Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “The Equality and Human Rights Commission’s report is a groundbreaking document. It is the first ever finding by the EHRC of unlawful acts. It heavily criticises the Labour Party’s former leadership. It makes clear recommendations to ensure that there is zero tolerance of antisemitism in the Party in the future. It provides a robust framework for ensuring that the Party complies.

“The EHRC’s report utterly vindicates Britain’s Jews who were accused of lying and exaggerating, acting as agents of another country and using their religion to ‘smear’ the Labour Party. In an unprecedented finding, it concludes that those who made such accusations broke the law and were responsible for illegal discrimination and harassment.

“The debate is over. Under Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership, the Labour Party became institutionally antisemitic. It drove almost half of British Jews to consider leaving the country. For five miserable years, every effort to compel Labour to reform failed. We were left with no choice but to refer the Party to the EHRC, which launched an investigation with us as complainant. The EHRC’s findings and recommendations today – that Labour’s leadership and culture created an unlawful environment that discriminated against Jews – closely align with the hundreds of pages of evidence and argument that we submitted to the EHRC over many months.

“Frankly, this report would not be much different had we written it. It is the dispensing of British justice that British Jews have sorely awaited, but has been denied for too long.

“Jeremy Corbyn and those around him who took part in or enabled the gaslighting, harassment and victimisation of Britain’s Jewish minority are shamed for all time. Those who defended and stood by them are shown to have made possible the closest flirtation that mainstream British politics has had with antisemitism in modern history.

“Sir Keir Starmer now has a long list of reforms to make, including establishing an independent disciplinary process so that those who put Britain’s Jews in fear for their future in this country can at last be held to account for their deeds. To that end, we have submitted complaints against Jeremy Corbyn, Diane Abbott and fourteen other sitting MPs and have given Labour six months to conduct transparent investigations and finally deliver justice for the Jewish community.

“We are immensely grateful to everyone who fought alongside us for this day to come. Too many of them have suffered greatly for their principles. They are the best of this country.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism first approached the EHRC at the time of the Labour Party Conference in Brighton in 2017. The conference was so rife with antisemitism that Brighton and Hove City Council’s then Labour leader, Warren Morgan, told his own Party that he would not permit use of Council premises for the conference again. Mr Morgan later resigned from the Labour Party over its failure to address antisemitism. Following Campaign Against Antisemitism’s contact with the EHRC, the Chief Executive of the EHRC issued a statement demanding that the Labour Party prove “that it is not a racist party”.Campaign Against Antisemitism made a number of disciplinary complaints to the Labour Party between 2016 and 2018 about Jeremy Corbyn, including about his defence of the antisemitic Tower Hamlets mural in 2012, his Holocaust Memorial Day event in 2010, and his Press TV interview in 2012 (Press TV is an Iranian state broadcaster which Ofcom banned from broadcasting in Britain).

The Labour Party repeatedly refused to open an investigation into our complaints against Mr Corbyn, and consequently on 31st July 2018, Campaign Against Antisemitism formally referred the Labour Party to the EHRC over its institutional antisemitism.

Subsequently, the Jewish Labour Movement and Labour Against Antisemitism Ltd made further submissions, which supported our referral. 

At the EHRC’s request, Campaign Against Antisemitism submitted detailed legal arguments in November 2018. We continued to provide additional legal arguments to the EHRC in relation to subsequent developments, resulting in the EHRC’s announcement on 7th March 2019 that it was starting pre-enforcement proceedings against the Labour Party.

Pre-enforcement Proceedings

Prior to the EHRC opening a statutory investigation, it entered into a pre-enforcement period of engagement with the Labour Party, allowing it to propose a plan of action and make representations to the EHRC giving reasons why enforcement should not commence, and offering to take action voluntarily, under the EHRC’s supervision.

During the pre-enforcement period, the Labour Party had an opportunity to make representations to the EHRC seeking to agree a plan of action that would remove the need for a statutory investigation by offering to implement certain measures against antisemitism, with the EHRC able to monitor compliance.

The Labour Party failed to satisfy the EHRC that it could be trusted to address the antisemitism issue itself.

Investigation (enforcement) process

Campaign Against Antisemitism asked the EHRC to open a statutory investigation under section 20 of the Equality Act 2006 into antisemitic discrimination and victimisation in the Labour Party.

On 28th May 2019 the EHRC announced a full statutory investigation, which enabled it to use its enforcement powers.

A summary of the terms of reference of the investigation can be found here.

Most significantly, the EHRC suspected that the Labour Party “may have itself, and/or through its employees and/or agents, committed unlawful acts in relation to its members and/or applicants for membership and/or associates.” Therefore “the investigation will consider whether the Party carried out such unlawful acts.”

The purpose of the EHRC’s investigation has been to consider whether the Labour Party carried out unlawful acts.

Once the statutory investigation was launched, the EHRC was able to use its powers to compel the Labour Party to reveal details of its handling of antisemitism in recent years, including internal communications such as text messages and e-mails. It is also within the EHRC’s power to seek court injunctions against the Labour Party to prevent further antisemitic discrimination and victimisation, and it can impose an action plan on the Party and enforce compliance with the plan.

The only previous statutory investigation ever conducted by the EHRC was an investigation into unlawful harassment, discrimination and victimisation within the Metropolitan Police Service.

The only other political party to have been subject to action by the EHRC was the British National Party, but that was not a statutory investigation.

The launch of a full statutory investigation by the EHRC into the Labour Party was an unprecedented development, resulting from the EHRC’s acknowledgement that the legal arguments made by Campaign Against Antisemitism were sufficiently compelling to merit investigating whether the Labour Party committed unlawful acts.

Content of our legal submissions

Campaign Against Antisemitism submitted hundreds of pages of legal submissions to the EHRC between 2018 and 2020 with the assistance of specialist human rights counsel Adam Wagner of Doughty Street Chambers and Derek Spitz of One Essex Court Chambers.

The hundreds of pages of Campaign Against Antisemitism’s submissions provided substantial details of incidents for investigation, including incidents directly involving Mr Corbyn.

In summary, Campaign Against Antisemitism made legal arguments that:

  • An unacceptable number of antisemitic incidents of unlawful discrimination, harassment and victimisation had occurred in Labour in recent years, at all levels of the Party.
  • Under Mr Corbyn’s leadership, Labour’s disciplinary mechanisms for dealing with antisemitism were significantly weakened, and the machinery of the Party was used to victimise those who stand up against antisemitism. 
  • A culture of denial and victimisation developed in some sections of Labour in relation to antisemitism. For example, antisemitism allegations have often been described as “smears”.
  • The result of the toxic culture which surrounds the issue of antisemitism in Labour was that people who suffer discrimination were subjected to victimisation when they raised complaints or that they were reluctant to bring complaints in the first place.
  • Antisemitism in Labour should be judged according to the International Definition of Antisemitism, which Labour itself adopted in 2018 (under pressure) after its adoption by the Government and other major political parties.
  • Labour failed to put in place a fair and effective complaints and disciplinary process to deal with antisemitism.
  • There was substantial evidence that the problem of antisemitism in Labour became institutional.
  • Labour appeared incapable of resolving this issue of antisemitism itself.
  • There was sufficient evidence to warrant a section 20 statutory investigation by the EHRC into whether systemic unlawful acts occurred in the handling of complaints of antisemitism in relation to Labour officials, members and other representatives.

Labour’s reaction to the investigation

The announcement of the investigation following the referral by Campaign Against Antisemitism was, to date, the single most significant development in the fight against antisemitism in the Labour Party, a point acknowledged by both supporters and opponents of the investigation.

Campaign Against Antisemitism continued to receive strong backing from the mainstream Jewish community and was vilified by far-left factions within and without the Labour Party.

Some senior figures in the Labour Party, such as then-Shadow Foreign Secretary Emily Thornberry, then-Deputy Leader Tom Watson and Lord Falconer, welcomed the EHRC’s investigation (while admitting that it was shameful for the Labour Party to find itself subjected to such a probe). During the Labour leadership contest, the candidates, including Sir Keir Starmer, pledged to implement the EHRC’s recommendations.

However, some elements within the Labour Party tried to undermine the EHRC’s standing, and cast doubt on its independence and thus on its eventual findings, including the Labour leadership under Mr Corbyn and his allies within the Party, who saw the investigation as a threat.

During the 2019 General Election, Labour’s Race and Faith Manifesto pledged to “Enhance the powers and functions of the Equality and Human Rights Commission, making it truly independent, to ensure it can support people to effectively challenge any discrimination they may face.” The implication was that the EHRC was not an independent body but rather an arm of the Conservative Government and therefore that its investigation and subsequent report could not be trusted. At the time, Campaign Against Antisemitism called Labour’s pledge to reform the independent body conducting an investigation into the Party “sinister in the extreme”.

Similarly, in his first interview (given to a fringe blog) since stepping down as Leader of the Labour Party, Mr Corbyn said that the EHRC was made “part of the government machine” by the Conservative Party.

Other far-left Labour activists have claimed that the EHRC itself is racist, specifically against BAME people, or at least that it has prioritised addressing antisemitism over other forms of racism, and that this prioritisation is racist.

With the removal of Mr Corbyn as Leader, his allies turned their ire on the Labour Party as well, accusing it of institutional racism against BAME people rather than Jews. As proof, they cited a leaked internal report titled ‘The work of the Labour Party’s Governance and Legal Unit in relation to antisemitism, 2014 – 2019’, which conceded the scale of the antisemitism problem in Labour but purported to show that some staffers – particularly those allegedly antagonistic to Mr Corbyn’s leadership – had deliberately frustrated the Party’s efforts to address the antisemitism crisis and had made racist or misogynistic remarks toward BAME and women MPs. At the time, Campaign Against Antisemitism described the report as a “desperate last-ditch attempt to deflect and discredit allegations of antisemitism” and a “disgrace”.

The report is subject to an investigation by the Labour Party and its leak has reportedly led to libel and data protection complaints, not to mention threatsagainst Jewish complainants mentioned in the report. It was apparently intended that the report would be submitted to the EHRC, but it is understood that the Labour Party under Sir Keir’s leadership declined to do so.

Some far-left figures within Labour have tried to make the claim that the Party is indeed institutionally racist, but against BAME people rather than Jews.

When the first signs of this argument arose, Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is offensive to Jews and BAME people to suggest that tackling prejudice against either community is somehow at the cost of discrimination against the other, and it is an appalling sign of the lengths to which this far-left faction will go to try to exonerate itself from its own central role in Labour’s antisemitism scandal.”

Not just Jeremy Corbyn

Although Campaign Against Antisemitism’s referral of Labour to the EHRC was triggered by the Party’s failure to address our complaints regarding Mr Corbyn, those failures were cultural and institutional.

A culture of denial that antisemitism could exist on the ‘anti-racist’ far-left of the Party was institutionally cemented by the whitewash 2016 Chakrabarti Report. The Chakrabarti Report effectively served to protect the reputation of the Party, and therefore, in an affront to natural justice, recommended that Labour’s disciplinary procedures be kept secret. The result was a process that was not independent, transparent, fair, efficient or accountable.

Consequently, Campaign Against Antisemitism has not submitted further complaints to the Labour Party about MPs, councillors, officeholders and other members because the disciplinary process is not fit for purpose, a deficiency exacerbated by the former Shadow Attorney General’s Report. Sir Keir has since promised to introduce an independent disciplinary process but has not yet done so, and has ignored our calls for him to set out a timeline. Once the Labour Party introduces an independent disciplinary process, as Sir Keir has promised, Labour will have a backlog of complaints to address.

The Canadian premier has condemned the desecration of the country’s National War Memorial after an antisemitic hate symbol was carved into it on 16th October.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau described the “antisemitic desecration” of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in the Canadian capital, Ottawa, as “completely unacceptable”.

In a statement on Twitter he said: “I strongly condemn this hateful act.” He urged anyone with information to contact police.

The Hate Crimes Unit of the Ottawa Police is looking for the man suspected of carving the antisemitic symbol. The suspect is believed to have rode a bicycle to the city-centre National War Memorial – site of Canada’s annual, national Remembrance Day ceremony – and scratched hate graffiti onto the tomb before riding away.

Canada’s Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan said that the “hateful” desecration of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier “with an antisemitic symbol” was “despicable,” declaring: “The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier represents the gallantry and the sacrifices of all those who fought for our freedom. Its desecration with an antisemitic symbol is despicable.”

Ottawa Police have issued a description of the suspect. A police spokesperson said that the graffiti was removed within 24 hours. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism has now expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Ottawa Police Service

In what is seen as a game-changing move, Bahrain and the United States have signed a memorandum of understanding on combating antisemitism, including anti-Zionist antisemitism.

At the signing on 22nd October, Bahrain became the first nation in the Arab world to acknowledge the International Definition of Antisemitism.

At a ceremony on Thursday, which came less than a week after Israel and Bahrain signed a series of bilateral agreements normalising relations, the document was signed by the US State Department’s antisemitism monitor, Elan Carr, and Shaikh Khalid bin Khalifa Al Khalifa, the head of Bahrain’s King Hamad Global Centre for Peaceful Coexistence.

While the signing falls short of a legislative adoption of the Definition, it is, nevertheless, seen as ground-breaking. Under the Definition, claiming that Israel “is a racist endeavour” or that Jews or Israel exaggerated the Holocaust is antisemitic.

Under the terms of the document, both sides vowed to promote and share the best practices for “combating all forms of antisemitism, including anti-Zionism and the delegitimization of the State of Israel.” In a tweet following the signing, Mr Carr said: “Thank you Bahrain!” adding that, together, the US and Bahrain would “create programmes to teach the region’s children the value of peaceful coexistence.”

 “We all know that hatred is the enemy of peace,” Shaikh bin Khalifa said at the event.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has now expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A man imprisoned for antisemitic incitement has apologised for his actions after being required to learn about the Holocaust during his jail term.

Michael Graves, 21, of Anchorage, Alaska, was jailed last year for posting hate messages calling for violence against Jews and Muslims and for illegally owning a machine gun and silencers. As part of his eighteen-month prison sentence, he was required to take classes and read books about the Holocaust and other forms of race-hate and was then required to write essays about what he learned.

At a hearing on Wednesday, Mr Graves apologised for his comments and acknowledged that he was part of a group that expressed vile views.

Prosecutors said that Mr Graves had the means “and the mentality” to commit a violent act. The classes were described as a creative way to “stop potential mass shooters” who spew hate-speech.

“I’m sorry for what I said. I do not believe in prejudice or violence of any kind,” he declared.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has now expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The Head of the BBC World Service has personally apologised after the Corporation gave sympathetic coverage to an antisemitic mass murderer.

Jamie Angus, the Director of BBC World Service, described the sympathetic treatment of Ahlam Al-Tamimi, the terrorist mastermind of the 2001 Sbarro Pizza Restaurant attack in Jerusalem, a “lapse in our editorial standards”.

Ms Al-Tamimi is a Jordanian national who was convicted for the terrorist attack, which killed fifteen people, half of whom were children. She was also behind a previous failed terrorist attack. She has repeatedly expressed pride at her actions and never remorse; she was even disappointed that the death toll was not higher. Although she was given several life sentences, she was released as part of a prisoner deal.

However, she recently appealed to the King of Jordan on a live radio broadcast but was cut off. BBC Arabic then rushed to give her a platform for her appeal to be reunited with her husband, who is also a convicted murderer and was released in the prisoner exchange. BBc Arabic provided no context for her notoriety.

Late last week, Mr Angus said that the segment “did not follow the correct BBC procedures by failing to refer the matter to the BBC’s Editorial Policy team or to senior editors in BBC News Arabic. Had they done so, the segment would not have been authorised for broadcast.”

He added that “Al-Tamimi has been convicted of serious crimes” and it was “therefore not a suitable subject” to broadcast.

He insisted that appropriate lessons were being learned.

Jewish students at Lancaster University have pledged that they “will not stop” campaigning until their university adopts the International Definition of Antisemitism.

After the Education Secretary, Gavin Williamson, reiterated his call on universities to adopt the Definition, Lancaster University reportedly said: “Our University is committed to building a diverse, inclusive environment where people are able to reach their potential free from prejudice. Antisemitism, racism or hate speech of any form will not be tolerated. With the appointment of a new Vice Chancellor in May 2020, the university’s policies to support equality and diversity are under review as part of a wider Strategy update. A more formal consideration of the [International D]efinition of Antisemitism may take place as part of this. At this stage, no specific timetable relating to any consideration to adopt the [D]efinition has been set, however the matter will be discussed by University management in due course.”

However, the University’ Jewish Society has protested the University’s inaction, with its President saying “We would like it to be implemented. We have never said you can’t have valid criticisms or anything like that. Not adopting this Definition is in itself antisemitic. There is no disadvantage in adopting this Definition.”

The Jewish Society’s Campaigns Officer said: “It is shameful that people in 2020 can’t accept a definition that protects against hate…We love Lancaster, it’s an amazing place, we are heavily involved in campus life and the community. The work we are trying to do is relating to us improving the prospects of Lancaster students because the university can do better and we want them to do better.”

The President added: “We will not stop working until this Definition is adopted.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities and public bodies. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Eric Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

A new report has exposed antisemitism in the overwhelming majority of anti-vaccination networks.

The twenty-page report, titled “From antivaxxers to antisemitism: Conspiracy theory in the Covid-19 pandemic” and produced for the Government, urges action against a “resurgence of antisemitism” within the anti-vaccination movement, which it predicts is likely to play a role if and when a vaccination for COVID-19 becomes available.

“Exposing the level of antisemitism amongst the anti-vaxxer movement now is therefore of the utmost importance,” the report warned.

The report, produced by Lord Mann, the Government’s Independent Adviser on Antisemitism, and Dr Lewis Arthurton, a molecular cell biology expert, reviewed 27 leading anti-vaccination networks on Facebook and Twitter and observed antisemitic content in 79% of them.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has previously reported on antisemitism among protests against pandemic lockdown measures, and has monitored the intersection of antisemitism and COVID-19 conspiracy theories over the past several months. Various reports, including by Campaign Against Antisemitism, have shown how the far-right and others have exploited the pandemic to target the Jewish community.

Expectations of an acrimonious debate came to nothing as Hastings Borough Council adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism almost unanimously.

With the exception of Cllr Leah Levane, who abstained, it is understood that all councillors present at the 21st October virtual Council meeting agreed to the adoption. Cllr Levane is a co-Chair of Jewish Voice for Labour, an antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation.

The motion was proposed and promoted by Cllr Dany Louise, who bravely resigned from the Labour Party in 2019, saying at the time that “sensible people have long ago abandoned the Hastings and Rye branch of the Labour Party” and that she had been “driven out” because Labour had become a “welcoming environment for antisemites”. Later in the year, she revealed the dismissive reactions of erstwhile colleagues when she rightly raised the issue of antisemitism, including that “Jews should complain quietly”, references to “the Jewish question” and that she herself might have a “right-wing motivation”.

Cllr Louise now sits as an Independent, and Campaign Against Antisemitism praises her and others for pushing adoption of the Definition, and welcomes Hastings Borough Council’s decision.

Cllr Louise gave an impassioned speech at the meeting, saying: “In the last few years, antisemitism has entered the national public discourse in a truly frightening and morally repugnant way. Where once it was the preserve of the far right, it has now become commonplace on the left as well. Shockingly, there has been widespread denial of this fact, with far too many people somehow casting it as yet another Jewish conspiracy theory. The denial itself has become another form of antisemitism, enthusiastically entertained by many who would otherwise call themselves part of the Community of the Good.”

She also rightly noted that the eleven examples “are indivisible from the Definition”, and that any “modified version” of the Definition is “no longer the…Definition”.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We are delighted that Hastings Borough Council has joined other local authorities in adopting the International Definition of Antisemitism, something for which we and others have long campaigned ever since we secured the adoption of the Definition by the British Government in 2016. We are particularly grateful to Cllr Dany Louise, formerly of the Labour Party but who quit over antisemitism and now sits as an Independent, for bringing and promoting the motion to adopt the Definition so passionately.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently published its first Audit of Local Authorities, documenting the campaign for widespread adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by local authorities.

The former Mayor of Luton, who is currently Labour’s candidate for Bedfordshire Police and Crime Commissioner, has been suspended by the Party over alleged antisemitism.

Tahir Khan, who served as Mayor of Luton in 2016-17, will no longer be able to represent Labour in the 2021 election for the senior police job, and a new selection process is reportedly underway.

Although the basis of the suspension is unclear, Mr Khan is believed to have posted Rothschild conspiracy theories on social media in the past and to have claimed that the BBC is a “Zionist channel”.

A Labour spokesman reportedly said: “The Labour Party takes all complaints of antisemitism extremely seriously and they are fully investigated in line with our rules and procedures, and any appropriate disciplinary action is taken.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We are pleased that this case is being investigated by Labour, but the Party must make its processes transparent so that the Jewish community and the public can see whether and what action has been taken. The Party’s failed disciplinary processes are why we referred Labour to the EHRC in the first place, and it must now urgently introduce an independent disciplinary process in order to restore confidence in the Party’s procedures.”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Several major music streaming platforms have reportedly removed antisemitic and racist music, following an investigation.

The BBC found that sections of speeches by Adolf Hitler, references to white power and celebrations of the Holocaust featured in songs on the platforms, with Spotify, Apple, Deezer and YouTube apparently having now removed them.

One song on Spotify, for example, contained the lyrics: “Aryan child, listen to what is said/ So rise your hand and learn to love your land/ For the white revolution needs your uncorrupted hand.”

According to the BBC, Spotify said that the songs violated its hate content policy, while YouTube reportedly said that there was no place for hate on its platform. Apple Music has apparently hidden the majority of the songs while it investigates, and Deezer is investigating.

Following an antisemitic rampage by the grime artist Wiley over the summer, more than 700 musicians and members of the music industry signed a letter decrying racism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

Albania has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The country’s Parliament adopted the Definition last Thursday ahead of the upcoming Balkans Forum Against Antisemitism conference, which the Parliament is organising in conjunction with Jewish groups.

Albania thereby becomes the first Muslim-majority to adopt the Definition.

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds this decision at a time of rising antisemitism in Europe.

“It is good news that we, the Albanians and the peoples of the Western Balkans, a region that has suffered more than any other part of the world, the consequences of ethno-centrist and religious-centrist views and attitudes, join this emancipatory action of contemporary civilization: the fight against antisemitism,” said Gramoz Ruci, the Speaker of Albania’s parliament.

“All nations that throughout history have protected Jews from extermination and support them today against stigma have a right to be proud,” he said, adding: “But we Albanians have more reasons to be proud, because Albania is the only country in Europe where all Jews were taken under protection and rescued during World War II. Our homeland, Albania, in difficult times has served as a substitute soil for Jews.”

Britain was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism and Lord Pickles worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street. Serbia joins a growing list of national governments and public bodies to use the Definition.

An attempt by ten police officers to prevent disciplinary proceedings against them in connection with antisemitic and racist Whatsapp messages has cost Police Scotland nearly £200,000, it has been reported.

Whatsapp messages described as being “sexist and degrading, racist, antisemitic, homophobic, mocking of disability and included a flagrant disregard for police procedures by posting crime scene photos of current investigations,” were discovered in the course of an investigation into alleged sexual misconduct on the part of another officer, who was later cleared.

After the messages were discovered in 2016, Police Scotland’s Professional Standards department sought to discipline the officers implicated in the messages in November 2017. However, the Scottish Police Federation tried to block the disciplinary proceedings on behalf of the officers on the basis that they were entitled to privacy under Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights, and a common law right to privacy. Last month, however, three appeal judges upheld an earlier ruling that rejected those arguments, claiming that the duty to uphold professional standards on the police force overrode the right to privacy and that it was proportionate for Police Scotland to use the messages.

Following the ruling, The Ferret submitted a Freedom of Information request to Police Scotland, which revealed that its legal bill to date is £189,366.04 (including VAT).

Police Scotland reportedly noted in its reply that “subject to the outcome of any further proceedings, Police Scotland intends to seek an award of expenses in its favour as a result of being successful both in the outer and inner houses of the court of session.”

A spokesperson for Police Scotland reportedly said: “Because of their position, our officers are held to higher standards than ordinary members of the public and this is consistently made clear from the first day of training. The inner house judgment underlined that these high standards also apply to the virtual space. The vast majority of our officers conduct themselves in line with our values of fairness, integrity and respect. Where inappropriate conduct is brought to our attention it will be considered by our professional standards department. All probationary officers still involved in this long running court action have been placed on restricted duties pending further proceedings.”

A spokesperson for the Scottish Police Federation reportedly said: “The SPF does not comment on any individual legal cases.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We welcome this judgement, so that the messages in question can be properly investigated and the public can be confident that everyone will receive equal treatment without discrimination by the police in Scotland.”

Police in Ontario are appealing for witnesses after antisemitic graffiti appeared in Richmond Hill.

Located in the Greater Toronto Area, Richmond Hill is one of the York’s largest towns. The graffiti, which includes swastikas and blames Jews for 9/11, appeared on 13th October.

Shortly after 13:00 on that day, police were called to a neighbourhood park after antisemitic and other racist graffiti was reported. When officers arrived, they also found that a bench had been vandalised.

Investigators, including from the York Regional Police Hate Crime Unit, are asking witnesses or anyone with information or video footage to come forward.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist us with this project.

Image credit: Bnai Brith Canada

Members of Brooklyn’s Hasidic community has protested a decision by the New York Police Department to to treat what they deem to be an antisemitic hate crime merely as an attempted robbery.

Police are investigating an attack on a Hasidic Jewish man in Williamsburg at 22:40 on Thursday, 15th October as an attempted robbery.

Surveillance video footage shows two individuals approaching the victim, chasing him, beating him and trying to steal his bag. The victim’s face was injured but he managed to hold on to his belongings. The suspects – two men in their twenties, according to police – fled the scene empty-handed.

Former NY State Assemblyman Dov Hikind, a vocal communal activist, reportedly described the attack as a hate crime, while two eye-witnesses who spoke to CBS News claimed that the attack was sparked by antisemitic hatred.

One of the eye-witnesses, however, conceded that robbery might have been an “additional” motive as the area was “not the best.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist us with this project.

A “dangerous” Islamist, who is alleged to have played a prominent role in organising protests against the Paris high school teacher who was beheaded last week, has been taken into police custody.

Abdelhakim Sefrioui, 61, is alleged to have helped to organise protests against Samuel Paty, the teacher from the school in a north-western suburb of Paris who was decapitated after showing his students images of the prophet Muhammad during a discussion on freedom of speech.

Further raids on the homes of suspected Islamists by French police were reported on Monday as the French Government announced an investigation into 51 Muslim organisations. One of them, the Cheikh Yassine Collective, which is named after a former leader of the genocidal antisemitic terrorist group, Hamas, was dissolved by the French Cabinet today. The Government said that the Cheikh Yassine Collective was ‘implicated’ in Mr Paty’s murder.

Eye-witnesses said that Abdoullakh Anzonov, the eighteen-year-old refugee from Chechnya shouted “Allahu akbar” (“God is great”) as he slaughtered Mr Paty, 47. Mr Anzonov was later shot dead by police.

In the days leading up to his murder, Mr Paty had been the target of protests from some Muslim parents in connection with his display of the images. One parent had sought the backing of Mr Sefrioui, a Moroccan-born Islamist described by a prominent French Muslim leader as “dangerous.”

On the day before the murder, after filming an interview with a female Muslim pupil, Mr Sefrioui had a meeting with members of the school management and issued a statement asserting that Muslim children “had been attacked and humiliated in front of their classmates.” He demanded the immediate suspension of Mr Paty, whom he referred to as “this thug.”

In an interview with the news outlet Marianne, Bernard Godard, an expert on Islam and former adviser to France’s Interior Ministry, said that Mr Sefrioui had been well-known to French intelligence for nearly twenty years. In 2011, Hassen Chalghoumi, an Imam in the Parisian suburb of Drancy, was placed under police protection after Mr Sefrioui denounced him as a “pawn of the Zionists.”

Also speaking to Marianne, Imam Chalghoumi said Mr Sefrioui was “dangerous because he seduces the youth.”

Mr Sefrioui’s activism has repeatedly involved antisemitism. In 2006, for example, he campaigned on behalf of the comedian, presidential candidate and convicted antisemite Dieudonné M’Bala M’Bala, who was recently banned from several social media platforms for Holocaust denial and antisemitism.

Mr Sefrioui is a member of the Council of French Imams and claims to speak in its name. However, Daw Meskine, Secretary-General of the organisation, vigorously disputed his right to do so in interviews with French media over the weekend. When asked about the harassment of Mr Paty, Mr Meskine said: “Sefrioui does not have the right to speak on our behalf. It was a personal initiative.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist us with this project.

An antisemitic note was discovered hanging on a municipal bulletin board at the Schio city council in Italy.

The sign, with several grammatical and spelling errors, read: “The Jewish senator [Liliana Segre] who asks herself where G-d was he was – where you put him, the Jew has a short memory, unlike G-d.”

The intended victim of the hateful rhetoric was Liliana Segre, an Auschwitz survivor who received honorary citizenship in the city of Trieste and several other cities across Italy in 2019 to show solidarity with her in her fight against antisemitism. In January 2018, Ms Segre was made an Italian senator by President Sergio Mattarella.

Senator Segre has been a target for online abuse, including death threats, since she first called for the establishment of a Parliamentary committee to combat racism and online hate speech in the country. She said at the time: “I appealed to the conscience of everyone and thought that a commission against hatred as a principle would be accepted by all.” Senator Segre has reported receiving in excess of 200 hate messages a day.

With such an influx of potential threats to her life, it was agreed that Senator Segre would receive police protection, and she is now accompanied in public by two paramilitary carabinieri officers.

The recent antisemitic sign on the council building in Schio has been condemned by city councilman Carlo Cunegato, who published an image of the note, and stated that acts of antisemitism in 2020 “stink of gross regression” which he hopes is simply “the madness” of an individual. He also pointed to the possibility that this is not an isolated incident. On 27th January a letter was found in Torrebelvicino, supposedly signed by the SS, that said: “Let us remember to reopen the ovens: Jews, Roma, sinti, fags, negri, communists. Free entry”.

The Major of Schio, Walter Orsi, outlined his disappointment at the note in a public statement, and reassured the community that the persons responsible would be found and held accountable. The sheet was promptly removed and investigations into the incident are ongoing.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Twitter has confirmed that it will ban and remove posts that endorse Holocaust denial, following Mark Zuckerberg’s announcement last week that Facebook will now enforce a similar policy on its platforms.

A spokesperson for Twitter reportedly said that posts and accounts that “deny or distort” or circulate disinformation on events, including the Holocaust, would be banned under Twitter’s hateful conduct policy. This has also been extended to include the glorification of historical acts of violence, persecution and genocides.

Mr Zuckerberg announced on 12th October that his platform’s revised hate speech policy would prohibit such offensive content and instead direct users to “authoritative sources to get accurate information.” The recent move followed a decision to ban the antisemitic conspiracist movement QAnon, which saw thousands of associated Twitter accounts removed over the last few months as well.

Twitter has assured users that the company will continue to work with a number of partners to tackle antisemitism and hateful conduct across the platform, including NGOs, the Jewish community, governments and several civil society partners.

In a public statement, a spokesperson reportedly said: “We strongly condemn antisemitism, and hateful conduct has absolutely no place on our service. Our Hateful Conduct Policy prohibits a wide range of behaviour, including making references to violent events or types of violence where protected categories were the primary victims, or attempts to deny or diminish such events.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The Argentine Football Association (AFA), which governs all Argentinian club activity, adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism on 8th October in a move to combat discrimination in the sport. The two-time World Cup winner Argentina is the first national football association to have adopted the Definition.

In the previous day the University of Buenos Aires, with more than 300,000 students, also adopted the Definition.

In recent years, the country’s football culture has come under criticism for several antisemitic controversies. In 2018, fans of the Atlanta team, a Buenos Aires club that is home to a large Jewish neighbourhood and has featured many Jewish players, were targets for chants that stated, “killing the Jews to make soap”, a reference to the claim that the Nazis made soap out of the dead bodies of Jewish victims.

At a football game this year a rival Argentine player, Arnaldo González, made antisemitic gestures towards the rival Atlanta team. While leaving the field, the player placed his hand on his head to imitate a kippah and gestured to his genitals as fans jeered. The AFA decided to adopt the Definition as a direct response to rising antisemitism, particularly amongst spectators, in the sport.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed the widespread adoption of the Definition internationally. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Eric Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street. Since then, numerous other national governments –including Argentina’s – and institutions have followed suit.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist us with this project.

A fourteen-year-old in San Diego, California, has been charged with a hate crime after allegedly punching a rabbi in the face and knocking him to the ground.

The teenager, who cannot be named because of his age, allegedly assaulted Rabbi Yonatan Halevy, 31, while the rabbi was walking with his father on Shabbat two weeks ago.

Rabbi Halevy told police that the teenager hit him so hard that he was knocked to the ground.

The teenager has been charged with hate-crime and battery.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Leaders of the United Hebrew Temple in Benton, Illinois are asking the public to provide any information on a recent spate of vandalism against the synagogue.

The synagogue remained closed due to COVID-19 prevention measures, however upon reopening approximately a month ago leaders discovered a vast amount of damage to the property. Local authorities were consequently notified and an investigation was launched to identify the suspect or suspects responsible.

On 9th October further vandalism was found with ten antique stain-glass windows broken, prayerbooks and skullcaps thrown across the floor, and damage to the building’s kitchen. The windows were purposefully made for the synagogue on its construction in 1957 and are irreplaceable.

This is the third act of vandalism in less than a month. Another incident saw two of the windows broken and more than a week earlier there was a further break-in, including the theft of electronic equipment, reported to Benton Police.

The Vice President of United Hebrew Temple said that the local community simply wants to worship “in peace and safety” without fear of potential antisemitism. She added that the organisation is currently exploring ways to protect and preserve the remaining windows, and supporters of the United Hebrew Temple raised nearly $6,000 in under a week to repair the damage to the building.

Benton Police are continuing investigations into the vandalism, however they have released no further information.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Google

Sky HISTORY has reportedly axed its programme, The Chop: Britain’s Top Woodworker, after Campaign Against Antisemitism and others protested the inclusion of a contestant who appeared to have neo-Nazi symbols tattooed on his face.

The contestant, Darren, was introduced by Sky HISTORY in a video on Twitter with the caption: “Meet the Woodman, the Bloke-With-All-The-Tattoos or Darren as we like to call him. #TheChop”, and he was due to feature on the show hosted by comedian Lee Mack.

The contestant is covered in tattoos, including on his face, where one tattoo reads “88”, a popular number in neo-Nazi numerology that denotes the phrase “Heil Hitler”, since ‘H’ is the eighth letter of the alphabet. Other tattooed numbers include 23/16, denoted White Supremacy, 18 for Adolf Hitler, and 1488, another white supremacist figure.

Sky HISTORY tried to defend one tattoo on the basis that 1988 was the year his father died, but this was disputed by a journalist on social media.

Now, the channel has reportedly cancelled the show, which was due to commence on Thursday.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Sky HISTORY made a terrible mistake by including in ‘The Chop’ an individual adorned with what appear to be neo-Nazi tattoos without providing serious evidence to show that the tattoos mean something other than how they appear. These tattoos would be plainly visible to viewers on the show, including younger viewers, which is unacceptable. Sky HISTORY is right to cancel the show until it can satisfy viewers that they and their families will not be subjected to neo-Nazi propaganda.”

Sky has insisted that the tattoos on the face of a contestant on its woodcutting show, The Chop, are not Nazi symbols.

Despite pushback by sceptics, Sky HISTORY has defended its choice of contestant on the show, which is hosted by Lee Mack.

The contestant, Darren, is introduced by Sky HISTORY in a video on Twitter with the caption: “Meet the Woodman, the Bloke-With-All-The-Tattoos or Darren as we like to call him. #TheChop.”

The contestant is covered in tattoos, including on his face, where one tattoo reads “88”, a popular number in neo-Nazi numerology that denotes the phrase “Heil Hitler”, since ‘H’ is the eighth letter of the alphabet.

In response to criticism, Sky HISTORY has claimed that “Darren’s tattoos denote significant events in his life and have no political or ideological meaning whatsoever. Amongst the various numerical tattoos on his body, 1988 is the year of his father’s death.”

According to one journalist, however, the contestant’s father was on the electoral role until 2011, indicating that he did not in fact die in 1988.

Other tattooed numbers include 23/16, denoted White Supremacy, 18 for Adolf Hitler, and 1488, another white supremacist figure.

Sky HISTORY went on to say: “The production team carried out extensive background checks on all the woodworkers taking part in the show, that confirmed Darren has no affiliations or links to racist groups, views or comments. Sky HISTORY is intolerant of racism and all forms of hatred and any use of symbols or numbers is entirely incidental and not meant to cause harm or offence.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Sky HISTORY has made a terrible mistake by including in ‘The Chop’ an individual adorned with what appear to be neo-Nazi tattoos without providing serious evidence to show that the tattoos mean something other than how they appear. These tattoos will be plainly visible to viewers on the show, including younger viewers, which is unacceptable. If Sky HISTORY is indeed ‘intolerant of racism’ as it claims, then it must urgently provide a credible clarification or remove the contestant from the programme.”

Academics have reportedly protested a call by the Education Secretary for universities to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Gavin Williamson wrote a letter to university heads calling on their institutions to adopt the Definition after a study showed that a limited number had done so, despite urging from the Government over the past several years and threats of loss of funding.

He also said that the Office for Students, which regulates higher education in England, could be tasked with taking regulatory action against universities, including over funding, if they fail to adopt the Definition by the end of this year.

“If I have not seen the overwhelming majority of institutions adopting the Definition by Christmas then I will act,” Williamson wrote.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities and public bodies. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Eric Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

However, universities have protested the intervention, with a spokesperson for Universities UK saying: “We recommend universities do all they can to tackle antisemitism, including considering the [D]efinition, whilst also recognising their duty to promote freedom of speech within the law. UUK has set up a taskforce to consider what can be done to address all forms of harassment, violence and hate crime on campus, including on the basis of religion. We are in regular contact with Jewish community leaders and student groups to ensure that universities are supported to do all they can to tackle antisemitism.”

A spokesperson for the University of Oxford, which has not adopted the Definition, reportedly said:“Harassment and discrimination of any kind, including harassment on racial or religious grounds, are totally unacceptable at Oxford University and we have strong policies in place to guard against them.”

Similarly, a spokesperson for the University of Cambridge reportedly said: “The University of Cambridge does not tolerate discrimination in any form. We are an inclusive community that welcomes staff, students, alumni, collaborators and visitors from a wide variety of backgrounds, including people of all faiths and none. We have a student-facing webpage dedicated to resources on the disclosure and prevention of hate crime, which explicitly links to the International Definition of Antisemitism sanctioned by the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance as a reference point. Any behaviour that would fall within the [D]efinition would be covered by the University’s current Rules of Behaviour. The University keeps its Rules of Behaviour under review and therefore, will continue to monitor its approach.”

At SOAS, it has been reported that academics expressed their furious opposition to adoption of the Definition in an internal discussion thread, with one lecturer allegedly claiming that the Definition was a “Zionist” attempt to redefine antisemitism. Another academic defended the Definition and was apparently attacked by colleagues in the thread.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

An A-star student said to have fallen down “the rabbit hole of the internet” to become a neo-Nazi has pleaded guilty to fourteen terror charges.

Harry Vaughan, who is eighteen, is said to have begun taking an interest in Satanic neo-Nazism at the age of fourteen, unbeknownst to his parents, who were bewildered when he was arrested some years later.

He had “every advantage that could have been afforded to him,” according to his barrister, having been educated at a prestigious grammar school and received four A-star grades in summer exams.

In 2018, he applied to join the System Resistance Network, a white supremacist successor to National Action, which the Government proscribed as a terrorist organisation in 2016 following a long campaign by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others. He wrote at the time that “there is nothing I wouldn’t do to further the cause”.

He was arrested at home on 19th June last year in a counter-terrorism operation against a far-right online forum called Fascist Forge. His laptop was seized, revealing documents relating to antisemitism, Satanism and neo-Nazism, as well as as far-right terrorist book, bomb-making manuals and materials from the Sonnenkrieg Division, a neo-Nazi organisation that was proscribed by the Government this year.

Police also discovered videos of child abuse, which also led to charges to which Mr Vaughan has pleaded guilty.

The Head of the Metropolitan Police’s Counter Terrorism Command reportedly said that the case “illustrates it is possible for any young person to be susceptible to radicalisation,” adding: “Harry Vaughan is an intelligent young man who was predicted A-star grades and aspiring to study computing at university. Yet, online, he was an enthusiastic participant of right-wing terrorist forums.”

Mr Vaughan faces sentencing at the Old Bailey in the coming days.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Metropolitan Police

A Nazi banner was seen draped out of a first floor window in a house in Stoke-On-Trent.

The banner in Birches Head was publicised on social media, where police announced that it was being investigated.

This is not the first time that a Nazi flag has appeared in the area. In 2017, a trader was suspended from a town market after displaying a Nazi banner at his stall in nearby Leek.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

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A neo-Nazi has pleaded guilty to plotting to blow up a local synagogue in Pueblo, Colorado.

Self-confessed white supremacist Richard Holzer, 28, had stated throughout the trial that he hated Jewish people, according to prosecutors.

Assistant Attorney General Eric Dreiband of the Civil Rights Division for the District of Colorado said that the defendant had tried to orchestrate a plan to bomb the Temple Emanuel Synagogue in an attempt to remove the Jewish presence from his local community.

Officials reported that Mr Holzer advocated for white supremacy and acts of extreme violence across his social media accounts, particularly against Jewish people. It was also recorded that he had visited the site of the synagogue in Pueblo to watch and taunt the congregants on several occasions.

According to the FBI, Mr Holzer told an undercover agents that he wished to threaten Jews and show them that they were not welcome in the city. Authorities described his motivation and ideology as unambiguously antisemitic. On one occasion the defendant sent images of himself with automatic weapons to prepare for what he described as “RAHOWA”, a shorthand for a racial holy war.

On 1st November 2019, Mr Holzer met with undercover agents to acquire explosive devices, including two pipe bombs and fourteen sticks of dynamite that had been fabricated by the FBI. Upon providing several inert devices, agents reported that Mr Holzer took out a copy of Mein Kampf, and claimed that “this was a move for our race” and he intended to “get that place off the map”.

The defendant confessed to planning to detonate the explosives several hours later at the synagogue in the early hours of the morning on 2nd November 2019.

In the plea agreement reached on 15th October, Mr Holzer pleaded guilty to a count of intentionally attempting to obstruct persons in the enjoyment of their free exercise of religious beliefs through force and the attempted use of explosives and fire; and an attempt to damage and destroy a building used in interstate commerce, by means of fire and explosives. He was also charged with use of fire and explosives to commit a felony, however he did not plead guilty to this count and may therefore continue to be prosecuted.

Sentencing is set for 20th January 2021 in a District Court and the defendant faces a maximum sentence of twenty years in prison for the hate crime charge and twenty years for the explosives charge, with a fine of up to $250,000 and a term of supervised release.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Nazi symbols and antisemitic slogans were paraded in the streets of Chile during a march on 10th October in opposition to a new constitution for the South American nation.

The march took place in Las Condes, a municipality in the Santiago province. Some of the marchers protesting against the proposed new constitution wore Nazi symbols, made Hitler salutes and flew flags with swastikas.

Many wore shirts bearing the initials ATP, signifying support for the nationalist ATP movement whose slogan is “Chile for Chileans” and whose acronym stands for Aun Tenemos Patria (“We still have a homeland”). It states that it is “openly anti-globalist” and “against progressivism and its political correctness.”

In a tweet, Marcelo Isaacson, Executive Director of Comunidad Judia de Chile, the country’s umbrella Jewish organisation, asked: “Germany 1930? No, Chile Oct 2020. Hate takes over the streets of Chile.”

Since last year, there have been frequent protests calling for a new constitution to reduce inequality in Chile, but the nationalist ATP opposes a new constitution.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Simon Wiesenthal Center

A group protesting about Corona virus restrictions reportedly shouted “Heil Hitler” in the streets of Den Bosch, the capital of the Netherlands province of North Brabant on Saturday.

Local radio station Omroep Brabant reported that video posted to Twitter appeared to show the demonstrators at the 17th October march shouting the antisemitic slogan.

Police are reportedly examining footage for possible criminal acts. Two arrests were made.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The outspoken Unite union leader, Len McCluskey, who has repeatedly downplayed antisemitism in the Labour Party, has apologised after saying that a Jewish politician should “go into a room and count his gold”.

Mr McCluskey made the comment about Lord Mandelson, a New Labour grandee and former minister, in an interview with the BBC. Told that Lord Mandelson had praised the new Leader of the Labour Party, Mr McCluskey told Newsnight: “I stopped listening to what Peter Mandelson said [sic] many, many years ago. I suggest that Peter just goes into a room and counts his gold, not worry about what’s happening in the Labour Party – leave that to those of us who are interested in ordinary working people.”

Lord Mandelson has made no secret of his Jewish heritage in the past. His grandfather founded the Harrow United Synagogue and his father worked at the JC. Lord Mandelson said in 2010: “It’s not that I am religious. It’s the extended family, which part of me wants to be part of.”

The notion that Jews are rich and self-interested is an age-old antisemitic trope.

Unite defended Mr McCluskey’s remark, reportedly saying in a statement: “Mr Mandelson’s religion was not relevant to the comments made by Mr McCluskey. Indeed, to the best of our knowledge Mr Mandelson is not Jewish. The ordinary meaning of the statement made by Mr McCluskey is one of his belief that in recent years Mr Mandelson has had more interest in increasing his own wealth than in fighting for social justice for working class people. The suggestion of any antisemitic meaning to the commentary would be ludicrous.”

However, late last night, Mr McCluskey tweeted: “Before this gets out of hand, let me say language is important and I apologise to Peter Mandelson and anyone else if mine has caused hurt.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “No wonder that Len McCluskey was among those who always insisted that they never witnessed antisemitism in the Labour Party or continually downplayed it, seeing as they can’t even tell when they use antisemitic tropes themselves.”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A Director of a Canadian human rights group has posted a virulently antisemitic meme and antisemitic text on Facebook and Twitter, according to a report.

Aliya Hasan, also known as Aliyawa Jamal Hasan, a Director of Canadian Defenders for Human Rights (CD4HR), uploaded a post to Facebook on 14th October featuring an octopus with a Star of David symbol and a letter “Z” (for Zionist) on its head and its tentacles wrapped around the Capitol building. Each tentacle bore the initials of a Jewish organisation. The caption read: “Dear Americans, Sorry to break it to you, but America is under occupation and Biden and the Democrats won’t change that. Sincerely, The rest of the sane world.”

Commenting on her own post, Ms Hasan wrote: “I’ll be getting blocked by some more diehard dems [Democrats] soon.” She accompanied her post with ‘sad-face’ and ‘crying’ emojis.

She added, “Just letting the trash take itself out,” with a series of ‘laughing’ and ‘crying with laughter’ emojis.

On October 14, 2020 Hasan tweeted: “Dear Americans, Sorry to break it to you, but America is under occupation and #Biden and the #Democrats won’t change that. Sincerely, The rest of the sane world.” She attached the same antisemitic meme of an octopus with its tentacles wrapped around America’s seat of government.

The notions of the Jews as excessively powerful – often illustrated through tentacles imagery – and parasitic are common antisemitic themes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Local police in Saxony-Anhalt in Germany have been accused of calling a fast food proprietor “Jew” for years.

The claim was reportedly made in an anonymous email, which claimed that the entire police department was aware that the takeaway manager was being referred to in this way since the 1990s but nobody had taken any action.

It is understood that the nickname arose because of the owner’s business-mindedness. As a result, police officers would use phrases such as “We’ll go out to eat at the Jew’s”.

The Minister of the Interior of Saxony-Anhalt has apparently confirmed the allegations and condemned the practice, pledging to launch a special commission on antisemitism, racism and xenophobia in the state’s police force.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A director at TikTok has told a Knesset Committee that hatred had “no place” on the video-sharing platform and that they would increase their efforts to remove antisemitic content.

The meeting with Elizabeth Kanter, TikTok’s Director for Government Relations in Israel, was the fourth meeting that the Committee for Immigration, Absorption and Diaspora Affairs held on social networking in recent months. The meeting with the representative of the viral video-sharing service followed the creation of “an inter-ministerial taskforce” to work with social media companies to “fight the phenomenon and remove antisemitic content from the networks.”

Committee chairman, MK David Bitan told the meeting that “the phenomenon of antisemitism on social networks has significantly intensified since the outbreak of the corona crisis” and that government offices were “monitoring the phenomenon.”

Ms Kanter said: “Antisemitism is an abomination, and therefore antisemitic content that expresses hatred has no place on our platform. We have zero tolerance for organised hate groups and those associated with them. In a world that is becoming more polarised by the day, it is probably a very difficult challenge, but we will never stop working to make TikTok a safe platform for our community.”

Stressing that its policy and community guidelines “do not tolerate content that attacks or incites violence,” and did not permit hate speech, she said that TikTok enforces this with “technology tools that proactively flag content or accounts that encourage hate or extreme content.”  

Noting the previous absence of TikTok, MK Michal Wunsh declared: “After its noticeable absence in the past, TikTok has chosen to take responsibility for the venomous antisemitism that exists on its platform.”

Dvir Kahana, Director-General of the Ministry of Diaspora Affairs, said that there was a wide gap between declarations of policy by social media companies and “actual implementation.” She added it was their “duty” to continue to ensure the “policies of the platforms” were implemented.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has repeatedly reported on antisemitism on TikTok, especially in the form of mockery of the Holocaust.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Officials, clergy and residents of a German town formed a human chain around the local synagogue on Friday night in an act of solidarity with the local Jewish community.

Around 80 people from Bad Nauheim in Wetterau, Hesse, participated in the event.

The chain circled the synagogue as Jews worshiping inside marked the Sabbath and the final days of the Jewish festival of Sukkot. It was initiated by the region’s Society for Christian-Jewish Cooperation. Local politicians and church representatives were among those present.

They were addressed by Karl Kress, the Mayor of Bad Neuheim, a town of 30,000 people north of Frankfurt. Mayor Kress said: “We stand together against antisemitism and discrimination. Above all we stand together for our values ​​of tolerance and openness, freedom of opinion and belief.”

Volkhard Guth, dean of the Protestant Church in Bad Neuheim, referred to the attack on a synagogue in the city of Halle by a neo-Nazi gunman in which two people were killed just over a year ago. “As Christians we have to say ‘Antisemitism is a sin against God!’” Guth told the crowd. “The Halle victims remind us that antisemitism is always a crime against humanity.”

Manfred De Vries of the Bad Neuheim Jewish community also addressed crowd and praised the turnout: “What would have happened in 1938 if a similar action had taken place in front of the synagogues? These are different times. Today’s Germany is a democratic country and that is worth fighting for.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The Parisian prosecutor’s office has failed to include a hate charge in the upcoming trial of the suspect who spray-painted twenty large red swastikas across the Plate de la Concorde and Rue de Rivoli on 11th October.

The 31 year-old male, from the Republic of Georgia, was arrested near to the scene following the incident and is currently remanded in police custody until the trial commences.

The prosecutor’s office stated that the defendant faces charges of damage to property, however there was no legal basis for a crime aggravated by religious or racial hatred and prejudice. The vandalism was daubed on the columns and walls of the Parisian buildings with no cultural or historical Jewish associations.

France’s Jewish student union (UEFJ) reacted with outrage to the decision and expressed concerns that such impunity undermines any possible sanctions against future antisemitic acts. In a Twitter post on 14th October, the UEFJ said: “As is often the case, there were many words of indignation and no real acts of condemnation”, despite Mayor of Paris Anne Hidalgo pledging to combat rising antisemitism in the city.

This is not the first case in which French prosecutors or courts have refused to charge or find hate crime motivations, contrary to the expectations of the Jewish community.

French authorities last year reported a 27 percent increase in antisemitic acts across the country, including growing rates of hateful vandalism and threats of physical violence.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The Department of Homeland Security has issued a report warning that white supremacists are the primary threat facing the United States.

The report was released on 6th October just ahead of the two-year anniversary of the white-supremacist, antisemitic terrorist attack at a Pittsburgh synagogue in which eleven people were killed. The alleged assailant, Robert Bowers, is currently on trial.

The second anniversary of the attack on the Tree of Life Synagogue, which took place on 27th October 2018, also marks the return to duty of the Police Officer who heroically defended congregants, reports the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

Police officer Timothy Matson was shot seven times in the attack. He returned to duty last week following extensive rehabilitation for his injuries and amid acclaim for his heroism that included a ‘Shield of Israel’ award and the Police Department’s ‘Act of Valour’ award.

The Department of Homeland Security report states that “racially and ethnically motivated violent extremists…specifically white supremacist extremists…will remain the most persistent and lethal threat…”.

In his foreword to the report, Chad Wolf, Acting Secretary of Homeland Security, wrote:  “I am particularly concerned about white supremacist violent extremists who have been exceptionally lethal in their abhorrent, targeted attacks in recent years.”

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Antisemitic content in Spanish is being significantly reduced by Google, Facebook and YouTube, according to a Latin American antisemitism watchdog.

A report on online antisemitism in Spanish by the Buenos Aires-based Observatorio Web (Web Observatory) stated that since 2016, antisemitic content resulting from a Spanish-language search for “Judio” (Jew), had dropped from nearly one third to 3%.

Observatorio Web was set up as a joint initiative of the Latin American branch of the World Jewish Congress and Argentina’s Jewish community, to monitor online antisemitism in Spanish. In its report, released on 25th September, it stated that in 2016, 30% of Spanish-language search-results for “Judio” contained antisemitic content. That figure was now down to about 3%. Meanwhile, it stated, the level of antisemitic content in the top ten results of a Google search for Judio had dropped by 50% over the past year alone.

On Facebook, where Spanish is the second most popular language, the report found that around 30% of the Spanish-language content mentioning Jews involved antisemitism. Within the antisemitic content, a majority mentioned Zionism or Israel, noted the report.

“Israel and Zionism are the vehicles for antisemitism online,” the report states. “This is a consolidated trend.”

In the case of YouTube, Observatorio Web identified 500 videos in Spanish espousing Holocaust denial, which YouTube has now taken down.

“The companies are starting to work against hate speech, but there is still a lot to do,” said Ariel Siedler, Director of Observatorio Web.

Recently, Facebook announced that it would ban QAnon conspiracy theories and Holocaust denial on its platforms.

It comes as researchers in Sweden claimed that 30 percent of comments and posts about Jews on social media included antisemitic rhetoric and tropes.

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The Hate Crimes Task Force for New York State is assisting in an investigation following a spate of antisemitic incidents on Long Island.

A swastika was carved into the driveway of a home in the suburb of Merrick on 9th October, and antisemitic graffiti was twice spray-painted at student residences belonging to the nearby Hofstra University.

Noting that he was “appalled and disgusted”, Governor Andrew Cuomo said: “Our state has zero-tolerance for antisemitism.”

“I want to assure the homeowner whose property was damaged and the Hofstra community that we will do everything in our power to bring the perpetrators to justice. That is why I am directing our Hate Crimes Task Force to assist the police in their investigations into these incidents,” he declared.

President Stuart Rabinowitz said that the University condemned “discrimination, bias, and prejudice in all its forms” and would hold accountable members who failed to live up to Hofstra’s core values of diversity and inclusion.

“Creating a welcoming supportive environment is a shared responsibility,” he said. “Incidents like these are a painful reminder that we must be vigilant.”

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The leader of the far-right People’s Party Our Slovakia, has been convicted of using neo-Nazi symbols, which is illegal in the country. He has been sentenced to four years and four months in prison.

Marian Kotleba stood trial after presenting three disadvantaged families with cheques for €1,488 on 14th March 2017. The number is numerically symbolic for neo-Nazis and white supremacists, and the date is the anniversary of the wartime puppet state established in 1939.

The People’s Party Our Slovakia is the fourth most popular party in Slovakia, with 8% support in February’s parliamentary elections. It currently has seventeen seats in the 150-seat Slovak Parliament and two seats in the European Parliament. The Party’s members, including Mr Kotleba, openly advocate the legacy of the historical Nazi presence in Slovakia and commonly greet one another with Nazi salutes.

In 2016 the party celebrated the 129th anniversary of the birth of Jozef Tiso, who served as Slovakia’s President during the War. During his presidency, approximately 60,000 Slovak Jews were transported to Nazi death camps. His involvement led to his sentence for death and hanging in 1947.

Many rights activists and members of the country’s Jewish community have signed petitions for the banning of the Party.

Last year, the country’s Supreme Court dismissed a request made by Slovakia’s Prosecutor-General, to ban the far-right Party. He argued that the Party’s activities violate Slovakia’s constitution and seek to destroy the existing democratic system, however the court ruled there was insufficient evidence to impose a ban.

The far-right leader pleaded not guilty to the 2017 offence and therefore may appeal the verdict, which was handed down by the Specialised Criminal Court in Pezinok. If an appeal is submitted, the case would move to Slovakia’s Supreme Court.

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The Ethnicity Awards has announced its nominees for its 2020 prizes. Many have done laudable work and set tremendous examples for the advancement of minorities and racial harmony in our society. However, a small proportion of the nominees are troubling in respect to their past comments or conduct in relation to the Jewish community.

In the Inspirational Personality category, the celebrity Jameela Jamil is applauded for launching and using her Instagram account “to create a safe and radically inclusive space on social media”. What goes unmentioned is her sharing over this summer of a video from 1990 featuring the antisemitic hate preacher Louis Farrakhan, with the caption: “Someone please tell me the name of this extraordinary man who so perfectly sums up white fear in under a minute.” She deleted the video after an outcry, but not before it was seen and shared by many of her followers, including other celebrities.

In the same category, the radio and television personality, Reggie Yates, is praised for his work helping people “steer clear of crime or substance abuse”. Again, unmentioned is his 2017 comment that it is “great” that the young generation is not “managed by some random fat Jewish guy from north west London, they’re managed by their brethren”, adding that they were “idiots”, “dickheads” and not “your people”. He subsequently apologised.

A nominee in the Charity or Community Initiatives category, Black Lives Matter UK, appears to be the collective behind the @UKBLM Twitter account, which posted an antisemitic tweet claiming that “mainstream British politics is gagged of the right to critique Zionism” – redolent of the notion that the Jews or the Jewish state exercise outsized influence in British politics – and refused to apologise. The Black Lives Matter Movement is also recognised in the Media Moment 2020 category.

Another nominee in the Charity or Community Initiatives category is the activist group Show Racism the Red Card, lauded as “the UK’s largest anti-racism educational charity”. Show Racism the Red Card has, however, been embroiled in controversy over its blind eye to antisemitism, demonstrated, for example, in its appointment of the outspoken filmmaker Ken Loach to a judging panel. The debacle eventually led one of the charity’s trustees to resign in protest against this appointment and Show Racism the Red Card’s disregard for the views of the Jewish community.

Among the Political Figures are numerous MPs who defended Jeremy Corbyn over antisemitism, including Dawn Butler, who sat on Mr Corbyn’s front bench and served as one of his most loyal colleagues, and Marsha De Cordova. It is concerning that these figures should be celebrated so soon after their involvement in an episode that terrified British Jews, almost half of which considered fleeing the country. That does not seem like a credential for an ‘ethnicity award’.

Given that there are so many worthy figures and organisations who have done so much to further the standing of minorities in the UK, it is disappointing that these controversial nominees, who have in recent years provoked controversy in relation to the Jewish minority – and indeed in almost every case they have done so specifically over the past twelve months – have been included.

Campaign Against Antisemitism contacted the BBC this week for an update on how it has dealt with an employee caught in a controversy over antisemitic and trolling tweets, but the BBC refused to disclose whether it has taken any action beyond launching an investigation. Today, however, The Times has learned that the journalist, Nimesh Thaker, has resigned, leaving questions about how seriously the BBC took the matter and why it refuses to divulge its actions.

Last month, Campaign Against Antisemitism and the JC revealed that Mr Thaker, who has been a BBC journalist for more than twenty years at BBC World News, used a Twitter account in his name and then an anonymous account to post controversial and even antisemitic tweets, in clear breach of the BBC’s guidelines.

Mr Thaker used both accounts to conduct official BBC business as well.

Using an account in his own name, Mr Thaker posted tweets describing antisemitism accusations against Jeremy Corbyn and the Labour Party as “smears” and trolled public figures who were campaigning against antisemitism. He also used the account to troll Campaign Against Antisemitism and to harass the editor of the JC and the actress and writer Tracy-Ann Oberman, tweeting at them dozens of times. He has also retweeted controversial political activists who themselves have come under fire for antisemitism, such as the notorious antisemite Jackie Walker, trolled Labour MPs over antisemitism, and defended Ken Livingstone and supported the disgraced former Labour MP, Chris Williamson. He also trolled his own BBC colleagues. The JC showed that he also behaved similarly with an anonymous account.

The Culture Secretary called the revelations “very concerning”, and the BBC launched an investigation, during which Mr Thaker reportedly resigned, thereby apparently escaping scrutiny.

The BBC told Campaign Against Antisemitism that while the Director of BBC News “very much understands your interest in this matter, and that of the wider Jewish community, however our position remains that we are unable to comment about individual employment matters…Please be assured that the BBC takes allegations such as this very seriously.”

However, the response failed to acknowledge that Campaign Against Antisemitism had a direct stake in the matter, not merely as an organisation that combats antisemitism but because we helped to bring the matter to light in the first place. Moreover, the response is concerning to the extent that it implies a double standard in how other racism controversies have been handled by the BBC in the past – rapidly and publicly – and how this matter has been dealt with.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The BBC’s refusal to disclose whether it took any action at all against Nimesh Thaker is unacceptable. While there are reports that he has resigned from the Corporation, even if true this does not signal whether the BBC itself has taken this matter seriously at all. Mr Thaker’s former colleagues, the Jewish community and licence fee payers all deserve to know how the BBC treats antisemitism, and whether it acts with the same gusto against expressions of anti-Jewish hatred as it does other forms of racism.”

An employee was sacked by one of the world’s leading banking groups after he was found to be running a conspiracy theory website which attracted millions of visitors.

An investigation into Jason Gelinas, an information technology specialist with New York City-based Citigroup, began after a fact checking website showed that Mr Gelinas was the “sole developer and mouthpiece” of a QAnon website. This was apparently in violation of Citigroup’s policy of engaging in paid business activity outside the company. He was put “on leave in mid-September” while the investigation was pending, and was subsequently sacked.

QAnon is a far-right conspiracy theory that believes that a cabal of Satan-worshiping pedophiles, consisting of political figures, celebrities and billionaires, is running a global paedophilic ring and plotting against the President, who is planning to make a stand against the secret group.

At the height of its popularity, Mr Gelinas’s  site was attracting ten million visitors a month, according to the traffic-tracking organisation, SimilarWeb. It also reported that the site was receiving around $3,320 (£2,654) a month in donations made via Patreon, a US-based artists’ platform.

The firing came within days of an announcement by Facebook that it will no longer host pages linked to QAnon in line with its policy of stopping the promotion of conspiracy theories.

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A city councillor in Spain has told an international aid meeting in Mallorca that Jews should be held accountable for supporting Israel.

Sonia Vivas, a member of the far-left Podemos party, which sits in the country’s governing coalition, criticised Israel and, when challenged, replied: “I haven’t spoken to all the Jews, but their government is elected and they’re voting for a government that constantly violates fundamental rights of Palestinians.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the State of Israel” is an example of antisemitism.

Podemos became a member of Spain’s new coalition government after forming an alliance with the Spanish Socialist Workers’ Party.

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According to Columbia University’s Office of University Life, a swastika was discovered on 6th October on campus following the recent passage of an Israel divestment resolution.

The swastika was found by students on the steps of the Ivy League University’s main library, the Low Library. The administration condemned the act and has made a public commitment to investigate the antisemitic act to ensure that the campus remains a “welcoming and inclusive place where everyone is treated with dignity and respect.”

The swastika appeared days after the undergraduate student body voted in favour of a BDS resolution targeting Israel. Jewish communities have long contended that such measures are related to a rise in antisemitic incidents.

Students Supporting Israel (SSI) at Columbia University alleged, in an 8th October post on their social media page, that there was almost certainly a link between the vote and the swastika, described as a “despicable act of antisemitism”, and noted, as the group did before the vote, that it poses a threat to Jewish students.

Bryan Leib, chairman of Jewish millennial group HaShevet, drew parallels between the graffiti in Columbia and other on-campus incidents across the country, expressing concern that this may soon be “the new normal”. Last year a group of far-left students painted swastikas on the dorm room doors of Jewish students soon after a similar vote at the University of Indianapolis.

The SSI have expressed concern that the matter will not be taken seriously by the University administration and that the perpetrators will remain unpunished following previous failings to tackle antisemitism.

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The Vienna municipality has moved to protect the statue of a former mayor who made virulently antisemitic statements and may have inspired Hitler.

The statue of Karl Lueger, located in the heart of the Austrian capital on Ringstrasse Boulevard, was recently fenced in a bid to prevent protesters from spraying graffiti calling for its removal. They also stated that the municipality plans to clean the statue.

Mr Lueger served as mayor of Vienna for thirteen years until his death in 1910 at the age of 65. He was known for antisemitic rhetoric that is claimed to have inspired the young Hitler, who lived in the Austrian capital and spoke in Mein Kampf of his “undisguised admiration” for The Viennese mayor.

For example, in one speech, delivered to members of the Christian-Social Workers’ Association in Vienna in July 1899, Mr Leuger invoked the kind of antisemitic rhetoric that would later be employed by the Nazis, saying: “The influence on the masses is in the hands of the Jews…the largest part of the press is in their hands; the vast majority of capital and especially big business is in the hands of the Jews,” adding “above all, this is about the liberation of the Christian people from the domination of Judaism.”

Artist Simon Nagy, who helped start a vigil in protest at the continued city-centre presence of the statue and at the municipality’s plan to clean it, declared that it belonged “on the manure heap of history” or “in a museum.”

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Amid uncertainty over the continued detention of the Islamist terrorist convicted in Pakistan of the murder of American-Jewish journalist Daniel Pearl, a statement by a leading American Jewish organisation said that Mr Pearl’s murderer “should be behind bars for the rest of his days”.

The Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organisations, issued its statement after it appeared that Mr Pearl’s murderer, Ahmed Omar Saeed Sheikh  –   a British national  –   could be released imminently.

Mr Sheikh was sentenced to death by a Pakistani court in 2002 for masterminding the kidnap and murder of Mr Pearl. The Jewish Wall Street Journal reporter was murdered in the capital, Karachi, in January of that year.

However, earlier this year, a lower court commuted Mr Sheikh’s sentence to a seven-year prison term and argued that he should be released immediately as he had already served eighteen years.

Responding to an appeal from the Pearl family’s lawyer, Faisal Siddiqui, Pakistan’s Supreme Court ruled that Mr Sheikh’s detention should be extended for another week. The court will then rule on whether to release Mr Sheikh or keep him in custody while his case is again appealed.

Following the hearing and noting that the appeal “could take years”, Mr Siddiqui told the AP news agency that he was pressing for Mr Sheikh’s continued incarceration during the appeal process.

Mr Siddiqui added that there was “ample evidence” to dismiss Mr Sheikh’s appeal. “There is eye-witness evidence, there is forensic evidence, there are confessional statements,” he said.

In a statement welcoming the Pakistani Supreme Court’s decision not to release Mr Sheikh, the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organisations said: “This killer should be behind bars for the rest of his days. Anything less would be a painful insult to the Pearl family. They have suffered enough in the years since this atrocity occurred.”

Those responsible for the death of “an American citizen” who affirmed his Jewishness with his last words, were “motivated by their hatred of who he was and must be held accountable, the organisation said, adding: “We call on the US government to do all it can to ensure that justice is served in this case.”

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The Foreign Minister of the United Arab Emirates made a ground-breaking visit to the Holocaust memorial in Berlin last week.

Sheikh Abdullah bin Zayed al-Nahyan visited Germany’s main Holocaust memorial with his Israeli counterpart, Foreign Minister Gabi Ashkenazi, in a visit hosted by German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas that was described by Mr Ashkenazi as a “historic moment”.

The event showcased the rapprochement between the two Middle East nations following the US-brokered establishment of full diplomatic relations between the Gulf state and Israel on 15th September.

Both sides have pointed to a sense of reconciliation and mutual tolerance as a driver of the deal – a message that the UAE Foreign Minister expressed at Berlin’s Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe.

Writing in the visitors’ book in Arabic, he called the site a memorial to “victims of advocates of extremism and hatred”. He then referred to “the noble human values of co-existence, tolerance…and respect of all religions and beliefs,” before adding, in English: “Never Again”.

Mr Ashkenazi and his Emirati counterpart were in Berlin to discuss a variety of issues in connection with the promotion of relations between the two countries, according to an Israeli Foreign Ministry spokesman.

The UAE dignitary’s visit to the memorial was particularly poignant given the high levels of ignorance about the Holocaust and Holocaust denial in the Middle East.

In his own inscription, Mr Ashkenazi – a former commander of Israel’s armed forces – said that his presence alongside the Emirati and German Foreign Ministers “symbolises a new era…of peace between the peoples.” It was also a reminder of the need “to ensure that this will never recur,” added Mr Ashkenazi in Hebrew.

In statements to the press issued following the meeting between the three, Sheikh al-Nahyan and Mr Ashkenazi both referred to the other as “my friend”” and pledged to continue to work together.

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The head of security for Pittsburgh’s Jewish Federation has urged members of the community to “be vigilant” following the release from prison of white supremacist Hardy Lloyd.

Mr Lloyd, 42, is said to have espoused antisemitic rhetoric and to have held beliefs similar to Robert Bowers, the neo-Nazi gunman currently on trial for the massacre of eleven worshipers at Pittsburgh’s Tree of Life Synagogue in October 2018. Mr Lloyd was released last week after serving a one-year sentence for violating his parole.

The Director of Community Security at the Jewish Federation said: “The notion is to be vigilant, to be mindful, but also to feel empowered because we’ve done such great work trying to build and protect our community.”

Mr Lloyd reportedly declared on social media: “Anyone who supports such laws [a ban on assault rifles] must be targeted, and their families murdered. Lone Wolves GET BUSY.” In another post, he is alleged to have directed the “lone wolves” to a Pittsburgh neighbourhood with a large number of Jewish homes. “Target: Jew Hill,” Mr Lloyd allegedly wrote.

At his last hearing, Lloyd reportedly apologised for his actions and acknowledged that he was suffering from mental illness, but local Jews have been encouraged to be cautious nonetheless. “I would hope that he is getting mental health counselling, and the appropriate rehabilitation, but as a community, we need to be vigilant,” the Director said.

Mr Lloyd is alleged to have been active with white supremacist groups for nearly 20 years, beginning with his affiliation to the World Church of the Creator, which has been described as “espousing antisemitic and racist ideology.” In 2004 Mr Lloyd was acquitted of murdering a 41-year-old woman whom he had met via an online dating service when a jury accepted his claim of self-defence.

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During an evening Yom Kippur service at Indiana University (IU) on 27th September, an individual drove passed a group of Jewish students and yelled antisemitic statements at the congregation.

According to the IU Police Department (IUPD) Deputy Chief, members of the student body IU Hillel were having an outdoor service on the lawn at the front of the building in line with local COVID-19 prevention measures. The perpetrator shouted “Heil Hitler!” out of the vehicle’s window during the service.

Several IU freshman students said that although leaders anticipated some form of confrontation with such a public service, the lack of security led to greater anxiety following the incident. One female freshman stated: “There’s been so many shootings and antisemitic acts. Even though it was just words, that doesn’t mean they can’t take action later.”

In response to the recent incident, IU Hillel leader Rabbi Sue Silberberg requested that IUPD patrol the site and the surrounding area to ensure that Jewish students are protected and can continue to connect with the centre and its activities without fear of abuse. In a social media post on 2nd October the organisation condemned the offensive act as evidence for the antisemitic beliefs “of a small minority.”

As a result of the incident, IU’s Dean of Students, Dave O’Guinn, encouraged all students to shine a light on the issue of antisemitism on campus in solidarity with the Jewish community. He said that he stands with the Jewish students, faculty and staff as they engage with cultural and religious customs in peace.

While IUPD took a case report of the incident, it is not actively investigating the act at present as the car description and license plate are currently unknown. If the IUPD receives further information from the public, however, the investigation would be opened to identify the suspect, according to the IUPD.

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Flyers combining a swastika and a political message were found on cars and in mailboxes in a small New Jersey town on 9th October.

The leaflets in Harrison Township in Gloucester County, NJ were from a group calling itself “The Mullica Hill Militia.” The flyer had a swastika along with a political message and a phone number.

Angry residents posted a picture of a flyer on a Facebook group for the local community. In an accompanying statement they rejected its message, saying: “We are very saddened and extremely disappointed to learn that a flyer from a group called the Mullica Hill Militia was placed on cars and in mailboxes in our community today.

“The racist content of the flyer is NOT a reflection of our community but rather the hatred act of disturbed individuals.”

The Harrison Township Police are reportedly investigating and have asked that those with information about “their source or the so-called Mullica Hill Militia” make contact with the detective conducting the investigation.

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A Florida high school principal who was fired in November 2019 for suggesting that there was doubt over the historical truth of the Holocaust has been reinstated.

William Latson, the Principal of Spanish River High School in Boca Raton, allegedly told the parent of a student in an April 2018 e-mail that “not everyone believes the Holocaust happened.” His comment came in response to the parent’s request to ensure that Holocaust education was treated as “a priority”.

In the same e-mail, the principal said that “we are a public school” and educators had “to be politically neutral” adding: “I can’t say the Holocaust is a factual, historical event because I am not in a position to do so as a school-district employee.”

On Wednesday, the seven-member Palm Beach County School Board voted 4-3 in favour of rehiring Dr Latson.

The Palm Beach County School District said in a statement in July 2019 that Dr Latson had “made a grave error in judgment in stating, ‘I can’t say the Holocaust is a factual, historical event.’ In addition to being offensive, the principal’s statement is not supported by either the School District Administration or the School Board.”

Dr Latson later apologised, saying: “I regret that the verbiage that I used when responding to an e-mail message from a parent…did not accurately reflect my professional and personal commitment to educating all students about the atrocities of the Holocaust.”

In August, Administrative Law Judge Robert Cohen, the judge in Dr Latson’s appeal, ruled that the offence was “not serious enough to warrant termination.”  

“These acts of poor judgment on Dr. Latson’s part should result in a verbal or written reprimand,” wrote Judge Cohen. Last week, Schools Superintendent Donald Fennoy recommended that Dr Latson be reinstated and given $152,000 (£117,000) in back pay.

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Image credit: WPTV News segment

An initiative by a Gaza women’s organisation to hold a conference to discuss the banning of child marriage has been branded as “a Jewish plot to destroy Gaza society”.

Abd Al-Aziz Al-Ansari, a Qatari author who writes about social issues, reportedly described the plan for a conference as “a satanic demand”, according to MEMRI.

He made his comments in a video uploaded to his YouTube channel on 28th August after the independent Gaza women’s organisation AISHA called for a conference on the issue of child marriage.

In his video, Mr Al-Ansari urges his listeners to “marry off” their daughters at “the correct age,” which he states is “twelve or thirteen” because “delaying marriage increases depravity, homosexuality, lesbianism, prostitution and sodomy.”

He praises Yemeni society, where, he says, “they still marry their daughters off at the correct age. Early marriage is a tradition with them.”

He then mocks Western efforts to curb this practice, saying: “This has made the US Congress upset. They are losing sleep over this.”

Addressing the people of Gaza directly, Al-Ansari said: “The Jews failed to destroy you, kill you, disgrace you…They want to destroy you socially, by increasing your depravity.”

He then sought to undermine the credibility of the Islamic women’s organisation by associating it with Jews, claiming: “This is not the ‘AISHA association’, this is the ‘Golda Meir association.’…This is a satanic association that demands to delay the age of marriage. It demands to change the law of Allah upon the land. This is a message to our people in Gaza. Beware! Beware! Marry your daughters off at the age of 12…Marry them off! Don’t let the [Jews] fool you.”

According to its website, AISHA was established in 2009 and “works to achieve gender equality and integration through economic empowerment and psycho-social support.” Its website also declares that it “aspires to play a leading role in “protecting women and children.”

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Image credit: MEMRI

A group of researchers in Sweden have published a report showing that 30 percent of comments and posts about Jews on social media included antisemitic rhetoric and tropes.

The Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI) analysed postings specifically about Jews across four different social media platforms over a six month period in 2019 and came to its conclusion after reviewing approximately 2.5 million posts about Jews or Judaism on the digital sites 4chan/pol, Gab, Reddit and Twitter.

The research is a contribution in the Swedish-government funded project to investigate increasing antisemitism online.

A study of the researchers’ results showed almost 25 percent of the social media posts contained popular antisemitic stereotypes, with a further nine percent containing no explicit stereotype but expressing an active hatred towards Jews and the Jewish community.

A researcher at FOI stated that the most common stereotypes, centring on Jewish world domination, could be seen “in several of the conspiracy theories circulating on the internet and in social media pages.” The majority of these were found on the networking pages of Gab and 4chan/pol. It is suspected that limited regulation and policy on hate speech in the United States, where most major platforms are based, contributes to increasing antisemitism on social media, as these sites provide total user anonymity.

According to the report, users who are suspended from Twitter turn to Gab as an alternative platform on which to spread antisemitic propaganda and messages.

Following the publication of the research, Sweden’s Jewish Central Council has demanded that internet giants now seek swiftly to remove all discriminatory content from their platforms in the fight against antisemitism.

Recently, Campaign Against Antisemitism reported on concerns over the antisemitism in Sweden, in Malmö in particular.

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At the end of one of the most high-profile trials in modern-Greek history, Greek judges ruled that an extreme right-wing neo-Nazi political party operated as a criminal gang.

In an Athens court, a five-year trial ended with seven former parliamentarians from the neo-Nazi Golden Dawn Party, including Party leader Nikos Michaloliakos, being found guilty of “running a criminal organisation.”

Over the course of the trial, the court heard evidence that the political party operated “as a paramilitary group.” It was alleged that leaders “handed down orders to small clans in neighbourhoods” instructing them to “assault groups and businesses.” The court heard claims of how the group targeted migrants and refugees along with political opponents.

The extremist group was founded in 1985 and was registered as a political party in 1993. In the 2012 elections, against a backdrop of financial chaos that led to stringent austerity measures, the Golden Dawn Party became the third largest in the Greek parliament.

Two years into the trial, the prosecutor was forced to recommend acquittals for numerous party members who were not active in the violence.

During the run-up to elections, Party members were alleged to have set alight Athens bars and cafés owned by migrants and the Party’s political opponents.

Golden Dawn members denied the charges, calling the verdict an “unprecedented conspiracy”.

Greece’s Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis said that the ruling brought an end to “a traumatic cycle in the country’s public life.”

Mr Michaloliakos and the other former Parliamentary members face at least ten years in prison for their crimes. However, the verdict does not mean the immediate end of the party, as members promised to remain active.

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Police in Paris have arrested a suspect in connection with the vandalisation of the walls and columns of the Place de la Concorde and Rue de Rivoli with fascist imagery.

The 31 year-old male, who was arrested near to the scene, is suspected of having spray-painted twenty large red swastikas across the Parisian buildings on 11th October.

The Wiesenthal Centre issued a statement saying that “it was eerie to see swastikas back” and praising the French authorities for the swift arrest and expressed parallels between the recent incident and the German occupation in the 1940s which saw the incorporation of Nazi flags along the Rue de Rivoli.

The recent incident occurred just over a week after a kosher restaurant in Paris was vandalised and destroyed with spray-painted swastikas and antisemitic statements.

In 2019, French police registered a 27 percent increase in antisemitic acts last year, including vandalism and threats of physical attacks.

Anne Hidalgo, The Mayor of Paris, stated that the prevention of such acts is part of the city’s mission to combat antisemitism and assured the public that cleaning teams would intervene rapidly to remove all signs of these hateful messages. However, many members of the wider community have taken to social media to suggest that removing the graffiti does not make the threat to their lives and identities disappear.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

An investigation is being undertaken after a large Torah scroll was stolen, along with other religious items, from a synagogue at the Lincoln Park Jewish Centre in the city of Yonkers in New York on 25th September. The incident occurred only days before Yom Kippur.

Surveillance footage of the incident, captured from the interior and exterior of the building, was released on 5th October in an effort to find the thief. The CCTV showed the perpetrator, with a beard and Harvard t-shirt, entering the synagogue and then leaving in a change of clothes, carrying several large objects, including a laptop and guitar.

The Torah had been donated to the synagogue by a veteran of WWII and has been housed in the synagogue for many years, according to police. The scroll was kept securely behind a curtained-off sanctified cabinet in a section of the building that faces Jerusalem, as per Jewish custom.

Earlier this year, eighteen Jewish community centres around the US were deliberately targeted with a series of threatening e-mails that mentioned the use of weapons, including bombs. New York’s Albany Jewish Community Centre was among the recipients. The synagogue was closed off by authorities who searched the entire building. Authorities found no evidence that the e-mailed threats were intended to be carried out.

The Yonkers Police Department is currently appealing to the public for information or help identifying the suspect, who is believed to be local, and locating the stolen Torah.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The Jewish community has expressed outrage after police in Hackney suggested that there appeared to be no hate crime motive after arresting a man who drove a moped into a group of Jewish pedestrians in Stamford Hill.

It is understood that on 10th October over the weekend – the Jewish festival of Shemini Atzeret and Simchat Torah – a male drove a moped onto the pavement on Clapton Common, colliding with Jewish children.

The suspect was held by bystanders before police officers – reportedly in a nearby unmarked van – arrested him.

However, while the police have confirmed that “the rider of the moped has been arrested on suspicion of dangerous driving, driving without insurance and assault (ABH),” nevertheless, “there is nothing to indicate that this is a hate crime.”

In correspondence with Campaign Against Antisemitism, locals have reacted to this interpretation with disbelief, and we call on the police not to rule out a hate crime motive in its investigation.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A cross-party group of more than twenty MEPs from fifteen countries have requested that the European Union withholds future funding to the Palestinian Authority (PA) until antisemitic incitement is removed from its school textbooks.

Austrian MEP Lukas Mandl sent the letter on Wednesday to the EU’s foreign policy chief Josep Borrell and Neighbourhood Commissioner Olivér Várhelyi. The recent move by the MEPs follows the publication of a report into the content of PA textbooks by the research body, IMPACT-se.

The report outlined the inclusion of antisemitic rhetoric and imagery, as well as incitement to violence and hate speech, across all subjects and levels of education in the texts and other cultural mediums including school plays and sporting events. The legislators stated that these textbooks are taught by teachers and education sector civil servants who are financed through the EU’s PEGASE system of support. The PA has also attracted controversy for naming around 28 schools after terrorists and at least three schools after Nazi collaborators. This, the MEPs argued in their open letter, is in direct violation of the UNESCO standards for peace and tolerance.

Legislators from four major political parties have made a further call for the discontinuation of the collaboration between the EU Commission and the Georg Eckert Institute. The German organisation was asked in 2019 to analyse PA textbooks, however a subsequent presentation of its interim report has uncovered a series of alleged professional errors. For example, the report had reportedly made multiple Arabic translation errors, demonstrated a miscomprehension of local culture and mistakenly included – and complimented – Israeli textbooks that were wrongly understood by researchers as being PA textbooks. It has been argued by Vice-Chair of the European Parliament’s Budget Committee Niclas Herbst that this research blatantly ignored overt antisemitism and justified messages of terror.

The report cost the EU approximately €220,000.

In 2018 and May 2019 the European Parliament condemned the failings of the PA and insisted that it no longer wanted “European taxpayers to finance the teaching of antisemitism.” Earlier this year the Norwegian Government, another major donor to the PA, announced that it would withhold half of its funding to the PA’s education sector.

Despite commitments made by the PA’s Education Minister, a recent IMPACT-se report on the revised 2020-21 PA textbooks discovered that there had been almost no relevant changes made to the curriculum.

MEPs have requested that the Commission put a 5% reserve on funding for the PA until changes to the antisemitic material are evident in all educational texts.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A commentator who regularly appears on a Sydney-based Arabic language channel was seen on film in September repeating the classic antisemitic blood libel that claims that the Jews use the blood of Christian children to bake unleavened bread for Passover (matzot), according to the Australia/Israel & Jewish Affairs Committee (AIJAC).

According to AIJAC, Dr Moustafa El-Lidawi, who is a former Hamas representative based in Lebanon, appeared on the Iranian Arabic language TV channel Al-Alam on 6th September. In a clip translated by the Middle East Media Research Institute (MEMRI), Dr El-Lidawi declared: “The Europeans hated the Jews because of this holiday [Passover] because they used to make matzot with the blood of European children.”

He also claimed that although the practice had stopped, nevertheless “Israelis still believe that God commanded them to make matzot from the blood of the goyim [the non-Jews], and to distribute these matzot to every Jew.”

Dr El-Lidawi is a regular contributor to Farah News, a Sydney-based Arabic language news and opinion platform with several thousand followers in Australia. In August 2019, Australian academic Dr Ran Porat argued in AIJAC’s Australia/Israel Review that Farah News offered a wide range of “viciously antisemitic content” and hosted “conspiracy theorists, antisemites and fervent anti-Zionists.”

AIJAC claims that in 2015 Dr El-Lidawi was reported to have repeated an even more gruesome libel concerning Christian babies and Passover. According to Dr Porat, Farah News has published many “venomous” claims by Dr El-Lidawi, including some “quite recently”.

Earlier this year, Dr El-Lidawi reportedly claimed that Israel steals the organs of Arab prisoners due to “ancient malice, and Talmudic and Torah commandments”, which is another type of blood libel, in a Canadian newspaper, and in 2018 he accused Jews of making festive pastries out of non-Jews’ blood, which is also a classic blood libel. He apparently went on to claim that this justified the periodic expulsions of Jews from European countries during the Middle Ages.

Campaign Against Antisemitism have expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The founder of Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg, has just announced that the company’s hate speech policy will now include Holocaust denial.

In his statement, Mr Zuckerberg said: “Today we’re updating our hate speech policy to ban Holocaust denial.

“We’ve long taken down posts that praise hate crimes or mass murder, including the Holocaust. But with rising antisemitism, we’re expanding our policy to prohibit any content that denies or distorts the Holocaust as well. If people search for the Holocaust on Facebook, we’ll start directing you to authoritative sources to get accurate information.

“I’ve struggled with the tension between standing for free expression and the harm caused by minimizing or denying the horror of the Holocaust. My own thinking has evolved as I’ve seen data showing an increase in antisemitic violence, as have our wider policies on hate speech. Drawing the right lines between what is and isn’t acceptable speech isn’t straightforward, but with the current state of the world, I believe this is the right balance.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We welcome this policy announcement from Facebook, which, along with its ban on QAnon conspiracy theories earlier this month, shows that the company is beginning to take antisemitic incitement on its platforms seriously. There is a direct line between online incitement and threats and violence against Jews in the real world, and social media companies must take responsibility for the role that their platforms play in this vicious process.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

A Brooklyn synagogue was reportedly broken into and vandalised last week. 

A 25-year-old man suspected of causing damage to the Shore Parkway Jewish Centre in Gravesend last Sunday, during the Jewish festival of Sukkot, was arrested by police in New York last Wednesday. The assailant allegedly grabbed an Israeli flag from outside the synagogue and used it to smash synagogue windows. He then reportedly broke in and destroyed property including items relating to the festival. 

The incident was reported to police by the building’s caretaker, who apparently found the intruder wrapped in the Israeli flag shouting antisemitic slurs. 

The synagogue’s director reportedly said that the attack was “a disaster for the synagogue. We’re a poor shul. We don’t have the funds to replace our glass. I don’t know how we’re going to get out of this.” She added that the attack had alarmed the local Jewish community, with many members afraid to go to the synagogue alone. “A lot of our members are concerned. We’re scared,” she said.

She further noted that efforts had already been taken to enhance the building’s security and make members feel safe, but she remained concerned about the future.

Three of the six charges faced by the suspect are classified as hate crimes, which dramatically increase the penalties he may face if convicted.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Plans are currently in progress to find a new home for a collection of paintings by a victim of the Holocaust that were only discovered in 2018 by a construction worker during the demolition of a dilapidated house near Prague.

The paintings by Czech artist Gertrud Kauders (1883-1942), who perished in a Nazi concentration camp, were discovered 78 years after her death.

Initially 30 paintings were recovered, however around 700 more canvases and sketches were subsequently uncovered in the walls and under the floorboards of the building in “near perfect condition”. The artwork is dated between the 1910s and the 1930s.

In 1939, the Nazis invaded the Czech provinces of Bohemia and Moravia, and consequently Ms Kauders asked her classmate, the Russian-born Natalie Jahudkova, to hide her life’s work, which comprised Impressionist portraits and scenes from nature, in her house that was then under construction. Ms Kauders was deported from Prague in 1942 to the Theresienstadt concentration camp, and from there to the Majdanek extermination camp in Poland, where the artist was murdered. Ms Jahudkova passed away in 1977, taking with her the secret of the hidden paintings.

Photojournalist Amos Chapple and his colleague Dana Katharina Vaskova found Jakub Sedlacek, the owner of the house and a descendent of Ms Jahudkova, on behalf of the artist’s relatives living in New Zealand. Mr Sedlacek reportedly agreed that the works would be housed together in the Czech Republic, with family portraits going to the Kauders family currently residing in New Zealand.

Upon first seeing Ms Kauders’ artwork, the chief curator of Prague’s Jewish Museum believed that the discovery was unique given the history of art in the Czech Republic. A spokesperson for the Jewish Museum in Prague reportedly said that she would be updated about the “whole intense process” and provide a “concrete result” as to whether it would be possible for the museum to house some of the paintings.

Ms Vaskova stated: “[Ms Kauders] should not be forgotten, since she was just found again.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Plaid Cymru has shown that it has no intention of tackling antisemitism after the Welsh nationalist party decided not to take action against a repeat offender.

Prospective Welsh Assembly candidate Sahar Al-Faifi tweeted in June in connection with the racist killing of George Floyd: “If you wonder where did these American cops trained, look no further than Israel. Oppression is one and the struggle is transitional.”

The claim that Israel was somehow linked to the American incident is an antisemitic conspiracy theory that caused controversy when it spread over the summer, also implicating various Plaid Cymru members.

Ms Al-Faifi reportedly said: “I understand the concern of the Jewish community and I will always continue to work with Jewish members in Cardiff to make a more safe and open society for all. I presented all evidence required in response to the antisemitism allegation to the Plaid Cymru hearing panel who made the decision to exonerate me. I and Plaid Cymru pride ourselves on being open and inclusive as a party and members. We reject all forms of discrimination and prejudice and challenge it wherever and whenever it may arise.”

She said that her tweet was based on a report by Amnesty USA that, she claimed, was later amended, and “subsequently, my tweet was deleted.” However, not only did the Amnesty USA article not say that American police forces had learned specific policing techniques from Israel — merely that American police train with Israeli police, as police forces across the world do — but Amnesty International released a statement explicitly denying any linkage between Israel the death of Mr Floyd

In an email to Party members, she said that antisemitism “is an anathema to me, as are all types of racism. It is distressing that a small minority have targeted me. As a Muslim, as a refugee and a woman I have faced barriers that very few can understand.”

However, Ms Al-Faifi was previously suspended by the Party over historic antisemitic posts, but was subsequently reinstated without sanction.

Plaid Cymru reportedly said: “The disciplinary process has finished and no further action is being taken in this case…The party has a zero tolerance approach to antisemitism and all forms of prejudice and discrimination.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A senior member of Jewish Voice for Labour (JVL) has called for Labour members to “resist” Sir Keir Starmer’s efforts to address antisemitism in the Party.

Naomi Wimborne-Idrissi, who serves as JVL’s Media Officer and is also the Vice-Chair of Chingford and Woodford Green Labour Party, reportedly told an online meeting of Harrow and Brent Palestine Solidarity Campaign in late September: “In the past year we haven’t just seen victory for the Zionist lobby, we’ve seen a close collaboration between the pro-Israel advocates and the entire political elite and establishment. We’re talking about the interests of imperialism and colonialism worldwide, we’re talking about the interest of the capitalist financial system — so we’re up against it.”

She went on to say that “we should be working to resist the imposition of the [International Definition of Antisemitism]…on councils.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been among the those promoting the widespread adoption of the Definition, including among local councils.

She also protested a letter by Labour’s General-Secretary warning Constituency Labour Parties against discussing certain legally or reputationally damaging issues, particularly relating to antisemitism. Ms Wimborne-Idrissi said: “it is now impossible to discuss the General Secretary’s letter saying that we may not discuss those specific issues. This has to be resisted.”

JVL is an antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities and public bodies. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Eric Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A popular Dutch network has been criticised for including offensive chants in the soundtrack used for the first half of a recent football game.

With COVID-19 prevention measures in place, professional sporting events are being held in empty stadiums in The Netherlands and many television stations are consequently using pre-recorded audience sound when broadcasting games to simulate the usual atmosphere.

In FOX Sports Netherlands’ live broadcast of the 4th October match between Amsterdam team Ajax and a rival team from Groningen, the network used recordings from previous games that included the well-known chant, “Whoever doesn’t jump is a Jew!”.

Supporters of rival teams use the chant to taunt and mock Ajax players and fans. Ajax is a team that many fans label “the Jews” because of Amsterdam’s rich Jewish history and the club’s long association with the Jewish community. However, the designation is used not only against Ajax by also by the team’s own supporters; at many football matches, Ajax fans have been seen waving Israeli flags and shouting support for “the Jews” and Jewish immigrants as a proxy for showing support for the team.

A young Dutch rival supporter told the Jewish Telegraphic Agency in 2017 that: “I have nothing against your people. When I say I hate Jews, I just mean supporters of Ajax.”

In recent years, however, the derogatory chant has also been heard at several Islamist and neo-Nazi rallies and protests in the country.

Following public criticism, FOX Sports Netherlands apologised for the “human error” that led to the inclusion of the chant in its soundtrack for the game and the network says that it has removed the fragment for future events. FOX News Netherlands wrote on Twitter: “We offer our sincere apologies and are looking into how this could have happened and how to make sure it does not recur.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism have expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The social media platform Facebook stated that as of 6th October all accounts linked to the QAnon conspiracy theory movement would be removed from Facebook pages, groups, advertisements and Instagram accounts.

QAnon is a far-right conspiracy theory that believes that a cabal of Satan-worshiping pedophiles, consisting of political figures, celebrities and billionaires, is running a global paedophilic ring and plotting against the President, who is planning to make a stand against the secret group.

Many of QAnon’s conspiracy theories are inspired by the Protocols of the Elders of Zion forgery, a hoax document. Several followers also support theories which draw inspiration from the antisemitic blood libel, claiming that these “elites” drink the blood of abused children to acquire power.

A search engine known as Qresear.ch provides tools to explore posts on 8chan/8kun, QAnon’s former and current ‘host’ platform, comprised of around 14.5 million associated data sources. The term “Jews” when searched generated over 86,000 retrievable antisemitic posts. 

The largest Facebook group dedicated to QAnon had approximately 200,000 members before it was banned in mid-August. The movement gained traction amongst parenting groups through the “#SaveTheChildren” hashtag that was harnessed to recruit and organise concerned users. In June this year, Twitter took similar action and limited features for around 150,000 accounts with links to QAnon.

In a recent statement, Facebook claimed that staff had begun removing inappropriate content and deleting the pages responsible. Restrictions have been placed on over 1,950 Facebook groups and more than 10,000 Instagram accounts. With a Dangerous Organisations Operations team to enforce the introduced regulations, the platform has said that it will actively detect offensive content or disinformation rather than simply relying upon the reports of other users. 

However, it was emphasised that “this will take time and will continue in the coming days and weeks” with traffic to mainstream social media sites increasing during the coronavirus pandemic.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Swastikas have been painted over tributes to mark one year since the deadly antisemitic attack on a synagogue on Yom Kippur in Halle, Germany.

The tributes were sprayed by a group called Antifa Halle with the names of the two victims of the attack, which took place in October 2019 during the holiest day in the Jewish calendar.

But last night – the eve of the anniversary – some of the images, which bore the inscription “Never forget – Kevin and Jana”, were vandalised with red swastikas.

An investigation has been launched.

A neo-Nazi suspect is currently on trial for the original attack. He has reportedly told the court that the attach was “not a mistake”. The assailant had sought to storm the synagogue, but, failing to get through the armed door, he shot a female passer-by and a man at a nearby shop instead. The entire attack was caught on camera.

This latest incident comes a few days after a Jewish man was violently attacked outside a synagogue in Hamburg during the Jewish festival of Sukkot, while a mezuzah scroll at a Berlin synagogue was defaced with a swastika between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur.

Today, noting the one-year anniversary of the Halle attack, Thomas Haldenwang, the head of Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution (BfV), Germany’s domestic security service, said: “In the past two years, criminal offenses, including acts of violence, against Jews and Jewish institutions in Germany have increased significantly.” Describing the increase also as a “steep rise”, he added: “Germany has a special responsibility for Jewish life.”

Antisemitic crimes have indeed risen steadily in Germany, with over 2,000 offences recorded in 2019, representing an increase of 13 percent on the previous year.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The vandalism of these tributes to an antisemitic neo-Nazi attack on a synagogue on Yom Kippur one year ago in Halle, along with the recent violent attack on a Jewish man during Sukkot and the defacement of a mezuzah in Berlin following Rosh Hashanah, are examples of what Germany’s own security chief has said today about rising antisemitism in the country. Evidently, Germany has much more to do to address anti-Jewish prejudice and arrest the rise in antisemitism.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

One of Grazia magazine’s new writers – hired in order to “fight for diversity, inclusion and women’s rights” – has reportedly claimed that commemoration of the Holocaust can represent the “erasure of brown trauma”.

According to Private Eye, Stephanie Yeboah, who is now a contributing writer for Grazia, has previously stated on social media that “You know how I love Jews”, “Every Jew has an attic, but not every attic has Jews”, and “AUSCHWITZ Gas Chamber Music LMAO SHM [laughing my a*** off, shaking my head]”.

Last January, during the 75th anniversary commemorations of the liberation of Auschwitz, when the President of the UN General Assembly said that “The Holocaust remains the most horrific genocide in human history,” Ms Yeboah reportedly tweeted: “There have been bigger and more horrific genocides. They happened to brown people though, so I guess it doesn’t matter, huh?”

Responding to protest from another user, Ms Yeboah said: “I know what the occasion is [the 75th anniversary] and I’m doubling down on what I said. Of course it’s tragic, but the erasure of brown trauma is a real issue.” She added: “Lol of course it matters when Jews are killed. Nothing else matters more. We learn about it in school. It’s *THEE* [sic] most important thing. But it also discounts the other absolutely despicable things that have happened. So pls don’t play the oppression card here.”

In December 2019, protesting the exposure of antisemitism in the Labour Party to, in her view, the exclusion of racism in other parties, she also tweeted that “There’s a hierarchy of prejudice which always leaves black and brown people at the bottom.” She has also tweeted: “I haven’t seen any empathy/sympathy shown from those complaining about antisemitism towards those who have suffered under this Islamophobic/racist government.”

The notion that commemoration of historic antisemitism is either unwarranted or somehow detracts from or prevents the memorialisation of other tragedies is a popular antisemitic idea in some circles.

Campaign Against Antisemitism will be writing to Grazia to seek an investigation.

Jeremy Corbyn’s Chief of Staff sought to force out Labour MPs who protested antisemitism in the Party, according to a report.

In WhatsApp messages, Karie Murphy expressed disappointment in April 2019 in reaction to seven Labour MPs quitting the Party in February, according the JC. She reportedly wrote: “F**king idiots. All the work I did to trigger them and they leave before I had the pleasure.” It appears that the message as reported is referring to so-called “trigger ballots” by local Labour Party branches to deselect incumbent MPs.

Efforts to deselect MPs who opposed antisemitism in Labour was a major issue during Mr Corbyn’s tenure, with three Jewish women MPs — Luciana Berger, who was among the seven who quit; Dame Louise Ellman, who quit later in the year; and Dame Margaret Hodge, who decided to continue to take the whip from Labour — all repeatedly threatened with deselection by pro-Corbyn elements in the Party and in their local constituency parties.

This report lends credence to the claim that at least some of these deselections were being encouraged by Mr Corbyn’s inner circle.

The messages also apparently show that Ms Murphy was involved in removing Keith Birch of the Unison union from the equality portfolio on the Labour Party’s ruling National Executive Committee. Mr Birch had called for the Party to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism, which was controversial on the pro-Corbyn far-left of the Party. Ms Murphy reportedly wrote: “We took out Keith so Unison are p***ed. He has been a c**t for years.”

Labour has reportedly confirmed that it has opened an investigation into Ms Murphy’s messages.

A spokesperson for the Labour Party reportedly said: “Labour takes all complaints extremely seriously and they are fully investigated in line with our rules and procedures, and any appropriate disciplinary action is taken.”

Mr Corbyn, despite promising not to nominate peers to the House of Lords, nominated Ms Murphy, among others. The appointment has been blocked, however, due to claims of bullying by Ms Murphy. Mr Corbyn has reportedly appealed the decision.

On 28th May 2019, the EHRC launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The frontrunner in the contest to become leader of Canada’s Green Party, who has been dogged by allegations of antisemitism, has been defeated by a Black Jewish candidate.

Dimitri Lascaris, a Montreal class-action lawyer, was one of eight candidates for the leadership of the Party, having previously being accused of “antisemitic smears” by the Canadian Prime Minister and sacked as Justice spokesperson by the Green Party Leader over his support for the Boycott Divestment Sanctions movements.

In 2018, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau accused Mr Lascaris of “vile, antisemitic smears” after Lascaris accused two Jewish MPs from Mr Trudeau’s Liberal Party of being “loyal to apartheid Israel.” Mr Lascaris also reportedly tweeted in 2019: “When will the Palestinian people stop paying for the unspeakable atrocities of Germany against the Jewish people?”

Mr Lascaris has been defeated in the primary by Annamie Paul, who said that she has been the target of “a lot of hate” throughout the campaign, particularly antisemitic comments on social media.

The ongoing leader, Elizabeth May, who has led the Party for fourteen years, will remain its Parliamentary Leader, as Ms Paul does not have a seat in Parliament.

Campaign Against Antisemitism have expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The online video-sharing site YouTube has finally deleted the account of the Nation of Islam (NOI), which is led by the antisemitic hate preacher Louis Farrakhan.

According to the platform, the NOI channel was removed on 2nd October for content in violation of the site’s policies against hate speech, specifically the widespread circulation of ideas that target members of a protected group as being part of evil conspiracies. Mr Farrakhan has made several claims that the Jewish people orchestrated the slave trade and the 9/11 terrorist attacks and that the Jewish community conspires to control the country’s media, economy and foreign and domestic legislation. These are all antisemitic conspiracy theories.

During a speech on 4th July, Mr Farrakhan referred to Jews collectively as “Satan” and “the enemy of God”, claiming Jews had “broken their covenant relationship with God.” He encouraged listeners to actively fight “the imposter Jews who are worthy of chastisement of God”. The controversial speech has been viewed over 1.2 million times on numerous YouTube channels, one of which is a digital cable network founded by Sean “P Diddy” Combs. The video has since been removed from the platform.

In an online lecture series between 2013 and 2014, which had an average of around 40,000 views per sermon, the NOI leader made claims that the “Jewish media”, referencing Hollywood, was responsible for “normalised sexual degeneracy, profanity and all kinds of sin.”

A spokesperson for YouTube reportedly said: “We have strict policies prohibiting hate speech on YouTube, and terminate any channel that repeatedly or egregiously violates those policies.”

The site has reportedly updated guidelines to tackle content that spreads hateful or discriminatory conspiracy theories, leading to five times more videos being removed and over 25,000 channels terminated for directly violating the revised hate speech policies.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A Jewish cemetery was targeted with antisemitic slogans and graffiti in the district of Nikea, in southwestern Athens.

The authorities in Greece are searching for the perpetrators responsible for the incident, which took place on 5th October, during the Jewish festival of Sukkot, and saw hateful rhetoric and slogans spray-painted across the walls of the cemetery.

The Central Board of Jewish Communities in Greece condemned the incident by suspected neo-Nazis in the area and stated that the language used was worryingly similar to that of the Nazi regime.

Athens Mayor Kostas Bakoyannis has been praised by communal groups for his swift arranging for the walls to be cleaned and any destruction repaired. The Jewish community expressed confidence that the Greek state will take “all necessary measures” to promptly bring the vandals to justice.

Earlier this year, a Jewish school in Athens was graffitied with antisemitic slurs, and the monument commemorating the Jews of Thessaloniki, at the University of Athens, was defaced.

Government spokesman, Stelios Petsas, announced that fascism, antisemitism and their followers have no place in the country and there will be zero tolerance towards such hatred. Investigations into the destruction of the Jewish cemetery are ongoing.

The vandalism came ahead of a verdict from a Greek court on 7th October in the case of the neo-Nazi Golden Dawn party’s leaders and several members charged with running a criminal gang. The group has denied these accusations.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Social media comments described as “racist and antisemitic” have been levelled at the Jewish leader of the Together Gibraltar party.

The Gibraltar Government condemned the abuse levelled at Marlene Hassan Nahon and said that it would refer the matter to the Royal Gibraltar Police.

Ms Hassan Nahon is the daughter of former Chief Minister Sir Joshua Hassan. A historian, journalist and member of the Gibraltar Parliament since 2015, she said that the latest barrage of abuse “was of particular concern” as it contained the “age-old antisemitic trope of dual loyalty.”

This was a “new and dangerous phenomenon in Gibraltar politics,” she said. “I urge the Chief Minister and Leader of the Opposition to condemn this discourse immediately.”

Fabian Picardo, the Chief Minister and Leader of the House, would “refer the comments to the Royal Gibraltar Police as aggravated racism,” said a spokesperson. “Untruths” on social media, including a claim that Ms Hassan Nahon held dual nationality with Israel, which she does not, had been designed to fuel suggestions she should “somehow not be trusted,” said the spokesperson.

The Opposition leader also said: “There is no place for racism, discrimination, antisemitism, prejudice or intolerance in Gibraltar.”

Ms Hassan Nahon said that her message and her father’s legacy had been “manipulated to fire up nationalist sentiment.”

Some of those reactions, particularly on social media, had crossed the boundaries of legitimate and lawful political debate, Ms Hassan Nahon said.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

An international effort to generate legislative and political pressure on social media companies to raise awareness and protect platforms from individuals or groups who engage in hate speech, propaganda and disinformation online has been launched by the US Congress.

The Interparliamentary Task Force to Combat Online Antisemitism was announced on 29th September by a bipartisan group of US legislators. The task force will work across party lines and in cooperation with fellow lawmakers from Australia, Canada, Israel and the UK.

The concept for the group was first introduced at the World Holocaust Forum in Jerusalem earlier this year.

Rep. Chris Smith, a co-founder of the Task Force, has noted that it is the responsibility of social media platforms, including Facebook and Twitter, to maintain safeguards and ensure that users do not abuse communication tools to spread messages of hate. The Task Force has attributed a lack of regulation to the rise in antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes online and via networking apps.

Other parliamentarians active in the Task Force include the Canadian Liberal MP Anthony Housefather, Knesset Member Michal Cotler-Wunsh of Israel’s Blue and White Party and British Labour MP Alex Sobel.

Ms Cutler-Wunsh expressed disappointment in a recent Knesset committee hearing, organised to address social media companies’ policies on antisemitic content, when a representative from the video-sharing platform TikTok failed to attend. She argued a lack of accountability was responsible for the “virulently antisemitic content” that is accessible to millions of children and young people worldwide.

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has recently expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The controversial far-left activist-journalists, Ash Sarkar and Owen Jones, are continuing their effort to distance themselves from the antisemitism scandal that engulfed Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour Party, now that the electorate rendered its verdict clear and the Equality and Human Rights Commission prepares its report into the Party.

In an interview to promote Mr Jones’ new book, Ms Sarkar, a contributing editor of Novara Media, lamented how both she and Mr Jones had been “really crucified” in the “debate” over the antisemitism scandal.

She said: “The most emotionally challenging and difficult part of the book to read, especially for me, was on antisemitism. And I think the reason why it was so emotionally difficult was [that] both you and I have a shared experience of being really crucified by both polarised sides of the debate. On the one hand, doing media appearances and being seen as, you know, the living embodiment of vicious, vitriolic antisemitism; and then, on the other hand, certain sections of the Left decrying me as a ‘traitor’ for saying more needs to be done, or maybe this needs to be handled in this way, or maybe it’s not all a ‘smear’ and that there are these things that need to be dealt with. So I think, as a chapter, it’s very emotionally painful.”

It is extraordinary that Ms Sarkar and Mr Jones (to the extent that he agrees with her) could see themselves as victims of Labour’s antisemitism scandal, when they used their considerable influence and wide-reaching platforms to defend Mr Corbyn’s leadership of the Labour Party at every opportunity, in spite of its rampant antisemitism and the terror it caused British Jews.

One might forgive Ms Sarkar’s use of the phrase “really crucified” as an unintended further insult, suggesting as it does that it is the Jewish community that is to blame for her “emotional pain”.

Viewers will draw their own conclusions from Ms Sarkar’s revelation that it was her, rather than the Jewish community, who was the real victim in this sorry saga.

Ms Sarkar has previously defended activist Ewa Jasiewicz’s graffitiing of the Warsaw Ghetto and complained of the “silencing effects” of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right. It also showed that 42% of British Jews considered leaving the UK, of which 85% cited antisemitism in politics.

A seventeen-year-old from Rugby linked to neo-Nazi groups has been found guilty of preparing for acts of neo-Nazi terrorism.

Jurors deliberated for fifteen hours over four days before unanimously deciding to convict at Birmingham Crown Court. The defendant, who cannot be named for legal reasons, had pleaded not guilty.

It is believed that he is alleged to have joined the neo-Nazi Feuerkrieg Division group, which the Home Office plans to proscribe.

The court had been told that the defendant had to pass a test to prove his hatred of Jews and that he had “graphic” video footage of a terrorist attack on his telephone and had searched the internet for information about guns, including how to convert a gun that fires blanks into a live weapon.

He had also apparently praised the terrorist who carried out the mass shooting last year in Christchurch, New Zealand, describing such perpetrators as “saints”.

Jurors were told that he had adopted the “twisted ideology” of Nazis and white supremacists and had participated in far-right chat groups online, where he shared the information about firearms that he had learned.

In one of the messages, the defendant said that he was an administrator of a group called ‘League of Nationalists’, and also said: “Whatever happens I’m going to have a local unit. I’m working on the propaganda and the weapons. I need men.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Far-right groups are recruiting children as young as twelve through livestreaming events on YouTube, according to The Times.

The events reportedly include live interviews with teenagers who are considered to be rising stars in far-right circles, aimed at viewers born in the 1990s and 2000s.

It is understood that groups such as Patriotic Alternative, a fascist organisation founded last year, are using such tactics, including through “Zoomer Night”, a regular event livestreamed as part of the group’s “Patriotic Talk” series.

In one recent such event on YouTube, four males in their teens and early twenties talked about their concerns over the supposed “complete erasure of white Europeans” and “white genocide”, and how “white people being written out of their own history”. One participant said: “The [British] Government is preparing for a future without white people and that should be obvious to everybody.”

Other far-right individuals and groups are reportedly using the same tactics.

Police believe that the far-right constitutes the fastest-growing terrorist threat to Britain.

Patriotic Alternative reportedly said: “It is not our intention to ‘recruit’ anybody because our way of thinking is already widespread. It is simply our intention to provide a voice for the millions of people who already agree with us.”

YouTube reportedly said: “We have strict policies that prohibit hate speech. We terminate channels that repeatedly or egregiously violate our policies. After updating our guidelines to better address supremacist content, we saw a fivefold spike in video removals and have terminated over 25,000 channels.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat for years and continues to urge the Jewish community to remain vigilant and welcomes the seriousness with which the police are treating the danger posed by the far-right.

Robert Jenrick has sounded a note of defiance in the wake of death threats made against him in connection with the proposed Westminster Holocaust Memorial.

The Housing and Communities Secretary has been given counter terrorism police protection over what was described in reportage as a “series of vicious attacks”, including antisemitic letters and threats “to burn down his home, and to kill his family”.

Mr Jenrick, whose wife is Israeli-born, reportedly told the JC: “The behaviour of some of the opponents to the memorial has been shocking and disgraceful. The fact that I have been subjected to these smears, and my family to antisemitic abuse and death threats only shows the paramount importance of the memorial.”

Mr Jenrick also welcomed Sir Keir Starmer’s support for the proposed Memorial.

A final decision on the application to construct the memorial is expected after an ongoing public inquiry.

Royal Holloway’s Students’ Union has disinvited the disgraced former MP Chris Williamson from a Debating Society event in order to comply with its policy on hate speech.

In a statement, the Students’ Union said: “Over the weekend the Students’ Union was made aware of an event Debating Society had planned, involving the former Labour MP Chris Williamson, that contravened our Guest Speaker Policy – a policy introduced following the October 2019 referendum on No Platform for Hate Speech.

“No advance notice of this event was given to the Students’ Union and the society has failed to follow the guidance and training that has been delivered to them over the summer. The event has subsequently been cancelled and robust discussions will now take place with the society to understand why they have circumvented the policy, brought the Students’ Union’s reputation into disrepute, and to understand if further action is required.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism welcomes the disinvitation to Mr Williamson, whose views were anathema even to Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour Party.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

After Campaign Against Antisemitism reported on the numerous investigations, resignations and suspensions of Labour councillors on Sandwell Council – including a Leader and the current Interim Leader – a concerned member of the public has submitted further evidence of antisemitism from members of the Council.

So far, the Leader of the Council, Cllr Yvonne Davies, resigned from Labour in the midst of an antisemitism controversy; Cllr Joanne Hadley, Cllr Ian Jones and Cllr Mohammed Yaseen Hussain have been suspended from the Labour Party for reasons unknown; the interim Leader, Cllr Maria Crompton, and Cllr Bob Piper are understood to be under investigation, although reasons have not been provided; and Cllr John Edwards has also been revealed to have shared problematic social media content, and it is not clear if any action has been taken.

The new evidence, some of which has also been unearthed by Campaign Against Antisemitism, concerns two of the councillors on the above list and one further councillor, and indicates that the problems on Sandwell Council and in the local Labour Party are even worse than previously reported.

Cllr Bob Piper, in 2016, defended the disgraced former London Mayor, Ken Livingstone, and insisted that “Hitler’s pact with the Zionists is historical fact, not a matter of opinion.” He also shared a post on Israel in 2014 that said: “And, appallingly (and promiscuously), Israel deploys, yet abuses, the suffering and memory of Holocaust victims to confer on itself a spurious moral supremacy, and to justify these shameful inhumanities on others.”

Cllr John Edwards repeatedly opposed the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by the Labour Party; defended Jeremy Corbyn’s and the Party’s records on antisemitism; defended the disgraced then-Labour MP Chris Williamsonwelcomed Labour’s absurd and abortive antisemitism investigation into then-MP Ian Austin; criticised then-Deputy Leader Tom Watson for speaking out against antisemitism; supported those who tried to deselect the Jewish woman MP, Luciana Berger; and boosted Jewish Voice for Labour, an antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, even facilitating the membership in that group of the disgraced journalist, Mira Bar-Hillel. As we have previously reported, he also implied comparisons of Israeli policy to the Nazis in breach of the Definition by saying to then-Prime Minister David Cameron that “when you leave Auschwitz David Cameron go to Gaza”.

Cllr Laura Rollins sent several tweets in 2013 referencing “rich Jewish boys”, a “rich Jewish trendsetter” and “rich Jewish friends”. Cllr Rollins deleted those tweets but they were caught by other Twitter users, including the disgusted local MP.

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently published its first Audit of Local Authorities, documenting the campaign for widespread adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by local authorities. Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council has not adopted the Definition, and we call on it urgently to do so and to incorporate the Definition into its codes of conduct for councillors and staff, so that the Council, as well as the Labour Party, can hold councillors to account when they promote antisemitic discourse.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “These new revelations, together with what we already know, indicate that there is an endemic problem in Sandwell’s Labour Party. Labour must consider opening a full investigation into Sandwell’s Labour Party, the reasons for the various suspensions and investigations (and any outcomes) must be publicised, and Sandwell Council itself must itself take action if it to show its opposition to racism. In particular, the Council must adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism and incorporate it into its codes of conduct for councillors and staff.”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

An exclusive, private American social media app has found itself caught in controversy after antisemitic stereotypes were allegedly invoked during an online discussion it was hosting on relations between Jews and African Americans.

The Clubhouse is a live audio app which emerged during the COVID-19 lockdown. According to various online reports, it is “the top virtual hang-out for venture capitalists and tech-industry entrepreneurs, along with the occasional celebrity,” while Bloomberg News calls it a favoured haunt for “venture capitalists and other Silicon Valley insiders.”

Last Monday night, the by-invitation-only app hosted a virtual conversation on “Antisemitism and Black Culture,” which, according to reports, had more than 300 participants.

Some of those present reported that antisemitic tropes linking Jews with controlling commerce and banking were repeatedly invoked during the conversation.

One Clubhouse member declared on Twitter that she had listened in for “only three minutes, but heard enough” in that time to close the app and leave the discussion. She tweeted: “There’s a room on Clubhouse right now that is literally just a bunch of people talking about why it’s ok to hate Jews so I’m done with that app for a while.”

According to another attendee, who did not want to be named, the “essential thesis” was that Jewish people and Black people face the same amount of historical trauma but “because Jewish people control the banking system they were able to claim their own reparations.”

New York University (NYU) has reached an agreement with the US Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights (OCR) to revise its Non-Discrimination and Anti-Harassment Policy following a legal complaint filed last year over campus antisemitism.

The administration was accused of failing to take steps to “prevent the discriminatory attack” or of acting “to prevent its reoccurrence,” following the arrest of two students who physically assaulted a celebrant at an Israel Independence Day party in April 2018 and trampled and set fire to an Israeli flag. The OCR opened the investigation into NYU last November.

Following the agreement reached with the OCR, NYU has said its updated policy would set out “the procedures for addressing and responding to … incidents and complaints of antisemitism.” The agreement also set out a description of “the forms of antisemitism that can manifest in the [NYU] university environment.”

It also pledged to issue a statement to all NYU students, faculty, and staff saying that the university does not tolerate acts of discrimination or harassment.

Among other requirements, the policy will make it mandatory for NYU to “train students, faculty and staff” about the issue of antisemitism. NYU also vowed to take disciplinary action against students who violate the policy and promised to report to the OCR on the implementation of the changes.

NYU’s settlement with the OCR was “ground-breaking,” declared attorney Neal Sher, one of those who filed the legal complaint. He hoped it would “send an important message to all colleges and universities,” he added.

The move was also welcomed by Alyza Lewin, president of the Louis D. Brandeis Centre: “This is a defeat of antisemitism that will undoubtedly improve the climate on NYU’s campus.”

Referring to the OCR’s requirement that colleges must use the International Definition of Antisemitism when addressing the issue, she added: “Other universities that are serious about combating antisemitism should follow suit and, similarly, incorporate the [Definition] into their university policies.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Members of Halifax’s Jewish community are publicly condemning antisemitic stickers that have begun appearing around the city over recent weeks.

The stickers read, “The Bug That Backfired COVID-19” in black and white print, and feature a Star of David and a symbol commonly associated with Freemasonry. Many have reportedly been seen in the downtown area of Halifax and across college campuses also around the city.

One local Jewish leader explained that the rhetoric draws inspiration from the antisemitic text ‘The Protocols of the Elders of Zion’ that outlines conspiracies surrounding Jewish domination of the world, and she voiced concerns that the COVID-19 outbreak was causing a rise in such antisemitic sentiments amongst “a very small, very radical group”, who seek to use the Jewish community as a “scapegoat”.

Her organisation insisted, however, that this line of thinking is not representative of Halifax and Nova Scotia at large, and that the Jewish community has always felt welcome and safe in the provincial capital.

The public has been encouraged to report any stickers to Jewish communal groups and to the Halifax Regional Police, in order to ensure the incidents are not “let go”.

The police confirmed that at least one report of the stickers had been received.

Far-right sticking campaigns have also been a problem in the UK.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Atlantic Jewish Council

A 26-year-old Jewish man was attacked outside a synagogue in Hamburg on Sunday evening as members of the local community celebrated the Jewish festival of Sukkot.

The attack happened outside Hamburg’s Hohe Weide Synagogue. The victim was attacked with a shovel by a man dressed in military fatigues. The synagogue’s security personnel intervened and the attacker was taken into custody by police. Germany’s DPA news agency reported that the suspect, who is aged 29 and a German of Kazakh heritage, had a picture of a swastika in his pocket.

The victim, who suffered serious head injuries, was admitted to a local hospital.

A police spokesperson said that the motive for the attack was still under investigation, although German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas denounced the attack in a tweet, saying: “This is not an isolated incident, this is disgusting antisemitism and we must all oppose it”.

The suspect was “extremely confused” and investigators were unable immediately to question him. The suspect, who appeared to be acting alone, was accused of causing grievous bodily harm.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A kosher restaurant in Paris, the Mac Queen, was ransacked and vandalised overnight by a group of unidentified individuals on 1st October.

The walls were defaced with antisemitic graffiti that included phrases such as “Hitler was right” and “Jews get out”. Several tables and windows were destroyed, and swastikas had been painted across the interior decor. Witnesses stated that they counted at least ten swastikas and up to fifty antisemitic slogans drawn on the walls. The abbreviation “FDP”, belonging to a neo-Nazi group, Front des Patriotes, was also seen scrawled around the restaurant.

Prior to leaving the premises, the perpetrators tampered with the water supply in an attempt to flood the business. The managers of Mac Queen discovered the damage the following morning.

The Chair of the French Union of Jewish Students, stated concerns were rising amongst Parisian Jews and many believe that, “In France in 2020, eating in a kosher restaurant is now a danger.”

Earlier this year, French officials announced antisemitic acts and hate crimes reportedly increased last year by 27%, with 687 acts recorded in 2019. Figures from the previous year stood at 541 incidents.

The recent vandalism of the popular kosher restaurant was denounced by the French Interior Minister Gérald Darmanin following pressure from Nathalie Goulet, a representative of Paris in the French Senate, who called for a policy of zero tolerance to be stressed to the public. Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo has publicly condemned the “hateful act” in solidarity with the local Jewish community.

Investigations into the incident are on-going and no suspects have yet been identified.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A London-based Arabic-language newspaper has printed an antisemitic cartoon that appears to condemn Muslims who do not seek to kill Jews.

The Qatari-owned Al-Quds Al-‘Arabi newspaper, which is based in London, printed a cartoon in its 20th September edition showing figures that appear to be the Israeli Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, and an Emirati, the former standing behind a rock and the latter casting aside a sword.

The cartoon plays off an infamous Hadith that reads: “The Last Hour would not come until the Muslims fight the Jews, and the Muslims kill them to a point that the Jew[s] shall hide behind the rock[s] and the tree[s], and the rock or tree will say: ‘O Muslim, O servant of Allah! This is a Jew behind me, so come and kill him!’ Except the Gharqad, being one of the Jews’ trees.”

In the cartoon, the rock is in despair, saying to the Emirati: “O Muslim…O servant of Allah…What are you doing!!?”

The implication – with the Israeli Prime Minister standing behind the rock with a tree in the background – is that the Emirati is betraying an Islamic teaching by making peace with a Jewish leader instead of seeking to kill him.

Campaign Against Antisemitism will be writing to the newspaper and the Independent Press Standards Organisation, and we thank CAMERA UK for drawing attention to the matter.

The neo-Nazi Hundred Handers group has appended far-right stickers to street furniture in Liverpool.

The branded stickers, one of which reads “Britain Is Under Occupation” with a Star of David and the other “They Are Sexualising your CHILDREN”, were discovered in Walton Hall Park and posted on Instagram by a disgusted observer. They have apparently been removed.

The leader of the Hundred Handers, an online group that encourages users to print and distribute stickers and posters, was recently unmasked.

A few months ago, members of the proscribed National Action group were sentenced to prison, having engaged, amongst other activities, in far-right stickering and recruitment campaigns. At the time, Campaign Against Antisemitism commented that we have monitored and reported on far-right stickering operations, including on university campuses, for a long time, including by the far-right Hundred Handers group.

We continue to call on the authorities to take action against these seemingly low-level incidents, including because they are gateways into more heinous and dangerous activity.

A mezuzah has been desecrated in the outside entrance to a synagogue in Berlin.

It is believed that mezuzah capsule was opened and a swastika was graffitied on both sides of the parchment inside before the scroll was re-affixed to the door frame at the Tiferet Israel synagogue. It is thought that the incident occurred between Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, and Yom Kippur. The perpetrator is yet to be identified.

The German Foreign Minister tweeted that “it simply hurt to see something so disgusting,” adding: “This crime must be quickly solved and those responsible punished!”

A recent report, from the Federal Association of Departments for Research and Information on Antisemitism (RIAS), highlighted 1,253 antisemitic incidents had been registered in 2019 across four federal states in Germany, including Berlin. Far-right and neo-Nazi perpetrators accounted for a high proportion of these reported crimes.

Following a further increase in antisemitic incidents during the COVID-19 pandemic, Josef Schuster, head of the Central Council of Jews in Germany, has said that antisemitism in schools, on the streets and the internet are now “commonplace” for Jews in the country.

At a rally on 1st August, 20,000 protesters demanded an end to coronavirus prevention measures in the German capital, many of whom were seen carrying or wearing antisemitic propaganda, including swastikas and yellow stars.

On 15th September, the 70th anniversary of the Central Council of Jews in Germany, German Chancellor Angela Merkel said that it is “shameful” that antisemites are becoming increasingly bold in their expressions of hatred and racism. The Chancellor stated that if “education and enlightenment” could not address such attitudes, disciplinary action as sanctioned by criminal law would be enacted.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A petition has been launched urging school authorities in Marin County, California to take immediate action against high school students who were active on an antisemitic social media page.

Earlier this month, an Instagram account titled “Redwood students organised [against] semitism” was discovered. The social media account, accompanied by an antisemitic caricature, named specific, local Jewish students and urged its followers to contribute additional Jewish names to a public Google document. The online list was decorated with images of bullets and a swastika. Several other accounts linked to the high school have also been found to feature antisemitic content.

The petition, which has attracted thousands of signatures, is addressed to the Tamalpais Union High School District’s (TUHSD) superintendent, Tara Taupier. It voices concern and disappointment at the lack of action taken against antisemitism by young people in the area. Redwood school officials were allegedly alerted to potential suspects in the case as early as March this year. Demands have been made for the swift discipline of the offenders to reflect a transparent zero-tolerance policy for antisemitism.

The Redwood student behind the petition said that her and fellow students were fearful that online harassment and psychological abuse could become a physical threat if this form of hatred was “swept under the rug”, and she drew parallels between the Google document and lists used during the Holocaust to record the Jewish population.

Others in the community have said that they are frightened of signing the petition and consequently being identified as Jewish.

Ms Taupier said that Marin County education, law enforcement, religious and community officials recently conducted an online forum on the controversy. The superintendent stated that members of various institutions united to express abhorrence at the incidents and share information and resources on combating antisemitism in the county.

Local law enforcement is working alongside the Northern California Computer Crimes Task Force to continue its investigations into the incident.

The social media account has been removed from the platform.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The EU Commission Vice President tasked with leading the EU’s fight against antisemitism has declared that “antisemitism is not just a Jewish problem. It is not just a local problem. It is a European, and a global issue.”

Margaritas Schinas made the comments at an online conference on increasing hate crimes, ‘Working together to fight antisemitism in Europe: Structures and strategies for a holistic approach’.

All EU countries have been encouraged to explore a holistic approach that incorporates security, education and an active celebration of Jewish life, identity and faith. Seven EU Member States have adopted, or are in the process of incorporating, a “self-standing strategy” on antisemitism, with a further seven introducing specific measures within broader strategies against racism and extremism.

In his keynote address, Mr Schinas said that the European Commission is working with partners to issue and circulate practical guidance and effective examples on the use of the International Definition of Antisemitism. The governments of several EU Member States have adopted the Definition so far. Britain was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism and Lord Pickles worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

Mr Schinas stated that the Commission has also launched an immediate measure to increase awareness of disinformation and online content following incidents earlier this year. However, he highlighted concerns raised in the recent EU Fundamental Rights Agency which, in an annual overview on antisemitism, claimed that most acts of hatred towards the Jewish community remain unreported.

He argued that it is imperative for Member States to improve both methodologies and criteria in the collection of antisemitic hate crime data, as currently the true extent of the threat is unknown. The Commission is investing almost €8 million and hosting a series of discussions amongst leading experts to ensure police statistics better match and support civil society and Jewish community data.

In December, the Commission is hoping to host the fourth Working Group meeting on antisemitism, with representatives from various Member States and Jewish communities in attendance. With fresh momentum from the German Presidency, the Vice President described this as an “ideal moment” to present how far the continent has come, and what more will need to happen for a future rid of antisemitism.

The Vice President said that the issue of antisemitism will remain a high priority in the EU’S political agenda.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Mendip District Council in Somerset has voted unanimously to reject the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The matter came before the Council in February of this year but a vote only took place this week, with 35 councillors voting against with none in favour and seven abstaining.

It is understood that the Council determined that it was not necessary to adopt the Definition because existing policies on equality and discrimination were sufficient.

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently published its first Audit of Local Authorities, documenting the campaign for widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities. Mendip is almost unique in having considered adoption of the Definition but ultimately rejected it.

Rejecting the Definition is completely unacceptable at a time when antisemitism is so common in local politics.

Politically, the Council has no overall control but is dominated by the Liberal Democrats, with the Conservatives and the Greens also holding numerous seats.

On Wednesday a Paris appeals court ordered the French state to return three significant works of art to the heirs of a Jewish collector who died in a German concentration camp in 1945.

The artworks by Andre Derain are currently housed at the Museum of Modern Art in Troyes and in the Cantini museum in Marseille.

They had initially been in the collection of Parisian gallery owner Rene Gimpel, who was denounced by a rival art-dealer after joining the Resistance which fought against the Nazi occupation and France’s collaborationist Vichy regime.

After Mr Gimpel was arrested the works – painted between 1907 and 1910 – were taken as spoils.

In Wednesday’s ruling, the court overturned the judgment of a lower court which last year rejected a bid for the restitution of the artworks to Mr Gimpel’s heirs.

“This is great,” declared Corinne Hershkovitch, a lawyer for the heirs, who are still trying to recover other works from their Mr Gimpel’s collection.

Mr Gimpel, who was of Jewish descent, was a prominent art collector in the early 20th century. He was arrested in 1944 and deported to Neuengamme concentration camp in Germany, where he died.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Investigators have identified an individual suspected in connection with several antisemitic incidences in Thornhill, Ontario as 43 year-old Kurt Edwards. A warrant has been issued for his arrest.

On 18th September, officers responded to a report from a caller who was outside a synagogue when a male, unknown to him, began shouting antisemitic comments. The victim filmed the suspect who advanced towards the caller’s vehicle in an alleged attempt to assault the caller and his son.

In the video recording shared on social media, the suspect shouts, “Because you’re a piece of s***, you’re Jewish, you run the f****** world!”, before attempting to place his hand inside the car.

The suspect is believed to be responsible for six other related incidents which occurred over Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. Private homes and garages were defaced with hateful graffiti that read, “Jews run the world” and “Jews hate blacks”. A vehicle had also been vandalised in the community of Thornhill, north of Toronto, home to Canada’s largest concentration of Jewish residents.

In Ottawa, another male reportedly spat and hurled insults towards worshippers in an outside service on the 19th September.

Investigators with the York Regional Policing Hate Crime Unit and the #4 District Criminal Investigations Bureau are now appealing to the general public in the city of Vaughan to help locate the man wanted in connection with the aforementioned hate crimes. York Regional Police have issued a statement that asks those with further information to come forward, and have emphasised a zero tolerance policy to ensure those responsible are prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: York Regional Police

Swedish columnist Paulina Neuding testified before the United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC) with concerns for the Jewish community of Malmö, Sweden.

Mälmo city officials outlined plans in 2019 to allocate around $2 million to initiatives, including educational programs, that protect the Jewish community. The Government hopes to host an international conference on combating antisemitism and plans to open a Holocaust museum in the Swedish city.

However, these events have been postponed following the outbreak of COVID-19.

In recent demonstrations against Rasmus Paludan, leader of Denmark’s far-right party, protestors in Malmö allegedly shouted: “Khaybar Khaybar, oh, Jews, Muhammad’s army will return!”

The offensive chants are a direct reference to the massacre of the Jews in Khaybar, northwestern Arabia, in 628 C.E. Several cars were set alight and at least ten people were arrested throughout the protest.

Jewish residents have expressed fear when openly wearing symbols of Judaism in public spaces and many, as Ms Paulina Neuding stated, feel as though they must actively censor their identities. The Swedish columnist highlighted how residents have taken measures in schools and the workplace to protect community members from targeted abuse and harassment, for example, the instillation of bulletproof windows in Jewish kindergartens.

At the end of 2019, it was found the population of Malmö had dropped over the past decade from 3,000 residents to approximately 1,500.

According to government statistics, antisemitic hate crimes in Sweden have reportedly rose by a record 53% over the past three years.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Fabio Tuiach, a controversial council member in the northern city of Trieste, Italy, has posted claims on his social media pages that Jews are at “fault” for the COVID-19 pandemic.

Mr Tuiach, who reportedly proposed theories typical of Nazi propaganda, said: “Their ancestors committed deicide, now they have total control of the world, depriving us of the truth.”

The councillor previously sparked controversy in 2019 when he abstained from a vote to grant an Auschwitz survivor, Liliana Segre, honorary citizenship in the city. Mr Tuiach, a self-proclaimed devout Catholic, stated that he was shocked and offended by Ms Segre’s comments describing Jesus as Jewish.

The Holocaust survivor has been a target for online abuse, including death threats, since she first called for the creation of a Parliamentary committee to combat racism and online hate speech in Italy.

Mr. Tuiach’s comments provoked outrage amongst his colleagues and Christian leaders, as well as online. On 19th November 2019, the motion to grant Ms Segre’s citizenship was approved and various cities across Italy named her an honorary citizen to show solidarity with her cause.

Mr. Tuiach was elected to Trieste’s City Council in 2016 with the backing of the League party, however he since left to join Forzo Nuova, an openly neofascist movement. He is now, however, reportedly an active independent.

The recent social media posts are yet to be removed, despite criticism from the public.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Following discussions with Campaign Against Antisemitism, Google has acted to remove the disgusting “Jewish baby stroller” meme from its image search engine.

Campaign Against Antisemitism approached our contacts at Google after we received a number of reports that searching for “Jewish baby stroller” using Google Images returned images of a gas barbecue oven, in a disgusting reference to the gassing and cremation of Jewish children along with their parents by Nazi Germany during the Holocaust.

The problem was that the search term “Jewish baby stroller” reveals what is known as a data void. In short, unlike other search terms such as “blue baby stroller” or “lightweight baby stroller”, which return helpful content, there is no helpful content for “Jewish baby stroller” because it is not something that people search for and there is no such thing as a “Jewish baby stroller”. Therefore, the only content that Google’s algorithms could find was the abhorrent meme.

Soon after we contacted Google, the company apologised and took steps to improve its algorithm.

A spokesperson for Google said: “We apologise. These [search results] don’t reflect our opinions. We try to show content matching all key terms searched for, as people normally want. But for ‘data voids’ like this, it can be problematic…We’ve done considerable work with improving data void situations and finding systematic improvements.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Having discussed this with Google, we understand how this situation arose. We are pleased that Google listened and acted quickly. We are grateful to everyone who reported this to us.”

Ironically there are still some images of the meme still available on Google Images, but they are only from articles explaining why the meme is so despicable.

A new book appears to confirm that Jeremy Corbyn’s allies were worried about the Labour Party adopting the International Definition of Antisemitism in 2018 because Mr Corbyn, then the Leader of the Party, would be found to have breached it, as Campaign Against Antisemitism has long maintained.

The new book, by controversial journalist Owen Jones, claims on behalf of Mr Corbyn’s allies: “If the [International Definition of Antisemitism] was passed in full, Corbyn’s enemies would trawl through the back catalogue of comments made by the Labour leader and [Seamus] Milne himself, then submit official complaints to the Party on the basis that they stood in violation of the Definition. That would trigger a disciplinary procedure, leading to their possible suspension, necessitating Corbyn’s removal as leader.”

This is an incredible admission of what was known to Campaign Against Antisemitism and others: Mr Corbyn had breached the Definition on multiple occasions in the past, and that if he had been treated by the Party as it was meant to treat all of its members, he would have to be disciplined.

Indeed, by the summer of 2018, Campaign Against Antisemitism had submitted over several years three complaints to the Labour Party regarding Mr Corbyn, all of which were ignored or dismissed by the Party without proper consideration, let alone serious investigation, as befitted the matters raised. This failure by the Party’s institutions led to the formal referral of the Labour Party to the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) by Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant in the EHRC’s ongoing investigation. Another group – Labour Against Antisemitism Ltd – also reports that it submitted a complaint against Mr Corbyn in August 2018.

Mr Jones’ book, titled This Land: The Story of a Movement, immediately goes on to explain why Labour’s institutions were unfit to deal with our complaints and, in effect, why the EHRC was compelled to intervene: “As Andrew Fisher pointed out, however, this was nonsensical: there was a pro-Corbyn majority on the Party’s National Executive Committee, and the General Secretary, Jennie Formby, was a committed Labour leftist who would never countenance such a move.” In other words, there was no need to be concerned about Mr Corbyn being found to have breached the Definition and being disciplined, because his allies were in control of the Party’s corrupted disciplinary mechanisms and would shield him from the consequences of his record.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “These revelations confirm what we have always known, namely that Jeremy Corbyn had breached the International Definition of Antisemitism but that his allies, who controlled Labour’s corrupted disciplinary mechanisms, would protect him from complaints like ours, thereby shielding him from the consequences of his long record of antisemitism. Here is further corroboration from inside sources that Labour is institutionally antisemitic, and further confirmation that we were right to refer the Party to the Equality and Human Rights Commission.”

On 28th May 2019, the EHRC launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Spotify has been called on to remove the music of a French rapper whose controversial songs are accused of inciting antisemitic views and hatred, particularly among young people.

The rapper, known as Freeze Corleone, is facing criminal prosecution after his debut album was criticised for antisemitic lyrics and Holocaust denial in several tracks.

The rapper’s lyrics include lines such as, “f*** the Shoah!”, “I arrived determined like Adolf in the 30s” and, “Too many Cohens, Jews in finance, politics, plots, school books.”

The opening track from the album, released on 11th September, is currently ranked 12th on Spotify’s daily Top 200 chart for France. Three of the top five spots on the weekly Top 200 Spotify chart also contain songs from the rapper’s controversial album. He has attracted 5.2 million listeners on the digital music platform.

Media commentators have expressed alarm at the rapid sale of copies in France that currently adopts a zero tolerance policy for antisemitic language.

In a recent announcement Gerald Darmanin, France’s Interior Minister, condemned the lyrics and confirmed that his Ministry would be pursuing legal action against the artist. Fifty members of the French Parliament also wrote to the Ministry of Justice with requests for a swift prosecution.

The rapper has been dropped by Universal Music France for the discriminatory lyrics. However, his music is still live on the streaming platform and competing services.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Another local councillor in Sandwell has been suspended by the Labour Party, joining several colleagues who have been suspended by the Party in recent months. At least one case – the most high-profile – involved alleged antisemitism, while reasons in the other cases have not been disclosed.

Cllr Mohammed Yaseen Hussain is the third Labour councillor at the local authority to be suspended by the Party in September alone. It is not clear why he has been suspended. Cllr Joanne Hadley and Cllr Ian Jones have also been suspended. Official reasons have not been provided. Also under investigation are Sandwell’s interim Leader, Cllr Maria Crompton, and another colleague, Cllr Bob Piper. In none of these cases is it known whether or not antisemitism played a role, as it has in other suspensions.

Cllr Crompton became interim Leader after Cllr Yvonne Davies, the Leader of Sandwell Council, resigned from her post in July and was suspended by the Labour Party pending investigation, after Campaign Against Antisemitism called for decisive action by the local authority and the Party over her social media history.

Cllr Yvonne Davies is being investigated by the Party over tweets she sent in 2018, one of which promoted a petition calling for a parliamentary debate over whether Israel has an “improper influence” over British politics, a notion reminiscent of historically popular claims of excessive Jewish power in national politics. In another tweet, Cllr Davies linked to a story titled “Is Israel’s hand behind the attacks on Jeremy Corbyn?”, alongside which she commented: “This makes interesting reading if anyone is wanting to understand where all this emphasis on Labour and antisematism (sic) comes from…” According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Using the symbols and images associated with classic antisemitism (e.g. claims of Jews killing Jesus or blood libel) to characterise Israel or Israelis” is an example of antisemitism.

A few days later, another Labour councillor – John Edwards – was revealed to have a record of problematic remarks, including describing accusations of antisemitism as “smears”, calling criticism of the disgraced then-Labour MP Chris Williamson a “smear campaign”, describing the Definition as “unfit for purpose”, and implying comparisons of Israeli policy to the Nazis in breach of the Definition by saying to then-Prime Minister David Cameron that “when you leave Auschwitz David Cameron go to Gaza”. Cllr Edwards has been a Labour councillor for forty years.

In addition, a local businessman and Party activist, Basharat Khan, has also now been suspended by Labour. It is believed that he was suspended after a series of social media posts that the Labour Party said “may reasonably be seen to involve antisemitic actions, stereotypes and sentiments.” One post, from August 2014, shows a cartoon image of a man with a Star of David on his sleeve cutting up a small child, with Mr Khan’s caption: “Until the Kings of KSA [Kingdom of Saudi Arabia] are overthrown Israel will continue its killing and destruction of the people of Palestine.”

Mr Khan reportedly said that he was trying to highlight to political turmoil in the Middle East, in particular “Israel’s bombing of Palestine,” adding: “I’m not antisemitic. I have never been antisemitic. I have friends in the Jewish community, the Sikh community, the Hindu community, every community. I am sorry if I got it wrong. It was not my intention to hurt anybody.”

Mr Khan is the complainant in the case against Cllr Hadley, alleging that she made racist comments in a telephone call, which she denies.

A Labour Party spokesman reportedly said: “The Labour Party takes all complaints extremely seriously and they are fully investigated in line with our rules and procedures, and any appropriate disciplinary action is taken.”

The string off Sandwell suspensions comes after Campaign Against Antisemitism reported on an antisemitism scandal engulfing Labour in Haringey in London.

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently published its first Audit of Local Authorities, documenting the campaign for widespread adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by local authorities. Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council has not adopted the Definition.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The police are understood to be investigating a cyber-attack on the annual dinner of a major Jewish communal organisation in the UK.

The Centenary celebration of the United Jewish Israel Appeal (UJIA), a major Jewish charity, was marked with a gala online dinner last night, but the event was marred by a severe technical disruption.

It is understood that the event company operating the platform believes that the cyber-attack was “targeted”, which has led to speculation that there may have been an antisemitic motivation.

In a statement, UJIA explained that the evening “was disrupted by a targeted cyber-attack”. The effect of the disruption was that hundreds of registered attendees were unable to access the event, but it was then streamed on YouTube, where they were able to watch it.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has urged communal institutions to take precautions to safeguard against antisemitic disruption of online events. We now urge the police to undertake a full investigation and bring the culprits to justice, with charges to take account of any antisemitic motivation.