reportedly left her diaries, letters and other personal papers on long-term loan to Leicester University, in order to ensure that the Attenborough family’s act is recorded for posterity.

The two sisters have died, but their elder sister is reportedly alive, at 99 years old.

John McDonnell has claimed that it is “ridiculous” to suggest that he ‘shared a platform’ with expelled Labour members at the Labour Representation Committee’s (LRC) Annual General Meeting on 5th September, as it was an open meeting and he could not control who spoke.

The controversial former Shadow Chancellor made the comments in response to calls to Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer to discipline him for sharing a platform with former Labour members expelled in connection with antisemitism, in accordance with Sir Keir’s leadership pledge.

In particular, the meeting was attended by the notorious antisemite Jackie Walker, as well as expelled member Tony Greenstein.

Mr McDonnell reportedly said in response to the accusations: “Don’t be ridiculous. Speaking to an open Zoom meeting which is not hosted by me or whose audience is not selected by me or even monitored by me, could not in any rational judgement be construed as providing a platform, support or campaigning for individuals who may or may not be attending.”

However, Mr McDonnell, who is the president of the LRC, omitted to note that Ms Walker is a board member of the LRC. Not only was it likely, therefore, that she might speak alongside him, but in any event given her history of unashamed racism toward Jews the fact that the LRC, and by reasonable extension its President, John McDonnell, have continued to stand by her is itself abominable.

Mr McDonnell has yet to be held to account for his involvement in the LRC, a pro-Corbyn pressure group with a long history of belittling claims of antisemitism and publishing extremely disturbing articles. The LRC also supported Cllr Jo Bird, infamous for her “Jew process” comments, for a seat on the Labour Party’s ruling National Executive Committee. Cllr Bird was also present at the LRC’s AGM.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “John McDonnell claims that it is ‘ridiculous’ to suggest that he has ‘shared a platform’ with those who happened to speak at the Labour Representation Committee’s AGM. But he studiously avoids addressing why he continues to serve as the President of that controversial group at all, particularly while notorious antisemite and expelled Labour member Jackie Walker is one of its officers. Who does he think he’s fooling?”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The New British Union (NBU), a self-described fascist organisation, is recruiting youth members on social media.

In a tweet, the NBU announced that “Now 8-16 year olds have the opportunity of joining New British Union’s new Fascist youth branch, where children can learn about the great ideas behind the philosophy of Fascism! Join Britain’s fastest growing Blackshirts Fascist Party today!”

The NBU uses the same symbol as its predecessor, the British Union of Fascists, a 1930s group led by Oswald Mosley that infamously clashed with Jews and anti-fascist campaigners at Cable Street in East London.

The NBU’s motto is “restoring faith in fascism” and its flag was recently seen at a protest against pandemic lockdown rules led by the antisemitic hate preacher David Icke and Piers Corbyn, the conspiratorial brother of the former Labour leader.

Fascism has no place in democratic society and Campaign Against Antisemitism will continue to monitor this group and its activities.

Sir Keir Starmer has admitted that the Labour Party’s investigation into antisemitism allegations in connection with Pete Willsman is taking “too long”.

The Labour leader made the comments to Nick Ferrari on LBC.

In May 2019, the Party was provided with a recording of Mr Willsman, who is suspended from Labour but still sits on its ruling National Executive Committee, saying that the Israeli Embassy was behind allegations of antisemitism in the Labour Party, a popular antisemitic trope.

Sixteen months on and the investigation is yet to conclude. Sir Keir admitted that “it has taken too long, and I want it to be speeded up.” Although he declined to comment on the case, he insisted that he “did not want to dodge the challenge. On the cases, on the particular challenge of the speed, I now get regular reports on my desk telling me about why cases aren’t going as quickly as they should. We have got new processes in place, we’ve got a new approach. We are acting much much more quickly.” He went on to asset that “I am determined we will deal with it. I think in fairness, anybody looking at this will say we are taking this seriously. We are taking action. And we will be judged by the action we take.”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The hacktivist group known as Anonymous has posted an antisemitic cartoon on Twitter by the notorious Brazilian cartoonist Carlos Latuff.

The cartoon shows two arms, one with an Israeli flag on the cuff and the other with an American flag, using a plaster labelled “antisemitism” to muzzle the mouth of a man wearing a “Free Palestine” bandana. The connotation is that accusations of antisemitism are being cynically used by Israel and the United States to muzzle criticism of Israel.

This notion is an example of the “Livingstone Formulation”, which holds that accusations of antisemitism are bad faith attempts by Jews to stifle criticism of Israel. It was deployed by the former Mayor of London, Ken Livingstone, which is how it earned its name, and it is antisemitic.

The post has been liked over 17,000 times. Anonymous has over 7 million followers on Twitter.

Mr Latuff has previously placed second in Iran’s Holocaust Denial Cartoon Contest, and has drawn other outrageous cartoons, for example a cartoon comparing Israel’s policies to those of the Nazis, in breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism. That cartoon was shared by Baroness Tonge.

This is not the first time Anonymous has shared antisemitic material on social media. Last month, the group posted an image of the antisemitic Freedom for Humanity mural on Facebook.

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

The Liberal Democrats have quickly moved to drop a prospective mayoral candidate after her past antisemitism was revealed.

Last week, the Party announced that Geeta Sidhu-Robb and Cllr Luisa Porrit would vie for the Party’s nomination for the London mayoralty.

However, video has now emerged of Ms Sidhu-Robb, who is a millionaire businesswoman, former corporate lawyer and “juice diet” entrepreneur, making antisemitic statements in her 1997 General Election campaign as a Conservative candidate standing against Jack Straw.

In the video, Ms Sidhu-Robb is seen saying: “The Labour Party is going around with a microphone at the moment saying ‘she’s against Islam, she’s not Muslim, she’s not one of us: don’t vote for her because she’s against Islam.’ And this is making it racist, it’s making it personal, particularly considering the fact that my husband actually is Muslim. So, we’re just going to pull the gloves off. I’m going to get a car and walk around, drive through town telling everybody Jack Straw’s a Jew. How’s a Muslim going to vote for someone who’s Jewish? That’s it. That’s what happened and that’s what we’re going to do about it.”

The footage then shows the car driving around the neighbourhood with a voice through a megaphone saying: “Don’t vote for a Jew, Jack Straw is a Jew”, “If you vote for him you’re voting for a Jew”, and “Jews are the enemy of Muslims”.

Later in the video, Ms Sidhu-Robb claimed that she had acted because she was “furious” but had regretted doing it. She said: “I didn’t want racism and bigotry to play a part in anything that I had anything to do with,” she said. “I object strenuously to it. I did it because I was furious. So, I must admit I wish I hadn’t done it.”

Ms Sidhu-Robb went on to lose the election to Mr Straw and eventually left the Conservative Party and joined the Liberal Democrats.

After the video was unearthed, Ms Sidhu-Robb has reportedly reiterated that she deeply regretted her “appalling behaviour”.

A Liberal Democrat spokesperson reportedly said: “The Liberal Democrats take all allegations of this nature extremely seriously. A complaint has been received by the party and will be actioned in accordance with our processes.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “While Ms Geeta Sidhu-Robb claimed to have been subject to unacceptable racist political campaigning in 1997, she was absolutely wrong to respond by indulging in antisemitism and, worse still, encouraging it among voters. It was right that she recognised at the time that she was wrong to do it, and she is right to reiterate that apology now. Even so, the Liberal Democrats are also right to recognise that she cannot possibly stand as the Party’s candidate for the London mayoralty following these revelations, and the Party’s investigation should determine what further steps are needed to verify whether she is fit to remain a member.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism can reveal that the BBC journalist, Nimesh Thaker, who has recently been criticised for antisemitic comments on his anonymous Twitter account, also had another – now-deleted – Twitter account in his own name, which he used to post antisemitic material and criticise other BBC journalists.

Using the handle, @thaker_nimesh, Mr Thaker, who has been a BBC journalist for more than twenty years at BBC World News, posted tweets describing antisemitism accusations against Jeremy Corbyn and the Labour Party as “smears” and trolled public figures who were campaigning against antisemitism.

He used the account to troll Campaign Against Antisemitism and to harass the editor of the Jewish Chronicle and the actress and writer Tracy-Ann Oberman, tweeting at them dozens of times. He has also retweeted controversial political activists who themselves have come under fire for antisemitism, such as the notorious antisemite Jackie Walker, trolled Labour MPs over antisemitism, and defended Ken Livingstone and supported the disgraced former Labour MP, Chris Williamson.

As with Mr Thaker’s subsequent anonymous Twitter handle, @BotheredThat, Mr Thaker openly used his @thaker_nimesh handle for work purposes, such as booking interviews on the BBC. He also used the handle to criticise the BBC and his colleagues, such as BBC Political Editor Laura Kuenssberg, whose Twitter account he accused of being “officially the Tory fan club message board” and whom he urged to “do some digging…what is the money for journalism please,” among other claims.

Abandoning this personal account in favour, apparently, of pseudo-anonymity, Mr Thaker then adopted the handle @BotheredThat for both work and abusive tweets, accusing antisemitism campaigners of “smears” (see herehereherehereherehereherehere and here for examples) and claiming that antisemitism campaigners believe that anyone who criticises Israel is an antisemite, 

According to BBC guidelines for employees, “All BBC activity on social media, whether it is ‘official’ BBC use or the personal use by BBC staff is subject to the Editorial Guidelines and editorial oversight in the same way that our on-platform content is. We should take particular care about maintaining our impartiality on social media, both in our professional and personal activities […] BBC staff should avoid bringing the BBC into disrepute through their actions on social media.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism submitted a complaint to the BBC about Mr Thaker some weeks ago, and the BBC has confirmed that an investigation is underway.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The BBC must swiftly and transparently investigate Nimesh Thaker for his blatant breaches of the Corporation’s social media policy, including posting appalling comments online, using an account in his own name as well as an anonymous account.

“More broadly, this should be a moment of reflection for the BBC, whose relations with the Jewish community have been strained for many years. If licence fee payers are to have confidence in the broadcaster, it must show zero tolerance for antisemitism by its employees – on screen and off.”

Mr Thaker was approached for comment.

Police in Carlisle are appealing for witnesses after a man shouted antisemitic abuse.

The incident occurred at around 15:00 on Saturday 29th August on Church Street.

A Cumbria Police spokesman reportedly said: “There is no place for hate on the streets of Cumbria and these type of incidents are dealt with vigorously and appropriately.”

Anyone with information is asked to contact PC 2870 Willis on 101, referring to incident 160 of 2ndSeptember, or call Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

It is understood that two Labour councillors in Haringey have been suspended by the Party in connection with antisemitism, which represents just the latest in a string of antisemitism scandals at the local authority over the past few years.

The first suspended councillor, Cllr Preston Tabois, was reported by Guido Fawkes to have appeared to endorse the despicable notion that Jews murdered each other in the Holocaust in some masterplan to create the State of Israel, and other antisemitic conspiracy theories. Cllr Tabois was also slated to be a Labour candidate for the London Assembly.

The Labour Party reportedly said: “The Labour Party takes all complaints of antisemitism extremely seriously and they are fully investigated in line with our rules and procedures, and any appropriate disciplinary action is taken.”

The other suspended councillor is Cllr Noah Tucker, who was exposed earlier this year as having told Tottenham’s Constituency Labour Party to drop a “zero-tolerance” clause from an antisemitism motion that it was debating. Cllr Tucker is reported to have suggested that Israel was somehow to blame for the racist killing of George Floyd, which is a popular antisemitic conspiracy theory, and he has also defended the disgraced then-Labour MP Chris Williamson.

Cllr Tucker reportedly said: “I am an opponent of racism in all its forms including antisemitism. Social media posts have been collated, including selective editing, seemingly in a malicious attempt to falsely associate me with antisemitism. States and organisations which engage politically are legitimately subjects of discussion and criticism. I am confident that a fair process by the Labour Party will reinstate me soon to full membership.”

Another local councillor, Gideon Bull, was previously exposed by Campaign Against Antisemitism as having referred to a Jewish Labour councillor as “Shylock” and consequently withdrew as the Party’s prospective parliamentary candidate in Clacton in the 2019 General Election. It is understood that Cllr Bull is intending to seek the Haringey mayoralty.

In 2018, two Jewish councillors in Haringey revealed that “it has become impossible to operate as a Jewish councillor in the Haringey [Labour] Party without having your views and actions prejudged or dismissed in terms that relate to your ethnicity,” and that “Haringey Labour is definitely not a safe space for Jews.”

The local authority is sometimes dubbed the “Corbyn Council” for its high proportion of Momentum councillors. Its former Leader and the most senior Labour woman in local government at the time, Cllr Claire Kober, stood down in 2018 after ten years in the post in protest against antisemitism, saying: “The levels of antisemitism I’ve seen in the Labour Party are just astonishing. The only thing I see that’s worse than sexism in the Labour Party is antisemitism.”

Cllr Kober was instrumental in the Council’s adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism in 2017, which came amid threats and heckling from the public gallery.

That adoption will not mean much if the Council itself does not investigate and take disciplinary action against the offending councillors, in addition to the Labour Party.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Something is rotten in the London Borough of Haringey. This one Labour-dominated local authority has seen a Council Leader step down in protest at Labour’s antisemitism, another councillor withdraw as a parliamentary candidate over antisemitism, two further councillors suspended by the Labour Party over antisemitism, and Jewish councillors complain of being the targets of antisemitism or having their identity give rise to prejudice by fellow local Party members.

“Under previous leadership, Haringey adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism. Not only must Labour investigate the local Party in the borough, but the Council itself must now launch its own investigations and take action against the offenders. This disgraceful state of affairs is totally unacceptable.”

A further councillor, who has sought to challenge the current Council Leader, has also reportedly been suspended by the Labour Party over an alleged anti-Muslim comment. In addition, another councillor has also previously been suspended from the Labour Party, although he has reportedly denied that his suspension is related to antisemitism and there is no indication that the suspension was related to antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently published its first Audit of Local Authorities, documenting the campaign for widespread adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by local authorities.

A seventeen-year-old from Rugby linked to neo-Nazi groups is facing a terror charge in Birmingham Crown Court. It is understood that he is alleged to have joined the neo-Nazi Feuerkrieg Division group, which the Home Office plans to proscribe.

The court was told that the defendant, who cannot be named for legal reasons, had to pass a test to prove his hatred of Jews and that he had “graphic” video footage of a terrorist attack on his telephone and had searched the internet for information about guns, including how to convert a gun that fires blanks into a live weapon.

He had also apparently praised the terrorist who carried out the mass shooting last year in Christchurch, New Zealand, describing such perpetrators as “saints”.

His original trial was ended by the pandemic lockdown earlier this year, and the retrial has now commenced, with jurors told that he had adopted the “twisted ideology” of Nazis and white supremacists and had participated in far-right chat groups online, where he shared the information about firearms that he had learned.

In one of the messages, the defendant said that he was an administrator of a group called ‘League of Nationalists’, and also said: “Whatever happens I’m going to have a local unit. I’m working on the propaganda and the weapons. I need men.”

The trial is expected to last for several weeks.

crowd-funder to cover the legal costs for “Labour Party members who have been caught up in the absurdities of [its] disciplinary processes” has raised almost £30,000.

The crowd-funder is backed by the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, Jewish Voice for Labour (JVL).

The crowd-funder was launched by a group called ‘Labour Activists 4 Justice’, which describes itself as “Labour Party members who have been caught up in the absurdities of Labour’s disciplinary processes who want to see them changed”. The campaign is hosted by the website www.crowdjustice.com.

“These processes,” the group claims, “are unjust and unfair, and we intend to use the law to get them changed. We have started the action, but we need your help to be able to complete it.”

In a statement earlier this month, JVL called on its supporters to back the appeal.

Although it is not clear precisely what disciplinary processes in the Labour Party are at issue or who is involved in the campaign, observers have reasonably assumed that it is connected to controversies over antisemitism in the Party.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The University of Warwick has rejected a complaint by the Warwick Jewish and Israel Society (JISoc), against a sociology lecturer who described allegations of antisemitism in the Labour Party as “very much an Israeli lobby kind of idea”.

In a lecture on 11th November 2019, Dr Goldie Osuri posited in a recording obtained by Campaign Against Antisemitism that “the next time they say that the Labour Party is antisemitic, you know there are some people possibly that are possibly antisemitic, but this idea that the Labour Party is antisemitic is very much an Israeli lobby kind of idea, the idea that you want to discredit the Labour Party because there is support for Palestine among some members of the Labour Party.”

Her conspiratorial comments, alluding to supposed outsized Israeli power and interference in British politics, and dismissal of antisemitism in Labour as a smear, left Jewish students outraged.

At the time, in an email to students shown to Campaign Against Antisemitism, Dr Osuri doubled down on her claims, promoting the work of the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, Jewish Voice for Labour, as well as bemoaning that she was “saddened” that “none of these issues were raised in the seminars.”

However, the University stood by Dr Osuri earlier this year, finding that her comments “opened up the space for dialogue and discussion as would be expected in an academic environment and that the statement made in the lecture holds within the principles and values of tolerance and free speech.”

In a recent letter to the JISoc President, it is understood that the University’s Provost, Professor Christine Ennew, has now determined that there are “insufficient grounds to progress the complaint”, and therefore no action will be taken against the lecturer. Students have charged the University with having failed to investigate the matter properly and accused the decision-makers of a conflict of interest.

It is understood that they intend to escalate the complaint to the Office of the Independent Adjudicator for Higher Education.

The University of Warwick is also under pressure over its refusal to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism, a refusal that may well have had a bearing on this case.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The University of Warwick’s decision not to take action against a lecturer peddling antisemitic conspiracy theories about the ‘Israel lobby’ being behind the well-documented and indisputable institutional antisemitism in the Labour Party is an abdication of both its academic responsibility and its duties towards its minority students. Sadly, this determination is of a piece with Warwick’s decision not to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism. Had it done so, it might have recognised Dr Goldie Osuri’s remarks for what they were and taken appropriate action. It is little wonder that the University’s Jewish students are losing confidence in the administration.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Labour is reportedly investigating three candidates running for positions on the Party’s ruling National Executive Committee (NEC) after complaints were submitted by activists from the Socialists of Colour group.

The group sent a series of questions to the candidates and, after receiving the responses, raised complaints about three of the respondents, including Brian Precious and Carol Taylor-Spedding, whose responses have been marked with a content warning.

Brian Precious responded to a question on ‘institutional racism’ in the Labour Party by saying that “Labour is not institutionally antisemitic” but rather “Israel is institutionally antisemitic via its ethnic cleansing of the (semitic) Palestinians since 1948.” He also lamented the “antisemitic smear campaign against Jeremy Corbyn” and advised, in response to a different question, that “We can address Islamophobia best of all by not invading one Muslim country after another, and above all by showing solidarity with Palestine and by pointing out to the antisemitism merchants that the Palestinians are a Semitic people.” He added: “Regarding antisemitism against Jews, I would call on all Labour members to support Jewish Voice For Labour,” a reference to the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation.

When asked to name a black Socialist man who inspired her, Carol Taylor-Spedding named three black women, one of whom was the notorious antisemite Jackie Walker, whom she proceeded to defend for being “expelled unjustly” from the Labour Party.

The group complained about a third candidate as well for alleged racism.

LabourList reports that a Socialists of Colour steering committee member said: “A number of responses to our questions we disagreed with but could be put down to political difference. However, there were some that entered into clear-cut racism and antisemitism, which Socialists of Colour do not in any way endorse. Responses that warranted content warnings for their antisemitic and racist content included the defence of Jackie Walker, who was expelled from the party for antisemitism, the denial of institutional antisemitism, perpetuating conspiracy theories and comments around certain communities being more predisposed to commit crime. We are also deeply worried about the erasure of antisemitism especially in the face of the EHRC investigation into the Party. Some of these issues have been picked up by the party, with Brian Precious’ original candidate statement being taken down due to antisemitism and then replaced.It is evident that party vetting processes when it comes to candidates are not thorough enough and do not have conclusions that effectively hold candidates, or people who should not be candidates due to their racism, to account.”

Ms Taylor-Spedding reportedly responded that the accusation of antisemitism “does not make any sense” because Ms Walker was expelled for bringing the party into disrepute rather than for antisemitism itself.

Another six NEC candidates signed a letter organised by the Labour Left Alliance criticising Socialists of Colour for their stand against antisemitism and racism, calling on the group to “take off the content warning” and “issue an apology”.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Matt Le Tissier has apologised for comparing rules on mask-wearing during the COVID-19 pandemic to the Holocaust in a highly controversial and ill-considered social media post.

The football pundit, who was until recently a fixture on Sky Sports and continues to serve as an ambassador for Southampton Football Club, shared an image on Twitter that had been posted by another user in response to a police officer challenging a train passenger for not wearing a protective face mask.

The image showed the famous child victim of the Holocaust, Anna Frank, with the caption: “The people who hid Anne Frank were breaking the law. The people who killed her were following it.”

After a social media backlash, Mr Le Tissier apologised, saying: “Apologies for the recent tweet. Obviously taken out of context so I’ve deleted it so there’s no confusion.” It is not, however, clear what the “context” was other than a comparison between a law requiring people to wear masks to reduce the spread of a pandemic and the systematic genocide of the Jewish people.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Matt Le Tissier is right to apologise for a grossly ill-considered tweet. Everyone is free to express an opinion on the pandemic and lockdown within the bounds of the law, but their opinions should also be expressed within the bounds of taste. Comparing the need to wear a protective mask to protect oneself and others during a worldwide pandemic is in no sense comparable to the systematic murder of over six million Jews because of who they were. Hopefully Mr Le Tissier has now grasped that elementary distinction.”

Jacqui Harris, a local councillor, has been suspended again from the Conservatives after Campaign Against Antisemitism brought her social media history to the Party’s attention.

Cllr Harris is currently a Conservative councillor on Stratford-upon-Avon District Council, having previously served as an Independent as well after being suspended by the Conservatives over allegations of antisemitism in 2019. In 2018 she was selected as a prospective parliamentary candidate for the Party.

Some of the examples of her social media history that we brought to the Conservatives’ attention are below.

In January 2019, Councillor Jacqui Harris tweeted: “At this time when we are remembering the horror of Auschwitz – those who were treated so badly back then, seem to have a short memory and are now behaving badly against fellow human beings now! look how they are treating the innocents in GAZA?” According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

In March 2019, Cllr Harris responded to a tweet which alleged, “The whole AS [antisemitism] thing is a false flag, probably masterminded by mossad/cia…Its [sic] not about AS, its [sic] about removing JC [Jeremy Corbyn]”, by saying: “Spot on, don’t you find it timely that this was encouraged fanned and exploded just before the release of the report on Israel and war crimes?” Suggesting that antisemitism accusations are a political-motivated smear orchestrated by Israel represents several antisemitic tropes woven into one.

In December 2019, Cllr Harris ‘liked’ and retweeted a tweet stating: “Trump ran for office on a platform of ‘America first’ — his actions over the last 3 years have clearly demonstrated, he is ‘Israel first’ #Puppet”, which also linked to an article claiming that “All the credible, independent, and objective evidence proves that Israel and the United States were behind 9/11. Despite the fact that the Zionist controlled US mainstream media simply ignores all the evidence.” According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Using the symbols and images associated with classic antisemitism to characterise Israel or Israelis” (in this case the outsized power of the Jews and their involvement in evil events) is an example of antisemitism.

In January 2020, the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, Jewish Voice for Labourshared an article on Twitter which alleged that Labour’s performance in the general election had been undermined by a “concerted campaign to falsely describe [it] as antisemitic”, and described those making accusations of antisemitism as “witch hunters”, most of whom were doing so for cynical reasons. Cllr Harris ‘liked’ this.

Campaign Against Antisemitism brought these and other examples of Cllr Harris’ conduct on social media to the attention of the Conservative Party, which has advised us that she has now been suspended from the Party for a second time pending further investigation.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We applaud the Conservatives for taking swift action within days of being alerted the Cllr Jacqui Harris’ social media activity, some of which breaches the International Definition of Antisemitism. Anti-Jewish racism has no place in British political parties or in local politics, and we urge the Conservatives to conduct the investigation quickly and transparently and deliver a verdict that takes into account that this is her second suspension.”

Recently, Campaign Against Antisemitism criticised the Conservative Party for taking so long to investigate two MPs and one parliamentary candidate over antisemitism allegations.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently published its first Audit of Local Authorities, documenting the campaign for widespread adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by local authorities.

The conspiracy theorist and antisemitic hate preacher David Icke led a rally in London over the weekend against the lockdown and other pandemic-related rules and restrictions. He was joined on stage by Piers Corbyn, the conspiracist brother of the former Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn. Participants at the demonstration displayed the symbol of Oswald Mosley’s British Union of Fascists, among other controversial material.

Other attendees reportedly displayed placards promoting the antisemitic QAnon conspiracy theory, which believes a powerful cabal runs the world.

Mr Icke uses social media, his books and his stage performances to incite hatred. His preaching is so absurd that since the 1990s he has been dismissed as a crank, but because he is dismissed, there has been no major opposition to him and he has built up a following of thousands upon thousands of disciples whom he has persuaded to adamantly believe that the world is in the grip of a conspiracy run by the “Rothschild Zionists”. His repertoire includes conspiracy myths and tropes classified as antisemitic according to the International Definition of Antisemitism. Campaign Against Antisemitism has successfully persuaded some venues to pull out of hosting his events.

Recently, Ofcom sanctioned the television channel London Live for airing an interview with Mr Icke on COVID-19 in which he claimed that Israel is using the pandemic to “test its technology” and Facebook and YouTube resolved to remove Mr Icke from their platforms, albeit because of his conspiracies regarding the pandemic rather than because he is a Jew-hater. Waterstones also recently announced that it would remove from sale all of his books.

Piers Corbyn has his own history of controversy in relation to antisemitic conspiracy theories. He has previously retweeted @whiteknight0011, a notorious neo-Nazi who declared that “They will force Trump in to war What do you think happened to Hitler? Bilderberg CIA IMF Banker Gangsters They are the problem” along with four images. The @whiteknight0011 account has since been suspended. One image showed Lord Jacob Rothschild, the Jewish banker and philanthropist, against the background of a Nazi flag, claiming that he controls the world. A second showed Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu as a puppeteer controlling ISIS through Israeli intelligence agency Mossad, orchestrating the war in Syria and Paris attacks as Lord Rothschild and the Queen look on approvingly. A third image showed the faces of supposed Jewish conspirators who run the world to society’s detriment, proclaiming: “Know your enemy”. The last image showed a family photo of the Royal Family, claiming that they are in cahoots with these Jewish conspirators in committing “the worst genocides, invasions and theft in all history.”

Piers Corbyn has also claimed that “Zionists” were conspiring against his brother: when Jewish then-MP Louise Ellman complained of antisemitic attacks against her, Piers accused her of using it as a cover for political attack, tweeting: “ABSURD! JC+ All #Corbyns are committed #AntiNazi. #Zionists can’t cope with anyone supporting rights for #Palestine”.

It is ironic that Jeremy Corbyn, agreed with and defended his brother over that statement, citing the fact their mother had been at Cable Street, a 1936 clash between Mr Mosley’s British Union of Fascists and his Jewish and non-Jewish opponents.

Image credit: Joe Mulhall

Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to the Charity Commission following the resignation of the entire trustee board of Islamic World Relief.

The board of Britain’s largest Muslim charity resigned earlier this week after a new trustee-director was discovered to have a history of antisemitic posts on social media. He had been appointed to replace another trustee who had resigned recently after his history of antisemitic social media posts was uncovered.

Heshmat Khalifa was replaced by Almoutaz Tayara, who also serves as the chairman of Islamic Relief Germany. But even though the charity pledged to review its processes for screening trustees after the previous scandal “to ensure that this will not happen again”, Mr Tayara was discovered to have praised the genocidal antisemitic terrorist group Hamas as “great men” who responded to the “divine and holy call of the Muslim Brotherhood”, and also posted an image of former President Barack Obama wearing a tie branded with the Star of David.

It is understood that in 2017 Islamic Relief Germany learned of the posts after they were uncovered by a blogger, which dated from 2014 and 2015, but Mr Tayara was permitted to remain in his post on condition that Mr Tayara apologised, deleted the posts and closed his Facebook account.

Although Islamic World Relief did not apparently know of the posts until it was approached by The Times, the charity announced that the social media comments were “inappropriate and unacceptable” and that its board would resign and not seek re-election to a new board.

In our letter to the Charity Commission, we wrote: “The episode has shown that IRW’s processes are defective. Given the size of the charity and the severity of the breach, we are writing to invite you to open a statutory investigation into how IRW has been operating and whether the racist views and negligence of some of its trustees have impacted its activities. We believe that the Commission must intervene to chart a new course for IRW, rebuild the public’s trust in its work. This matter has caused considerable concern amongst members of the Jewish community who have sought our support and it is important that the Commission is seen by them to be investigating this matter thoroughly and taking action where it is needed.”

The full letter can be read below.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The replacement of a trustee with a history of antisemitic comments with a new trustee who also has a history of antisemitic comments and the subsequent resignation of the entire board has shown that Islamic Relief Worldwide’s processes are defective. Given the size of the charity and the severity of the breach, we have written to the Charity Commission calling for a statutory investigation into how the charity has been operating and whether the racist views and negligence of several of its trustees have impacted its activities. The Commission must chart a new course for the organisation in order to rebuild the public’s trust in the charity’s work.

A residential housing proposal by a Jewish housing association in Gateshead has been greeted with objections that have utilised antisemitic tropes.

The Jewish Community Council of Gateshead has applied for planning permission to construct a 26-dwelling estate on the brownfield site of the former Go-Ahead Bus Depot.

The project will be undertaken by Adler Housing and funded by private money with some sponsorship from Homes England.

The houses are specially designed with the size of religious Jewish families in mind, as well as their practices and security needs.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been made aware of objections to the proposals raised on social media that utilise antisemitic tropes, suggesting that the British Jews for whom the houses are being designed are somehow not really British and that the homes are, as it were, being designated for alien migrants whose rights to housing should be deprioritised in favour of native Britons. There has also been a suggestion that Israel would not tolerate foreigners turning up demanding housing estates be built for them, the implication being that Britain should not tolerate it either.

In reality, the prospective residents are British Jews who have an equal right to housing as their fellow citizens, and the comparisons to Israel are gratuitous. It has also been pointed out by defenders of the proposals that the design of the homes to meet the needs of religious Jews – funded by a mix of private money and a government grant to which others are equally entitled to apply – is no different from housing specially equipped for other protected groups, such as the elderly or the disabled.

It is understood that Gateshead Council is minded to grant the proposal planning permission, subject to a section 106 agreement, which is common in connection with such proposals.

ACORN, the renters’ union, has confirmed to Campaign Against Antisemitism that it expelled a member after its Manchester branch posted a response to a prospective Jewish member on Instagram saying “no time for Zionists sorry” and “We are a pro Palestine organisation”.

The Instagram account then proceeded to block the prospective member on the social media platform. It was clear from the prospective member’s account that he is Jewish, as he uses his Hebrew name and describes himself as a “full-time” Jew”, and “new immigrant in the diaspora”.

ACORN had already apologised swiftly and unreservedly, mounting an immediate investigation.

Following the conclusion of the investigation ACORN convened its national board this evening.

In a statement sent to Campaign Against Antisemitism, Acorn said: “On Sunday morning, two direct messages were sent from ACORN Manchester’s Instagram account by a then unidentified individual. Following an investigation, the individual responsible has now been identified and was expelled from the organisation by ACORN UK’s national board on Tuesday evening.”

The statement continued: “ACORN UK unequivocally condemns the antisemitic messages that were sent. We would also like to reiterate our apology to all our Jewish members and the wider Jewish community for the upset and offense caused. We will be keeping our social media access processes under continual review, having already taken steps to improve these in order to avoid an incident like this from happening again. We would like to thank everyone for their patience whilst the investigation was promptly carried out. The outcome has now been communicated to those affected.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “This was an appalling act, but ACORN has made very clear that it was the act of an individual whose antisemitism is not tolerated by their union. ACORN acted swiftly to apologise, investigate and take robust action, expelling the member responsible. This is an example of best practice in dealing with antisemitism. We commend ACORN on turning this incident of anti-Jewish discrimination into a case study in best practice. We also applaud the victim and their friends for bringing this matter to light.”

Acorn, the renters’ union, has swiftly and unreservedly apologised after its Manchester branch posted a response to a prospective Jewish member on Instagram saying “no time for Zionists sorry” and “We are a pro Palestine organisation”.

The Instagram account then proceeded to block the prospective member on the social media platform. It was clear from the prospective member’s account that he is Jewish, as he uses his Hebrew name and describes himself as a “full-time” Jew”, and “new immigrant in the diaspora”.

In a statement, Acorn said: “On Sunday morning, two direct messages were sent from Acorn Manchester’s Instagram account by an as yet unidentified individual. Acorn UK’s national board met the same day and unequivocally condemn the antisemitic messages sent from the Manchester Instagram account. In no way do they represent the views of our organisation which seeks to unite all low and moderate income communities.

“Acorn UK apologises to all our Jewish members and the wider Jewish community for the upset and offense caused. An investigation has been launched and this will be prioritised to ensure it is concluded in a timely manner. All members with access to the Instagram account have been suspended whilst this investigation takes place. 

“Regardless of the outcome of the investigation, it is clear there has been a lapse in our social media access practices. The account in question was accessed with a single shared password that was distributed internally, which has prevented oversight of communications made on behalf of the branch. This has been reviewed and amended with immediate effect to ensure that incidents like this do not happen again. Access to the account has been taken under the ownership of the National Organisation, and we will continue to review the security and accountability of our communication channels.

“The outcome of the investigation will be communicated to those affected and we will not be commenting further until this has been concluded.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism will be monitoring the outcome of the investigation and expects that the culprit and any accomplices will be expelled from the union for this racist act.

Thames Valley Police are reportedly investigating an antisemitic e-mail sent to a Jewish newspaper, the JC and numerous local councillors.

The e-mail, which was apparently also sent to several local authorities and other media organisations, including The Sunday Times and Dorset and Chester Councils, came from a group calling itself the Keep Britain Pure League.

The e-mail is understood to have claimed that Jews “are in charge of the money” and that “the only think [sic] Hitler did wrong, was not kill enough of them.” It was signed off “Heil Hitler”.

The two individuals named as the group’s leader and media co-ordinator insist that they have nothing to do with the organisation or the e-mail.

A spokesperson for Thames Valley Police reportedly told the JC: “We have received a report relating to this email and it is being investigated as malicious communications. We are working to establish the source of the correspondence. No arrests have been made.”

We are grateful to the local councillor who brought this matter to our attention.

The Liberal Democrat leadership hopeful Layla Moran, has described the Hamas terrorist group as “authoritarian, antisemitic and homophobic”.

Ms Moran made the comment in remarks to Liberal Democrat Friends of Israel, saying: “The authoritarian, antisemitic and homophobic Hamas won the election in Gaza and in true dictatorial fashion, they have outlawed elections. I have publicly condemned Hamas and made clear they do not speak for me or my values.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for Hamas, an antisemitic genocidal terrorist organisation, to be proscribed in its entirety in the UK.

Ms Moran also noted that “As with many political circles, unfortunately, the BDS movement does have issues with antisemitism which should be condemned,” referencing the Boycott Divestment and Sanctions movement, the tactics of which a majority of British Jews find intimidating.

Following the contest between Mr Moran and Sir Ed Davey, the new leader of the Party will be announced on 27th August.

Numerous users of the social media video platform TikTok are pretending to be Holocaust survivors in a abominable new antisemitic trend dubbed “trauma porn”.

Some videos feature the user wearing a Star of David or the striped clothing worn by inmates at Nazi concentration camps, while others feature makeup to simulate bruising. Other videos use Auschwitz as a backdrop.

Most of the users are teenage girls and consequently we are not showing the images, although they remain available on TikTok and other social media platforms.

Some of the videos have thousands of views and likes.

However, some users have defended the videos on the basis that they are somehow educational.

One user, for example, has removed her video, saying: “I’ve always been interested in the history of the Holocaust and just wanted to make a creative video informing people about it on TikTok. It was never intended to be offensive.”

Another reportedly said: “I’m very motivated and captivated by the Holocaust and the history of World War II. I have ancestors who were in concentration camps, and have actually met a few survivors from Auschwitz camp. I wanted to spread awareness and share out to everyone the reality behind the camps by sharing my Jewish grandmother’s story.”

Last week, TikTok announced that it had removed 380,000 videos in the United States over violations of its hate speech policy.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has previously reported on the infestation of far-right videos and Holocaust-denial on TikTok, and has taken action in the past over Holocaust mockery on the platform.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has launched a petition calling for new legislation urgently to introduce a requirement for technology companies to remove racist incitement within set timeframes, a duty of care for social networks with personal liability for executives, and tighter requirements to provide evidence to police under warrant.

The petition can be signed here: https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/333146/

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “These videos are TikTok’s latest antisemitic abomination. The obsession among too many users of the platform with Holocaust mockery and Holocaust denial should be of grave concern to the company, but time and again TikTok shows even greater indifference than other social media networks to the hate spewed on its platform. Tech companies have shown that they are incapable of regulating themselves, which is why we have called on the Government to bring forward an Online Harms bill immediately.”Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

A new book quotes a union official and former senior advisor to Jeremy Corbyn who claimed that Mr Corbyn struggled to empathise with the Jewish community because it is “relatively prosperous”.

Andrew Murray is quoted in a new behind-the-scenes book by journalists Gabriel Pogrund and Patrick McGuire saying about the former Labour leader: “He is very empathetic, Jeremy, but he’s empathetic with the poor, the disadvantaged, the migrant, the marginalised, the people at the bottom of the heap. Happily, that is not the Jewish community in Britain today. He would have had massive empathy with the Jewish community in Britain in the 1930s and he would have been there at Cable Street, there’s no question. But, of course, the Jewish community today is relatively prosperous.”

Some have interpreted Mr Murray’s suggestion that Jews are “relatively prosperous” as reminiscent of the antisemitic trope that Jews are rich, and apparently some Labour MPs have called for him to be disciplined.

Left Out: The Inside Story of Labour under Corbyn also describes how Karie Murphy, Mr Corbyn’s Chief of Staff, suggested some gesture of goodwill by the then-leader towards the Jewish community, including a trip to Auschwitz, a visit to the Jewish Free School in London, an interview with the Israeli newspaper Haaretz, or perhaps a mingle at a Progressive synagogue or Jewish old age home. According to The Times, in which the book is being serialised, “all but one of them came to nothing”, the exception being an amendment to Labour’s code of conduct.

The book also reportedly claims that John McDonnell, the Shadow Chancellor and key Corbyn ally, wanted Mr Corbyn to intervene in a disciplinary case against Dame Margaret Hodge MP, after she called Mr Corbyn and “antisemitic racist”. It is suggested that Mr Corbyn was so offended at being called a racist that he refused to intervene. Consequently, he and Mr McDonnell apparently did not speak to each other “for month”.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has provided our new ground-breaking report on adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by local authorities to the Rt Hon. Robert Jenrick MP, the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, as a resource for his department.

Mr Jenrick has been a champion of the campaign for widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, recently warning local authorities that those refusing to adopt the Definition would risk losing public funding. 

In September 2019, Mr Jenrick declared that “there is no place for antisemitic abuse” and regretted that local authorities had not followed the Government in adopting the Definition, and indicated that he was taking action to encourage wider adoption. In October 2019 Mr Jenrick wrote to all local authorities in England urging them to adopt the Definition, and in January 2020 Mr Jenrick reiterated his policy, announcing in the House of Commons that he was “requiring all councils to adopt it forthwith”. Mr Jenrick followed up later that month by warning that any local authorities that expressly refused to adopt the Definition would be named and could expect to lose public funding if they failed to tackle antisemitism.

In the letter, Campaign Against Antisemitism said that “We are delighted to provide you with our new, ground-breaking report, published today, that investigates how many and which local authorities have adopted the Definition to date, and which have not.”

In addition to documenting the adoption of the Definition (or otherwise) by each and every local authority in the country, the painstaking report also provides important insights into how disciplinary processes function at the local level and makes significant recommendations as to how these processes can be enhanced in order to eradicate racism from local politics.

The full letter can be read below, and the report can be accessed here: https://antisemitism.org/councils/

Today, Campaign Against Antisemitism publishes its report revealing the extent of adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by local authorities across the United Kingdom.

The report — the first of its kind — shows that the campaign for widespread adoption of the Definition is well underway.

Ever since Campaign Against Antisemitism led the effort for adoption of the Definition by the British Government — which became the first in the world to do so — two Secretaries of State for Local Government have joined our push for local authorities to follow suit. As this report shows, that campaign is yielding results, with much success owed to the work of grassroots local activists and organisations right across the country. We applaud them and the local authorities that have listened, but there remains much to do.

The current Secretary of State for Local Government, the Rt. Hon. Robert Jenrick MP, recently warned local authorities that those refusing to adopt the Definition would risk losing public funding. This report examines where pressure is needed by naming and shaming for the first time those local authorities that have failed to adopt the full Definition in line with Government policy.

The report — which finds that 121 of the 422 local authorities in the UK (29%) have adopted the Definition in full — gives a fuller picture of the fight against antisemitism at the local level, exposing which local authorities take this issue seriously and which do not, and enabling local activists and voters to make informed choices.

But the report also shows that there is still a long way to go. While the number of local authorities adopting the full Definition is rising, in total fewer than a third of local authorities have adopted the full Definition so far. With some exceptions, which the report analyses, this failure is national and cross-party.

The purpose of adoption of the full Definition is not only to send a message of where local councillors stand on antisemitism but also to ensure that the Definition is applied in disciplinary cases involving councillors or staff. As this report shows, the number of local authorities that have actually incorporated the Definition into their codes of conduct for councillors and staff is negligible.

The report also discusses the shortcomings of the existing disciplinary and sanctions systems in place for dealing with misconduct by local councillors. Adoption of the Definition and its incorporation into codes of conduct are still insufficient if appropriate sanctions are unavailable and local councillors can engage in antisemitic conduct without consequence.

A separate Campaign Against Antisemitism project exposing antisemitism in political parties has shown just how extensive antisemitism is among local councillors and council candidates. Adopting and applying the Definition in antisemitism cases and enforcing judgments with real sanctions are critical if anti-Jewish hatred is to be eradicated from local politics in the UK.

British Jews should not have to endure antisemitism from their elected representatives, and all opponents of racism in our country should root out prejudice at any level of our politics. It is easy to say that antisemitism is unacceptable, but words must be followed by action. Widespread adoption of the Definition is the bare minimum.

If you would like to write to your local councillors or representatives in a devolved administration, please visit antisemitism.org/councils.

The report comes following a surge of antisemitism at the local level over the past years, which most recently has resulted in the resignation of at least one leader of a council and political control in at least two local councils changing hands.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “This ground-breaking report, which is the product of painstaking research by our team, shows that the campaign for widespread adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by local authorities across the UK is well underway. But the report also shows that there is still a long way to go: only 29% of local authorities have adopted the full Definition so far, a shortcoming that is national and cross-party.

“In support of the policy announced by the Secretary of State for Local Government, this report names and shames recalcitrant local authorities, and makes numerous recommendations. Above all, the report is designed to serve as an accessible resource for local media and members of the public, whom we invite to write to their local councillors to urge adoption of the Definition.

“The surge of antisemitism at the local level demonstrates just how essential it is for local authorities to adopt the Definition and, crucially, to incorporate it into their codes of conduct for councillors and staff. Antisemitism has no place in our political life, and that must include local politics as well.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Kerry-Anne Mendoza, the editor of The Canary, a controversial hard-left blog, has appeared to double down on her antisemitic comparison of Israel to Germany during Nazi rule.

Ms Mendoza’s latest incident began when she equated Brexit with Nazism, referencing the infamous slogan astride the gates to the Auschwitz death camp in a tweet: “Get Brexit done; Build, build, build; Jobs, jobs, jobs; Arbeit macht frei.”

In response to a backlash on social media, she explicitly referenced Israel and Jews, appearing to double down on her racist analogy, tweeting: “Being called an antisemite by people who think “Never again” doesn’t apply to Palestinians, Muslims, trans people, GRT communities, or Ethiopian/Mizrahi/anti-Zionist Jews…”

This is not the first time that, Ms Mendoza, whose website is under investigation by the Government’s Independent Advisor on Antisemitism, has compared Israel to the Nazis, in a breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Ms Mendoza also recently attacked Campaign Against Antisemitism using violent language, saying “The antisemitism witch hunt is seriously about to face off with #BlackLivesMatter I’m telling you now, those anti-Black, anti-Palestinian racists are gonna get their asses dragged all over town. And they have no clue. Because…entitlement.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

The leader of a neo-Nazi group behind numerous stickering campaigns has been unmasked.

The anti-fascist group Hope Not Hate has identified Sam Melia as the leader of Hundred Handers, an anonymous network of activists who have carried out far-right stickering campaigns across the country and worldwide over the last two years.

The stickers, which feature far-right slogans and imagery and antisemitic tropes, have been seen in cities in the UK, Europe, United States and Australia.

Mr Melia, who has reportedly supported the proscribed neo-Nazi terrorist group, National Action, is now believed to be working with Patriotic Alliance, another far-right group that was formed by Mark Collett, the former head of publicity for the British National Party (BNP), in 2019.

Mr Collett is a senior figure in the far-right in the UK. An author with almost 100,000 subscribers on YouTube, he also previously served as the chairman of the BNP’s youth division. Mr Collett is understood to have dabbled in Holocaust denial, collaborated with the infamous American antisemite David Duke, and espoused antisemitic and racist views.

According to Hope Not Hate’s report, Patriotic Alliance is “a racist far-right organisation with antisemitism at its very core. They aim to combat the ‘replacement and displacement’ of white Britons by people who ‘have no right to these lands’.” The group reportedly holds that “it is Jewish elites, particularly, who are orchestrating the ‘replacement’ of white Britons.”

Meanwhile, a neo-Nazi, David Holmes, 63, has been jailed for engaging in a racist stickering campaign in Derbyshire.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has monitored and reported on far-rightstickeringoperations, including on university campuses, for a long time, including by the Hundred Handersgroup. We continue to call on the authorities to take action against these seemingly low-level incidents, including because they are gateways into more heinous and dangerous activity.

Earlier this week, the hacktivist group known as Anonymous posted a picture of an antisemitic mural on Facebook, but when a member of the public brought it to the attention of the social media company, it declined to take any action.

The mural originated on a wall in London’s East End in October 2012 after the Los Angeles-based street artist Mear One painted the image, which featured apparently-Jewish bankers beneath a pyramid often used by conspiracy theorists playing Monopoly on a board carried by straining, oppressed workers, several of whom had dark or black skin. The mural, called Freedom for Humanity, was widely perceived as antisemitic, and was eventually removed.

Former Leader of the Labour Party Jeremy Corbyn was heavily criticised when it transpired that he had defended the mural. More recently, the same image was approvingly tweeted by the rapper Ice Cube who refused to remove it, and it was used by the Oxford branch of Black Lives Matter to promote an event, but the group retracted the advertisement and apologised.

A concerned member of the public reported the Anonymous post to Facebook, which apparently replied: “Thanks for your report – you did the right thing by letting us know about this. The post was reviewed, and although it doesn’t go against one of our specific Community Standards, we understand that it may still be offensive to you and others. No one should have to see posts they consider hateful on Facebook, so we want to help you avoid things like this in the future.”

We are grateful to the concerned member of the public for bringing this matter to our attention.

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

Back during the closing days of the General Election in December 2019, the Conservative Party announced that it was commencing investigations into alleged antisemitism on the part of three parliamentary candidates – Sally-Ann Hart, Lee Anderson and Richard Short – two of whom won their seats.

Only some of the allegations were reported at the time; others are still unknown.

However, the investigations, during which the subjects were not suspended from the Party, have now taken over eight months, and there is still no indication of when the investigations might be concluded.

The Conservative Party confirmed to Campaign Against Antisemitism several weeks ago that the investigation into Lee Anderson had concluded and that a panel had delivered a judgment, but the allegations and decision have not yet been publicly revealed. The other MP subject to investigation, Sally-Ann Hart, recently claimed in an interview that a panel investigation relating to her had also been concluded and that she had attended social media training, but there has been no public announcement.

In the absence of any public disclosures by the Party, as far as we are concerned both matters – in addition to the investigation of Richard Short – are still open until the public is verifiably informed otherwise.

It is completely unacceptable for these investigations to be taking so long, with no end in sight. The conclusion that the Conservatives announced the investigations to avoid bad publicity during the General Election campaign but have not actually initiated the investigations at all or have otherwise not taken them seriously is becoming increasingly unavoidable.

Ironically, since not all of the allegations have been made public, their gravity cannot be assessed, leaving the Party’s procedural failures in the spotlight.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Following contact with the Conservatives, it is becoming clear that the Party is unserious about the three antisemitism investigations it is carrying out in relation to two sitting MPs and one parliamentary candidate.

“These were investigations that the Party reassuringly announced at the end of last year, in some cases before the allegations were even known to the public. But there is no justification for these investigations to have taken eight months with still no end in sight. These are not murder investigations, and by delaying for so long the Party risks making its poor procedures, rather than the allegations themselves, the real story.

“Any further delays are unacceptable, and we call on the Conservative Party to conclude these investigations immediately and publish the results.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The former Wimbledon champion and campaigner against antisemitism, Angela Buxton, has died, just shy of her 86th birthday.

Ms Buxton, whose grandparents had immigrated to the UK from Russia, was born to a Jewish family in Liverpool and began playing tennis early, eventually winning the women’s singles title at the 1953 Maccabiah Games and placing runner-up in the 1956 women’s final at Wimbledon. But in the same year, she momentously won the women’s doubles title at both the French Open and Wimbledon championship with her black American playing partner, Althea Gibson.

Both made great strides together for their communities in the sport, and Buxton was inducted into the Black Tennis Hall of Fame in 2015, thanks to her partnership and friendship with Gibson.

A year later Ms Buxton was forced to retire due to a hand injury.

Ms Buxton was denied admission to the All England Club, where the Wimbledon Championships is played, even though the Club traditionally awards Wimbledon winners with a lifetime membership. She claimed the refusal was due to antisemitism. She reportedly continued to apply every year for 64 years. (The Club reportedly denied the accusation.)

She said to The Sunday Times last year: “It’s an unfortunate example of how the British really treat Jews in this country. This sort of thing exacerbates the feeling towards Jews. It’s perfectly ridiculous, it’s laughable. It speaks volumes.”

She also revealed other experiences with antisemitism, including when, as a teenager, she was refused access to a leading tennis club in London after the coach apparently told her: “You’re perfectly good, but you’re Jewish. We don’t take Jews here.” Instead, she reportedly practiced on the private court of the Jewish owner of Marks & Spencer, Simon Marks.

Ms Buxton was inducted into the International Jewish Sports Hall in Israel in 1981.

In a tribute, tennis legend Billie Jean King called Ms Buxton “a true champion”.

Several officeholders in Constituency Labour Parties (CLPs) around the country have expressed their opposition to a call by the Party’s General-Secretary to local branches not to discuss sensitive issues, including several related to antisemitism.

David Evans sent an email to the chairs and secretaries of CLPs with guidelines for how their online meetings should be conducted in order to avoid bringing the Party “locally and nationally or its officers open to potential legal liabilities.”

The email began by covering matters relating to nominations to Labour’s ruling National Executive Committee, but the other three issues addressed related to antisemitism.

First, Mr Evans noted that Labour had agreed a settlement with the Panorama whistleblowers, which included a full apology, and advised that “the withdrawal [of the allegations] and apology are binding on the party and any motions which seek to undermine or contradict them will create a risk of further legal proceedings for both the national party and local parties. As such, motions relating to these settlements and the circumstances behind them are not competent business for discussion by local parties.”

Second, Mr Evans noted that the Party announced that it had received the draft report by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC), and said: “When we are able to provide more information about the EHRC’s report we will do so. Until that time speculation as to the contents of the report is not helpful. It is therefore not competent business for CLPs to discuss.”

The EHRC launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party in May 2019 following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

Third, Mr Evans observed that “some CLPs and branches have had motions tabled to ‘repudiate’ the…[International] Definition of Antisemitism [which] was properly adopted by the Labour Party in September 2018. CLPs and branches have no powers to overturn this decision. Furthermore, such motions undermine the Labour Party’s ability to tackle racism. Any such motions are therefore not competent business for CLPs or branches.”

Among the CLPs tabling such motions is Islington North, which is Jeremy Corbyn’s CLP.

Mr Evans added that “as per the previous general secretary’s instruction, any discussion about ongoing disciplinary cases remains prohibited.”

However, Mr Evans’ email has received pushback, with some saying the decisions were made “without accountability” and others describing the demands as “authoritarian”.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A police officer has appeared in court after being charged last month with being a member of the banned neo-Nazi terrorist group National Action following his arrest in March.

Benjamin Hannam, 21, appeared in the Old Bailey and did not enter any pleas for the five charges, which cover other allegations, including possession of indecent images and fraud.

He has been suspended from duty in the Metropolitan Police following an investigation by the Metropolitan Police’s Counter Terrorism Command.

It is alleged that he belonged or professed to belong to the proscribed group between December 2016 and January 2018 and that he falsely represented himself in his application to join the Metropolitan Police in this connection.

Other members of National Action were recently convicted and sentenced to prison for their role in the organisation.

National Action was proscribed as a terrorist organisation in December 2016 following a long campaign by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others. Under section 11 of the Terrorism Act 2000, membership of a proscribed terrorist organisation is a criminal offence.

A new analysis by the Institute for Strategic Dialogue (ISD) has concluded that Facebook’s algorithm “actively promoted” Holocaust denial content.

The UK-based ISD, a counter-extremism organisation, reportedly found that if one searches for “Holocaust” on Facebook, one receives suggestions for Holocaust denial pages which themselves link to publishing websites offering Holocaust revisionist and denial literature, such as material by notorious Holocaust-denier David Irving.

Last week, Facebook announced that it was banning conspiracy theories about Jews “controlling the world” from its platform and from Instagram, which is owned by Facebook. But there is no plan to proscribe Holocaust denial on the networks.

Jacob Davey, ISD’s senior research manager, reportedly said: “Facebook’s decision to allow Holocaust denial content to remain on its platform is framed under the guise of protecting legitimate historical debate, but this misses the reason why people engage in Holocaust denial in the first place. Denial of the Holocaust is a deliberate tool used to delegitimise the suffering of the Jewish people and perpetuate long-standing antisemitic tropes, and when people explicitly do this it should be seen as an act of hatred.”

Recently, Campaign Against Antisemitism part of a coalition of 140 organisations around the world calling on Facebook to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is to issue a complaint to The Guardian newspaper over the characterisation of an antisemitic conspiracy theory as merely “anti-Israel”.

In an interview with the esteemed Jewish actress and writer, Maureen Lipman, the interviewer, Zoe Williams, referenced recent comments by activist actress Maxine Peake that Israel may have been to blame for the racist killing of George Floyd, writing: “Peake, sure, would be an impossible acquaintance, after her recent comments – which she retracted – were deemed anti-Israel enough to get Rebecca Long-Bailey kicked off the Labour front bench for retweeting her” (emphasis added).

The conspiracy theory in question was not only baseless but, as Campaign Against Antisemitism explained at the time, antisemitic, and the Leader of the Labour Party, Sir Keir Starmer, also recognised it as such and sacked Ms Long-Bailey from the Shadow Cabinet for promoting the article.

As Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote at the time, the conspiracy theory is antisemitic because it observes an evil — police brutality or systemic racism in the United States — and looks to link it with Israel, in order to associate the Jews through the Jewish state with that evil. Moreover, for antisemites, associating a phenomenon with Jews not only makes Jews look bad but can also make the phenomenon itself seem worse.

Moreover, we wrote, the linkage of Mr Floyd’s death to Israel is not criticism of Israeli policy. It is criticism of American police brutality or systemic racism in the United States that unnecessarily and baselessly blames the Jewish state for that evil. It has nothing to do with Israel or Israeli policy and serves only (and deliberately) to tarnish Israel by attaching it to a foreign evil entirely unrelated to it.

To describe the antisemitic conspiracy theory as merely “anti-Israel” is effectively to deny that it is antisemitic. The conspiracy theory is not simply “anti-Israel” because in reality it has nothing to do with Israel at all; it is about gratuitously associating Jews with evil, and that is why it is antisemitic.

Moreover, the article may even be understood as suggesting that it was criticism of Israel that got Ms Long-Bailey fired, an interpretation which misunderstands and demeans the fight against antisemitism. The failure of the far-left and elements of the moderate Left to understand this distinction is why some in those circles can find it so difficult to identify, recognise and eliminate contemporary manifestations of anti-Jewish racism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism will be writing to The Guardian to lodge a formal complaint.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

The Architects Registration Board (ARB) has removed an architect from its professional register following an investigation into his claims that Judaism is a “cult” and Jews should be banned from “important public office”.

On 13 April 2019, Peter Kellow, an award-winning architect, published a long post on Facebook, which read, in part:

“This business of ‘anti-semiticism’ [sic] in the Labour party which is held up as racism. What is it all about really? Let us get a few thing [sic] straight. There is no such thing as the Jewish race. This is one of the many stunts that Judaists have pulled on non-Judaists who have swallowed it whole. There is only the religion/cult of Judaism and I never use the word ‘Jew’ because that implies buying into the myth of racial commonality amoungst [sic] Judaists. […]

“There is no doubt that Judaists have suffered from unfair and cruel treatment at many times in history but this was never racially motivated until the late nineteenth century and bloomed in the ideology of Adolf Hitler. Hitler used the myth of a Jewish race that the Judaists had invented against them. It is not far from the truth to say the Judaists were the inventers of European racism for they asserted they were racially different to the rest of us. […]

“But racism as I have said is a recent phenomenon. Are the so-called ‘antisemites’ in the Labour Party simply ‘racists’ as the popular narrative would have it? I doubt it. The problem people have and always have had with Judaism is not about race. It is because Judaism is a cult. What do I mean by a cult? A cult is a set of people, normally norminally [sic] unified by a religion or quasi-religion, who try to create a society within the general society. Judaism is far from being the only or even the most resented cult in history or the present.”

Mr Kellow identified as other cults similar to Judaism: Freemasonry, Mormonism, Scientology, paganism and Sunni Islam.

He continued: “Cults work against the interest of the general society as its members, in subscribing to a society within the society favour each other over the rest of us….How can you trust such people?…So how should society deal with cults? How should society deal with people who through their cult activity weaken the bonds that the society needs to function well?”

Although Mr Kellow insisted that such “cults” should not be proscribed, he did believe that “we must put restraints on their ability to create a society within a society.” Among these “restraints” was “(1) Registration of the cult in a public register; (2) Registration of all adult members in a public register; (3) No cult member can hold an important public office where they are in a position to descrimiate [sic] between cult members and non-cult members. For instance it is totally unacceptable lo have a Freemason or Judaist as a judge as their decisions will very like work in favour of fellow cult members. Their strong bond in their society within the society will ensure this; (4) Whereas adults are free to choose to belong to a cult, the same cannot reply [sic] to their children….To this end, no cult can run its own “faith” schools; [and] (5) It must be against the law to wear cult clothing in public – except something worn on the top of the head like a hat [e.g. Sikh turbans or Judaist skull caps].[…]”

On 3 June 2019, Architects’ Journal brought the Facebook post to the attention of the ARB, which is the statutory regulator for the industry. The ARB commenced an investigation and found that the post was “was visible as a ‘public’ post. When the Respondent’s profile was clicked, his profile information could be seen which included his profession and a link to his professional website.”

The panel established to investigate the matter concluded that the “comments, which the Respondent continues to stand by, made as they are against two specific established religions and other groups, are discriminatory, potentially offensive and are therefore inappropriate.”

The panel was concerned that the respondent showed a “lack of demonstrable meaningful insight” into his conduct and considered that he had “entrenched discriminatory attitudinal issues”. It concluded that “these failings…are fundamentally incompatible with continuing to be an architect” and accordingly erased Mr Kellow from the register for no less than two years.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We applaud the Architects Registration Board for removing the respondent from the register. The panel was absolutely right to find that his suggestions that all Jews should have to join a register or be excluded from holding public office – notions reminiscent of past eras that we all hope have been confined to the dustbin of history – were discriminatory and offensive and damage the reputation of the profession. We call on other professional bodies to follow the ARB in showing zero tolerance for this sort of antisemitic propaganda.”

Urban Dictionary, the online crowd-sourced dictionary of slang words, has deleted antisemitic definitions of “anti-Zionism” following a campaign by online activists, including Campaign Against Antisemitism.

However, while “anti-Zionist” has no definitions and several antisemitic definitions of “anti-Zionism” have been removed and replaced by new, more accurate definitions, a new offensive definition has also arisen.

There is also a new offensive definition of “Zionism”.

During the campaign against the antisemitic definitions, Campaign Against Antisemitism threatened to bring the matter to the attention of advertisers in order to go after Urban Dictionary’s advertising revenue, as we have done before, in order to pressure Urban Dictionary to remove the definitions. We will continue to campaign against anti-Jewish racism on Urban Dictionary and other major websites and social media.

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently and successfully pressured advertisers to withdraw from Urban Dictionary due to its promotion of antisemitism, and the website removed a particularly offensive entry as a result. In the past, the website has removed other gratuitously offensive terms, but is generally slow to act against racism on the website.

Gateshead Council has removed offensive anti-Jewish graffiti from a building site today.

The graffiti was spotted a week ago on Bensham Road in Gateshead and was reported by Gateshead Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

Campaign Against Antisemitism then reported the graffiti to Gateshead Council, which has now, after a week, removed it.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has welcomed as a “positive start” the Ivors Academy’s announcement that it shall be establishing an Ethics Committee to review past awards, after we called on the professional association for music creators to rescind Wiley’s 2019 Ivors Inspiration Award following the grime artist’s antisemitic rampage on social media.

Joe Glasman, an award-winning composer, Ivors member and former Ivors award panellist, as well as a senior volunteer at Campaign Against Antisemitism, initiated contact with Ivors last week, noting that Wiley had “spent the last several days on an antisemitic tirade” and wrote that it would be “untenable for an individual who holds such horrific antisemitic views to continue to be held up as worthy of such an award by the Academy, an honour bestowed specifically upon those whom the Academy considers to be inspirational role models for composers and young artists.”

Mr Glasman went on to note that the Academy is “rightly dedicated to diversity, equality and inclusivity” but that this means that the Academy “must be a safe space for all minorities, and that includes Jews.”

Following correspondence with Campaign Against Antisemitism over the past week and after its AGM today, Ivors has now released a statement announcing that “any statements of discrimination and intolerance made by Academy members or award winners affects us all, not just those who are targeted for prejudice or abuse. We adopt a generous and supportive outlook, fostering collaboration and growth, not division and hate. These are values our members must sign up to on joining our membership; they are also expectations we should have of our award winners in future. […]

“When we recognise individuals in our awards, we are giving them a high honour that comes with responsibilities for the recipient and for the Academy. We wish to codify these obligations going forward and are today announcing the establishment of an Ethics Committee which will review our award decisions in future, and carefully revisit how others have been treated in the past. Part of their work will be to review our current members’ codes of conduct and put in place an ethics framework to govern the giving and rescinding of honours and awards. We can only achieve consistency if we first establish solid guidelines that ensure an objective and robust approach. We intend to have the Ethics Committee formed and giving us guidance by November this year when the entries for next year’s awards begin to be received.

“We have needed a framework for some time, but this is now made more urgent following the antisemitic comments made by Wiley last month. Wiley is not the first musician to make abhorrent comments or behave in a way that is counter to the Academy’s values. But as a recent recipient of The Ivors Inspiration Award, for his work establishing UK Grime, the Academy has needed to be clear that his antisemitic views were not known at the time we gave him this award. And these views should not be an inspiration to anyone.”

The Ivors Academy has asked Campaign Against Antisemtisim to advise the new Ethics Committee and provide input to the new code of conduct.

Joe Glasman, an award-winning composer, Ivors member, former Ivors award panellist and senior volunteer at Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We welcome the statement from the Ivors Academy today that Wiley’s views ‘should not be an inspiration to anyone’ alongside its original unequivocal condemnation of his comments. Whilst I regret that the Academy does not currently have the structures in place to immediately rescind Wiley’s award and membership, I welcome its commitment to establishing an Ethics Committee in order to be able to do so, and accept the Academy’s invitation to contribute to its work. I applaud this positive start and look forward to the new Ethics Committee acting swiftly to rescind Wiley’s award.”

Following Wiley’s antisemitic rant, 700 musicians and members of the music industry signed a letter decrying racism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has called for Wiley to prosecuted and for his MBE to be revoked. The Cabinet Office has confirmed to us that it has opened a case.

We have also launched two petitions: one calling for racists like Wiley to be stripped of their MBEs, which can be signed here, and the other calling for the Government to bring forward Online Harms Bill this year, which can be signed here.

The editor of The Canary, a controversial hard-left blog, has compared Israel to the Nazis in a tweet.

Kerry-Anne Mendoza, whose website is under investigation by the Government’s Independent Advisor on Antisemitism, wrote: “Jewish families were once dragged from their homes so Nazi families could move in. It wasn’t wrong because of the ethnicity of the victims. It was wrong because it was wrong. Apartheid Israel does it daily. ‘Never again’ must be universal.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is antisemitic.

Ms Mendoza recently attacked Campaign Against Antisemitism using violent language, saying “The antisemitism witch hunt is seriously about to face off with #BlackLivesMatter I’m telling you now, those anti-Black, anti-Palestinian racists are gonna get their asses dragged all over town. And they have no clue. Because…entitlement.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

TikTok has become the latest social media platform to delete Wiley’s account.

The move comes following a multi-day antisemitic tirade by the grime artist, a global 48-hour walkout from social media in protest at technology companies’ toleration of antisemitism on their platforms, and a successful effort by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others to pressure Facebook, InstagramTwitter and YouTube to remove Wiley from their networks. We even literally shone a light on Twitter’s racism at its London headquarters.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has called for Wiley to prosecuted, for his MBE to be revoked – and the Cabinet Office has confirmed to us that it has opened a case – and for his 2019 Ivors Inspiration Award to be rescinded.

We have also launched two petitions: one calling for racists like Wiley to be stripped of their MBEs, which can be signed here, and the other calling for the Government to bring forward Online Harms Bill this year, which can be signed here.

Following Wiley’s antisemitic rant, 700 musicians and members of the music industry signed a letter decrying racism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

The controversial American activist Norman Finkelstein praised Holocaust denier David Irving at a pro-Corbyn meeting of Labour Against the Witch-Hunt, an antisemitism-denial group of former and expelled Labour members.

Mr Finkelstein described Mr Irving as a “very good historian” who “knew a thing, or two or three.”

He reportedly went on to say: “I don’t see the reason to get excited about Holocaust deniers. First of all I don’t know what a Holocaust denier even is. People say if you deny the centrality of the six million Jews being killed and you try to bring in other groups of people you become a Holocaust denier. Other people say if you deny the centrality of the gas chambers you become a Holocaust denier.”

For the benefit of the perplexed Mr Finkelstein, one of the examples of antisemitism provided by the International Definition of Antisemitism captures well the manifestations of Holocaust denial: “Denying the fact, scope, mechanisms (e.g. gas chambers) or intentionality of the genocide of the Jewish people at the hands of National Socialist Germany and its supporters and accomplices during World War II (the Holocaust)”.

There is a difference between historical exploration of humanity’s darkest hour in a good faith effort to pursue the truth on the one hand, and on the other hand deliberate attempts to minimise Nazi brutality in an ideological effort to rehabilitate Nazism or diminish the reality or legacy of Jewish suffering.

Other speakers at the meeting, a recording of which was made public by the Community Security Trust, included the veteran activist Tariq Ali, who has previously linked Israel to the racist killing of George Floyd, the notorious antisemite Jackie Walker, expelled Labour members Marc Wadsworth and Tony Greenstein, and the disgraced former Labour MP Chris Williamson, who (unusually for an incumbent) humiliatingly lost his deposit in his attempt to win re-election to Parliament as an independent last year.

Where Mr Williamson is present, so, inevitably, is the activist academic David Miller, who quit the Labour Party after he was suspended pending an investigation. In the meeting, Dr Miller confirmed that he resigned from the Party due to what he described as “the ongoing witch hunt”.

He went on to suggest that even under Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership the Labour Party was led by the “Zionist movement” and he reportedly attacked a leading Jewish charity as being incapable of distinguishing “anti-Zionism from antisemitism” in an effort to pursue the political Left.

Ms Walker apparently described the meeting as the “best” she had attended this year.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

The robotic Twitter handle of the online crowd-sourced dictionary of slang words known Urban Dictionary has promoted an antisemitic entry on the website about “anti-Zionism”.

If someone sends the Twitter handle a term that features on the controversial website, it will automatically provide a screenshot of the definition.

A Twitter user asked the handle to provide a definition of “Zionism” but instead got a definition for “anti-Zionism”, which read: “Anti-Zionism is in no way connected to antisemitism. To be antizionist is to be anti-fascist. Zionism is based on the idea that millenia old literary myth is the basis for nationhood and that religion (which is a matter of choice) is genetically predetermined, both of which are clearly shite. Zionists believe that they can turn up in a country and kick out the indigenous population, as did Hitler. Zionists are fascist.” (emphasis in original).

The definition has received, at time of writing, 2,715 thumbs up compared to 1,433 thumbs down. These ratings determine how prominent the definition is as opposed to alternative definitions for the same term.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is antisemitic.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said “Comparing Zionism to Nazism is textbook antisemitism, which has become all too common on Urban Dictionary. Those behind the website have been slow to act against racism on their platform, but in the past we have successfully pressured them to delete gratuitously antisemitic entries by going after their advertisers. We will not hesitate to do so again if Urban Dictionary does not remove this entry and prove that it is capable of administering a site that doesn’t incite hatred.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently and successfully pressured advertisers to withdraw from Urban Dictionary due to its promotion of antisemitism, and the website removed a particularly offensive entry as a result. In the past, the website has removed other gratuitously offensive terms, but is generally slow to act against racism on the website.

An elderly hospital patient was reportedly ‘hit’ by a healthcare worker “after being identified as Jewish”, according to the JC.

The alleged incident took place at Northwick Park Hospital in Harrow, and was reported to the newspaper by a fellow Jewish patient, who claimed that the worker had identified the two Jewish patients to the others in the ward and then hit one of the patients on the knee. When the elderly patient complained that the worker had hurt his knee, the worker lifted him by his shoulders and shook him.

According to the report, the administrator of the hospital, North West London University NHS Trust, apparently confirmed that a complaint had been received and that it had been referred to the Metropolitan Police.

A spokesperson for the North West London University Trust told the JC: “We can confirm that we recently received a complaint about an alleged assault that is said to have occurred a few weeks ago on one of our wards. We have acknowledged the complaint and are referring it to the Metropolitan police for investigation as we normally would in these circumstances.”

However, the Metropolitan Police apparently could not locate a report when asked.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A new report has revealed worrying levels of antisemitism in Britain’s Muslim community.

The report, authored by Dr Rakib Ehsan, showed that:

  • 34% of British Muslims polled thought that Jews have too much control over the global banking system;
  • 33% believed that Jews have too much control over the global political leadership; and
  • 44% thought that British Jews were more loyal to Israel than to the UK.

All of these figures are considerably higher than polls of the general population conducted by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

The report, published by the Henry Jackson Society, also found that British Muslims who have been university-educated are more likely to hold those antisemitic views, as do British Muslims who attend a mosque more frequently.

The greater likelihood of antisemitic views among university-educated British Muslims suggests that universities, far from cultivating tolerance and understanding, may in fact be incubators of intolerance. Certainly Jewish students have continually found universities to be hotbeds of antisemitism in the UK.

The polling was conducted by Savanta ComRes in late 2019 and surveyed 750 British Muslims.

The JC is reporting that the woman behind a crowdfunder that has raised hundreds of thousands of pounds for Jeremy Corbyn’s legal expenses is involved with a company that aims to “end the politicisation of Jewish suffering”.

According to Companies House, Carole Morgan, who set up the crowdfunder on Go Fund Me, is one of two persons with significant control over Truth Defence Ltd, a new company incorporated to administer the funds. It is understood that the other person with significant control, Andrew Feinstein, is reportedly a member of the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, Jewish Voice for Labour.

On its Facebook page, Truth Defence describes itself as “We are a collective of Jewish lawyers, creatives, journalists, academics and citizens seeking to correct the historical record on Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership of the Labour Party and end the politicisation of Jewish suffering.”

The crowdfunder was not set up with Mr Corbyn’s endorsement, but it is understood that his office is in contact with Ms Morgan.

Mr Corbyn is being sued by the journalist John Ware for defamation. Another defamation case, brought by the Jewish activist Richard Millet, is also underway. The claimants are being represented by Mark Lewis, an esteemed media lawyer who is an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism previously reported that the crowdfunder received money from donors calling themselves “Adolf Hitler” and “B*stard Son of Netanyahu and Starmer” and that donors posted horrendous comments on the page when making donations.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A group of black-shirted activists in South London gathered to march on the first day of August, which marks African Emancipation Day, to call for Britain to pay reparations for its role in the transatlantic slave trade.

The group, calling itself the Forever Family Force, was formed last month, apparently modelled on the militant Black Panthers, in order to campaign against “racism, inequality and injustice”. The participants appeared in black uniforms with body armour and walkie-talkies and acted out military-style drills.

It is believed that the group is led by Khari McKenzie., a rap artist.

Mr McKenzie has reportedly shared the antisemitic conspiracy theory that Israel was to blame for the racist killing of George Floyd, and recently declared on Instagram that “every Zionist is an Islamophobe” and that “when we’re talking about Zionists, and even talking about if I don’t agree with the people that run the banks, yeah, and by them running the banks the rich get richer and the poor get poorer, if I don’t agree with that, that don’t make me anti-no one. I’m just anti-oppression. If I look in my history book and see there were people with Zionist blood that were heavily involved in the transatlantic slave trade, me pointing that out doesn’t make me antisemitic.”

Mr McKenzie also described as “devils” those like Campaign Against Antisemitism and other Jewish activists who had successfully campaigned for the antisemitic grime artist Wiley to be removed from social media platforms, and he called for Wiley to be reinstated, reportedly using hashtags such as #Rothschildbloodline and #whoownsthebanks.

A spokesman for the Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “There is no justification for using antisemitic tropes to commemorate the horrors of slavery or protest against ongoing racism in society today.

“Forever Family should appreciate that, for ordinary decent people, and the Jewish community in particular, seeing a paramilitary group wearing black shirts and marching through the streets of London led by a man who rails against ‘Zionist bloodlines’ is frighteningly reminiscent of humanity’s darkest hour and does nothing to further the noble cause of fighting racism.“Prejudice cannot be beaten by more prejudice.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism is among 140 groups calling on Facebook to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism just as Facebook told the Chief Rabbi that it “wants to listen”.

In an open letter to the technology company’s board of directors, the international coalition called on Facebook “to implement a hate speech policy on antisemitism that includes the full [Definition]”.

The letter asks whether Facebook “will take responsibility and move toward removing the scourge of antisemitism from today’s most important online public square”.

The letter comes as Facebook has written to the Chief Rabbi agreeing that “we have more to do” and wishing to “listen and learn from those who live with these issues every day”.

Facebook can show that it is listening and learning by heeding the call of the letter and adopting the Definition.

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

A virtual Zoom shiva for a grieving husband mourning his late wife was disrupted by neo-Nazis broadcasting antisemitic messages and images of swastikas and Hitler.

The shiva, a period of mourning following a funeral, was “Zoom-bombed” by neo-Nazis on Wednesday evening, shortly after the funeral took place.

According to the JC, attendees described it as “horrific” and “an awful sight on different screens” featuring “swastikas and cartoonish-type propaganda that wouldn’t have been out of place in Nazi Germany” as well as “films of the Nazis [and] of Hitler”, “images of people saluting Hitler”, and expressions of Holocaust denial.

There were reportedly three or four disrupters who had entered the session under names like Anne Frank and Adolf Hitler.

The deceased had been very active in the Jewish community in Liverpool, and her husband said of the incident: “it was particularly insensitive, the world is full of crazy people  but we are proud Jewish people, and my view is: bring it on, let me meet them face to face.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Whoever thought it impossible that neo-Nazis could go any lower than their sick ideology has brought them will find that it is in fact possible, because the ingenuity of vile antisemites knows no limits. We extend our condolences to the mourners and appeal to the police to bring the offenders to justice.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has previously reported on the phenomenon of ‘Zoom bombing’ and has urged communal institutions to take precautions to safeguard against antisemitic disruption of online events.

A Jewish student who videoed a couple after one of them told her “We should have gassed the lot of you” has posted on Facebook that she believes the perpetrator has been identified.

In the course of an altercation about seating at The Hedley Verity pub in Leeds, Danielle Greyman was told that she looks like a Jew and “We should have f***ing gassed the lot of you” by a man with a local accent who claimed to be “a German”, apparently to drive home his antisemitic abuse.

Ms Greyman said that she began to record a video of the man and his companion after he asked whether she was Jewish in the midst of their argument.

As the man turned his attention to Ms Greyman’s Judaism, he made the hateful antisemitic remark. Mr Greyman retorted: “If you want to gas my people, I will take you to court. I’m not joking — I will ruin your whole f***ing life.”

Wetherspoons staff asked the couple to leave and banned them from returning.

A spokesperson for West Yorkshire Police said: “Police were called at around [17:45 on Thursday] to a report of a hate incident which is believed to have happened a short time prior. The victim reported being verbally abused by three suspects outside a bar on Woodhouse Lane, Leeds, before the suspects made off. Enquiries remain ongoing and officers are making attempts to speak to the victim. Anyone with information should contact police on 101, quoting log 1439 of 06/08. Any incidents motivated by hostility and hate are unacceptable and are taken very seriously by West Yorkshire Police.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has attempted to contact the victim to offer assistance in ensuring that the perpetrators face the full force of the law.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Clearly this man felt completely comfortable telling a Jewish student that he felt the Holocaust was unfinished business in broad daylight in a busy pub. He must face the full force of the law. We are encouraged that West Yorkshire Police is taking this seriously and that the perpetrator has reportedly been identified, and we stand ready to assist the victim should she decide to contact us.”

The Cabinet Office has confirmed to Campaign Against Antisemitism that it is now reviewing Wiley’s MBE, in response a letter that we wrote to the Honours Forfeiture Committee calling for the antisemitic grime rapper to be stripped of the honour.

In a letter from the Cabinet Office, the Honours and Appointments Secretariat has advised that the Honours Forfeiture Committee “is able to consider cases for a variety of reasons,” including “being found guilty of a criminal offence” and “behaviour that is deemed to bring the honours system into disrepute”.

The letter went on to confirm that the Committee is acting on Campaign Against Antisemitism’s representations and has opened a case.

Additionally, in a departure for the Committee, which normally does not publish its decisions, the letter confirmed that Campaign Against Antisemitism will be kept informed of progress.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has also launched a Parliamentary petition for racists to be stripped of their honours automatically. The petition can be signed here: https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/333141/

Campaign Against Antisemitism has also written to the Ivors Academy calling for Wiley’s 2019 Ivors Inspiration Award to be rescinded.

Moreover, Campaign Against Antisemitism has called for Wiley to be prosecuted and stands ready to take legal action if the authorities do not.

Wiley has also been banned from TwitterInstagram, Facebook and YouTube after using the platforms to incite racial hatred against Jews.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has submitted evidence to the House of Commons Justice Committee in its inquiry into private prosecutions, drawing on our wealth of experience in this area.

Although the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) usually undertakes prosecutions of criminal activity, individuals and civil society organisations, like Campaign Against Antisemitism, can launch private prosecutions if the CPS fails to act, and we have done so in the past. However, the CPS can then take over such private prosecutions, with a view either to continuing them or to discontinuing them.

Our submission to the inquiry focused on the role of the CPS in taking over private prosecutions.

The concerns we raised were twofold: “firstly, the CPS is able to refuse to prosecute and then to prevent a private prosecutor from prosecuting; and secondly, a challenge to such intervention by the CPS is judged against an almost impossibly high bar.”

With regard to the first point, we noted that “A decision by the CPS not to prosecute can be a decision to deny justice. Private prosecution exists as a check on that power, to enable individuals and organisations, like CAA, to pursue justice when the state does not.”

Accordingly, we recommended that “The CPS should not be permitted to regulate itself in this manner. Whilst it should be at liberty to take over private prosecutions in order to continue them, any decision to discontinue a private prosecution should be made by an independent party. We submit that the independent party should be a senior barrister acting as a reviewer of private prosecutions.”

Concerning challenges to decisions by the CPS, whether not to prosecute or to discontinue a private prosecution, we observed that “A decision by the CPS not to prosecute or to discontinue a private prosecution is subject to judicial review, however the courts have interpreted their discretion very narrowly. Campaign Against Antisemitism has sought judicial reviews and both succeeded and failed, however there are many occasions when we have not sought judicial review because we know the bar to be set almost impossibly high.”

We therefore recommended that “judicial review of a decision [by the CPS] not to prosecute or to discontinue a private prosecution should be judged on the balance of probabilities and not on the existing threshold. This would force the CPS to consider decisions to prosecute or to discontinue private prosecutions more carefully, and would ensure that more crimes are heard by the criminal courts and not written off by the CPS with almost no accountability.”

The full submission can be downloaded here.

The International Olympics Committee (IOC) has apologised for posting a tweet that appeared to celebrate the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games hosted by Nazi Germany.

To mark the lighting of the Olympic cauldron a year in advance of the postponed Tokyo Games, the IOC tweeted a film about the conclusion of the first-ever Olympic torch relay, when the torch entered the stadium at the Berlin Games.

The 1936 Berlin Olympic Games was used by the Nazi regime to try to sanitise its global image, hide its nascent atrocities and advance its racial ideology. The latter objective was shattered most famously by Jesse Owens, the Black American athlete who won four gold medals at the Games. At least six Jewish athletes – Samuel Balter of the United States, Gyorgy Brody, Miklos Sarkany, Karoly Karpati and Endre Kabos of Hungary and Robert Fein of Austria – also won gold medals in basketball, water polo, wrestling, fencing and weightlifting.

The IOC deleted the tweet and wrote: “We apologize to those who feel offended by the film of the Olympic Games Berlin 1936. We have deleted this film, which was part of the series of films featuring the message of unity and solidarity, from the @Olympics Twitter account.”

Avery Brundage, who led the United States’ team in the Berlin Olympics, served as President of the IOC for twenty years until 1972, and is widely considered to have been a Nazi sympathiser with racist views.

Although racist products are prohibited on Amazon, Google and Wish according to their policies, not only have neo-Nazi items been available for sale, but the platforms’ algorithms have been promoting the white supremacist merchandise.

Amazon was selling a flag with a Celtic Cross, a popular white supremacist symbol, while Wish was selling Ku Klux Klan-themed products and the page was recommending “related items”, such as a hood and a Celtic Cross.

The revelations came following an investigation by the BBC.

The companies each released a statement:

Amazon said: “The products in question are no longer available and we’ve taken action on the bad actors that offered the products and violated our policies.”

Google said: “We don’t allow ads or products that are sold on our platforms that display shocking content or promote hatred. We enforce these policies vigorously and take action when we determine they are breached.”

Wish said: “We are working hard to remove these items and taking additional steps to prevent such items appearing again.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has previously been in contact with online retailers over neo-Nazi merchandise available for sale.

The Labour Party tried to have one of the Panorama whistleblowers prosecuted, according to The Sunday Times.

Sam Matthews, a former head of governance and legal, was one of a number of former staffers turned courageous whistleblowers who featured on the BBC Panorama expose of antisemitism in the Labour Party and with whom the Party recently settled a defamation case.

It has now emerged, however, that he was also the subject of a criminal investigation instigated by Labour, which had reported him to the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) for alleged data breaches.

However, the ICO has now dropped the charges, having even interviewed Mr Matthews under caution, reportedly admitting that there was no evidence to substantiate the claims.

Mr Matthews revealed in the Panorama programme that he had contemplated suicide, such was his treatment while working at Labour Party headquarters. It is extraordinary that the Labour Party, of all institutions, could have treated its workers so appallingly and then, despite praising whistleblowers in every other industry, smeared these brave former staffers because they called out Labour’s own racism.

Mr Matthews and the other claimants in the defamation case against Labour were represented by Mark Lewis, an esteemed media lawyer who is also an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Meanwhile, it has also emerged that Islington North’s Junction Ward branch of the Labour Party, in Jeremy Corbyn’s local constituency, will debate whether to reject the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The motion, brought by a member of the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, Jewish Voice for Labour, also states that “We are deeply committed to opposing all forms of racism, including antisemitism. We are also deeply committed to opposing what we regard as false accusations of antisemitism.”

According to the JC, two years ago the Islington North CLP’s treasurer, Russell Smith-Becker, resigned citing Mr Corbyn’s “often tolerant” attitude toward antisemitism and worried that Labour had become “somewhere where antisemites feel comfortable and many Jews feel uncomfortable.”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The Football Association (FA) has banned Tom Pope for six matches and fined him £3,500 over an antisemitic Twitter post.

Earlier this year, the Port Vale striker responded to a request online to predict the course of a hypothetical Third World War. Mr Pope tweeted: “We invade Iran then Cuba then North Korea then the Rothchilds [sic] are crowned champions of every bank on the planet – the end.” The tweet has since been deleted.

After being warned by other Twitter users that his tweet could be construed as racist, he said: “I mentioned them owning the banks which is fact and now I’m facing all this,” adding: “How is it racist?? Seriously is someone out to destroy me or what?”

Port Vale then released a statement in which Mr Pope apologised.

Nevertheless, the FA investigated the incident as an ‘Aggravated Breach’ of Rule E3(2), which prohibits abusive speech with reference, whether expressed or implied, to race and/or religion and/or ethnic origin, and Mr Pope has been found to have breached the Rule.

Port Vale is expected to appeal the ruling.

Donors to an unofficial crowd-funder for Jeremy Corbyn’s legal expenses have posted horrendous comments in support of the beleaguered former Labour leader.

The crowd-funder was launched by a supporter of Mr Corbyn’s and does not appear to have his formal endorsement, however the supporter said: “The funds on this campaign will not be touched and remain on GoFundMe until the details for distribution have been established with Jeremy’s office and I will continue to provide updates as they become available.”

Not only did some donors use names like “Adolf Hitler” and “B*stard Son of Netanyahu and Starmer”, but the online activist Habibi has alerted Campaign Against Antisemitism to some of the horrendous comments that donors – including those using what appear to be their real names – have posted. Many of the comments deny Labour antisemitism under Mr Corbyn, using phrases such as “false antisemitism accusations”, “smears”, “lies”, “false”, “trumped up”, “witch-hunt” and “stitch-up”.

Other comments suggested that such accusations come from “elitist tax dodging leeches that are trying to tarnish [Mr Corbyn’s] name” or “Anglo-American oligarchs”.

There were also concerns that Mr Corbyn was being “crucified”, and equations of Zionism and Israel with racism.

Mr Corbyn will have to decide whether he wishes to accept donations from “Adolf Hitler” and other antisemitism-deniers.

The campaign, called Jeremy’s Legal Fund and hosted by GoFundMe, has so far raised hundreds of thousands of pounds.

Mr Corbyn is being sued by the journalist John Ware for defamation. Another defamation case, brought by the Jewish activist Richard Millet, is also underway.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has launched two parliamentary petitions, one calling for racists like Wiley to be stripped of their MBEs, and the other calling for the Government to bring forward Online Harms Bill this year.

Following our letter to the Cabinet Office calling for the antisemitic grime artist Wiley to be stripped of his MBE, we have launched a petition for this process to become automatic, as honours bestow credibility and prestige on individuals as a reward for bravery, achievement, or service to the UK, but some recipients later prove unworthy. To maintain confidence in the honours system, the Honours Forfeiture Committee should automatically revoke honours and deliberate in public, and its decisions be published and subject to judicial review.

The petition can be signed here: https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/333141/

A second petition has also been launched calling for new legislation urgently to introduce a requirement for technology companies to remove racist incitement within set timeframes, a duty of care for social networks with personal liability for executives, and tighter requirements to provide evidence to police under warrant.

The petition can be signed here: https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/333146/

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “From their pitiful responses to the hate spewed daily on their platforms, it is evident that social media companies will stop at nothing to make a profit. It is time for these deeply damaging and irresponsible companies to be held accountable for the hatred they help to spread. Antisemites are able to use these platforms to reach millions and by failing to act on anti-Jewish incitement technology companies are enabling it. Social networks are allowing racism to run rampant and it is high time they were regulated like all other mass media.”

Following Wiley’s antisemitic rampage, more than 700 musicians and members of the music industry have signed a letter decrying racism.

Among the signatories were Alexandra Burke, Biffy Clyro, Clean Bandit, Dougie Poynter, Labrinth, Lewis Capaldi, Little Mix, James Blunt, Jess Glynne, Naighty Boy, Nao, Niall Horan, Nile Rodgers, Olly Murs, Rita Ora, and The 1975.

The letter was also signed by the heads of EMI, Universal Music UK, Warner Music UK, and Sony Music UK, and numerous songwriters, producers, managers, publishers and lawyers from the music industry.

In the letter, the signatories wrote: “We representatives of the music industry write to express our determination that love, unity and friendship, not division and hatred, must and will always be our common cause.

“In recent months anti-black racists and antisemites, plus those who advocate Islamophobia, xenophobia, homophobia and transphobia, have repeatedly demonstrated that they want us all to fail.

“Whether it be systemic racism and racial inequality highlighted by police brutality in America or anti-Jewish racism promulgated through online attacks, the result is the same: suspicion, hatred and division. We are at our worst when we attack one another.

“Music brings joy and hope and connects us all. We stand together to wipe out racism.”

The letter comes after the grime artist Wiley delivered an unrepentant multi-day antisemitic rant on any social media platform he could find.

Last week, Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to the Ivors Academy calling to Wiley to be stripped of his 2019 Ivors Inspiration Award. We have also called for Wiley to be prosecuted and to lose his MBE.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been informed by Google that it has decided to ban Wiley from YouTube. He was using his channel to broadcast disturbing videos to almost 250,000 followers. It had initially refused to remove him, but Campaign Against Antisemitism has successfully appealed the decision.

The performer, who was finally banned from TwitterFacebook and Instagram following worldwide outrage, had been uploading further videos to his popular YouTube channel.

The videos continued in the same vein as his previous videos and his recent interviews with Sky News and The Voice, a newspaper for the black community, in which he reaffirmed his belief in antisemitic conspiracy theories and bigoted stereotypes about Jews.

For example, in one of the new videos, Wiley demanded that an unspecified “you”, which appears from the context to refer to Jews in general, try taking his passport away so that Wiley can see quite how much power the unnamed “you” has.

In another video, he read the name of a Twitter user and demanded to know whether she is a Jew.

In yet another video, he said that he had to “throw myself on the bonfire” to show his audience and “draw everything out — you saw it”.

The videos attracted many thousands of views, and comments posted beneath them were vehemently antisemitic.

Google initially decided to remove only one video, which it said was antisemitic, but not the ones cited above.

Following an appeal by Campaign Against Antisemitism, Google has now reversed its position and banned Wiley from the platform entirely.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Following contact between Campaign Against Antisemitism and Google, Wiley has now been banned from YouTube. This should have happened faster but we are pleased that this now means that Wiley can no longer incite antisemitism on any of the major social media platforms and has lost the ability to broadcast his hatred to the hundreds of thousands of people who followed him.

“It is extremely important to us that Wiley is held to account for his actions, which is why we are in touch with the Metropolitan Police Service to ensure that he is prosecuted and the Cabinet Office to ensure that he is stripped of his MBE.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

The disgraced former Labour MP, Chris Williamson, has published an unhinged conspiracy theory article and video claiming that “Zionists” and Campaign Against Antisemitism control the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) in service to the Conservative Party.

Mr Williamson, who was suspended from the Labour Party several times before running as an Independent in the 2019 General Election and receiving so few votes that, extraordinarily for an incumbent MP, he lost his deposit, has been embroiled in controversy over comments about Jews, “Zionists” and antisemitism for a long time.

Mr Williamson claims in the article and video, titled “Unmasking the EHRC”, that “over the last few years, we’ve seen how the Commission’s lack of independence has led to its purpose being perverted in order to attack the British Left, Jeremy Corbyn and his supporters” and ludicrously asserts that “the number of antisemitism cases in the Labour Party are miniscule”.

In a more sinister vein, however, he claims that these cases “were clearly exaggerated as part of a pernicious smear campaign against Corbyn and his supporters”. Such comments are in line with Mr Williamson’s tradition of calling attempts to address antisemitism in the Labour Party “smears”, thereby accusing Jews of acting in bad faith when they complain about anti-Jewish racism.

Mr Williamson’s particular interest in the EHRC is due to the full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party launched by the independent body in May 2019 following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant. He believes that the EHRC has become part of the ‘smear campaign’, although he seems conflicted as to whether this is because it is staffed or manipulated by “racists” and “Zionists” or is simply doing the bidding of the Conservative Party.

Mr Williamson accuses the EHRC of racism and inappropriate closeness to the New Labour Government in its early years and now the Conservative Government. Both claims have been made in recent months by the far-left in a desperate attempt to undermine the EHRC in advance of its report on Labour antisemitism.

Mr Williamson describes the “so-called” Campaign Against Antisemitism as an “anti-Corbyn, pro-Israel outfit,” and claims that the EHRC was conflicted because its Chief Executive’s husband is a trustee of a charity which once made a donation to us. In order to buttress claims of a conspiracy, Mr Williamson claims that this donation was received in 2016, well into Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership, implying that it was part of a concerted effort to target the Labour leader for partisan reasons. In reality, the donation was pledged and received in 2015 and was ring-fenced for a specific polling project that had already been carried out at the beginning of that year, months before the 2015 General Election and well before anyone, including Mr Williamson, could have imagined that Mr Corbyn would become leader of the Labour Party.

The donation was made because – hard as this may be for Mr Williamson to imagine – there are people who acknowledge that antisemitism exists in Britain, and because – doubtless even more incomprehensible to Mr Williamson – there are some people who want to tackle it. Sometimes reality is not as conspiratorial as The Protocols of the Elders of Zion might have people like Mr Williamson believe.

Perhaps if Mr Williamson had requested comment from us – as would be expected when someone is publishing controversial accusations – he would have learned this. But in the world of sinister conspiracy theories, evidence is an avoidable inconvenience.

The video and article are the product of the Campaign For Chris Williamson Limited, a company whose sole director is the conspiratorial Bristol University academic, David Miller. Dr Miller, who was suspended from the Labour Party before quitting, has been accused in the past of making Jewish students deeply uncomfortable, including after accusing the “Zionist movement” of being one of the “five pillars” of hatred of Muslims in a lecture.

Mr Williamson, seemingly under the tutelage of Dr Miller, seems to believe that there is a “Zionist movement” in which some Jewish organisations are “formal member[s]” and some are not. One would have to excavate the over-extended minds of Mr Williamson and Dr Miller to discover how an organisation is able to join this movement and what – other than supposedly controlling British politics and targeting Muslims – the movement does. While Mr Williamson’s offensive ignorance of the Jewish community is entirely unsurprising, Dr Miller parades his as academic research, and Bristol University appallingly continues to tolerate his doing so.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Chris Williamson destroyed his political career by backing antisemites within the Labour Party and claiming that they were merely the victims of a ‘witch hunt’ which he likened to the oppression of East German citizens by the Stasi.

“Now, fearing that his apologism for and defence of antisemites is about to be fulsomely unmasked by the EHRC, he has launched this unhinged attack claiming that the EHRC is in fact run by a ‘Zionist’ conspiracy on behalf of the Conservative Party, even attacking our charity as we are the complainant in the EHRC’s investigation.

“This latest attack contains no interesting revelations about the EHRC, but it does open a fascinating window into the deranged conspiracy-theory-addled mind of Mr Williamson.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Action by Campaign Against Antisemitism has resulted in new criminal charges against the notorious antisemite Alison Chabloz.

Ms Chabloz is a virulent antisemite and Holocaust denier who has an extensive record of using social media to publicise her hatred for Jews and to convert others to her views about Jewish people.

Following a private prosecution by Campaign Against Antisemitism, which was later continued by the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), Ms Chabloz became the first person in Britain to be convicted over Holocaust denial in a precedent-setting case.

Ms Chabloz is fixated on the idea that the Holocaust did not occur, and that it was fabricated by Jews and their supporters as a vehicle for fraudulently extorting money in the form of reparations. This forms the basis for her second obsession, that Jews are liars and thieves who are working to undermine Western society. Ms Chabloz is also connected to extremist right-wing movements, at whose meetings she gives speeches and performs her songs, in the UK, France and North America. 

The three new charges under section 127 of the Communications Act relate to two internet radio broadcasts featuring Ms Chabloz.

On 1st July 2019, we have alleged that Ms Chabloz was a guest on The Graham Hart Show, an internet radio show, with Graham Hart and Brian Smyth, both of whom are far-right extremists with antisemitic views. Mr Hart, who admits to admiring Hitler, was arrested in May following the presentation of evidence to the police by Campaign Against Antisemitism. During the show, Ms Chabloz said that “the police and the lower ranks, they will never get anywhere unless they become members of the local Freemason lodge, and that is basically the same as becoming a member of the synagogue”, and that “the Jews, they need to stop indoctrinating their children, you know their grandparents were gassed just because they were Jews. No wonder they grow up into psychotic maniacs. They are indoctrinated from birth with this bulls***, and they’ve been doing the same for centuries, even before the Holocaust. But the Holocaust is how most Jews identify themselves. That is the central pillar of Jewishness now, it’s the Holocaust: ‘Oh, we suffered so much’.”

On 5th May 2019, we have alleged Ms Chabloz was a guest on The Realist Report, an internet radio show hosted by John Friend, an American white-nationalist, antisemite and Holocaust-denier. During the show, in which Mr Friend endorsed Hitler’s treatment of European Jews, Ms Chabloz promoted the antisemitic conspiracy theory that the Jews control anything worth controlling; accused the Jewish people of inventing the Holocaust in order to profit financially; suggested that Hitler’s treatment of European Jews was caused by bad Jewish behaviour; insisted that there was nothing wrong with saying ‘Hitler was right’; claimed that the judge who convicted her had been intimidated by the ‘Jewish lobby’; and argued that Jews who did not conform to her idea of a member of Western society should be deported.

A trial date has not yet been set.

Earlier this year, an investigation instigated following action by Campaign Against Antisemitism found that Ms Chabloz had falsely claimed that a court officer – who was horrified to hear the allegation – had agreed with her vile antisemitic views.

Last year, Ms Chabloz had her application for a judicial review denied by the High Court following her landmark conviction on three charges of sending grossly offensive communications via a public communications network. That case began as a private prosecution by Campaign Against Antisemitism, which was then continued by the CPS. The charges related to three self-penned songs in which Ms Chabloz denounced a supposed Jewish conspiracy to dominate the world and attacked the Holocaust as a fraud perpetrated by Jews for financial gain. The conviction set a new precedent in British law, effectively delivering a landmark precedent verdict on incitement on social media and on whether the law considers Holocaust denial to be “grossly offensive” and therefore illegal when used as a means by which to hound Jews.

Ms Chabloz has also been banned from entering France, where Holocaust denial is illegal, for forty years until 2059.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We are pleased to see that the CPS is moving on these actionable offences committed by a notorious and unrepentant antisemite following action by Campaign Against Antisemitism. If Alison Chabloz continues to pile up convictions with no punitive impact or remedial effect on her behaviour, that is a mockery of justice. If convicted of these charges, Ms Chabloz must face a sentence with real teeth if the criminal justice system wishes to deter others from following her odious example.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is calling for the Labour Party and the Co-operative Party MP Barry Sheerman to lose both parties’ whip over a tweet posted this morning.

Mr Sheerman, who has been the MP for Huddersfield since 1979 tweeted: “Apparently there has been a bit of a run on silver shekels!” After Twitter users asked what he was talking about, he posted another tweet, seemingly referring to the first, saying: “Apparently Richard Desmond & Philip Green were on the original list for seats in the House of Lords!”

As Twitter users denounced him, Mr Sheerman later deleted the tweets and instead tweeted, hours later: “I apologise for my earlier tweet. I did not intend the meaning which has upset many, and I am very sorry for the upset and offense I have caused. I will think more carefully in future and will reflect on this…I have fought antisemitism all my political life & have been a Labour Friend of Israel since joining as a student at the LSE I am deeply sorry that my clumsy tweet has caused offence.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Barry Sheerman’s first reaction on hearing that two prominent Jewish businessmen supposedly missed out on peerages is to think about ‘silver shekels’, alluding in one fell swoop to both classic and modern antisemitic tropes about Jews corrupting politics with money and being more loyal to Israel than their own countries.

“Mr Sheerman must immediately face disciplinary proceedings and lose the whip of both the Labour and Co-operative Parties. Sir Keir Starmer also has a more fundamental question to answer about his parliamentary party: how long are Labour MPs capable of going without making brazenly antisemitic statements? Labour’s antisemitism problem apparently goes well beyond the Party’s far-left contingent.”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The Independent Doctors Federation hosted Prof. John Ashton earlier this week, despite the public health expert’s long history of antisemitic comments.

Prof. Ashton’s record includes comparing Israel to the Nazis and holding Jews responsible for the actions of the State of Israel, both of which are breaches of the International Definition of Antisemitism, as well as trolling Jewish women MPs.

The Independent Doctors Federation describes itself as the leading membership organisation representing Independent medical practitioners in the UK for both specialists and general practitioners.

It is likely that the Federation was unaware of Prof. Ashton’s views when he was invited and hosted.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is grateful to one of the members of the Federation who brought the event to our attention.

After thousands signed our petition calling on the BBC, ITV and Sky News to stop featuring Prof. Ashton on their programmes, Prof. Ashton appears to have had fewer bookings by major broadcasters.

Campaign Against Antisemitism calls on all decent organisations and individuals to shun Prof. Ashton until he makes amends for his history of anti-Jewish racism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

John Ware, the maker of the BBC Panorama documentary “Is Labour Antisemitic”, is reportedly commencing legal proceedings against two members of the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, Jewish Voice for Labour (JVL).

Naomi Wimbourne-Idrissi, one of the group’s founders, and web officer Richard Kuper, will join Jeremy Corbyn as defendants in separate libel actions by Mr Ware.

It is understood that the libel action concerns comments made by Ms Wimbourne-Idrissi on the radio, in which she claimed that Mr Ware allegedly had a “terrible record of Islamophobia, far-right politics” and that the BBC had in the past had to “apologise” for his journalism and discipline him. The claims were then repeated on the JVL website. Mr Ware denies the claims.

JVL confirmed they it was “defending” a libel action against two of its officers.

The programme, which was televised in July 2019, showed former Labour Party employees speaking out publicly to reveal Mr Corbyn’s personal meddling in disciplinary cases relating to antisemitism. The programme explained how senior Labour Party staffers, some of whom Campaign Against Antisemitism has known for years, used to run Labour’s disciplinary process independently, but soon after Mr Corbyn’s election as Party leader found themselves contending with his most senior aides, who were brazen in their efforts to subvert due process.

During the programme Labour’s press team made claims that the staffers featured had political axes to grind and lacked credibility, and the whistleblowers and Mr Ware commenced libel proceedings against the Labour Party.

Recently, the Labour Party reached a settlement with Mr Ware and the whistleblowers featured in the programme over alleged libels made by the Party during the show that questioned the motives of the claimants.

Mr Ware’s cases have been brought by Mark Lewis, a highly esteemed media lawyer who is also an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A senior volunteer at Campaign Against Antisemitism has written on our behalf to the Ivors Academy calling for it to rescind Wiley’s 2019 Ivors Inspiration Award.

In his letter, Joe Glasman, an award-winning composer, Ivors member and former Ivors award panellist, noted that Wiley has “spent the last several days on an antisemitic tirade” and wrote that it would be “untenable for an individual who holds such horrific antisemitic views to continue to be held up as worthy of such an award by the Academy, an honour bestowed specifically upon those whom the Academy considers to be inspirational role models for composers and young artists.”

Mr Glasman went on to note that the Academy is “rightly dedicated to diversity, equality and inclusivity” but that this means that the Academy “must be a safe space for all minorities, and that includes Jews.”

Mr Glasman observed that he could not remain a member of the Academy if it fails to revoke Wiley’s award, but expressed confidence that Ivors would make the right decision.

The full letter can be read below.

Twitter has permanently banned the former Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard, David Duke, from its platform.

Mr Duke has a long history of vile antisemitic views and is a prominent white supremacist.

Twitter’s decision comes a month after YouTube banned the far-right racist. It also comes after a global walkout from Twitter earlier this week to protest its failure to address antisemitic hatred on its website.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Twitter has done the right thing by banning arch antisemite and prominent racist David Duke. But why on earth has it taken this long? Yet again Twitter has been slow to act on cases that are not remotely borderline. However, if the 48-hour global boycott earlier this week has brought about a culture change at Twitter, that is to be welcomed, and hopefully the former Grand Wizard is only the first of many Jew-haters to be booted from Twitter.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been informed by Google that it has decided to remove only one video from Wiley’s YouTube channel, from which he continues to broadcast disturbing videos to almost 250,000 followers.

The performer, who has was finally banned from Twitter, Facebook and Instagram following worldwide outrage, is now uploading further videos to a small Instagram account that appears to be new, and his popular YouTube channel.

The videos continue in the same vein as his previous videos and his recent interviews with Sky News and The Voice, a newspaper for the black community, in which he reaffirmed his belief in antisemitic conspiracy theories and bigoted stereotypes about Jews.

For example, in one of the new videos, Wiley demands that an unspecified “you”, which appears from the context to refer to Jews in general, try taking his passport away so that Wiley can see quite how much power the unnamed “you” has.

In another video, he reads the name of a Twitter user and demands to know whether she is a Jew.

In yet another video, he says that he had to “throw myself on the bonfire” to show his audience and “draw everything out — you saw it”.

The videos have already attracted many thousands of views, and comments posted beneath them are vehemently antisemitic.

Google has decided to remove one video, which it said was antisemitic, but not the ones cited above. Google will also revoke Wiley’s monetisation privileges.

A spokesperson for Google told Campaign Against Antisemitism: “Hate speech and content that promotes hate against religious groups is strictly prohibited on YouTube. We’ve worked hard to develop responsible and universal Community Guidelines that make clear what content is unacceptable on our platform, and we enforce our policies consistently, and regardless of viewpoint.”

We are now appealing the decision following failed talks with Google’s management in the UK. Campaign Against Antisemitism has until now had good relations with Google and acts as a ‘trusted flagger’, helping to highlight antisemitic material on YouTube.

Hundreds of thousands of people joined the #NoSafeSpaceForJewHate boycott of Twitter and Instagram. We had hoped that social media companies might have learned from this, but Google’s decision to allow Wiley to continue to broadcast his disturbing messages to hundreds of thousands of his followers on YouTube shows that Google is just as bad as the rest.

We are concerned that his fans could be inspired to act on Wiley’s hateful broadcasts. That is why we have asked social networks to take him off air, and reported Wiley to the police and intend to privately prosecute him should the authorities refuse to act. This underlines how urgent it is that the Government legislates to regulate these deeply irresponsible companies.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We are aghast. Today is Tisha B’Av, one of the saddest day of the Jewish calendar, when we remember past persecution of the Jewish people. Today of all days, an appalling antisemite who was banned from Twitter, Facebook and Instagram following a global campaign, has shown up on YouTube to continue broadcasting, and Google has decided to defend him.

“Google is acting as though Wiley has not spent the past week spewing antisemitic conspiracy theories to hundreds of thousands of people using every social media platform available to him. He has called for Jews to be shot, for a ‘war’ against Jews, and said that Jews are rich exploiters, slavers, cheats, thieves and cowards. He has even claimed that modern-day Jews are in fact imposters, drawing on the same conspiracy theory whose believers have tormented Jews in London and murdered Jews in the states of New Jersey and New York.

“Google is behaving dangerously and sending a clear message that it provides a safe space for Jew-hate. Google’s failure to act will not go unanswered. It is now the last bastion for this appalling antisemite. We have appealed the decision following failed talks with Google’s management in the UK and hope that the company will now see sense.”

The Voice newspaper must apologise for its disastrous interview with Wiley that failed to distinguish between reporting on antisemitism and enabling it.

In his interview, Wiley doubled down on his previous social media comments, describing Jews as rich exploiters and slavers, using classic antisemitic tropes and generalising about an entire ethnic group following an apparent dispute with his management team.

But rather than challenge Wiley’s views, the interviewer, Joel Campbell, suggested that there might be ‘salient’ points in Wiley’s racist ranting and seemed to affirm the idea that the Jewish community has a ‘stranglehold’ on the black community. The article also failed convincingly to dispute Wiley’s unfounded and antisemitic claims that Jews are rich exploiters and slavers.

The article’s commentary was also unacceptable. “There is no way to put this all in one nutshell but the hypothesis that you need to get a Jewish lawyer in order to progress in the music business may be a complete fallacy (I haven’t done the numbers, looking into the correlation in respect of who is and isn’t successful with or without one), but yet it remains,” Campbell wrote, adding: “I’ve never seen anyone Jewish refute or confirm this (maybe there was never a need felt to do so), but maybe, it’s a discussion that needs to be had?”

The notion that artists from the black community require a Jewish lawyer to advance is not “a discussion that needs to be had”. If anything, a discussion needs to be had about how The Voice could possibly have published such a disastrous article about such a sensitive topic. There is a difference between reporting on Wiley’s antisemitism and enabling and amplifying it. The Voice’s article was very much on the wrong side of that line.

Wiley had spent the last several days spewing antisemitic bile on social media before being locked out of Twitter, Facebook and Instagram following a global #NoSafeSpaceForJewHate campaign and mass 48-hour social media boycott. Wiley’s comments were condemned by the Prime Minister, the Home Secretary, politicians from across parties, celebrities and many others.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “In its interview with Wiley, The Voice newspaper repeatedly played down Wiley’s antisemitism, suggesting that there might be ‘salient points’ hidden within his racist ranting and seeming to affirm the idea that the Jewish community has a ‘stranglehold’ on the black community, not to mention failing convincingly to dispute Wiley’s unfounded and antisemitic claims that Jews are rich exploiters and slavers. There is a difference between reporting on racism and enabling it. The Voice was firmly on the wrong side of that line. It must apologise and explain how it managed to get such a sensitive topic so dreadfully wrong.

“Now that Wiley’s career as a performer is over and the social networks have finally stopped him from spewing hatred online, he must be stripped of his MBE and prosecuted. The message from the criminal justice system must be clear that those who incite racial hatred will face the full force of the law. Should the authorities fail to act, we stand ready to take our own legal action.”

Various other figures have weighed in on the article as well.Campaign Against Antisemitism has called for the revocation of Wiley’s MBE and for him to be prosecuted for incitement to racial hatred.

The antisemitic grime artist Wiley has given incendiary interviews to Sky News and The Voice Online.

Wiley has spent the last several days spewing antisemitic bile on social media before being locked out of TwitterFacebook and Instagram following a global #NoSafeSpaceForJewHate campaign and mass 48-hour social media boycott, in which Campaign Against Antisemitism participated.

Wiley’s comments were condemned by the Prime Minister, the Home Secretary, politicians from across parties, celebrities and many others.

In his interviews, Wiley doubled down on his previous comments, describing Jews as rich exploiters and slavers, using classic antisemitic tropes and generalising about an entire ethnic group following an apparent dispute with his management team. Nevertheless, the intensity of Wiley’s vitriol and some of the conspiracy theories he espoused indicate that these are longstanding beliefs that have incubated over time, rather than comments arising from the moment.

In a depressing passage in The Voice Online article, the interviewer explained that he had set out “to find out what had triggered [Wiley’s] outburst and why he would make such sweeping generalisations against a community of people in such a scathing manner. These questions were not being posed from an ignorant perspective, some of the views espoused by Wiley are the great unsaid outside of the black community.”

The notion that Wiley’s views may be widespread in some communities is deeply concerning.

The writer went on to say: “Putting anything remotely near considered antisemitic to one side of course, in fact out the window in the bin, not too many seem prepared to vocalise their consternation for some of the recurring themes Wiley believes is the stranglehold one community seems to have over another in particular relation but not confined to, the music business.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Wiley appears to be on a quest to destroy his career and reputation completely. He has passed up opportunity after opportunity to genuinely apologise. Instead of showing genuine contrition or a morsel of self-awareness after a weekend of racist ranting online, including calling for a “war” against Jews, Wiley still appears to be convinced that he is the real victim.

“Now that his career as a performer is over and the social networks have finally stopped him from spewing hatred online, he must be stripped of his MBE and prosecuted. The message from the criminal justice system must be clear that those who incite racial hatred will face the full force of the law. Should the authorities fail to act, we stand ready to take our own legal action.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has called for the revocation of Wiley’s MBE and for him to be prosecuted for incitement to racial hatred.

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently visited Twitter’s London headquarters to shine a light on racism.

Jeremy Corbyn has deleted a past tweet exchange with the grime artist Wiley, who has become embroiled in controversy over an extended antisemitic rant.

Wiley, whose real name is Richard Kylea Cowie Jr., appears to have shown support for the former Labour leader, who thanked him for his endorsement.

However, with Wiley now at the centre of his own antisemitism scandal, Mr Corbyn, whose tenure as Labour leader was marked by the Party’s institutional antisemitism, has apparently deleted the tweet, but has not issued any statement explaining why or condemning Wiley’s antisemitism.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Jeremy Corbyn has not found time to express a shred of solidarity with the Jewish community even as #NoSafeSpaceForJewHate became Twitter’s top trending hashtag, but he has found time to cover his own tracks. Mr Corbyn’s deletion of his positive Twitter exchange with Wiley without any statement condemning his antisemitism suggests that he is acting purely out of self-interest to try to protect the shards of his shattered reputation as a supposed ‘anti-racist’.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently called for Mr Corbyn to be suspended from Labour after he made a conspiratorial statement about a legal settlement reached between Labour and former staffers turned whistleblowers.

Mr Corbyn has a long history of antisemitism controversies implicating him directly, and over 57,000 people signed our petition denouncing him as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Twitter has permanently deleted antisemitic performer Wiley’s account. They did so following discussions with Campaign Against Antisemitism under immense pressure amid a worldwide 48-hour boycott of Twitter under the hashtag #NoSafeSpaceForJewHate.

Last night, Campaign Against Antisemitism went to Twitter’s London headquarters to shine a light on the company after it failed so spectacularly to address racist incitement on its platform.

Numerous examples of antisemitic tweets were projected onto Twitter’s building in an effort to embarrass Twitter into cleaning up the mess that it has enabled and allowed to fester online.

The video can be watched here.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Following discussions with Campaign Against Antisemitism, during which we made clear that the beginning of their path to building faith would be the removal of Wiley’s account, this morning Twitter has finally listened. The closure of Wiley’s account is too little too late, but it is at least a start for this deeply irresponsible social network.

“After Twitter’s abysmal response to blatant anti-Jewish incitement on its platform, last night we decided to literally shine a light on the company and project onto its London headquarters some of the hateful tweets that Twitter permits on its platform.

“From their pitiful responses to the hate spewed daily on their platforms, it is evident that social media companies will stop at nothing to make a profit. It is time for these deeply damaging and irresponsible companies to be held accountable for the hatred they help to spread.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism and others walked out from Twitter, Instagram and Facebook for 48 hours from Monday morning as part of a #NoSafeSpaceForJewHate campaign following the social media platforms’ failure to take appropriate action against racism on their websites.

A crowdfunder launched to raise money for Jeremy Corbyn’s legal defence has received money from donors calling themselves “Adolf Hitler” and “B*stard Son of Netanyahu and Starmer”.

The crowdfunder was launched by a supporter of Mr Corbyn’s and does not appear to have his formal endorsement, however the supporter said: “The funds on this campaign will not be touched and remain on GoFundMe until the details for distribution have been established with Jeremy’s office and I will continue to provide updates as they become available.”

Other donors also used provocative names or left offensive comments, such as ‘Jack T’, who claimed that Mr Corbyn had been targeted by “people within the Labour Party working on behalf of the racist State of Israel”.

Another complained: “We love Jeremy Corbyn and he is all we got! Him being seen and propagated by reich wing media and portrayed like he can be the next S***ler is absurd beyond belief [sic].”

The campaign, called Jeremy’s Legal Fund and hosted by GoFundMe, has so far raised over £300,000.

Mr Corbyn is being sued by the journalist John Ware for defamation. Another defamation case, brought by the Jewish activist Richard Millet, is also underway.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: ““Under Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership, the Labour Party became institutionally anti-Semitic, driving Labour’s own workers to defy their own Party and blow the whistle on the Jew-hatred within it. It was Mr Corbyn’s senior team that directed a forceful effort to drag the whistleblowers’ names through the mud, in some cases driving them to the point of considering suicide. Instead of apologising inshore for the attempts to bully and silence these principled whistleblowers, Mr Corbyn has now attacked the Labour Party for apologising to them.”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The Prime Minister has spoken out against Wiley’s antisemitism, calling it “abhorrent”, and declared that Twitter’s response was “not good enough”.

A spokesperson for Boris Johnson said: “The Prime Minister would echo the comments of the Home Secretary yesterday that the antisemitic posts by Wiley are abhorrent. The Prime Minister would also echo the Home Secretary’s comments that this material should not have been able to remain on Twitter and Instagram for so long.”

The spokesman added that “social media companies need to go much further and faster in removing hateful comment such as this” and that “the message is clear: Twitter needs to do better on this.”

The comments come after Home Secretary Priti Patel also said: “The antisemitic posts from Wiley are abhorrent. They should not have been able to remain on Twitter and Instagram for so long and I have asked them for a full explanation. Social media companies must act much faster to remove such appalling hatred from their platforms.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has joined others in walking out of Twitter and other social media platforms for 48 hours.

Those who oppose antisemitic racism are encouraged to join the walkout and to add the #TogetherAgainstAntisemitism profile badge in solidarity.

You can keep up with Campaign Against Antisemitism’s updates during the walkout at antisemitism.org/news or by subscribing to our e-mail updates and switching them from weekly updates to daily updates.

A leaked email from a senior Corbyn ally in Labour Party headquarters shows that he recognised that a controversial leaked report about the Party’s handling of antisemitism was misleading and that there may be adverse consequences following its dissemination.

Thomas Gardiner, who resigned a few weeks ago as Labour’s Director of Governance and Legal, is reported to have sent an email on 11th April to the Party’s General-Secretary saying that the report on Labour’s handling of antisemitism ought not to be circulated because emails and WhatsApp messages from Party staffers had been “presented selectively and without their true context in order to give a misleading picture.”

An unredacted version of the 851-page report was nevertheless leaked, giving rise to potential date breach claims that may cost the Labour Party millions of pounds in legal costs.

In his email, Mr Gardiner expressed concern that the report would “lay false blame” on him, that searches of staffers’ email accounts, including his own, were “not authorised” and “improper” and that use of confidential WhatsApp messages represented “a clear and unacceptable breach of confidence,” adding: “Further, these messages are presented selectively and without their true context in order to give a misleading picture.”

Although the report had by then been leaked, Mr Gardiner said “I realise it will not be helpful not to further use the report, given that it has apparently been leaked in a previous version, but I must register this formal objection.”

The report, which Campaign Against Antisemitism described at the time as “a desperate last-ditch attempt to deflect and discredit allegations of antisemitism”, was originally compiled for submission to the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC). On advice from Labour’s lawyers, the Party has not submitted the report to the EHRC.

The EHRC launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party in May 2019 following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

Ms Formby has released a statement saying that the searches of staff email and social media accounts were authorised and were carried out in response to requests by the EHRC. Other allies of Mr Corbyn’s have reportedly claimed that Mr Gardiner had supported the compilation and publication of the report but rowed back only after it was leaked.

Labour is currently conducting an internal investigation into the provenance, leaking and content of the report.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Swastika graffiti was reported on a Jewish home in Stamford Hill over the weekend.

The graffiti, on Springfield, left the family and small children traumatised about being targeted and fearing for what may happen next.

The incident, which took place on Sunday 26th July, was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD851 26/07/2020.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The #NoSafeSpaceForJewHate campaign has launched today and gone global, with Jewish communities around the world, including in Australia and the United States, joining British Jews in walking out of Twitter and other social media platforms for 48 hours to protest antisemitic hatred on the platforms.

The hashtag #NoSafeSpaceForJewHate has also been trending on Twitter, while numerous politicians from across the political spectrum and celebrities have joined the walkout, which began as the idea of actress Tracy Ann Oberman, with whom we are proud to be closely associated, who was joined by activists including Saul Freeman, Fiona Sharpe and others.

Celebrity backers include the historian Simon Sebag-Montefiore, former Chief Rabbi Jonathan Sacks, actors Jason Isaacs and Eddie Marsan, the broadcaster Ian Dale, the comedy writer Armando Iannucci, musician Billy Bragg, and Sarah Brown, the non-profit executive and wife of a former Prime Minister.

Emma Barnett, the BBC presenter, also gave an impassioned monologue on her radio show about why Wiley’s antisemitism – which was the trigger for the walkout – “burns deep”, while Chief Rabbi Ephraim Mirvis has written to the chief executives of Twitter and Facebook (which owns Instagram) accusing them of complicity for not doing more to stamp out antisemitism on their platforms.

Those who oppose antisemitic racism are encouraged to join the walkout and to add the #TogetherAgainstAntisemitism profile badge in solidarity.

You can keep up with Campaign Against Antisemitism’s updates during the walkout at antisemitism.org/news or by subscribing to our e-mail updates and switching them from weekly updates to daily updates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism and our allies are walking out from Twitter and Instagram for 48 hours on Monday and Tuesday after the social networks refused to close the social media accounts of the musician known as Wiley over his unhinged incitement against Jews.

A raft of celebrities, ministers and commentators are standing behind the walkout, with #NoSafeSpaceForJewHate now a major trending hashtag on Twitter.

On Friday, Campaign Against Antisemitism called for the prosecution of Wiley, the revocation of his MBE, and the closure of his social media accounts by Twitter and Facebook, which owns Instagram. Wiley has already been dropped by his management.

The Home Secretary, Priti Patel, has joined our call for the social networks to be held accountable as large amounts of antisemitic material remained available despite some being deleted by the networks in what appears to have been a token intervention.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Wiley has been tweeting and instagramming vile antisemitism including calling for Jews to be shot and for ‘black people’ to go to ‘war’ with Jews. He clearly has deeply-held antisemitic beliefs based on unhinged conspiracy theories that in our experience are indicative of long-term exposure to Jew-hatred.

“Instead of acting immediately to close down Wiley’s accounts, Twitter and Facebook have decided to protect this racist, with Twitter deleting only a few token tweets and leaving most of Wiley’s incitement to racial hatred online. They have decided to allow a racist to continue to use their platforms to reach hundreds of thousands of people. That is why we are walking out from these social networks and we are heartened to see so many decent people standing with us in doing the same.”

The walkout began as the idea of actress Tracy Ann Oberman, who we are proud to be closely associated with, who was joined by activists including Saul Freeman, Fiona Sharpe and others.

Those who oppose antisemitic racism are encouraged to join the walkout and to add the #TogetherAgainstAntisemitism profile badge in solidarity.

You can keep up with Campaign Against Antisemitism’s updates during the walkout at antisemitism.org/news or by subscribing to our e-mail updates and switching them from weekly updates to daily updates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is calling for the prosecution of the musician known as Wiley over his unhinged incitement against Jews. We have also called for the revocation of his MBE and asked Twitter and Instagram, which is owned by Facebook, to close his social media accounts.

The rapper, whose name is Richard Kylea Cowie but who is known as Wiley, has spent today engaged in an escalating rant which has culminated in calls for Jews to be shot and for black people to go to “war” against them.

After a day spent likening Jews to the Ku Klax Klan and claiming that Jews had cheated him and were “snakes”, Wiley tweeted that Jews should “hold some corn”, which is a slang expression meaning that they should be shot. He added “Jewish community you deserve it”.

He also called on “black people” to go to “war” with Jews.

Wiley repeatedly evoked conspiracy theories that Jews were responsible for the slave trade and that modern-day Jews are in fact imposters who usurped black people — a conspiracy theory that has incited acts of terrorism against Jews, such as a stabbing attack in Monsey in New York in December.

As Wiley spewed his antisemitic venom, Campaign Against Antisemitism responded with the facts, for example that the conspiracy theory that Jews were responsible for the slave trade has been described by the Legacies of British Slave Ownership project at University College, London, as based on “no evidence whatsoever”.

Wiley’s racist ramblings, which he apparently referred to as “Black History Lesson For Today”, come after the musician known as Ice Cube tweeted a picture of an antisemitic mural and several other celebrities have promoted the antisemitic hate preacher Louis Farrakhan. During his rant, Wiley praised Ice Cube.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Our Crime Unit has reported this matter to the Metropolitan Police Service as we consider that Wiley has committed the offence of incitement to racial hatred, which can carry a substantial prison sentence. We have additionally asked Twitter and Facebook, which owns Instagram, to close down his accounts which have hundreds of thousands of followers, to prevent further outpouring of anti-Jewish venom. Our Regulatory Enforcement Unit is contacting the Honours Forfeiture Committee at the Cabinet Office to ask that Wiley’s MBE be revoked, and we will be looking to ensure that no reputable label or manager works with him again.

“The conspiracy theories evoked by Wiley today claiming that white Jews were responsible for the slave trade usurped the position of black people have caused recent bloodshed, for example the terrorist attack against Jews in Monsey, New York in December.

“Wiley has many hundreds of thousands of followers on social media and we have seen today that a significant number of them truly believe the unhinged hatred that he is spreading. We are treating this as a very serious matter which must be met with the firmest of responses.”

John Ware, the maker of the BBC Panorama documentary “Is Labour Antisemitic”, is reportedly suing former Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn for repeating libels that saw the Party reach a settlement with Mr Ware and the whistleblowers featured in the programme.

The programme, which was televised in July 2019, showed former Labour Party employees speaking out publicly to reveal Mr Corbyn’s personal meddling in disciplinary cases relating to antisemitism. The programme explained how senior Labour Party staffers, some of whom Campaign Against Antisemitism has known for years, used to run Labour’s disciplinary process independently, but soon after Mr Corbyn’s election as Party leader found themselves contending with his most senior aides, who were brazen in their efforts to subvert due process.

During the programme Labour’s press team made claims that the staffers featured had political axes to grind and lacked credibility, and the whistleblowers and Mr Ware commenced libel proceedings against the Labour Party.

This week, the Party settled the case, issuing an apology and reportedly paying damages and costs worth hundreds of thousands of pounds.

However, Mr Corbyn described the settlement as “disappointing”, saying that it “risks giving credibility to misleading and inaccurate allegations about action taken to tackle antisemitism in the Labour Party in recent years.”

It is understood that Mr Ware will now sue Mr Corbyn directly.

Mr Ware explained his motivations in an impassioned article.

Meanwhile, a former Labour General-Secretary is suing the Labour Party over the leaked internal report which he claims tried to blame him for the Party’s antisemitism crisis.

Lord McNicol, a moderate who served in the role under Ed Miliband and in the first years of Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership, will be joining some fifty other individuals named in the report who have brought legal claims against the Party after their names were circulated on social media and far-right websites.

The report, compiled in the last weeks of Mr Corbyn’s leadership, tried to deflect from his and his allies’ failings and cast blame on staff whom it claimed were ideologically motivated to undermine Mr Corbyn. It is widely believed that the compilation and leak of the report were intended to undermine the investigation into Labour antisemitism by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC). A full statutory investigation was launched by the EHRC in May 2019 following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

Mr Ware’s and Lord McNicol’s case, as well as those of the whistleblowers, have been brought by Mark Lewis, a highly esteemed media lawyer who is also an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has this week called for Mr Corbyn to be suspended from Labour after his conspiratorial statement about the legal settlement.

The damages and legal costs arising from the multiple cases arising from Labour’s antisemitism crisis could amount to millions of pounds.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has called for the former director and trustee of Islamic Relief Worldwide to be banned from serving as a charity trustee in future after numerous antisemitic comments that he made on social media were uncovered.

The Times has reported that Heshmat Khalifa, who ran Islamic Relief Worldwide, Britain’s largest Muslim charity that received some £570 million in income over the past five years from the United Nations, the European Commission and British taxpayers, posted derogatory comments about Jews on Facebook.

In more than a dozen posts in 2014 and 2015, Mr Khalifa called Jews “the grandchildren of monkeys and pigs” and threw antisemitic insults against Egypt’s President, calling him a “pimp son of the Jews”, a “Zionist pig”, a “Zionist traitor” and a “Zionist criminal”. President el-Sisi deposed his predecessor, Mohammed Morsi, who was affiliated with the Muslim Brotherhood.

Mr Khalifa, who was born and educated in Egypt and became a British citizen in 2005, wrote the comments in Arabic. He also used his page to promote the charity and was friends on the platform with other charity trustees.

Mr Khalifa, who has been with the charity since 1999, resigned after The Times confronted the organisation with his comments.

The charity reportedly said that it “sincerely regrets any offence caused” by the comments, which “contravene the values and principles of Islamic Relief Worldwide”, which is a “purely humanitarian organisation with no political affiliations” and worked to help people “of all faiths and none, without discrimination by race, religion, gender or sexual orientation”.

It continued: “Heshmat Khalifa has resigned from the board of trustees of Islamic Relief Worldwide with immediate effect. He will also play no further part in any other Islamic Relief boards. We reject and condemn terrorism and believe all forms of discrimination – including antisemitism – are unacceptable.”

Mr Khalifa regretted the “language and sentiments expressed”, saying that his comments were “my expressions of frustration with the political regime, rather than beliefs that I hold,” and added: “I did not intend to insult the Jewish community and neither do I hold views which are antisemitic. I have dedicated much of my life’s work to promoting tolerance and freedom of religion and beliefs.”

It is understood that the Charity Commision has opened an investigation.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “It is appalling that Mr Khalifa was able to lead for so long one of Britain’s largest charities whilst expressing brazenly antisemitic views. Islamic Relief has questions to answer about how this went unnoticed. We hope that the Charity Commission will now act to ban him from acting as a charity trustee ever again.”

A tribunal has backed a university after it dismissed a professor for using “positive stereotypes” about racial groups, including Jews.

Stephen Lamonby, a 73-year-old professor, was dismissed by Solent University for making controversial statements in a private conversation with his course leader, including that “I believe that the Jewish are the cleverest people in the world [sic]. They are much maligned because of it. I asked if you were Jewish because of your ability with maths/physics etc. Which is a speciality of theirs.”

He later explained that “I was excited to think she might be one of them – excited to meet a Jewish physicist, who had been my heroes since boyhood.”

Prof Lamonby had also said that “Germans are good engineers” and made a similar comment about Japanese people and Americans. He further apparently said that he “had a soft spot” for young black men because “many are without fathers” and so “need all the help they can get.”

Prof Lamonby took the University to a tribunal, but the Judge C H O’Rourke said: “For the avoidance of doubt, I find that it is clearly at least potentially racist to group nationalities, races, ethnic or religious groups, by entire categories and to ascribe certain abilities or talents (or the opposite) to them, when, of course, as with any such group, talents or abilities will vary wildly from individual to individual…

“While Mr Lamonby sought to argue that his stereotyping (which it was) was positive, such ‘positivity’ is nonetheless potentially offensive to the recipient. A Jew told they are good at physics – because they are a Jew – may well consider that as demeaning their personal intellectual ability/hard work. Secondly, it could also be simply grossly offensive, as the person may not actually be Jewish, but feel some characteristic is being ascribed to them. Thirdly, even if they are Jewish, they may quite properly consider it none of Mr Lamonby’s business.”

The case has caused some controversy because many of Prof Lamonby’s comments were, in his view, complimentary “positive stereotypes”. However, after the judgment Prof Lamonby complained that “You can’t make any comments [in universities] now because they are totally obsessed with racism and to talk about Jews in the context of racism is crazy because they are not even a race, they are an ethnicity.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for universities to take action against academics who indulge in negative stereotypes and antisemitism. If a professor can be dismissed for promoting positive stereotypes, it stands to reason that those deliberately denigrating Jewish students or intimidating them should face the sack.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

The Labour Party could be facing a legal bill of over £5 million over claims arising from its scandal of institutional antisemitism, according to the JC.

The settlement reached by the Labour Party yesterday in libel proceedings brought by the maker of the BBC Panorama programme, “Is Labour Antisemitic”, and the whistleblowers it featured, including the legal costs, was reportedly in the region of several hundred thousand pounds.

During the programme Labour’s press team made claims that the staffers featured had political axes to grind and lacked credibility, and the whistleblowers and programme maker John Ware commenced libel proceedings against the Labour Party. The libel cases were brought by Mark Lewis, a highly esteemed media lawyer who is also an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

However, it is anticipated that costs from claims connected to a leaked internal report by the Labour Party could rise into the millions. It is understood that more than 50 individuals are pursuing claims against the Party after their names were circulated on social media and far-right websites.

In addition, it is possible that the Party may face a fine from the Information Commissioner’s Office in connection with the personal data in the unredacted leaked report, which in some cases led to threats against Jews named in the report.

There is also the possibility that claims may arise following the publication of a report into Labour antisemitism by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC), which launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Party in May 2019 following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

Mr Lewis called yesterday’s settlement the “first of many battles” in the effort for legal redress of the victims of Labour antisemitism.

It is understood that Sir Keir Starmer has tasked Lord Falconer, the Shadow Attorney General, to manage the Party’s response to matters arising from antisemitism in the Party.

Yesterday, Campaign Against Antisemitism called for Jeremy Corbyn to be suspended from Labour after his conspiratorial statement about the legal settlement.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

After Campaign Against Antisemitism reported that Twitter was locking accounts featuring Stars of David in their profile pictures, Twitter is reviewing its policy, which it claims was directed at ‘yellow stars’ specifically, which it categorised as “hateful imagery”.

Several Twitter users recently contacted Campaign Against Antisemitism reporting that their accounts had been locked, and Twitter provided the following rationale: “What happened? We have determined that this account violated the Twitter Rules. Specifically for: Violating our rules against posting hateful imagery. You may not use hateful images or symbols in your profile image or profile header. As a result, we have locked your account.”

Twitter appeared to have deemed the Star of David, a symbol of Judaism and Jewish pride, to be “hateful imagery”, and was locking the accounts of users who displayed it.

Now Twitter has claimed that the policy was directed only at ‘yellow stars’. Yet the Stars of David in the profile pictures of locked accounts that we saw also included artistic blue Stars of David and graffitied white Stars of David.

Twitter has claimed in its statement that “While the majority of cases were correctly actioned, some accounts highlighted recently were mistakes and have now been restored.”

We are pleased that Twitter has taken remedial action in this individual cases, however questions remain as to whether this was a genuine policy ineptly administered, or whether Twitter has provided an after-the-fact rationalisation for why the accounts of Jewish users displaying their identities were locked.

In response to Twitter’s statement, Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Only one of the accounts locked featured a yellow star, and it very clearly did so as a means of reclaiming the yellow stars used by the Nazis. This is precisely the kind of inept response to antisemitism that we have come to expect from Twitter, which just last week tried to convince us that the viral antisemitic #JewishPrivilege hashtag was legitimate.

“We would happily help Twitter, but they largely ignore us when we approach them, which we take as a reflection of their inconsistency in addressing this. It seems that Twitter prefers to go after Jewish users who proudly display their identity but not after antisemitic users who unabashedly promote anti-Jewish vitriol.”

Others also observed the locking of accounts with Stars of David in their profile pictures.

Recently, Twitter refused to take action against the viral antisemitic hashtag #JewishPrivilege, and earlier this year the social media giant was forced to apologise for permitting advertisements to be micro-targeted at neo-Nazis and other bigots.

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is calling for Jeremy Corbyn to be suspended from the Labour Party after he called the Party’s decision to settle the defamation case brought by the Panorama whistleblowers and the journalist John Ware “a political decision” that was “disappointing”.

Mr Corbyn said that the settlement reached today, which reportedly requires the Labour Party to issue an apology and pay damages and costs worth hundreds of thousands of pounds, “risks giving credibility to misleading and inaccurate allegations about action taken to tackle antisemitism in the Labour Party in recent years.” In other words, Mr Corbyn was sticking to the same line that he and the Party took when he was Leader.

The outrage is exacerbated by the fact that ordinarily the Labour Party and Mr Corbyn might have been expected to stand up for whistleblowing workers who call out abuses by their employers. Indeed Mr Corbyn even tweeted as much in 2017, quoting his Shadow Attorney-General Shami Chakrabarti saying: “Whistleblowers keep us safe. We can’t allow them to be silenced.”

It now appears, however, that Mr Corbyn believes that those whistleblowers who tried to keep Jews safe by revealing how the Labour Party under his leadership failed to address antisemitism should be silenced.

Mr Corbyn has a long history of antisemitism controversies implicating him directly, and over 57,000 people signed our petition denouncing him as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.” Campaign Against Antisemitism submitted three complaints against Mr Corbyn over the years since 2016 and these complaints formed the basis of our referral of the Labour Party to the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC).

It is past time for Mr Corbyn to be disciplined and suspended by the Labour Party.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “From the backbenches, Jeremy Corbyn continues to spread conspiracy theories to cover up how the Labour Party became institutionally racist under his leadership. A few weeks ago he gaslit the Jewish community by claiming that the EHRC is ‘part of the government machine’ and now he is gaslighting the whistleblowers he bullied, some almost to the point of suicide. We have been calling for Mr Corbyn to be disciplined since 2016. We are again calling on Sir Keir Starmer to suspend Mr Corbyn now and open a disciplinary investigation.” 

The Panorama programme, titled “Is Labour Antisemitic?”, was televised in July 2019 and showed former Labour Party employees speaking out publicly to reveal Labour leader Mr Corbyn’s personal meddling in disciplinary cases relating to antisemitism. The programme explained how senior Labour Party staffers, some of whom Campaign Against Antisemitism has known for years, used to run Labour’s disciplinary process independently, but soon after Mr Corbyn’s election as Party leader found themselves contending with his most senior aides, who were brazen in their efforts to subvert due process.

During the programme Labour’s press team made claims that the staffers featured had political axes to grind and lacked credibility, and the whistleblowers and Mr Ware commenced libel proceedings against the Labour Party. The libel cases were brought by Mark Lewis, a highly esteemed media lawyer who is also an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The Labour Party has settled a defamation case in the High Court brought by seven whistleblowers who featured in last year’s BBC Panorama’s programme titled “Is Labour Antisemitic?” as well as the journalist behind the programme, John Ware.

The programme, which was televised in July 2019, showed former Labour Party employees speaking out publicly to reveal Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn’s personal meddling in disciplinary cases relating to antisemitism. The programme explained how senior Labour Party staffers, some of whom Campaign Against Antisemitism has known for years, used to run Labour’s disciplinary process independently, but soon after Mr Corbyn’s election as Party leader found themselves contending with his most senior aides, who were brazen in their efforts to subvert due process.

During the programme Labour’s press team made claims that the staffers featured had political axes to grind and lacked credibility, and the whistleblowers and Mr Ware commenced libel proceedings against the Labour Party. The libel cases were brought by Mark Lewis, a highly esteemed media lawyer who is also an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Today, the Labour Party settled the case, issuing an apology and reportedly paying damages and costs worth hundreds of thousands of pounds.

Mr Corbyn and his former senior aide Seumas Milne and the Party’s former General Secretary, Jennie Formby, are reportedly uneasy with the Party’s decision to settle the case.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Today’s extraordinary settlement shows that the Labour Party recognises that its attempts to discredit the courageous whistleblowers, as well as one of the nation’s most respected journalists, were indefensible. To see the Labour Party trying to destroy the reputation of its own workers for calling out Jew-hatred, in some cases causing serious mental health conditions, was an ignominious spectacle and demonstrated how, under Jeremy Corbyn, Labour was ready to ruthlessly betray its own principles and people in order to cover its institutional racism against Jews. As the complainant in the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s statutory investigation into that same institutional racism, we expect the Party to adopt a similarly apologetic approach when the Commission reports.” 

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Justice, justice, you shall pursue - צדק צדק תרדף
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