St Anne’s College at the University of Oxford has removed a statement issued by the President of the College’s JCR and its MCR BAME representatives offering “support to the Muslim and Palestinian members of our community” but not to its Jewish members.

The statement related to ongoing violence in Jerusalem and said: “We want to sincerely support and send solidarity to St Anne’s Muslim and Palestinian members and the wider Oxford community. We would also like or remind students to reach out to the St Anne’s JCR & MCR Welfare and BAME Officers if they are struggling and would like somebody to talk to. In addition, you can also reach out to the Oxford University Islamic Society (ISOC) ‘Welfare Officers’ and/or the Oxford University Champaign for Racial Awareness Equality (CRAE) Officers.”

It went on to say: “We also encourage other Oxford colleges’ JCRs and MCRs to show solidarity with the wider Oxford Muslim and Palestinian community and combat the noticeable lack of support.”

Disgracefully, nowhere did the statement offer any support or resources to Jewish students. The “lack of support” to the College’s Jews was thus particularly “noticeable”.

The statement was shared on St Anne’s College’s official Instagram account. The College then prohibited comments on the statements before deleting the post entirely, without explanation or apology.

There are growing reports of Jewish students facing antisemitism on campus and online since violence in the Middle East has erupted in recent days.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].  

It was announced today in the Queen’s Speech, in which Her Majesty announces the Government’s legislative agenda, that a new law will be passed banning public bodies from joining in with the Boycotts, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) campaign, on the grounds that it “may legitimise antisemitism”. 

According to the Government’s official documentation, the purpose of the legislation is to “deliver the manifesto commitment to stop public bodies from imposing their own approach or views about international relations, through preventing boycott, divestment or sanctions campaigns against foreign countries.”

The document also acknowledges the long-standing connections between the BDS movement and antisemitism, stating that: “Unofficial boycotts have been associated with antisemitism in the United Kingdom — including kosher food being removed from supermarket shelves, Jewish films being banned from a film festival and a student union holding a vote on blocking the formation of a Jewish student society.” 

While boycotting a country is neither illegal nor racist per se, the problem with BDS is that it is no mere boycott. Supporters of BDS routinely engage the International Definition of Antisemitism by:

  • Setting political tests which Jews must pass, or face being treated as a pariah, especially by demanding that Jews renounce their cultural and religious ties to Israel, the physical centre of the Jewish religion, the world’s only Jewish state, and the country in which almost half of the world’s Jewish population lives;
  • Attempting to isolate and shame Israeli Jews, but not non-Jews, who do not support BDS when they visit Britain or come to study or teach at British universities;
  • Treating the entirety of the State of Israel as occupied land, and thereby asserting that the existence of the state of Israel is a racist endeavour;
  • Working with genocidal antisemitic terrorist organisations;
  • Claiming that Israeli policy is to deliberately kill babies, or harvest the vital organs of non-Jews, which revives ancient blood libels;
  • Attempting to portray Israeli Jews as having created a Nazi state in the model of Nazi Germany, and of ‘using’ the Holocaust as political cover for purported Jewish crimes;
  • Defending against claims of antisemitism by proposing that the allegations are a ruse used by Jewish victims, not to call out racism but to silence criticism of Israel;
  • Projecting antisemitic conspiracy myths about nefarious Jewish power onto the Jewish state.

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds the Government’s latest efforts in tackling antisemitism in Britain.

Ryan Houghton, a Tory councillor who was previously suspended over antisemitic Facebook posts which diminished the Holocaust, has now been made the Leader of the Aberdeen Conservatives.

In a post on a martial arts forum eight years ago, Mr Houghton wrote under the username, Razgriz, that there was “no credible evidence to suggest the Holocaust did not happen” but revealed that “I do find some of the events fabricated, and exegarated [sic] in some cases.” He continued: “As history is written by the victors there is always going to be a bit of re-writing.” He also praised the “interesting” research of the antisemitic Holocaust-denier, David Irving. However, in a later post he said that he was “not defending David’s Irving’s views” and that he does not agree with “some of the stuff he says.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Denying the fact, scope, mechanisms (e.g. gas chambers) or intentionality of the genocide of the Jewish people at the hands of National Socialist Germany and its supporters and accomplices during World War II (the Holocaust)” is an example of antisemitism.

Mr Houghton is also accused of having made homophobic and anti-Muslim statements online. In a statement at the time, he said: “I apologise unreservedly for any hurt now caused by these comments and have been in contact with members of the Jewish community in Aberdeen.” Mr Houghton also said that he was a member of the Holocaust Education Trust, had visited Auschwitz-Birkenau and has “never held antisemitic or intolerant views.”

The Conservatives in Scotland readmitted him last year, but apparently there was no further sanction or expectation for him to undertake antisemitism training.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Derek Jackson, an anti-vaccination local election candidate for the Liberal Party (no connection to the Liberal Democrats), arrived at the Emirates Arena during the election count wearing sunglasses, a black suit, and a yellow star whilst performing a Nazi salute.

Mr Jackson, who was running for Glasgow’s Southside seat, was accompanied by several Liberal Party campaigners who were all dressed identically to Mr Jackson, and who were also performing the salute. Each of them had drawn red hearts onto the palms of their hands, and when performing the Nazi salute, would claim it was a “love salute.”

The yellow stars, designed to resemble the ones that Jewish Holocaust victims were forced to wear as a mark of identification, had the word “UNVAX” written on them. When questioned about the stars, the Liberal Party representatives stated that they were “sheriff badges.”

In an attempt to satire what he perceived to be the Scottish National Party’s (SNP) restrictions on hate speech, Mr Jackson performed the Nazi salute to a crowd of baffled onlookers as he proclaimed: “Love everyone…spread love…we’re just here to love everybody.”

Speaking directly to the crowd, he went on to say: “You’ve all got to love us as well. You’ve all got to love everybody, people you’ve never met before. You’ve got to care about people everywhere, all the time. You’ve got to give up your freedom and your liberty to love people you never met before.”

After being called a racist by a member of the crowd, Mr Jackson apparently grew agitated. He adopted what appeared to be a frustrated and confrontational tone and stated: “I hope you’re not stupid enough, all of you…I hope none of you are stupid enough to believe we’re promoting fascism, when plainly, and very obviously, we’re here to satire and parody the fascist SNP hate laws. Obviously. Are you all so stupid? Are you all so stupid, you think we’ve come here to promote fascism and racism and Nazism. Really? We are here to campaign against the SNP’s fascist hate speech laws which criminalise you expressing your thoughts in your home.”

Mr Jackson and his supporters were later escorted out of the arena by police.

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes, and this is not the first time that anti-vaccination campaigners have used the yellow star during events. Recently, London protestors were condemned online for wearing the yellow stars, while French protesters were seen wearing them at a demonstration in Avignon. They have also been seen elsewhere in Europe and North America.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Darran Davies, the Conservative candidate who used an antisemitic slur on Facebook has won a seat in the Hillingdon Council election.

Mr Davies won with 2,098 votes while Labour candidate Steve Garelick finished a close second with 1,799.

Mr Davies, who expressed “deep regret” for his actions, shared an image of a man on Facebook with the words, “Wanted Jew Boy Reward $100”. Mr Davies shared the image on his personal Facebook page with the caption: “Guys have you seen this bloke.”

A friend of Mr Davies’ apparently commented that the message referred to him because he had not attended a local pub in some time.

When the post emerged last month, Hillingdon Council’s Conservative group leader said: “The posting…relates to the use of an inappropriate nickname among friends. Although the comment was inappropriate and below the standards expected of a Conservative member this has been resolved by admonishing Mr Davies and reinforcing with him the standards expected of persons seeking to represent Hillingdon Conservatives. Mr Davies has shown deep regret for his lack of judgment and has apologised.”

The matter is still being investigated.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.   

Campaign Against Antisemitism has provided training to the Oxford University Labour Club (OULC) after the campus group reached out to us to provide an online training session to fight antisemitism.

The training was particularly poignant given the OULC’s contribution to the scandal of institutional antisemitism in the Labour Party. The event, held last Tuesday, was very well received. 

In 2016, the OULC was investigated by the Labour Party following multiple allegations of antisemitism levelled by the Club’s co-Chair, who resigned in protest against the antisemitic conduct he witnessed. However, the investigation was dropped in January 2017.

Students testified that members of the OULC had called Auschwitz a “cash cow”; Jews were called “Zios”; Jewish members were asked to renounce Israel publicly before speaking; the dead Jewish victims of the Paris Hypercacher terrorist attack were mocked; terrorist acts against Jews in Europe were rationalised; and it was asserted that the banks were controlled by the “Paris-Tel Aviv axis” — all in clear breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Following this, Labour Students was sent to investigate, but its findings were suppressed. Baroness Royall was then commissioned to undertake her own investigation into alleged antisemitism in the OULC and in the Party more generally to her chagrin, only the executive summary of her report was published, providing a misleadingly positive account of the problem, and she later leaked the entire report to give the fuller picture. The Royall report was not officially published in full because it too was rolled into yet another inquiry, that of Shami Chakrabarti, who went on to produce a whitewash report that introduced a system of secrecy into the Party’s disciplinary process and thereby contributed significantly to the institutionalisation of Labour’s antisemitism problem.

As for the OULC, all accused students were cleared without censure.  

While the Club’s past cannot be undone, it is extremely encouraging to see its current members’ commitment to fighting antisemitism. In the description for the online event, the organisers wrote that the training was “mandatory for all committee members but strongly encouraged for other members – especially for those interested in running for OULC committee positions in future.”

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We provide antisemitism training to university groups, regulators, police forces and others, but this session was particularly poignant given the OULC’s prominent role in the Labour Party’s antisemitism scandal.

“This new generation of OULC members clearly grasps the importance of fighting antisemitism and has shown a commitment to restoring the reputation of the Club, and we are proud to have contributed to that noble effort. We encourage other university societies and public bodies to contact us to arrange antisemitism training and become allies in the fight against the world’s oldest hatred.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, or wish to arrange antisemitism training for their university society, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

The Northern Ireland Assembly has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism. This came despite Sinn Fein’s opposition to the Democratic Unionist Party’s (DUP) proposal to adopt it.

The DUP motion stressed “the need to tackle the scourge of antisemitism in every aspect of our society” and called on the Assembly to adopt the Definition in full with the illustrative examples, which are integral to the Definition.

Sinn Fein tried to pass an amendment to remove the reference to the Definition, but retained similar wording without the examples.

In the past, Belfast City Council explicitly rejected the adoption of the Definition.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We applaud this decision by the Northern Ireland Assembly to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism. We regret that Sinn Fein opposed the adoption resolution, but its passage is a strong demonstration of solidarity with the Jewish community and a powerful expression of opposition to anti-Jewish racism, which has no place in Northern Ireland or any other part of the United Kingdom. We continue to call on local authorities, as well as universities and other public bodies, to adopt the Definition and apply it in cases of antisemitism.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds the decision. The British Government was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism and Lord Pickles worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street. Since then, the Scottish Government and the Welsh Government have also both adopted the Definition.

The Oscar-nominated actor LaKeith Stanfield has apologised for failing to to stop an antisemitic discussion in a Clubhouse room he was moderating.

Clubhouse is a live audio app that emerged during the COVID-19 lockdown. According to various online reports, it is “the top virtual hang-out for venture capitalists and tech-industry entrepreneurs, along with the occasional celebrity,” while Bloomberg News calls it a favoured haunt for “venture capitalists and other Silicon Valley insiders.”

The room, titled “Did Minister Farrakhan Tarnish His Legacy By Being Antisemitic?”, was said to have been widely in support of the antisemitic hate preacher, Louis Farrakhan, defending him against allegations of antisemitism previously levelled against him. Mr Farrakhan has called Judaism a “gutter religion” and had claimed that the Jews would face “God’s ovens” if they continued to oppose him, in a sick reference to the extermination camps of the Holocaust. He has also praised the Nazi leader, saying “Hitler was a very great man”. In addition, Mr Farrakhan has alleged that “Israelis and Zionist Jews” were involved in the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

A Twitter user documented the chat, noting the several slurs that were used in reference to Jews, including “hymies,” “split-tongued liars,” “thieves” and “Satan spawn.” They also reported that members of the room were quoting and praising Hitler.

This room was shut down only after a prolonged period of antisemitic messages were shared. However, a second room appeared shortly after where the hateful messages continued.

One participant in the room said: “Voltaire said, ‘to find out who rules over you, find out who you can’t criticise.’” This quote is commonly misattributed to the French philosopher but in fact originated in an essay by Kevin Strom, an American neo-Nazi, white nationalist, and Holocaust denier.

The participant went on to state: “if you look and see who are the owners, who are the presidents, who are the CEOs of the six major media outlets that control everything that we hear, see, believe, and are told to believe in America, there is a synonymous energy that runs through it.”

Mr Stanfield, who is understood to be a regular user of the social media platform, was present in both rooms and a moderator in the second. It was said that while he did not contribute towards the antisemitic hate speech, he allowed it to continue without challenging it, and claimed that he wanted to “hear both sides.” Later on, in a discussion elsewhere, Mr Stanfield tried to distance himself from the offensive discussions, saying that the conversation had been “derailed”.

Mr Stanfield has since apologised, posting on Instagram on Friday: “I unconditionally apologise for what went on in that chat room, and for allowing my presence there to give a platform to hate speech. I am not an antisemite, nor do I condone any of the beliefs discussed in that chat room.“

Last year, Clubhouse found itself caught in controversy after antisemitic stereotypes were allegedly invoked during an online discussion it was hosting on relations between Jews and African Americans.

Some of those present reported that antisemitic tropes linking Jews with control of commerce and banking were repeatedly invoked during the conversation.

One Clubhouse member declared on Twitter that she had listened in for “only three minutes, but heard enough” in that time to close the app and leave the discussion. She tweeted: “There’s a room on Clubhouse right now that is literally just a bunch of people talking about why it’s ok to hate Jews so I’m done with that app for a while.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Campaign Against Antisemitism will be writing to Tim Davie, the BBC’s Director-General, after our concerns over a BBC journalist’s social media activity were dismissed by BBC Arabic’s Head of Daily Output.

Last month, Nour Eddine Zorgui shared an article titled “Who are the Israel lobbyists that want David Miller fired?” that referred to Zionism as “Israel’s racist ideology”.

The article was published by The Electronic Intifada, an online news outlet which has also previously attacked Campaign Against Antisemitism.

In a letter from the BBC Arabic’s Head of Daily Output, we have been informed that Nour Eddine Zorgui was merely “reminded of the BBC social media guidelines.”

However, not only is the description of Zionism in the article offensive, but the article and tweet represents an intervention in the public debate over Prof. David Miller, a Professor of Political Sociology at the University of Bristol with a history of peddling conspiracy theories relating to Jewish students. Most recently, he asserted that “Zionism is racism”, declared his objective “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world” and accused the Bristol University Jewish Society of being part of a worldwide Zionist conspiracy, adding that it is “fundamental to Zionism to encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”. At the same online event, Prof. Miller also observed that the Jewish Society and the Union of Jewish Students are Zionist, thereby implying that Jewish students (and the wider Jewish community) inherently “encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”.

For a BBC journalist to intervene in this debate, share an offensive article and defend an academic accused of antisemitism – and to do so by suggesting that those making the allegations do so in service to Israel, which is precisely the sort of antisemitism-denial found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission to have contributed to institutional antisemitism in the Labour Party – is unacceptable. It is woefully insufficient for the BBC to be served with a mere reminder of the Corporation’s guidelines.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 revealed that two thirds of British Jews are deeply concerned by the BBC’s coverage of matters of Jewish concern, and 55% by its handling of antisemitism complaints.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

Politicians in Berlin have banned the annual “Al Quds Day” rally that was scheduled to take place in the German capital this year on 8th May.

The Iranian-sponsored Al Quds Day calls for the destruction of Israel. In 2020, events to mark it were cancelled due to the pandemic, but in 2019 more than 2,000 demonstrators chanted anti-Jewish slogans with one organiser telling a member of a counter-demonstration that “Hitler needs to come back and kill the rest of the Jews.”

Holger Krestel, the Spokesperson on the Protection of the Constitution for the FDP Party in the Berlin Senate, urged senators to “use all legal means to prevent this shameful event.”

This is the first time that Berlin has banned the event since coming to the city in 1996.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been at the forefront of the campaign against the annual Al Quds Day rally in London.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Author Shazia Hobbs is being investigated by police over allegations of posting pro-Nazi hate messages on social media platforms Telegram and Gab.

Ms Hobbs, who wrote a book centred around her own experiences of racism, was said to have attacked a member of an antisemitism awareness group by posting a photo of a Nazi salute with the caption: “raise your hand if you are tired of [name of member].”

Ms Hobbs’ Twitter account has been suspended, reportedly for antisemitic posts. She is also said to have created posts that featured swastikas on the social media platform Telegram and is accused of labelling a Holocaust survivor a “liar” on Gab.

In light of these accusations, her book contract is said to have been cancelled.

Last year, Ms Hobbes was photographed at an event for far-right group Patriotic Alternative. The group is led by the former head of the youth wing of the BNP, Mark Collett, who is reported to have dabbled in Holocaust denial, collaborated with the infamous American antisemite David Duke, and espoused antisemitic and racist views.

report into Patriotic Alternative published last summer found that several members of the group engaged in Holocaust denial.

The group was found using social media platform Telegram to create neo-Nazi channels dedicated to share vile messages, antisemitic conspiracy theories and images glorifying Hitler. An investigation by Scottish news site The Ferret found over 2,000 messages swapped by members of Patriotic Alternative on Telegram.

Ms Hobbs is also known to have associated with the notorious antisemite Alison Chabloz, who was recently jailed for malicious communications relating to Jews.

When asked to comment, the Metropolitan Police said: “Police received an allegation of malicious communications relating to content of an antisemitic nature that had been posted online. Officers are in touch with the complainant. Inquiries are ongoing. There have been no arrests at this stage.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

This week saw the first “key monitoring date” in the Labour Party’s Action Plan, agreed with the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) regarding antisemitism in the Party.

The Action Plan came following the publication of the EHRC’s damning report into antisemitism in the Labour Party, the product of an investigation in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant. The EHRC found that Labour had unlawfully discriminated against and harassed Jews. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Party.

A large proportion of the requirements due to be met by this first monitoring date are either proposals or internal policy changes, which will be assessed by the EHRC.

However, a number of items are outward-facing and are therefore available for evaluation.

The Labour Party is required by now, for example, to have engaged with stakeholders in the Jewish community and established an Advisory Board on antisemitism. It is understood that the Party has achieved this, but selectively. As we noted earlier this month, Sir Keir’s repeated refusal to engage with us, despite our being the complainant in the EHRC’s investigation into antisemitism in his Party, and Labour’s failure even to acknowledge our complaints against MPs, do not reflect a leadership wholly willing to address past failures.

The Party was also required, by this stage, to have published “at least one performance report”. The Party discharged this requirement earlier this year in part; the report contained ambiguities that made it difficult to assess. In particular, it referenced case numbers in 2014-2018 but appeared to make no reference to 2019 whatsoever.

By this first monitoring date, the Party was required to have published a Complaints Handling Handbook, which it has done. The handbook made some welcome improvements to the process but was largely a disappointment. In particular, the Handbook was pilloried for including a number of examples of what seemingly purported to be best practice, but which in fact served only to illustrate why Labour’s disciplinary process is unfit for purpose.

In one example, a Labour member “posted and shared several things on social media that were antisemitic; using Hitler, Nazi and Holocaust metaphors, distortions and comparisons in debates about Israel-Palestine”. In other words, they breached the International Definition of Antisemitism in at least one and possibly multiple ways. Yet the sanction given in the handbook was merely that the member was given a Formal Warning, which would remain on their record for eighteen months.

These case studies have now, however, been scrubbed from the Handbook entirely.

The Party was also required, by this stage, to have completed antisemitism training for all those officials responsible for disciplinary cases relating to anti-Jewish hatred. However, it recently emerged that a member of Jewish Voice for Labour, an antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, chaired a Labour disciplinary panel on antisemitism just earlier this month. It is difficult to square that development with the fulfilment of the training requirement.

Labour was also due by now to demonstrate to the EHRC that it has completed its “clearing of the backlog” of antisemitism cases. It is difficult to see, however, how the Party can do so before introducing an independent disciplinary system, which it has said it will not do until later this year. Campaign Against Antisemitism has submitted numerous complaints against MPs and others, which we expect the Party to investigate only once the independent system is in place. But the Party has not acknowledged our complaints, and the only indication that the Party has taken any action whatsoever was a report that our complaint against Deputy Leader Angela Rayner was dismissed out of hand earlier this year.

Reflecting on the milestone, Joe Glasman, Head of Political Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “This week was intended to be a landmark moment in the Labour Party’s recovery from the institutional antisemitism ushered in by Jeremy Corbyn. However, progress has been marked by inconsistencies, lack of transparency and potential burying of awkward issues, for example our complaints against Labour’s Deputy Leader and numerous other MPs.

“Only in the last few weeks, we have seen perplexing disciplinary outcomes, a member of an antisemitism-denial group chair a disciplinary panel, and now Labour has embarrassingly scrubbed its ‘best practice’ case studies from its Complaints Handling Handbook after we and others highlighted their absurdity.

“At this first major juncture in the Action Plan, we are yet to be reassured that the Party is capable of getting to grips with its antisemitism problem.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer study in 2019 found that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A police officer found guilty of being a member of the banned neo-Nazi terrorist group National Action has been jailed for four years and four months.

Benjamin Hannam, a 22-year-old from Edmonton in North London, has now been fired from by the Metropolitan Police for gross misconduct following his conviction earlier this month. Last year, it was alleged that he belonged or professed to belong to the proscribed group National Action between December 2016 and January 2018 and that he falsely represented himself in his application to join the Metropolitan Police in this connection.

With his conviction at the beginning of April, Mr Hannam became the first police officer to be convicted of far-right terrorism after being found guilty at the Old Bailey of membership in National Action, lying on his application to join the police and possessing guides to knife-fighting and bombmaking. It is understood that the ban on reporting the case was lifted after Mr Hannam admitted possessing an indecent image of a child.

Mr Hannam, who reportedly has autism, was apparently “desperate to impress” an older National Action organiser who gave him free stickers, but he ended his association with the organisation before he joined the Metropolitan Police.

Sentencing Mr Hannam at the Old Bailey today, Judge Anthony Leonard QC told him that “I consider what you did to be very serious and you have harmed public trust in the police by your deceit”, as he sentenced Mr Hannam to four years and four months in prison.

The Head of the Metropolitan Police’s Counter Terrorism Command, which carried out the investigation, emphasised earlier this month that there is no evidence that Mr Hannam abused his position at the police force to further his far-right views.

Mr Hannam had denied being a member of National Action before or after it was proscribed, and told the court that he had been attracted to fascism aged sixteen because of its artwork and propaganda and was under the impression that it was a youth network. He denied engaging in any stickering or propaganda campaigns and insisted that he only attended social events.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “National Action was proscribed as a terrorist organisation at our behest because it poses a considerable threat. Its members are indoctrinated to kill and instructed in the use of weapons. Benjamin Hannam posed as someone who would protect the public, when in fact he was a member of a dangerous far-right terrorist organisation, in possession of knife fighting and bomb-making manuals, as well as disturbing sexual images of a child.

“We applaud Counter Terrorism Command for its investigation of this very troubling case, as well as the CPS for prosecuting it and the court for delivering an appropriate sentence. Public confidence in the police depends on holding officers to a high standard and zero tolerance of far-right or neo-Nazi infiltration. The verdict and sentence in this disturbing case sends exactly the right message.”

Other members of National Action were recently convicted and sentenced to prison for their role in the organisation.

National Action was proscribed as a terrorist organisation in December 2016 following a long campaign by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others. Under section 11 of the Terrorism Act 2000, membership of a proscribed terrorist organisation is a criminal offence.

Image credit: Metropolitan Police

Chelsea Football Club has announced that it has banned an abusive online troll from its matches for ten years after he hounded a Jewish journalist who came forward and received support from Campaign Against Antisemitism. The announcement comes as football clubs around the country are walking out of social media in protest at online hate.

Sam Mole, a twenty-year-old from Kettering, had sent antisemitic and homophobic messages online to freelance Jewish journalist Dan Levene, including one wishing that Mr Levene would die and another lamenting that Mr Levene had not been killed in the Holocaust.

Further abusive messages had also been sent by Mr Mole from another account that Twitter suspended. Mr Mole, a fan of Chelsea Football Club, took issue with Mr Levene’s stance in opposition to antisemitic chanting by some fans of the club.

Earlier this year, a legal case against Mr Mole ended with a judge declaring his regret that “the law prohibits me from punishing you” following a blunder by the investigating police force. Mr Mole had admitted to police that he had sent the abusive tweets in October 2019, but he was found not guilty at Leicester Magistrates Court in February 2021 on the technicality that he was on holiday in Australia at the time, and therefore outside the jurisdiction of the UK’s courts.

Mr Mole was nonetheless issued a three-year restraining order prohibiting him from directly or indirectly contacting Mr Levene and posting messages about him on social media or encouraging others to do so. He was told that if he broke this order, he could go to prison.

The court heard that Mr Mole, a trainee teacher, expressed remorse for his actions. Campaign Against Antisemitism is in contact with the Teaching Regulation Agency.

Campaign Against Antisemitism contacted Chelsea to urge the football club to exclude Mr Mole from attending matches and the club confirmed that it would investigate. Chelsea has now confirmed that it has banned Mr Mole for a period of ten years.

In a statement, Chelsea said: “Following the conclusion of court proceedings in February, the club conducted our own investigation into the matter and has taken the decision to ban the individual from Chelsea FC for a period of ten years. Everybody at Chelsea is proud to be part of a diverse club. Our players, staff, fans and visitors to the club come from a wide range of backgrounds, including the Jewish community, and we want to ensure everyone feels safe, valued and included. We will not tolerate any behaviour from supporters that threatens that aim.”

The statement added: “As a club, we will continue to take action against individuals or groups who produce or disseminate social media posts that contravene these values.”

Chelsea was among nineteen Premiership clubs, along with the Premier League itself, to have adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Dan Levene said: “I’m delighted with this outcome. It sends a very strong message that abusive and antisemitic behaviour online is unacceptable. And it’s particularly poignant coming today, when football clubs are walking out from social media because of racism online. I hope this case leads to better processes at Chelsea and other clubs so that it doesn’t take so long to come to the right decision in future, but this is a good day for the fight against racism in football.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Chelsea should be applauded for banning an abusive troll for ten years. This announcement sends a powerful message that antisemitism in football and online must not be tolerated. Football clubs walking out of social media over online hate is one thing, but backing it up with strong action like this is the strongest antidote.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

Canterbury Christ Church University has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Last year, the University acted to remove its brand from Urban Dictionary after Campaign Against Antisemitism alerted it to its advertisements featuring alongside antisemitic and offensive entries on the controversial website.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authoritiesuniversities and public bodies. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Eric Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Several parliamentary candidates in Peterborough, belonging to both the Labour Party and the Conservative Party, have been accused of antisemitism, resulting in suspensions.

It has been reported that in response to several candidates allegedly harbouring and sharing antisemitic videos and opinions, including that Sir Keir Starmer is under “Zionist control”, the Peterborough Constituency Labour Party (CLP) has moved to suspend fourteen individuals, at least seven of whom were local councillors.

A spokesperson for the Labour Party said that the decision reflected the Party’s “determination to root out all forms of antisemitism from our party and it is testament to our commitment to zero tolerance that we will not be influenced by an election timetable.”

It was reported that some of the names of those suspended from Peterborough CLP were Councillor Ansar Ali, Richard Stargward, Cllr Angus Ellis, Colin and Linda Watson, Cllr Samantha Hemraj, Kit Hubback, and Cllr Mahboob Hemraj.

Other suspended individuals reportedly included Cllr Shabina Qayyum, Cllr Aasiayah Joseph and Cllr Mohammed Jamil, also from Peterborough CLP.

In addition, it is understood that Janet Armstrong and Jonathan Orchard were suspended from North Cambridgeshire CLP.

The Conservative Party in Peterborough has faced similar pressure to reprimand members who have also been accused of antisemitism. Cllr Muhammed Ikram was alleged to have shared an antisemitic article that propagated the idea that Israel was enacting a “Final Solution” in Gaza, adding: “Can you really support Zionism after this?”

Meanwhile, Cllr Mohammed Nadeem was said to have shared videos from a hate preacher who is banned from entering the UK.

Ishfaq Hussain, a Conservative candidate running in Dogsthorpe, is understood to have been suspended. He recently apologised for sharing antisemitic tropes on Facebook. In one Facebook post, he accused the “Saudi regime” of being “long standing puppets of America and Israel,” and went on to label them “a trilogy of zionists.” He then remarked that “Islam doesn’t breed terrorists the zionist trilogy do.” Mr Hussain also shared a video that was captioned: “The Jews in Israel are not true Jews.”

In his apology, Mr Hussain said: “I recognise Israel’s right to exist and wholeheartedly support a two-state solution. I deeply regret that my frustration at events in Israel and Palestine led me to suggest otherwise. Some of my previous language was ill-judged and offensive. It also echoed antisemitic tropes in ways I had not fully understood. However strongly we feel, we should never let our emotions get the better of us. By doing so, I allowed myself to become part of the problem. I am truly sorry.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is encouraging to see both the Labour and Conservative Parties taking action against local councillors and members in Peterborough accused of antisemitism. In this instance, Labour has been particularly proactive in issuing suspensions in spite of looming local elections, although any investigations must be delayed until the Party introduces an independent disciplinary system later this year. Conservative action in this instance leaves considerable room for improvement. Slaps on the wrist are no substitute for zero tolerance of antisemitism.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Brian Rose, a London mayoral candidate and podcaster, has been asked to step down from his run after a video interview promoting an antisemitic conspiracy theorist hosted on his website resurfaced.

A 2020 video podcast featured an interview with the antisemitic hate preacher David Icke, who explained to Mr Rose how Israel was was using the COVID-19 pandemic to “test its technology”. He then went on to detail how the Jewish state was supposedly responsible for orchestrating the 9/11 attacks, and that a group of American “ultra-Zionists” were responsible for covering up the story. 

Mr Icke also suggested that there was a hidden hand of “ultra-Zionist extremists” who run the world through a series of shadowy organisations. In addition, he referenced the Rothschild family and its supposed role in the “Illuminati”, another common antisemitic trope.

Mr Rose failed to challenge Mr Icke on any of his points during the interview.

Mr Rose also drew the ire of fellow mayoral candidate, Luisa Porritt. Ms Porritt, running as a candidate for the Liberal Democrats, criticised Mr Rose’s passivity, stating: “No candidate seeking to represent our diverse and liberal city should be giving a platform to sickening, antisemitic conspiracy theories about the tragedy of 9/11. Brian Rose is not only weird but dangerous and he should withdraw immediately.”

However, when questioned on hosting Mr Icke, Mr Rose did not believe he had acted inappropriately. He stated: “When he was on my show we didn’t discuss these things and I don’t allow anything illegal to be discussed. We weren’t discussing what you were talking about. You’re reading off titles, but I’m talking about what content was – I believe in freedom of speech, I believe in people.”

Ofcom sanctioned the television channel London Live for originally airing the video last year.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is very worrying that Brian Rose would see fit to interview the antisemitic hate preacher David Icke, let alone not to challenge him when he peddled antisemitic tropes about Rothschilds, 9/11 conspiracies and claims about Israel using coronavirus to ‘test its technology’. London Live was censured by Ofcom for airing the interview, but the fact that it remains on Mr Rose’s website appears to show that, in Mr Rose’s judgement, Mr Icke’s views should be promoted.”

Mr Icke uses social media, his books and his stage performances to incite hatred. His preaching is so absurd that since the 1990s he has been dismissed as a crank, but because he is dismissed, there has been no major opposition to him and he has built up a following of thousands upon thousands of disciples whom he has persuaded to adamantly believe that the world is in the grip of a conspiracy run by the “Rothschild Zionists”. His repertoire includes conspiracy myths and tropes classified as antisemitic according to the International Definition of Antisemitism, adopted by the British Government. Campaign Against Antisemitism has successfully persuaded some venues to pull out of hosting his events.

After years of pressure from Campaign Against Antisemitism, Mr Icke was banned from most social media platforms.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and candidates and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

European Liberal Youth (LYMEC) has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The European Union of Jewish Students (EUJS) announced that LYMEC, the youth organisation of the Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe Party, made the decision this past weekend at the online LYMEC Spring Congress.

In their press release, EUJS said: “EUJS is delighted that such a step forward was decided upon and would like to take this opportunity to congratulate LYMEC on its adoption of both the motion and the [D]efinition. Going forward, EUJS would like to note that the adoption of the [D]efinition represents simply a first step in the process and so we plan to be in regular contact with our contacts at LYMEC to ensure that the adoption is carried out and acted upon.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Protesters at an anti-vaccination rally held in London this past weekend were pictured wearing the yellow star that was forced upon Jews during the Holocaust.

Comedian David Baddiel took to Twitter to share a photo of a woman wearing the yellow star, accompanying it with the caption: “Take. That. Off.”

The Auschwitz Memorial replied to this photo in support of Mr Baddiel, tweeting: “Instrumentalization of the tragedy of Jews who suffered, were humiliated, marked with a yellow star, and finally isolated in ghettos and murdered during the Holocaust, in order to argue against vaccination that saves human lives is a sad symptom of moral and intellectual decline.”

This is not the first time that anti-vaccination protesters have used the yellow star during their rallies. Recently, French protesters were seen wearing them at a demonstration in Avignon, and they have also been seen elsewhere in Europe and North America.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Jews were forced to wear a yellow Star of David so that the Nazis could easily identify them and massacre them in a systematic genocide that saw six million Jewish men, women and children slaughtered simply for being Jewish.

“Comparisons between the Holocaust and COVID-19 regulations and vaccinations are grossly ignorant and utterly despicable, because to compare vaccination passports, restrictions on who can enter a football area or rules about wearing masks on public transport with the genocide of over a third of the world’s Jewish population in the Holocaust is essentially a form of Holocaust denial.”

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The BBC has been forced to amend its website to confirm that Jews are indeed considered an ethnic minority, after Campaign Against Antisemitism demanded an apology in response to the BBC’s airing of an offensive segment last month titled “Should Jews count as an ethnic minority?”

In addition to having launched a petition, signed by thousands, calling on the BBC to apologise for the “ridiculous” and insensitive segment, we also submitted a complaint to the Corporation. 

The segment featured four panellists and a guest, Ben Cohen, the Editor of Pink News, who is Jewish. Mr Cohen rightly observed on air that “the notion of this debate is ridiculous”.

Host Jo Coburn proposed that “many Jews have succeeded in reaching high political office and therefore don’t need to be seen as a group needing recognition in the same way as others”, but Mr Cohen observed that Jews “face antisemitism and racism very clearly” and referenced the Labour Party’s institutional antisemitism.

The debate was triggered by social media backlash against Labour’s Deputy Leader, Angela Rayner, who had tweeted that Scottish Labour’s newly-elected leader is “the first ever ethnic minority leader of a political party anywhere in the UK”.

The BBC has now confirmed to Campaign Against Antisemitism that our comments had been passed on to senior editors of the programme, and that they would publish a clarification to their website to “make clear that Jews are officially an ethnic minority.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It was outrageous for the BBC to air a segment questioning whether Jews count as an ethnic minority. The show’s only Jewish guest rightly considered the debate to be ‘ridiculous’. It is a question that the Corporation would never presume to ask of any other minority community in Britain, and it is telling that it does so in relation to the Jews. Debacles such as this one show why, according to our research, two thirds of British Jews consider that the BBC’s coverage of Jewish matters is unfavourable. Accordingly, we launched a petition, signed by thousands, calling for action, and submitted a complaint to the BBC. We are pleased that the BBC has recognised its error and clarified the position, but it must still consider the editorial failures that allowed the question to be asked in the first place.”

It is notable that the BBC initially rejected our complaint and only upheld it on appeal.

Our Antisemitism Barometer 2020 showed that two thirds of British Jews view unfavourably the BBC’s coverage of matters of Jewish interest (including antisemitism). Given segments like these, this breathtaking finding is wholly reasonable.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reports in the media, they should contact us.

A rabbi has been assaulted by a man yelling “Dirty Jew, I am going to kill you!”

The assailant was also said to have taken the rabbi’s hat off his head and thrown it to the ground.

Following this, the suspect stripped down to his underwear and “made explicit gestures outside a synagogue”.

The incident took place in Clapton Common and a suspect was said to have been arrested by Hackney Police.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 2394 26/04/21.

A few days ago, a man yelled “Heil Hitler” as he drove past a Jewish pedestrian in Clapton Common.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Ofcom has dismissed a complaint from Campaign Against Antisemitism regarding a Channel 4 segment that criticised the International Definition of Antisemitism without offering a Jewish perspective. The media regulator said that it found “no issues warranting investigation under its rules.”

Speakers during the segment, which lasted nearly ten minutes, repeatedly stated that the Definition “silenced” debate about Israel, which is precisely the “Livingstone Formulation” that the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) confirmed was used to victimise Jews in the Labour Party to such an extent that it broke equalities law. In using this antisemitic formulation, the segment breached Ofcom’s guidance on harm and offence.

Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant in the EHRC’s investigation of antisemitism in the Labour Party.

The failure to include a single representative from the mainstream Jewish community – in which there is a consensus in favour of widespread adoption of the Definition – represented a failure by Channel 4 News to show due impartiality in its programme, which is also a breach of Ofcom’s guidance.

In Ofcom’s response to us, they wrote: “In our view, the editorially-linked interview with Daniel Barenboim provided further context and helped to reflect an Israeli and Jewish perspective to the extent it was necessary given the limited content that had referred critically to the policies and actions of the Israeli Government in the earlier Akram Salhab item.”

Regarding our complaints that the Definition should not have been labelled ‘controversial’ due to its widespread adoption, and that under the Definition criticism of Israel similar to that levelled against any other country cannot be regarded as antisemitic, Ofcom replied: “In our view, the programme did not suggest that the Definition does not permit any criticism of Israel whatsoever. It also correctly highlighted that calling the existence of a state of Israel a racist endeavour would fall within the [D]efinition of antisemitism. We also considered that there has been a robust debate around the [Definition] and about the government’s efforts to convince universities to adopt it. In this context, we do not consider it would have been misleading to the audience to have described the [D]efinition as ‘controversial’.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 revealed that almost half of British Jews consider Channel 4’s coverage of matters of Jewish interest and antisemitism to be unfavourable, while almost a third add that they are unsatisfied with how Channel 4 deals with complaints relating to antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected]

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds Associated Press Stylebook’s (AP Stylebook) announcement that the organisation will now use the spelling ‘antisemitism’ instead of ‘anti-Semitism’.

In addition to this, they will also write ‘antisemitic’ rather than ‘anti-Semitic’.

Experts have long opposed the use of ‘anti-Semitism’, on the basis that there is no such thing as ‘Semitism’ that antisemites are opposed to; the term ‘antisemitism’ was in fact coined by an antisemite as a supposedly sophisticated alternative to ‘judenhass’, meaning ‘Jew hatred’.

The hyphenation of the term ‘anti-Semitism’ has also confused people into thinking that it might refer to hatred of all people who speak a group of Middle Eastern languages which are sometimes referred to as Semitic languages. Furthermore, the Nazi Party would use the term in reference to their ‘subcategories’ of humans.

The International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance writes that the term ‘anti-Semitism’ is problematic because it “not only legitimises a form of pseudo-scientific racial classification that was thoroughly discredited by association with Nazi ideology, but also divides the term, stripping it from its meaning of opposition and hatred toward Jews.”

One Twitter user embraced AP Stylebook’s decision, writing: “Glad to see you catching up!”

Another wrote: “This is a welcome change. Small, but with significant implications. It’s a style preferred by the world’s leading scholars of Jew-hatred.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism endorses the use of the preferred terms ‘antisemitism’ and ‘antisemitic’ when referring to Jew-hate.

Campaign Against Antisemitism held a rally in solidarity with French Jews yesterday in opposition to the Court of Cassation’s ruling to let Sarah Halimi’s murderer go free.

In 2017, Ms Halimi, a 65-year-old Jewish woman, was murdered by her 27-year-old Muslim neighbour, Kobili Traoré, after he tortured and hurled her from a window to her death. In December 2019, France’s lower court ruled that Mr Traoré could not be held to stand trial as he was under the influence of cannabis at the time, which was said to have affected his judgment. The lower court’s ruling was upheld by France’s Court of Cassation late last week, sparking outrage across Jewish communities.

The rally took place outside the French Embassy in Knightsbridge, with protesters holding placards bearing the words “J’accuse! Solidarity with French Jews” and “Je Suis Sarah Halimi”. Due to COVID-19 restrictions, attendance was by registration only, with all places taken within 24 hours of our announcing the rally, with a significant waiting-list. A further 10,000 supporters demanding justice for Sarah Halimi watched the event across Campaign Against Antisemitism’s social media channels.

The rally in London was part of a global movement of rallies in Paris, Marseille and other French cities, Tel Aviv, New York City, Miami and Los Angeles.

Beginning with a moment of silence for Sarah Halimi, a variety of speakers were then introduced, including Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, Gideon Falter, actress Dame Maureen Lipman, and Founder of the Hexagon Society, Sophie Weisenfeld. Other speakers included political commentator and YouTuber Raphael Landau, and activist and Trustee for Muslims Against Antisemitism (MAAS), activist Liz Arif-Fear.

The rally criticised not only the Court’s ruling in the murder case but also the treatment of French Jews in general. Addressing this issue in her speech, Dame Maureen accused France of “putting your knee on the neck of the Jewish race. Under such blind and bigoted injustice, we too cannot breathe. Nous ne pouvons pas respirer.” Dame Maureen and Mr Falter also both observed how there has been worldwide solidarity against some forms of racism over the past year but global silence over antisemitic injustice.

Ms Arif-Fear spoke passionately, stating: “Sarah Halimi’s family deserve justice…the murderer must face justice…I, and my colleagues at MAAS, will always stand with our Jewish brothers and sisters. We believe that we’re stronger together, and we want Jews across Britain, France, wider Europe, and the world to know that you do have allies.”

Mr Falter, detailing his own first-hand experiences of antisemitism in France, revealed harrowing accounts of heightened security in Jewish neighbourhoods and synagogues being firebombed, before adding: “It’s shameful that today in the European Union, in Europe, in the world, we have a leading country, like France, where Jews are in fear.” Mr Landau echoed this sentiment in his remarks.

The speeches can be watched in full on our YouTube channel.

Lawyers for Dr Halimi’s sister have announced that they will be bringing a lawsuit under Israeli law to convict Mr Traoré, and are considering an appeal to the European Court of Human Rights. Dr Halimi’s sister, Esther Lekover, is an Israeli citizen and the lawyers stated that they intend to make use of an Israeli law that allows them to take action over the murder even though it was committed outside of Israel.

Brunel University has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

In a statement the University said: “Brunel University London supports initiatives that seek to tackle prejudice and discrimination. It recognises the International Definition as supporting the University’s existing policies on Equality, Diversity and Inclusion, reinforcing the message that antisemitism will not be tolerated and will have due regard to the Definition when considering any allegation raised. Council upholds Brunel’s commitment to freedom of speech.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities and public bodies. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Eric Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

The University of Bath has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

In a statement, the University said: “Our University is committed to being an inclusive community, which cherishes diversity. We seek to create a community where hate, harassment and discrimination are never tolerated. Condemning antisemitism and tackling any antisemitic incidents is very much part of this commitment.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities and public bodies. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Eric Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Antisemitic graffiti promoting Holocaust denial and Nazi symbols has been found in Tottenham Hale.

Shocking antisemitic sentiments were found scrawled along Daneland Walk in Tottenham Hale promoting Holocaust denial. Written against a property billboard, one section of graffiti read: “COVIDHOAX + HOLOHOAX = JEW WORLD ORDER”

‘Holohoax’ is a word used by Holocaust-deniers to portray the extermination of six million Jews as a fraud that has been carried out by the Jewish people for financial gain, while anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

In a similar message, “COVID IS A LIE HOLOCAUST IS A LIE F*** THE JEWS” was found nearby with graffiti of a swastika beside it.

“F*** THE JEWS HITLER WAS RIGHT” was also spotted along the walk.

The handwriting used in these messages appeared to be similar to the antisemitic graffiti scrawled on a nearby Tottenham Hale billboard, on which we reported earlier. The billboard is situated on Ashley Road in Tottenham Hale, close to the large Jewish community in Stamford Hill and also near Tottenham Hotspur’s stadium. The football club has recently been the target of antisemitic abuse, including over the abortive European Super League proposal.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “This series of incidents of antisemitic graffiti are abhorrent and have no place on British streets, let alone so near a Jewish community. The graffiti must be removed and the perpetrators must be found. All citizens have a right to walk our streets without being confronted with racist graffiti and incitement.”

We are grateful to a member of the public who brought these images to our attention.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Talia Cohen

A fifteen-year-old Abingdon schoolboy has been expelled after allegedly sending an antisemitic image to a Jewish student from the same school.

The image, sent through the social media app Snapchat, was said to have depicted three people dressed as Nazis soldiers.

The teenager also allegedly created a video on Tik Tok, another social media app, in which he was said to have joked about raping a woman from a different Tik Tok video.  

The Headmaster of the prestigious Oxfordshire boarding school, Michael Windsor, said that the videos were “grossly racist and sexist”. He added: “These incidents do not just contravene our Behaviour, Rewards and Sanctions Policy but they go completely against the ethos and culture of the school based on courtesy, kindness and respect.”

The schoolboy has issued a response, stating: “I am deeply sorry and regretful of my stupid actions. I deeply regret my actions and I understand that people could get offended by them very easily but I had no intention of offending or hurting someone’s feelings. In the small amount of time I have had to think about my disgraceful actions, I can certainly confirm that not a single thing I said was intended with harm or to offend anyone. I understand now that it would and I regret posting those things, it was a lack of judgment before when posting, and I did not think about all the people that would see my profile. I am deeply sorry and I promise that this will not happen again.”

However, the boy’s parents defended their son, arguing that social media is not real life and therefore that the punishment should not be too severe, claiming that the videos were “just jokes”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

“F***” the Jews” has been found graffitied onto a billboard in North London.

The billboard is situated on Ashley Road in Tottenham Hale, close to the large Jewish community in Stamford Hill and also near Tottenham Hotspur’s stadium. The football club has recently been the target of antisemitic abuse, including over the abortive European Super League proposal.

The graffiti was reported earlier this week by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 3737 20/04/21.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Lawyers for the sister of murdered retired doctor and schoolteacher Sarah Halimi have announced that they will be bringing a lawsuit under Israeli law to convict her antisemitic murderer, Kobili Traoré, after France’s highest court ruled he cannot be held responsible for his actions because he was high on cannabis.

Dr Halimi’s sister, Esther Lekover, is an Israeli citizen and the lawyers stated that they intend to make use of an Israeli law that allows them to take action over the murder even though it was committed outside of Israel.

French lawyers Gilles-William Goldnadel and Francis Szpiner said in a statement in French that they: “deplore being forced to make use of this procedure, but cannot accept a denial of justice which tramples reason and justice, reaching far beyond the Jewish community of France.”

In 2017, Dr Halimi, a 65-year-old retired schoolteacher found Mr Traoré in her Paris apartment. He had reportedly subjected her to years of abuse. Mr Traoré savagely beat Dr Halimi, shouting “Allahu akhbar” and then hurled her from her window to her death, shouting “I killed the Shaitan [demon]”.

For months, French authorities refused to admit the antisemitic nature of his crime. Dr Halimi’s murderer, a violent drug dealer, claimed that he had felt “possessed” because he was high on cannabis and should not be held responsible.

France’s highest court has now ruled in his favour, meaning that in France today, it is possible to be sentenced to a year in prison for throwing a dog from a window, but if you hurl a Jew to their death whilst on drugs, you walk free.

In addition to the lawsuit being filed in Israel, Dr Halimi’s family is considering an appeal to the European Court of Human Rights.

French President Emmanuel Macron has called for a change in the law.

For years, France has gradually betrayed its Jews by allowing antisemitism to run rampant, putting French Jews in fear. This Sunday 25th April, to coincide with demonstrations in France, we will rally outside the Embassy of France in London to stand in solidarity with French Jews. By agreement with the authorities, due to COVID-19 restrictions, only those who have registered to attend will be permitted entry to the enclosure. Capacity is limited, so please only register if you are certain you can attend.

The Home Secretary, Priti Patel, has called for the proscription of the neo-Nazi group, Atomwaffen Division (AWD). This would make membership of the group punishable by up to ten years in prison.

AWD is a paramilitary neo-Nazi group that trains its members in the use of firearms and reportedly seeks to ignite a race war in the United States. Last year, a member of AWD who made terror threats against American Jewish journalists and activists was sentenced to sixteen months in federal prison in Washington state.  

The Home Secretary has also called for the National Socialist Order (NSO) to be listed as an official alias of AWD. This decision comes after AWD apparently disbanded in the UK last year. However, only a few months later in July, the NSO declared itself to be the group’s successor.

Ms Patel said: “Vile and racist white supremacist groups like this exist to spread hate, sow division and advocate the use of violence to further their sick ideologies. I will do all I can to protect young and vulnerable people from being radicalised which is why I am taking action to proscribe this dangerous group.”

Last year, the Home Secretary proscribed the neo-Nazi Sonnenkrieg Division as a terrorist group. This follows the proscription of National Action in 2016, for which Campaign Against Antisemitism had called.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

A driver reportedly shouted “Heil Hitler” while driving past a Jewish pedestrian in Stamford Hill earlier this week.

The victim was left “traumatised” and Hackney police are currently investigating.

The incident took place at Clapton Common last week and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 3331 15/04/21

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The growing community of Charedi Jews in Canvey has been targeted with antisemitic abuse after announcing plans to build a new synagogue.

Local Canvey Island leaders have raised concerns regarding the effect that the planned synagogue may have on the surrounding area, such as noise pollution and traffic, with others also worried that the synagogue’s architecture may not fit in with the other buildings on Canvey Island.

However, while most of the concerns raised were presented as genuine and civil, some Facebook users on the ‘Canvey Island action group’ used the opportunity to spew vile antisemitic vitriol.

One of the comments read: “I’ve objected. P***ed off my 13 yr old has to walk in the road, around their [Charedi Jews] f ing vans dropping 100’s of kids off”…if they allow this more will move here.”

Another wrote: “All they do is take and no give, what is happening here ?????”

Referring to the Jewish community of Stamford Hill, one user said: “Stamford Hill slung them all out, because they took over everything just like they are doing on the island. Unfortunately they don’t think about people around them, it’s their way or no way.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

Jeremy Corbyn has lost an appeal in the first stage of a defamation case brought by a Jewish activist and blogger.

On an unknown date in 2013, Mr Corbyn addressed a meeting convened by the Palestinian Return Centre. Referring to a previous speech given by Manuel Hassassian, the Palestinian Authority’s representative in Britain, Mr Corbyn suggested that “the progressive Jewish element” in Britain at the time of the Balfour Declaration had been against it, and that these same Jewish progressives had been the leaders of the London trade unions and the Labour Party at the time. He continued: “It was Zionism that rose up and Zionism that drove them [Jewish progressive Trades Union and Labour Party leaders] into this sort of ludicrous position they have at the present time.”

He gave as an example of this supposedly “ludicrous position” the meeting in Parliament, at which, he said, the Palestinian envoy’s words had been “dutifully recorded by the thankfully silent Zionists who were in the audience on that occasion and then came up and berated him afterwards for what he’d said. So clearly two problems. One is that they don’t want to study history and secondly, having lived in this country for a very long time, probably all their lives, they don’t understand English irony either. Manuel does understand English irony and uses it very, very effectively so I think they need two lessons which we can help them with.”

A video of Mr Corbyn’s comments was shown on The Andrew Marr Show, and on 13th June 2019 it was reported that one of the activists who had been identified as being the subject of his comments to Andrew Marr, Mr Richard Millett, was seeking libel damages from Mr Corbyn on the basis of his accusation that “Zionists” had “berated” Manuel Hassassian.

Mr Corbyn’s lawyers were said to have argued on the basis that the statement was a ‘statement of opinion’. However, in the ruling, the Judge declared: “In my judgment, it is clear that Mr Corbyn was making factual allegations in the statement as to Mr Millett’s behaviour on more than one occasion.”

Mr Millet is being represented by Mark Lewis, who is also an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Three judges were reportedly present to review the appeal case, all of whom concurred in its dismissal. This is only the first stage of the defamation case, which continues.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

France’s Court of Cassation has ruled that Sarah Halimi’s killer could not be held to stand trial due to being high on cannabis whilst committing the murder.

In 2017, Ms Halimi, a 65-year-old Jewish woman, was murdered by her 27-year-old Muslim neighbour, Kobili Traoré, after he tortured her before pushing her out of a window to her death.

Mr Traoré was said to have yelled “Allah Akbar,” “I killed the shaitan,” which is an Arabic word for ‘devil’ or ‘demon’, along with antisemitic vitriol.

In December 2019, France’s lower court ruled that Mr Traoré could not be held to stand trial as he was under the influence of cannabis at the time, which was said to have affected his judgment.

This decision provoked thousands of French Jews and their supporters to rally in Paris last year in order to protest the decision by the French Court of Appeal that Mr Traoré was “not criminally responsible” for his actions. Ms Halimi was routinely insulted in their building, Mr Traoré conceded that seeing a Jewish menorah and prayer book in the 65-year-old lady’s flat intensified his mental state and even the court acknowledged that the attack was antisemitic.

The lower court’s ruling was upheld by France’s Court of Cassation late last week. This most recent ruling from the Court of Cassation has sparked outrage across Jewish communities, with many, including France’s President, Emmanuel Macron, calling for reforms in French law.

In an interview with Le Figaro magazine, President Macron said: “Deciding to take drugs and then ‘becoming mad’ should not in my eyes remove your criminal responsibility. On this topic, I would like the Minister of Justice to submit a change to the law as soon as possible.

“It is not for me to comment on a court decision, but I would like to tell the family, relatives of the victim and all fellow citizens of the Jewish faith who were awaiting this trial of my warm support and the determination of the Republic to protect them.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “After the Holocaust, in which France did so little to protect its Jewish citizens, the nation swore to defend the Jews who remained against their tormentors. This latest decision, with France’s highest court determining that torturing and throwing an elderly Jewish woman out of a window cannot be ascribed to antisemitic motivations if the attacker is high, is a betrayal of that pledge.

“The fact that this cruel antisemitic murder has been punished less than a similar crime committed against a dog would be, tells you how the French authorities view Jews and how unserious they are about protecting them.

“In view of this attitude, it is little wonder that so many Jews have fled France in recent years and that fewer than half of British Jews believe that the Jewish community has a long-term future in Europe.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Twitter users have responded to news of a possible launch of a new European Super League (ESL) by blaming Jews for “ruining football.”

The announcement of the ESL has proved controversial and unpopular with swathes of football fans due to the potential harm it is believed may be caused to domestic football leagues. Many fans apparently feel that the concept of the ESL is not in keeping with the game’s integrity.

However, for some Twitter users, what began as reasonable criticism regarding the direction of modern football quickly escalated into vitriolic, antisemitic accusations levelled against some of the league’s creators. who are the owners of the football clubs involved. Some of the owners or chairmen are Jewish. Among the tropes were claims of Jewish greed, a classic antisemitic notion.

One user wrote: “Notably, most of the owners of these ‘big’ football clubs pushing for a Super League are Jews, including Roman Abramovic and the Glazers…..Jews are ruining football, they dont give a f**** about the Gentile fans..”

Another tweeted: “All this talk of the European Super League. It’s jew rats behind it. All money grabbing c***s. It’s no wonder that people hate them as much as the muslims.” This abhorent post was accompanied by a popular antisemitic meme.

Yet another wrote: “Them 3 fat AMERICAN C***S YOU F***ING BASTARDS. And as for that Jew levy your family should have been gassed. Inters owners also ruined the cal champions. Perez is in the f***ing mafia”. Daniel Levy is the Chairman of Tottenham Hotspur, one of the founding clubs of the ESL. He was recently targeted by antisemitic abuse online.“

Another still said: “Hey Zionists it’s not all about money you suckers“.

These were only a selection of the antisemitic abuse online, appealing to classic tropes of Jewish greed, parasitism and control, as well as references to the Holocaust. Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms. The Premier League and nineteen of its constituent clubs have adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The beautiful game has some very hideous fans, and they are out in force on social media objecting in the most grotesque fashion to the possible launch of a new European Super League. No controversy, however great the passions it may stir, can justify the horrendous antisemitic abuse meted out by some Twitter users towards football clubs and their owners. The Premier League, the clubs and social media networks have a responsibility to remove this material immediately and punish the offenders with bans from attending matches. This minority of perpetrators bring shame to the majority of fans who want to see racism expelled from football.“

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

It has been revealed that a candidate for the Scottish National Party (SNP) posted a comment on Facebook comparing the Labour Party’s political strategy in Scotland to that of the Nazi propagandist Joseph Goebbels.

Colm Merrick, the SNP candidate for Eastwood in Glasgow, the seat representing Scotland’s largest Jewish community, reportedly shared a post in February 2015 in connection with an article. In the post, Mr Merrick wrote: “Analysis of UK Labour in Scotland’s election strategy…becomes truly terrifying when the following potential source of its inspiration is considered: ‘If you tell a lie big enough and keep repeating it, people will eventually come to believe it’.”

The quotation is attributed to Joseph Goebbels, one of Hitler’s closest henchmen and Reich Minister of Propaganda for the Nazi Party.

Mr Merrick has since apologised, saying: “I am sorry for this stupid post I made over six years ago.”

Within the last fortnight, another SNP candidate was forced to apologise after comments from 2017 emerged in which she had reportedly compared tactics by the Conservatives to Hitler and the Holocaust.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “This is the second time in as many weeks that past comments by current SNP candidates have emerged comparing a major political party to the Nazis. Last time it was the Conservatives and Hitler, this time it is Labour and Joseph Geobbels, the mastermind of Nazi propaganda.

“Such trivial equations of today’s politics with the darkest period in human history diminish the meaning and memory of the Holocaust. This is the opposite of the example politicians are supposed to be setting, both about Holocaust education and how to conduct public debate.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Ten Jewish gravestones in Belfast City Cemetery were desecrated in an antisemitic hate crime.

The desecration is believed to have taken place last week on 15th April.

Sinn Fein councillor Steven Corr, along with other Sinn Fein members, were active participants in the clean-up crew. He posted photos of the scene on Facebook, writing: “We work continuously after attacks on all graves belonging to all denominations, all religions, adults and children and these unbelievable attacks on the headstones of dead people needs to stop. Let them Rest in Peace.”

Inspector Róisín Brown of the Police Service of Northern Ireland stated: “I am appalled at these criminal acts. City Cemetery, like any graveyard, is a place where members of the community come to pay their respects. The damage to these graves shows a total lack of respect for others and will have a significant impact on individuals and families within the Jewish Community.

“We are investigating this incident as a hate crime, but we need help from the local community in West Belfast to hold those responsible to account for their actions.

“If you saw anyone acting suspiciously in the City Cemetery yesterday evening, or if you have information that would help our investigation, I am asking you to please contact us on the non-emergency number 101 quoting reference 713 16/04/21.”

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Vandalism of Jewish graves is a cowardly act, but all too common in Britain and abroad. We can honour the dead by ensuring that the perpetrators are brought to justice, and we support the efforts of the Police Service of Northern Ireland in doing so.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Cllr Steven Corr

Conservative candidate in the coming local elections has reportedly expressed remorse over a social media post that included the phrase “Jew Boy”.

Darran Davies, who is standing in Hillingdon in London, is alleged to have shared an image of a man on Facebook with the words, “Wanted Jew Boy Reward $100”. Mr Davies shared the image on his personal Facebook page with the caption: “Guys have you seen this bloke.”

A friend of Mr Davies’ apparently commented that the message referred to him because he had not attended a local pub in some time.

Hillingdon Council’s Conservative group leader reportedly said: “The posting … relates to the use of an inappropriate nickname among friends. Although the comment was inappropriate and below the standards expected of a Conservative member this has been resolved by admonishing Mr Davies and reinforcing with him the standards expected of persons seeking to represent Hillingdon Conservatives. Mr Davies has shown deep regret for his lack of judgment and has apologised.”

A Conservative Party spokesperson said: “We are investigating the matter.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is difficult to see how someone who casually uses the phrase ‘Jew Boy’ in online interactions could be an appropriate election candidate for a major political party. The Conservatives will have explaining to do if this matter is simply buried. Zero tolerance means just that.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Tottenham Hotspur’s chairman, Daniel Levy, has been on the receiving end of antisemitic abuse by an unnamed Twitter user.

The tweet, since removed, was said to have contained several antisemitic tropes and has been reported to the police. This comes less than 24 hours after Spurs player Heung-min Son also received racist abuse online.

Labour’s Shadow Minister and MP for Tottenham, David Lammy, condemned the vile abuse. He tweeted: “It’s a football match! This is utterly unacceptable. Racism and antisemitism has no place in the game or anywhere else. Please delete the tweet. You are no Spurs man trust me.”

Tottenham replied on the club’s official Twitter account, stating: “We have reported this antisemitic post to Twitter and the police. Disappointing that the tweet has yet to be deleted. Twitter needs to take immediate action against racists continuing to post abuse. Our internal review into a best course of action moving forward is under way.”

The Premier League and nineteen of its constituent clubs, including Tottenham, recently adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

A South African lecturer is under investigation after he declared in an online lecture that Adolf Hitler committed “no crime”.

Lwazi Lushaba, a political studies lecturer at the University of Cape Town (UCT) and a well-known supporter of the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) campaign gave an online lecture in which he stated: “Hitler committed no crime. All Hitler did was to do to white people what white people had normally reserved for black people.”

A UCT spokesperson described Dr Lushaba’s comment as of “grave concern”, and said that UCT was “clear that all brutalities of genocide constitute both formal crimes against humanity and ongoing sources of pain” and that the university distanced itself “very strongly” from any other view.

A UCT Jewish student said that he had been deeply disturbed by Dr Lushaba’s comments, which became public on Yom Hashoah. “Hitler didn’t just persecute Jews” but also black people, Roma and disabled, pointed out the student, whose great-grandfather was murdered by the Nazis.

Another Jewish student alleged that Dr Lushaba had been “saying similarly egregious things” since gaining his doctorate in 2019, but had evaded sanctions by claiming he was a victim of “racism” or that it was a “free speech” issue. Dr Lushaba received a reprimand after allegedly becoming violent towards colleagues when his preferred candidate was not elected as dean of humanities.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The Students’ Union at Concordia University, Montreal, has apologised to the Jewish community for standing “idly by” in the face of antisemitism on campus, and has called for training to combat anti-Jewish sentiment.

In an open letter of apology on its Facebook page, the Students’ Union said that its mistakes were “embarrassing” and expressed regret that in standing “idly by” it had “assisted in fostering a campus culture where Jewish students are afraid to openly identify as Jewish.”

The Students’ Union also pledged to implement antisemitism training for incoming officers and to include “a Jewish perspective” in its operations when dealing in future with “topics of discrimination.”

The letter concluded by saying that the Students’ Union had “stood idly by in the past while acts of antisemitism occurred” and that it hoped “not to repeat those mistakes” and that the Jewish community would give it “a chance to support them in the future.”

Rabbi Reuben Poupko, co-Chair of the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs in Quebec expressed “gratitude and pride in the students of our community who very intelligently and very courageously engaged in the necessary dialogue to bring this about.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A Jewish Voice for Labour (JVL) official once labelled an “antisemitism denier” chaired a Labour disciplinary panel on antisemitism last week. JVL is an antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation.

Stephen Marks chaired a panel comprising three members of Labour’s National Constitutional Committee (NCC), the Party’s highest disciplinary body, on 8th April, to review claims by the former Mayor of Haringey and current Labour councillor, Sheila Peacock, of bullying and antisemitism against Cllr Vincent Carroll.

Cllr Peacock, who is Jewish, alleged that Cllr Carroll threatened and bribed her to leave the Labour Party over a dispute regarding her postponement of a meeting. She claims that Cllr Carroll texted her to say that she would be “physically removed from office.” She says that he also offered her money to leave the Party and alleged that the monetary incentive was antisemitic as it was made because she was Jewish (an allusion to the classic antisemitic trope connecting Jews and money).

Cllr Peacock then reportedly texted Cllr Carroll, saying: “Money unlike for some is not my God,” to which Cllr Carroll reportedly responded, “Yes it is. You either move the AGM or be disciplined by the Party.”

After hearing the case, the NCC reportedly cleared Cllr Carroll of any wrongdoing, which left Cllr Peacock “distraught”.

There was reportedly some controversy amongst senior Labour officials regarding the inclusion of Mr Marks on the panel.

Mr Marks has a history of controversial behaviour. In 2017, he signed a petition in support of Jackie Walker, a former Vice-Chair of Momentum and one of those exemplifying the institutionalisation of antisemitism in the Labour Party. Ms Walker was repeatedly suspended by Labour and finally expelled in 2019. She has persistently claimed that complaints of antisemitism are part of a plot to destabilise the leadership of Jeremy Corbyn and has rejected the International Definition of Antisemitism.

In 2018, Mr Marks also reportedly shared a petition in support of David Watson, who was suspended from Labour in 2016 for allegedly sharing claims on social media comparing the Israeli intelligence agency Mossad with the Nazis and accusing Israel of genocide. Mr Marks is reported to have written in respect of Mr Watson: “It is cases like this which ‘bring the party into disrepute’. Those responsible are the ones who should be suspended!”

According to the Deputy Leader of Oxford City Council, Mr Marks claimed at a meeting that “Labour’s antisemitism problem was a fabrication of Israeli propagandists and arms dealers terrified of a Corbyn government”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has lodged a complaint against Jeremy Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day of the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A graduate of Cambridge University “called for the extermination of all Jewish people,” Manchester Crown Court has heard.

Oliver Bel, 24, of Salford, was also said to have been in possession of a bomb-making manual. He denies the terror charges, claiming that his interest in the book was only “academic.”

However, in 2016 Mr Bel was reportedly in contact with members of National Action, a far-right neo-Nazi terrorist organisation. National Action was proscribed as a terrorist organisation in December 2016 following a long campaign by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others. Under section 11 of the Terrorism Act 2000, membership of a proscribed terrorist organisation is a criminal offence.

The court heard that Mr Bel expressed views in “preserving racial superiority.” The court was also told that Mr Bel “harboured and possibly still does harbour extreme right-wing views.”

Prosecutor Joe Allman told the court that in addition to declaring himself a National Socialist, Mr Bel “had held Jews responsible for ‘the communist revolution and pretty much every other progressive movement since then.’”

Mr Bel had also allegedly made several heinous claims, apparently calling for the extermination of the Jews as well as claiming that only 200,000 Jews died in the Holocaust, not 6 million.

Mr Bel was said to have had a track record of troubling online posts. Jurors heard that Mr Bel posted on Facebook: “I just want to go on a killing spree,” and posting just a day later, “Hate them Jews, kill them all then kill all n******.”

The court was told that it was only after Mr Bel made several antisemitic comments, which extended to defending Adolf Hitler, on the Young Free Speech society Facebook page that the Counter Terrorism Unit began to pay attention to him.

It was said that an officer from the Prevent Programme, a division of the Counter Terrorism Unit, spoke to Mr Bel in person. However, Mr Bel continued to espouse “angry and racist views online,” prosecutors said.

In a raid of Mr Bel’s house, anti-terror police found Nazi memorabilia and books about Hitler, with Mr Bel reportedly adding: “I have got more extremist material than that, I have got the Anarchist Cookbook,” which is a guide to making bombs and illegal drugs at home, written during the 1970s.

Jurors also heard that when the police were examining Mr Bel’s phone, which Mr Bel apparently attempted to hide from them, they found conversations between him and Alex Davies, founder of National Action.

In addition to controversial images, they also reportedly found an article written about Mr Bel for the anti-fascist website, Hope Not Hate. The article was said to have included Mr Bel’s online posts, in which he was said to have written: “Jews are parasites, well known for nepotism and financial corruption, with a background of communist revolution and pretty much every progressive movement from there… Extermination is the best option for them.”

The trial continues.

Last year, members of the proscribed National Action group were sentenced to prison, having engaged, amongst other activities, in far-right stickering and recruitment campaigns.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Image credit: Hope Not Hate

Congregants attending a virtual Easter service at Grace Baptist Church in San Jose, California were zoombombed with hateful antisemitic hate speech on the last day of Passover.

Zoombombing is when people join a Zoom video call with the intention of derailing it. This usually involves spewing antisemitic, racist, or otherwise hateful rhetoric.

One culprit can be heard saying: “F*** the f*****g Jews, man. Send Jews to the concentration camp and gas all the f*****g stinky Jews.”

The perpetrators also spouted several homophobic and racist slurs.

The church’s Senior Pastor, Reverend George Oliver, believed that the church was a target for racists owing to its particularly progressive nature.

Reverend Oliver said: “They had a purpose. This church hires a gay, black pastor…they come and spew profanity about black people and LGBTQ persons. And on the last day of Passover, talk about gassing Jews? So, I don’t think this is some kind of coincidence.”

He added: “It was vile and repugnant. Not only was it Easter, which is the highest of holidays for the Christians, it was the last day of Passover. It was also the day that Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated.”

A spokesman for Zoom reportedly said: “We have been deeply upset to hear about these types of incidents, and Zoom strongly condemns such behaviour. We have recently updated a number of default settings and added features to help hosts more easily access in-meeting security controls, including controlling screen sharing, removing and reporting participants, and locking meetings, among other actions. We have also been educating users on security best practices for setting up their meetings, including recommending that users avoid sharing private meeting links and passwords publicly on websites, social media, or other public forums, and encouraging anyone hosting large-scale or public events to utilize Zoom’s webinar solution.

“We are committed to maintaining an equal, respectful and inclusive online environment for all our users. We take meeting disruptions extremely seriously and where appropriate, we work closely with law enforcement authorities. We encourage users to report any incidents of this kind to Zoom and law enforcement authorities so the appropriate action can be taken against offenders.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has previously reported on the phenomenon of ‘Zoom bombing’ and has urged communal institutions to take precautions to safeguard against antisemitic disruption of online events.

Police have identified one of the suspects whom they believe plastered antisemitic graffiti on the side of the Chabad Centre for Jewish Life and Learning in Victoria, Canada.  

Two suspects were caught on surveillance vandalising the Chabad Centre on Glasgow Street, and the incident was reported on 6th April. A few days later, one of the suspects came forward.

Police are still investigating, and the graffiti has since been removed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A former senior official from the GMB union allegedly referred to victims of antisemitism as “rich b****** Jews” in an appalling speech, sources claim.

The speech was said to have taken place at the GMB Southern Region Christmas Party in November 2019 at the Holiday Inn in Guilford, Surrey.

The former official reportedly stated that he hoped that Jeremy Corbyn would not lose the General Election due to “false” antisemitism allegations against the Labour Party. He then was said to have professed that the issue of antisemitism within the Labour Party was perpetuated by “rich b****** Jews”.

Several complaints were made regarding the official’s remarks and GMB’s acting General Secretary, Warren Kenny, is believed to have reported the matter to ACAS, a non-departmental government organisation responsible for resolving workplace disputes, for a review of the incident.

A GMB spokesperson said: “GMB takes any allegation of antisemitism – or any form of racism – incredibly seriously. We have a zero tolerance policy and any report made is investigated thoroughly by the union. As a union that includes the Union of Jewish Garment Workers we stand shoulder to shoulder with Jewish communities in tackling the scourge of antisemitism across the globe.”

A BBC journalist has shared an article on Twitter which has defended Prof. David Miller over recent inflammatory comments that he has made.

The article shared by Nour Eddine Zorgui, titled “Who are the Israel lobbyists that want David Miller fired?” referred to Zionism as “Israel’s racist ideology”.

The article was published by The Electronic Intifada, an online news outlet which has also previously attacked Campaign Against Antisemitism.

We have written to the BBC regarding disciplinary action against the journalist.

This is not BBC Arabic’s first foray into controversy relating to Jews.

Prof. Miller, a Professor of Political Sociology, is a conspiracy theorist with a history of controversy relating to Jewish students, and the letter was prompted by his latest outburst, when he asserted that “Zionism is racism”, declared his objective “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world” and accused the Bristol University Jewish Society of being part of a worldwide Zionist conspiracy, adding that it is “fundamental to Zionism to encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”. At the same online event, Prof. Miller also observed that the Jewish Society and the Union of Jewish Students are Zionist, thereby implying that Jewish students (and the wider Jewish community) inherently “encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”.

He also portrayed the International Definition of Antisemitism as an attack on free speech and accused the Israeli Government of engaging in an “all-out attack” on the global Left as part of an “attempt by the Israelis to impose their will all over the world”. In comments reminiscent of the darkest years of the United Nations, Prof. Miller insisted that “Zionism is racism” and asked how “we defeat the ideology of Zionism in practice”, “how is Zionism ended” and about the way “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 revealed that two thirds of British Jews are deeply concerned by the BBC’s coverage of matters of Jewish concern, and 55% by its handling of antisemitism complaints.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

https://twitter.com/NourzorguiBBC/status/1377426934632681472

Two macabre antisemitic mock hangings in which dolls were strung up and daubed with red paint representing blood took place in Sweden and Denmark over Passover.

The first incident, at a synagogue in Norrköping, is being investigated by Swedish police who have classified the message found at the scene as incitement.

An apparent copy of the Swedish incident took place outside a Jewish cemetery in Aalborg, Denmark, which also featured dolls, red paint and antisemitic messages. At both scenes, the messages described Passover as “a Jewish celebration of death” in an allusion to the tenth plague. Police in Denmark are investigating the incident.

There were calls for the neo-Nazi Nordic Resistance Movement (NRM) to be treated as a prime suspect after the NRM published a picture of the Norrköping “hanging” on its website, allegedly the evening before its discovery. The NRM is banned in Finland.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: NRM

Explicitly hostile attitudes to Jewish people and Israel, including repeated use of the slogan “curse on the Jews” have been found in educational materials in Yemen.

A newly released report by the Institute for Monitoring Peace and Cultural Tolerance in School (IMPACT-se) reveals a violent and hostile attitude to Jewish people in materials published in areas of Yemen controlled by the rebel Houthis, the Iranian proxy whose organisation is known as Ansar Allah.  The report points out that Ansar Allah’s attitudes to Jews closely mirror those of its Iranian backers.

IMPACT-se notes that “Violence and jihad are expressly encouraged” and that the materials contain “explicit antisemitism”, including manipulated images relating to the Holocaust and children urged to “fight against the tyranny of the Jews.” It also states that the Houthi Ansar Allah slogan, “death to Israel, curse on the Jews,” is seen repeatedly throughout the material.

IMPACT-se states that while Ansar Allah has “made education a core tenet” of its campaign to increase its influence in Yemen, the “hatred, glorification of violence” and “worldview of its materials” are contrary to “UNESCO standards of peace and tolerance and are unacceptable in any society.”

IMPACT-se CEO Marcus Sheff said that the report offered “a worrying insight into the violent mindset” of Ansar Allah and was “an extreme example of how education can be weaponised to perpetuate conflict.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

It is understood that the Labour Party will not be backing incumbent councillor John Edwards at Sandwell.

Cllr Edwards has represented the Labour Party for 43 years. However, this year he will be running as an independent candidate. He claimed that this is due to his criticisms of Sir Keir Starmer’s “dismal performance.”

Cllr John Edwards repeatedly opposed the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by the Labour Party; defended Jeremy Corbyn’s and the Party’s records on antisemitism; defended the disgraced then-Labour MP Chris Williamsonwelcomed Labour’s absurd and abortive antisemitism investigation into then-MP Ian Austin; criticised then-Deputy Leader Tom Watson for speaking out against antisemitism; supported those who tried to deselect the Jewish woman MP, Luciana Berger; and boosted Jewish Voice for Labour, an antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, even facilitating the membership in that group of the disgraced journalist, Mira Bar-Hillel. As we have previously reported, he also implied comparisons of Israeli policy to the Nazis in breach of the Definition by saying to then-Prime Minister David Cameron that “when you leave Auschwitz David Cameron go to Gaza”.

Sandwell Council has had ongoing problems with numerous Labour councillors.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has published an Audit of Local Authorities, documenting the campaign for widespread adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by local authorities. Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council has not adopted the Definition, and we call on it urgently to do so and to incorporate the Definition into its codes of conduct for councillors and staff, so that the Council, as well as the Labour Party, can hold councillors to account when they promote antisemitic discourse.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The University and College Union (UCU) Scotland has defended Prof. David Miller over recent inflammatory comments that he has made.

Prof. Miller, a Professor of Political Sociology, has a history of peddling conspiracy theories relating to Jewish students, and the UCU statement was prompted by his latest outburst, when he asserted that “Zionism is racism”, declared his objective “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world” and accused the Bristol University Jewish Society of being part of a worldwide Zionist conspiracy, adding that it is “fundamental to Zionism to encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”. At the same online event, Prof. Miller also observed that the Jewish Society and the Union of Jewish Students are Zionist, thereby implying that Jewish students (and the wider Jewish community) inherently “encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”.

He also portrayed the International Definition of Antisemitism as an attack on free speech and accused the Israeli Government of engaging in an “all-out attack” on the global Left as part of an “attempt by the Israelis to impose their will all over the world”.

In comments reminiscent of the darkest years of the United Nations, Prof. Miller insisted that “Zionism is racism” and asked how “we defeat the ideology of Zionism in practice”, “how is Zionism ended” and about the way “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world”.

In its statement, UCU Scotland showed little regard for the anxieties of the concerned students involved, dismissing them as “Zionist lobby groups”. In addition, UCU Scotland have rejected the widely accepted International Definition of Antisemitism.

UCU has a horrendous reputation in the Jewish community.

Prof. Miller is current being investigated by Bristol police over the incident.

This is not Prof. Miller’s first controversy in relation to Jews, antisemitism and Zionism. Last June, Campaign Against Antisemitism revealed that Prof. Miller was behind disgraced MP Chris Williamson’s Resistance Movement. The group aimed to give a home to the “politically homeless” politicians who had been expelled from the Labour Party for antisemitism, such as Jackie Walker, Tony Greenstein and Mark Wadsworth.

Prof. Miller has a history of spouting conspiracy theories about various Jewish community organisations and figures that has reportedly discomfited his Jewish students. In a presentation titled “Harms of the Powerful”, for example, Prof. Miller suggested that the “Zionist movement” is one of the “five pillars” of hatred of Muslims (redolent of the five pillars of Islam) and is bankrolled by “ultra Zionist funders”. He has also suggested that Jewish interfaith dialogue with Muslim groups represents an Israeli-backed “Trojan horse” initiative to “normalise Zionism in the Muslim community”.

Prof. Miller has previously accused the current leader of the Labour Party, Sir Keir Starmer, of taking “Zionist money”, and he has talked about what he referred to as the “witch hunt” against Labour members accused of antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to the University of Bristol.

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “David Miller is a conspiracy theorist who believes that Bristol’s Jewish Society and the entire nationwide Jewish student body ‘encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism’. His teachings have been going on for years with no action taken despite deep ongoing concerns for the safety of Jewish students at Bristol University.”

Bristol University adopted the Definition in November 2019.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Jewish residents in Paris chased and apprehended a man whom they suspected of trying to stab three Jews. The man was then handed over to the police.

The incident took place on the evening of 31st March near a synagogue in Sarcelles, a suburb in northern Paris with a large Sephardic Jewish community.

Witnesses say that the man, a 35-year-old from Pakistan, approached three Jewish men, all wearing kippot and therefore visibly Jewish, from behind while carrying a large knife. 

Residents caused a commotion in order to alert the Jewish men who all escaped unharmed. The man was then chased and apprehended.

This is only the most recent antisemitic incident which has taken place in France.

On 29th December, a Jewish cemetery near Strasbourg was desecrated with swastikas and antisemitic slogans.

On 17th December, four men were arrested after they attacked a Jewish family for listening to Hebrew songs in their car. The attack took place in Aubervilliers, less than a 45-minute drive away from the Sarcelles incident.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A Polish politician has been criticised for repeating an antisemitic joke during a Lodz District council meeting on agriculture. The “joke” goes: “Why don’t Jews buy land? Because you can’t cheat the earth.”

Waldemar Wojciechowski, a member of the right-wing ruling Law and Justice Party on the council, claimed that he used the “joke” to make a point about the need for fairness for farmers.

But Marcin Bugajski, head of the opposition party on the Lodz District council, said that he believed that it “was an antisemitic statement” and that it was “a scandal” to perpetuate such stereotypes, adding that the words had been “utterly irrelevant to the discussion.”

Separately, police are investigating the desecration of a monument to Holocaust victims in the town of Częstochowa, near Krakow. The monument was desecrated with a swastika and neo-Nazi symbols.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A New York Times bestselling author has been called out for including antisemitic themes in her books, as well as the harassment of other authors.

Emily Duncan, author of several young adult books, has been accused of writing a plot that contains a multitude of antisemitic tropes, including the perpetuation of the “blood libel,” as well as the use of stereotypical, antisemitic physical and behavioural descriptions. These characteristics included “dark-eyed, dark-haired, vermin-like creatures who are part of a secret cabal that control the government of fantasy Poland,” according to one Twitter user.

Ms Duncan issued an apology on Twitter, stating: “In terms of criticisms that an element of my book included an antisemitic plot, I did recognise the significance while researching and tried to handle this in a sensitive way, but I fell short. I am sorry for the harm this has caused.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Students from the University of Connecticut held a rally on Monday 5th April after their campus was vandalised with swastikas and Nazi ‘SS’ symbols. In addition to this, a visibly Jewish student carrying a kippah and a box of matzah was the victim of an antisemitic verbal assault during the Jewish festival of Passover.

The incident is currently under police investigation, making this the seventh antisemitic incident to take place during the current academic year, according to the University’s Hillel Jewish campus group.

In an Instagram post, Hillel stated that the Nazi symbols were “graffitied on the side of the Chemistry Building directly facing the UConn Hillel building.”   

Hillel also confirmed that a student from the University drove past a Jewish student carrying a kippah and a box of matzah. The perpetrator allegedly rolled down their window and spewed antisemitic hate speech before driving off.

The University’s President, Thomas Katsouleas, said: “It is distressing to me that a letter like this one is necessary, but it is absolutely urgent for us to make clear to all of our students, faculty, and staff members that you are vital, valued members of the UConn community. For those who feel distressed or uncertain in the face of incidents of abhorrent conduct, let us be as clear as we can: Hate has no place here.”

Antisemitic graffiti was also discovered recently at Albion College in Michigan.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The University of North Florida (UNF) was vandalised with stickers that bore QR codes, which, when scanned, lead to a white supremacy website displaying antisemitic content.

The stickers were placed on the doors of classrooms belonging to Jewish professors. They were discovered on 29th March, two days into the Jewish festival of Passover.

UNF stated that the student responsible for the incident was identified and referred to the Office of Equal Opportunity and Inclusion and Student Conduct.

UNF said: “The University of North Florida wholeheartedly rejects hate in all its forms. We stand in solidarity with our Jewish community and strongly condemn these actions.”

UNF’s Jewish Student Union posted on Instagram in support of fellow Jewish students and condemning the incident. One Jewish student said: “I was kind of shocked. Why would you spread the message of something bad out there?” 

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Research from Tel Aviv University has shown that online antisemitism has increased due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Conversely, physical antisemitism has decreased, with reported, violent incidents dropping from 456 to 371.

The trends are due to a variety of reasons, according to the research, including the increased amount of time people spent on their computers in isolation and the spread of Covid-sceptic, antisemitic conspiracies theories which blamed Jews for not only the effects of the virus but its inception.

Theories also accused Jews and the Jewish state of intentionally spreading the virus in order to profit from the vaccine.

Comparisons between lockdown restrictions and Nazi Germany are also rife, with several anti-lockdown groups using symbols and imagery from the Holocaust. Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Along with the increased usage of Zoom came countless incidents of antisemitic Zoom bombing. Campaign Against Antisemitism has previously reported on the phenomenon of ‘Zoom bombing’ and has urged communal institutions to take precautions to safeguard against antisemitic disruption of online events.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

An fifteen-year-old Abingdon schoolboy is facing expulsion after allegedly sending an antisemitic image to a Jewish student from the same school.

The image, sent through the social media app Snapchat, was said to have depicted three people dressed as Nazis soldiers.

The teenager also allegedly created a video on Tik Tok, another social media app, whereby he was said to have joked about raping a woman from a different Tik Tok video.  

The Headmaster of the prestigious Oxfordshire boarding school, Michael Windsor, said that the videos were “grossly racist and sexist”. He added: “These incidents do not just contravene our Behaviour, Rewards and Sanctions Policy but they go completely against the ethos and culture of the school based on courtesy, kindness and respect.”

The schoolboy has issued a response, stating: “I am deeply sorry and regretful of my stupid actions. I deeply regret my actions and I understand that people could get offended by them very easily but I had no intention of offending or hurting someone’s feelings. In the small amount of time I have had to think about my disgraceful actions, I can certainly confirm that not a single thing I said was intended with harm or to offend anyone. I understand now that it would and I regret posting those things, it was a lack of judgement before when posting, and I did not think about all the people that would see my profile. I am deeply sorry and I promise that this will not happen again.”

However, the boy’s parents defended their son, arguing that social media is not real life and therefore that the punishment should not be too severe, claiming that the videos were “just jokes”.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It seems that the schoolboy has grasped the gravity of his actions far better than his parents who seem to think that Nazism and rape are joking matters. Unfortunately, social media is exposing young minds to the most appalling material, and in addition to firm regulation of social media companies, it is vital that schools and parents are vigilant and set a firm example. We hope that the school will apply a suitably serious penalty, even as this boy’s parents irresponsibly dismiss his conduct as ‘jokes’.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

A far-left Canadian student group, which has previously referred to Vancouver’s Temple Sholom as a “Zionist Synagogue,” is allegedly engaged in a campaign of harassment against the Toronto Jewish community.

During Passover, graffiti attacking the International Definition of Antisemitism and allegedly signed by the Revolutionary Student Movement (RSM) was found at a Toronto train station. Over the following weekend, a number of other sites were defaced, including a bank in a Jewish neighbourhood which was spray-painted with “Freedom for Ahmad Sa’adat! Death to Zionism!” alongside the Communist hammer and sickle symbol.

Ahmad Sa’adat, who is in prison in Israel, is General-Secretary of the the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP). The PFLP, which opposed the existence of Israel entirely, has also targeted Jewish schoolchildren and was responsible for other massacres of civilians.

The RSM proclaims that it is guided by Marxist, Leninist, Maoist and “Gonzalo” principles (the latter being an allusion to the leader of Peru’s murderous revolutionary “Shining Path” terror group). RSM has also openly endorsed antisemitic vandalism. Last year, pictures sent by “supporters” who had spray-painted “Free Palestine” outside Vancouver’s Temple Sholom, were hailed by the Vancouver branch of the group which described Temple Sholom as “a Zionist Synagogue.”

The community is working with law enforcement, with one communal leader saying that he is “confident that this terrorist-admiring cell will eventually be brought to justice.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Scottish National Party (SNP) candidate in the forthcoming Scottish elections has apologised after comments from 2017 emerged in which she had reportedly compared tactics by the Conservatives to Hitler and the Holocaust.

Stephanie Callaghan, who is standing in Uddingston and Bellshill, Lanarkshire, reportedly wrote on Twitter in connection with a possible second Scottish independent referendum: “Tory propaganda provides a window into future plans — stamp on democracy. Hitler did same: set scene 4 Jewish Holocaust to lower opposition.”

At the time, Ms Callaghan was a South Lanarkshire councillor, and she was apparently responding to then-Prime Minister Theresa May’s intention to block an independence vote.

Ms Callaghan has apologised saying: “The words in this old tweet were poorly chosen and I apologise for the offence caused. I have deleted the tweet.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “There is no comparison between political tensions in the UK today and Nazi Germany’s systematic destruction of democracy and murder of six million Jewish men, women and children. Politicians must set an example by learning the lessons of the Holocaust — not diminishing the memory of those innocents who were slaughtered by using the Holocaust to score political points. To make such a comparison is disgraceful and wounding, showing incredible ignorance.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Antisemitic graffiti has been discovered in Pittsburgh’s South Side. 

The graffiti was scrawled on the side of a concession stand at Quarry Field, home to the South Side Bears, a Pittsburgh youth American football team.

Kevin Alton, President of the South Side Bears, condemned the vandalism, stating: “The South Side is not for hate.”

An investigation has been launched by the Pittsburgh Bureau of Police. Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto said that the city would cover the costs of the clean-up and would commission a mural artist to restore the original mural. 

Mayor Peduto said: “We’ll put together the funds in order to be able to improve this entire area, and we’ll send a message to anybody who wants to talk in hate that we’ll come back stronger.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Pittsburgh Bureau of Police

A Jewish cemetery in Aalborg, Denmark was vandalised during the Jewish festival of Passover.

Red paint, baby dolls and antisemitic literature relating to the blood libel conspiracy theory were left outside the cemetery.

Flyers were also deposited directing readers to a website that associated with the Nordic Resistance Movement, a Pan-Nordic neo-Nazi organisation that is proscribed in Finland.

Henri Goldstein, Chairman of Denmark’s Jewish community, said: “Historically, a lot of antisemitism with a physical outcome has started with, among other things, vandalism against cemeteries and Jewish shops.” He added: “The vandalism at the cemetery around Passover is simply as classic antisemitism as it can be. We have seen this for centuries in Europe.”

Security in Denmark has been elevated and the incident is being investigated as a hate crime. 

Danish politicians have condemned the attack. Justice Minister Nick Hækkerup declared that it was “outrageous and deeply shameful”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Antisemitic graffiti has been discovered inside a dormitory stairwell of Albion College in Michigan.

The graffiti contained several racist remarks and references to the Ku Klux Klan. 

Albion community leaders, including Robert Dunklin, President of NAACP’s Albion branch, came together to support Albion College students and condemn the vandalism. 

Mr Dunklin said: “Students have been dealing with issues like COVID-19, locked in their dorms and now they have to deal with racial graffiti. It is not acceptable in this community. And we are here to stand with this community and the community of Albion College.” Mr Dunklin added: “Whoever it is, they’re best to come forward or get out of town.” 

Albion College President Mathew Johnson confirmed that the incident had been reported to police and was under investigation. Mr Johnson also stated that the college was offering a $1,000 reward for any information regarding the incident. 

Mr Johnson said: “The racist and antisemitic actions taken on our campus over the last week are cowardly and will not be tolerated. We are outraged and angered that this incident occurred within our community. In addition to caring for and protecting the students most directly impacted, and addressing the safety concerns of the broader student body, we are currently investigating who is responsible for racist graffiti on our campus.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Sharon, a suburb of Boston, has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism, making it the first town in Massachusetts to do so. 

The decision was taken on 23rd March by the Select Board of Sharon after a unanimous vote, for which the work of activists Susan Price and Robert Soffer has been particularly credited. 

Ms Price said: “The Town of Sharon has taken a proactive step that shows it cares about the safety of Jewish residents. The town can use this as a tool to educate its boards, departments and the broader community. It can be used to facilitate meaningful conversations and to identify antisemitic conduct, harassment, assault and vandalism.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

NRK, the Norwegian state-run broadcaster, included the antisemitic blood libel theory as an answer to a quiz.

The quiz related to Easter and Passover. Its eighth question, which referred to matzah, was titled “a very special bread”, and asked: “What was special about the bread Jesus and the disciples ate during the Passover meal?” 

The third option to the question stated “det var blod i det”, which translates as “there was blood in it.”

The original antisemitic blood libel dates from the Middle Ages, and is the accusation that Jews murder Christian children in order to use their blood in Passover rituals.

Twitter users condemned the quiz, with one sardonically remarking that NRK “decided to test how many people believe in antisemitic conspiracy theories in their Easter quiz.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Algemeiner

The Pears Foundation has withdrawn its name from the Institute for the Study of Antisemitism at Birkbeck. The news comes following a series of controversies involving the Institute’s Director, Prof. David Feldman, who opposes the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

In a statement, the Pears Foundation, which established the Institute in 2010, said that “The Institute has gained an international reputation for its innovative approach to the research and teaching of antisemitism.” However, the statement went on to say that “As the Institute increasingly tackles challenging and divisive issues in the public sphere, the Foundation’s Trustees have decided that continuing to be so closely associated with the Institute is no longer in the Foundation’s best interests.”

Accordingly, from 4th May the Institute will no longer bear the Pears Foundation’s name, however the Pears Foundation will continue to support the Institute “as one of several funders”.

Prof. Feldman has come under fire over the past several years for hindering the fight against antisemitism, including most recently his opposition to the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

Birkbeck, University of London has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism, against the wishes of Prof. Feldman.

Prof. Feldman was not referred to in the statement and it was unclear whether the “divisive issues” referred to were the controversies involving him, which had led a number of figures to call on the Pears Foundation to intervene. Recently, Gideon Falter, the Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism said that “The Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism at Birkbeck should not be lending its credibility to a man who does so much to hinder the fight against antisemitism.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

A 75-year-old Jewish woman opened her front door only to be confronted by a man screaming at her that Jews should leave the UK.

The incident took place on 26th March on Darenth Road in Stamford Hill and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 6798 31/03/21.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Google

Textbooks in Jordanian classrooms have been found to promote antisemitic tropes and propaganda.

The revelation comes despite the Jordanian Government’s earlier plans to repackage school textbooks in order to promote tolerance.

The ADL, which carried out a study and rigorous translation, found “particularly troubling examples in first and second semester textbooks for the seventh grade course on Islamic Education.”

In an autumn textbook, a story involving a Jewish tribe included the antisemitic explanation: “the Jews broke their pact with the Muslims, as is their custom always.” The chapter ends on the multiple-choice question: “Among the characteristics of the Jews for which they are renowned are: (A) the breaking of pacts, (B) treachery and treason, (C) hating Muslims, or (D) all of the above.”

A spring textbook taught the antisemitic trope that Jews are responsible for the death of Jesus, stating: “The Israelites who did not believe in Jesus, peace be upon him, wanted to be rid of him and eliminate his call, so they tried to kill him.”

A twelfth-grade history textbook describes Zionism as “a racist, settler political movement aimed at establishing a national homeland for the Jews in Palestine, founded on historical claims without basis in truth,” and claims all Jewish ties with Jerusalem are “founded on historical and religious claims without any actual grounds on which to base them.”

According to the ADL, these textbooks are still under official authorisation from the Government.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

With the one year anniversary of Sir Keir Starmer’s election to the leadership of the Labour Party, a review of the Party’s progress in its purported fight against antisemitism suggests that more work is needed to convince the Jewish community that he is serious.

Sir Keir’s statement on his victory one year ago and his pledge to “tear out this poison by its roots” provided a degree of reassurance, but coming from a politician who just a few months earlier had given his “100% backing” to an antisemite, actions were always going to speak louder than words.

There have certainly been some positive actions. The removal of Rebecca Long-Bailey from the Shadow Cabinet after she shared an article promoting an antisemitic conspiracy theory appeared to represent a turning point. Proclamations by Labour’s General-Secretary, David Evans, to Constituency Labour Parties to avoid discussing antisemitism, some publicly-announced investigations and other indications that discipline was quietly being imposed were also welcome indications of the direction of travel. At least two local councils saw power shift from Labour due to the suspension and resignation of councillors in connection with antisemitism controversies.

Sir Keir’s response to the damning report by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) into Labour antisemitism was also forthright, as was his suspension of Jeremy Corbyn within hours of the publication of the report, an unacceptable reaction by Mr Corbyn and the submission of complaints against Mr Corbyn and other MPs by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Important though these actions have been, however, it is Sir Keir’s inaction that has been the dominant theme of his first year in office. His repeated refusal to engage with us, despite our being the complainant in the EHRC’s investigation into antisemitism in his Party, and Labour’s failure even to acknowledge our complaints, do not reflect a leadership wholly willing to address past failures.

Despite his pledge to suspend MPs or Party members who share platforms with those expelled over antisemitism, Sir Keir never acted against MPs Diane Abbott or Bell Ribeiro-Addy or Labour candidate and former Respect Party leader Salma Yaqoob, to name only a few prominent figures, when they did just that. Nor did he act against those who divisively and disgracefully suggested that fighting antisemitism could be to the detriment of other minorities.

Although there were reports of a large exodus of far-left members from the Party, many of these have been voluntary (albeit following suspensions pending investigation) rather than expulsions. Meanwhile, Labour’s disciplinary procedures remain mired in controversy and incoherence, with Mr Corbyn’s suspension from Labour and rapid readmission to the Party (but not, at the last minute, to the Parliamentary Party) a particularly high-profile example. Another recent example is the suspension, readmission and resuspension of Cllr Noah Tucker in Haringey, and the removal of fellow Haringey councillor Preston Tabois from Labour’s slate of candidates for the coming London Assembly elections even as he remains a Labour councillor and a member of the Party.

Reports that our complaint against Deputy Leader Angela Rayner has been dismissed without so much as an acknowledgement (contrary to the Party’s new complaints handling policy) let alone an investigation, add to concerns that the Party has not yet reformed its ways. Meanwhile, the Party’s new Complaints Handling Handbook seems to imagine that ‘Formal Warnings’ lasting eighteen months will be sufficient to eradicate antisemitism from Labour’s ranks. Its virtues notwithstanding, the document reads like a bad April Fool’s Joke.

As if as a reminder of the persistence of the problem, a new poll of Labour members, conducted in late March by YouGov, found that over two thirds believe that the problem of antisemitism in the Party has been “exaggerated” or that there is not a serious problem. Given that a separate poll by Lord Ashcroft shortly after the 2019 General Election found that nearly three quarters of Labour members believed that the issue of antisemitism in the Party was “invented or wildly exaggerated by the right-wing media and opponents of Jeremy Corbyn”, it is difficult to see how progress has been made in changing the culture of the Party over the past year.

Ultimately, the Jewish community is not convinced. Our latest Antisemitism Barometer, published at the start of the year (with polling conducted well over six months into Sir Keir’s tenure as leader), showed that British Jews feel that the Labour Party is more than twice as tolerant of antisemitism than any other political party. Remarkably, compared to the previous year’s figures (polled while Mr Corbyn was still leader of the Party), Labour performed worse, with 88 percent of respondents considering that the Party was too tolerant of antisemitism under Sir Keir compared with 86 percent the year before under Mr Corbyn. At times, this sentiment has spilled into the open.

It was always clear that addressing antisemitism in the Labour Party would be the work of many years. But even that timeframe depends on genuine willingness and concerted action. After Sir Keir’s first year, both conditions remain very much in question, with concerns growing that his efforts look increasingly like an attempt to kick the problem down the road.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “It was always clear that addressing Labour antisemitism would be the work of many years. While the Party has taken some welcome steps over the course of Sir Keir Starmer’s first year in office, the inaction speaks far louder. MPs sharing platforms with expelled members with no sanction, no acknowledgement of our complaints, incoherent disciplinary outcomes at the national and local level, and polling that shows an unchanged attitude among ordinary Labour members reinforce the view, held by almost ninety percent of British Jews, that the Labour Party is too tolerant of antisemitism. Sir Keir himself has rightly said that words are not enough. It is time to see some real action.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has lodged a complaint against Jeremy Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day of the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The Labour Party has published its new Complaint Handling Handbook, as part of its compliance with the Action Plan devised in consultation with the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) after it delivered its damning report into antisemitism in the Party.

While the handbook pertains to the complaints system as a whole, it makes specific provision for complaints relating to antisemitism and sexual harassment, which are both areas where the Party has been deemed to have fallen short in recent years to the point that, in the case of the former, it became institutionally racist.

The publication of the handbook is in principle an important step as the Party begins to address its woefully inadequate disciplinary system, and there are some positive provisions, such as the social media policy. There is also a more advanced discussion of the nature of antisemitism than previous reports by the Labour Party have presented, and there will be a requirement for anyone found to have engaged in antisemitic conduct to attend training, presumably in addition to any other appropriate sanction.

Notwithstanding these welcome developments, in other areas the handbook is also deeply disappointing.

Although anyone can submit complaints about Labour members, if the complainant is not directly affected by the matter, i.e. is a “third party”, then the Party will “be unable to provide any ongoing information due to confidentiality and data protection reasons”. In other words, the complaints process will continue to operate without transparency and with complainants left in the dark about how their complaints have progressed or whether any decisions have been reached or sanctions imposed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has submitted numerous complaints against MPs and other officeholders; under this regime, we are unlikely to be informed as to how the complaints are progressing at all. (Although the handbook states that complaints will at least be acknowledged and the complainants will be told if the complaints are being investigated, we have not received any such acknowledgement to our complaints, months after submitting them.)

The handbook also limits the purview of complaints to the conduct of individuals or organisational bodies during their time of membership or affiliation, and will not consider conduct prior to the period of membership. This means that if a Labour member or officeholder or organisation is found to have engaged in antisemitic conduct prior to joining the Party, there is no recourse.

In a concerning instance of little having been learned, the handbook cites the recommendation of the whitewash Chakrabarti Report that Labour members should “resist the use of Hitler, Nazi and Holocaust metaphors, distortions and comparisons in debates about Israel-Palestine in particular.” That report fell short of designating such comparisons as antisemitic, as they are under the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Most astonishingly, the handbook presents numerous anonymised examples of how complaints relating to antisemitism were dealt with. These examples, far from demonstrating the Party’s progress in addressing the problem, in fact illustrate just how broken the current disciplinary system is and make the case for the independent disciplinary system that the EHRC has mandated.

In one example, a Labour member “posted and shared several things on social media that were antisemitic; using Hitler, Nazi and Holocaust metaphors, distortions and comparisons in debates about Israel-Palestine”. In other words, they breached the International Definition of Antisemitism in at least one and possibly multiple ways. Yet the sanction was merely that the member was given a Formal Warning, which would remain on their record for eighteen months.

In another example, a Labour member had “posted several articles on social media promoting conspiracy theories suggesting that Jewish people were responsible for real and imagined wrongdoings”, as well as “articles that minimised complaints of antisemitism within the Labour Party”. But an investigation “concluded that no Labour Party rules were specifically breached but a Reminder of Conduct was issued to the member”.

Another member “posted online the details of an email they’d sent which presented emotive, personal views” including that Labour’s Jewish affiliate and its pro-Israel Parliamentary group “should be disbanded”. The member refused to retract those views and was merely given a Formal Warning. They later resigned their membership.

Yet another member “responded to a social media post in a way that served to repeat antisemitic tropes”. Nevertheless, it was concluded that no Party rules had been breached, so the member only received a Reminder of Values.

Clearly, these illustrations, which appear to be presented as examples of best practice, are not remotely reassuring. Formal Warnings are not going to eradicate antisemitism from the membership ranks of an institutionally racist Party.

Joe Glasman, Head of Political and Government Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Labour’s new complaints handbook is like a bad April Fool’s joke. The idea that a prospective member can be as antisemitic as they’d like until they join the Party is another Chakrabarti-like attempt to turn a blind eye and move on.

“The illustrations of current practice, far from inspiring confidence, show just why the system is broken: for someone to be able to breach the International Definition of Antisemitism, which Labour adopted only after a massive row, and only get a formal warning, is a betrayal of the Jewish community.

“If this is what Sir Keir Starmer was referring to when he vowed to tear antisemitism out by its roots, then we can be sure that the fight against antisemitism in the Labour Party is very far from won.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has lodged a complaint against Jeremy Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day of the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A police officer has been found guilty of being a member of the banned neo-Nazi terrorist group National Action following his arrest last year.

Benjamin Hannam, a 22-year-old from Edmonton in North London, was suspended from duty by the Metropolitan Police after it was alleged that he belonged or professed to belong to the proscribed group between December 2016 and January 2018 and that he falsely represented himself in his application to join the Metropolitan Police in this connection.

Mr Hannam becomes the first police officer to be convicted of far-right terrorism after being found guilty at the Old Bailey today of membership in National Action, lying on his application to join the police and possessing guides to knife-fighting and bombmaking. It is understood that the ban on reporting the case was lifted after Mr Hannam admitted possessing an indecent image of a child.

It is understood that Mr Hannam, who reportedly has autism, was “desperate to impress” an older National Action organiser who gave him free stickers, but he ended his association with the organisation before he joined the Metropolitan Police.

The Head of the Metropolitan Police’s Counter Terrorism Command, which carried out the investigation, emphasised that there is no evidence that Mr Hannam abused his position at the police force to further his far-right views.

Mr Hannam had denied being a member of National Action before or after it was proscribed, and told the court that he had been attracted to fascism aged sixteen because of its artwork and propaganda and was under the impression that it was a youth network. He denied engaging in any stickering or propaganda campaigns and insisted that he only attended social events.

Mr Hannam’s sentencing is expected soon.

Other members of National Action were recently convicted and sentenced to prison for their role in the organisation.

National Action was proscribed as a terrorist organisation in December 2016 following a long campaign by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others. Under section 11 of the Terrorism Act 2000, membership of a proscribed terrorist organisation is a criminal offence.

Image credit: Metropolitan Police

Police are searching for vandals who sprayed antisemitic graffiti on a home in Oxford.

The pair of suspects daubed a swastika on the front door of a house on Stubbs Avenue at 22:07 on 31st January, and Thames Valley Police have now released images and confirmed that they are pursuing the matter.

The vandals returned at 22:23 on the same evening and reportedly used a pole to break a CCTV camera on the property.

In a statement, the police said: “Criminal damage of this kind will never be tolerated and we are asking anyone who recognises these men to come forward and speak to us. Anyone with information should call police on 101 with reference 43210042799.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Thames Valley Police

Police are reportedly investigating Prof. David Miller for a hate crime over recent inflammatory comments that he made about Jewish students.

Prof. Miller, a conspiracist whom Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring for years, recently added to his record of inflammatory comments about the Jewish community with the assertion that “Zionism is racism” and a declaration that his objective is “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world”. Most egregiously, he also suggested that Jewish students, by virtue of being Zionist, “encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”.

Prof. Miller’s comments and the University’s reaction have been the subject of a great deal of attention from the Jewish community as well as Parliament, including a written question by Lord Austin, an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been providing ongoing support to students at Bristol.

Avon and Somerset Police confirmed the investigation into “a hate crime or hate incident taking place during lectures at the University of Bristol,” adding: “We have recently been made aware of a number of incidents that may constitute a hate crime or hate incident taking place during lectures at the University of Bristol. We take issues such as these very seriously. An email was circulated to student groups last week asking people to speak to the police regarding their experiences. Our investigation is at an early stage and enquiries are ongoing to establish if any offences have been committed. Our aim is to help everyone to feel safe and supported while studying in Bristol and we are working closely with the university at this time. Anyone with information that can assist us should contact 101 and give reference 5221036233.”

Recently, the University of Bristol confirmed that it too was investigating Prof. Miller. It apparently also told students that he is on “sick leave absence”, with students being reassigned personal tutors and waiting double the time to have their work marked. However, it has now emerged that Prof. Miller has sustained his public activism and appearances. For example, he apparently spoke this week at the Third International Conference on Islamophobia, in which he was introduced by Sami Al-Arian, who was previously convicted in the United States after pleading guilty to one count of conspiracy for contributing services for the benefit of the antisemitic terrorist group, Islamic Jihad. Prof. Miller was reportedly seen coughing at the online event.

A University spokesperson reportedly told The Bristol Tab: “It is not appropriate for the University to make any comment on this matter while the investigation we have already referred to in previous statements is underway.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Aston Villa has condemned online antisemitic reactions to its Passover greeting to fans.

The Birmingham-based Premiership football club posted a “Happy Passover” greeting on its Facebook page over the weekend, only to receive almost 28,000 ‘angry’ emoji replies and numerous hateful comments. Some of the abusive messages have been removed.

In a comment on the post, the club said that it “deplores religious intolerance of any form and is an inclusive organisation who welcomes people of all faiths”.

Aston Villa recently adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The notorious antisemite Alison Chabloz has today been found guilty of sending by a public communications network an offensive, indecent message or material and given a custodial sentence. The prosecution followed action by Campaign Against Antisemitism, which has been pursuing justice against Ms Chabloz for over four years.

Ms Chabloz, 57, was convicted at Westminster Magistrates’ Court on charges under section 127 of the Communications Act relating to two interviews that she gave to far-right online outlets. She then publicised the interviews via her account on Gab, a social network associated with the far-right, claiming that “anything that’s worth controlling will have Jews there controlling it” and accusing Jews of turning their children into “psychopathic maniacs” because they are “indoctrinated from birth” with the idea that “their grandparents were gassed.”

She also stated that Jews were persecuted in Nazi Germany because they “had been behaving in a certain fashion, as we’re seeing again today”, and that Jews who do not conform to her idea of Western values should be deported.

Declaring that the Jewish community needs to be protected and noting that Ms Chabloz committed the offence while on a suspended sentence following a separate conviction (which also arose from a landmark case brought about by Campaign Against Antisemitism), District Judge Michael Snow sentenced Ms Chabloz to eighteen weeks in prison, of which she will serve nine.

Ms Chabloz is a virulent antisemite and Holocaust denier who has an extensive record of using social media to publicise her hatred for Jews and to convert others to her views about Jewish people. Following a private prosecution by Campaign Against Antisemitism, which was later continued by the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), Ms Chabloz became the first person in Britain to be convicted over Holocaust denial in a precedent-setting case. Ms Chabloz previously spent a short time in custody for breaching the conditions of her sentence, but this will be her first substantial period in prison.

Ms Chabloz is fixated on the idea that the Holocaust did not occur, and that it was fabricated by Jews and their supporters as a vehicle for fraudulently extorting money in the form of reparations. This forms the basis for her second obsession, that Jews are liars and thieves who are working to undermine Western society. Ms Chabloz is also connected to extremist right-wing movements, at whose meetings she gives speeches and performs her songs, in the UK, France and North America. 

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Alison Chabloz’s repulsive opinions about Jews can be traced back to the beer halls of 1930s Germany. Despite already having been convicted of similar offences, she continued, while serving her suspended sentence, to use the internet to attempt to radicalise others and convert them to her hateful way of thinking about Jewish people.

“Today’s verdict and sentence finally give the Jewish community justice and protection from someone who has made a vocation out of denying the Holocaust and baiting Jews. It also sends a clear message to those who might be tempted to go down the same path.

“This is not the end. Ms Chabloz now faces even more serious charges on other matters that we have brought to the attention of the police. We will not rest until all antisemites like Alison Chabloz are behind bars, where they belong.”

In separate proceedings also resulting from action by Campaign Against Antisemitism, Ms Chabloz also faces charges of incitement to racial hatred.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Conservative councillor in Bury has reportedly had the Party whip removed after making allegedly antisemitic comments in a job interview.

Cllr Robert (Bob) Caserta was found to have breached the Code of Conduct for Councillors and Other Voting Representatives four times when he appeared before a Standards Sub-Committee meetings last month.

The comments in question were apparently made during an interview to recruit a senior officer at the Council last July, when Cllr Caserta is alleged to have referred to “grot spots” in Sedgley and said that it would be difficult to communicate with residents “unless you are able to speak Hebrew”.

He was found to have “used inappropriate language that was disrespectful and wholly inappropriate” which “may affect Bury Council’s ability to recruit high calibre candidates in the future”.

The local MP for Bury South, Christian Wakeford, and Cllr Nicholas Jones, Leader of Bury Conservatives, issued a joint statement confirming that the whip has been removed from Cllr Caserta pending an investigation. They said: “Since being elected as MP for Bury South and Conservative Group Leader on Bury Council, we have always enjoyed an excellent relationship with the Jewish community. We consider antisemitism in all its forms abhorrent and will continue to call it out wherever it is found, including within our own Party. Cllr Caserta’s comments were at best inappropriate and deeply offensive and at worst could be construed as antisemitic, so it is right that prompt action is taken. We have acted as a matter of urgency and immediately removed the whip from Cllr Caserta pending a full investigation into this matter.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Strasbourg City Council has voted against adopting the International Definition of Antisemitism, despite a number of antisemitic incidents in the city during the past year.

The city councillor responsible for religious matters, Jean Werlen, of the dominant left-wing Europe Ecology Party, said that he rejected the definition because it was “out of the question to deny citizens the right to criticise a state.” This concern is widespread and entirely unfounded.

Opposition member Pierre Jakubowicz, who voted in favour of adopting the Definition, said that he was “dismayed” by the decision. “The city of Strasbourg needs this definition because in recent months there have been several notorious antisemitic acts,” said Mr Jakubowicz.

Incidents in the city have included an assault in August 2020 on a young Jewish graffiti artist, and in January of this year, the refusal from two food delivery service drivers to work with Jewish restaurants.

“We are the first democratic assembly in a European state to reject this definition,” Mr Jakubowicz lamented.

Mr Jakubowicz pointed out that the Definition had been adopted by the French National Assembly “at the urging of President Emmanuel Macron,” by the European Parliament whose seat was in Strasbourg, and by the cities of Paris and Nice.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Preston Tabois, a Labour councillor in Haringey suspended six months ago and now readmitted to the Party, has been the subject of an incoherent disciplinary decision by the Labour Party that illustrates how far it still has to go in addressing antisemitism.

Cllr Tabois, who is also an activist with the Unite union and is backed by the pro-Corbyn Momentum pressure group, was reported by Guido Fawkes to have appeared to endorse the despicable notion that Jews murdered each other in the Holocaust in some masterplan to create the State of Israel, and other antisemitic conspiracy theories.

He was slated to be a Labour candidate for the London Assembly in the coming local elections. His suspension for six months, along with a fellow controversial Haringey councillor, Noah Tucker, who has also reportedly weighed in on the matter, brought that candidacy into question.

It is understood that Cllr Tabois claimed to the Party’s ruling National Executive Committee (NEC) that he had made the inflammatory social media comments at a time when he did not know about antisemitism and would not now repeat the comments. The NEC panel suspended him for six months, apparently with a view to him being able to stand for the London Assembly once the suspension was lifted, but that decision has now been put to another NEC panel, which has voted to withdraw the Party’s endorsement of his candidacy.

In any event, while Cllr Tabois has reportedly lost his place on the Party’s electoral slate, he appears to remain a member of and councillor for the Party. Given that the much-anticipated independent disciplinary process that the Party is required to introduce has not yet been launched, it is not clear on what basis the NEC has reached this bizarre outcome.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Cllr Preston Tabois is the latest example of Labour’s unfit disciplinary regime. The panel that decided his case was working under guidelines nobody can fathom and has reached an outcome nobody can understand. This is not transparency and it is not zero tolerance. This sort of incoherent decision is why the Party so desperately needs the independent disciplinary system that the EHRC has mandated, and it is why no one can have confidence in Labour’s commitment to fighting antisemitism until that new system is implemented.” 

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Students at City University in London have voted in a campus-wide referendum in favour of a resolution calling on the University to reject the International Definition of Antisemitism.

A similar motion had been brought to a student members meeting in November 2020, where all students could vote, and it failed by an overwhelming margin, with 66% declining to support it. But the leadership of the Students’ Union insisted on taking the unusual step of calling a campus-wide referendum on the question: “Should the University reject the IHRA definition of antisemitism?”

City University has not yet adopted the International (IHRA) Definition of Antisemitism.

In deciding to call the referendum, it is understood that the Students’ Union appallingly failed to consult the Jewish Society.

It has been reported that 671 students voted in favour of the motion, with 260 opposed, representing a turnout of barely five percent of the estimated 20,000 students on campus. The University and College Union (UCU), which has a horrendous reputation in the Jewish community, reportedly backed the motion.

One visiting academic reportedly told the Jewish News that the passage of the motion would create a “hostile environment” for Jewish staff and students on campus, adding: “It’s an insult not to adopt it.”

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “City University’s Students’ Union has brought shame on the University. This referendum, apparently called after the failure of a similar attempt and without consultation with the Jewish Society, represents an abandonment of Jewish students by their own union. The goal of the campaign – to encourage the University not to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism – is tantamount to reserving the right to be antisemitic, which may be why so few students turned out to endorse it. This referendum had no place on a distinguished campus, and we call on the University to ignore this shameful and intimidatory motion and adopt the Definition as so many other universities across the country have done.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

A teenager from Newcastle who called himself Hitler on numerous social media platforms and an online group that he created glorifying far-right violence has pleaded guilty to terrorism offences.

The sixteen-year-old, who cannot be named for legal reasons, admitted to four counts of inviting support for the proscribed neo-Nazi terror group, National Action, as well as three counts of encouraging terrorism and four counts of stirring racial and religious hatred.

He had reportedly posted antisemitic and anti-Muslim material and created stickers with his group’s logo, which he disseminated in his local area.

North Tyneside Magistrates’ Court, sitting as a youth court, sentenced him to a twelve-month intensive referral order. He will also be subject to terrorism notification requirements for ten years, mandating him to inform the authorities of his whereabouts and certain activities.

It is understood that the teenager has autism, and that this consideration impacted his sentencing.

Last year, members of the proscribed National Action group were sentenced to prison, having engaged, amongst other activities, in far-right stickering and recruitment campaigns.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Google has admitted that it “must do better” after more than 150 antisemitic comments were discovered on the Google Maps site for the Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp.

An investigation by The Guardian discovered the comments, which included posts such as “Heil Hitler”; “It’s a shame the SS was disbanded so long ago”; “Showers were a great experience, Anne Frankly I’m glad I came”; and “Good place to go if you want to lose weight fast”. Some of the comments had been on the site for years – in the case of the latter comment even close to a decade.

Many posts were anonymous, but others used pseudonyms such as prominent Holocaust survivors or Nazis.

Google allows users to post written reviews of sites around the world, including the museum at the death camp, which operated during World War II and where over one million people – mostly Jews – were murdered.

A spokesperson for the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport said that the much-anticipated online harms bill “will hold tech platforms to account for tackling and removing illegal content such as antisemitic comments. We will impose tough sanctions including huge fines if they do not act”.

A Google spokesperson reportedly said: “We are appalled by these reviews on our platform and are taking action to remove the content and prevent further abuse. We have clear policies that prohibit offensive and fake reviews and we work around the clock to monitor Maps. In this case, we know we need to do better and are working to evaluate and improve our detection systems.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

Calls have been issued for a public inquiry amid claims that the Secret Intelligence Service (also known as MI6) protected alleged Nazi war criminals after WWII.

The controversy has arisen after the BBC discovered that a suspected Nazi collaborator, Stanislaw Chrzanowski, may have worked for the agency.

German authorities believe that he may have murdered tens of people during the Holocaust, while British police claimed that there was insufficient evidence to prosecute him. 

Mr Chrzanowski was suspected by his stepson of having committed atrocities against Jews and others in the town of Slonim in Belarus, and investigated his past and built a dossier of evidence, including eyewitness accounts.

Although British police interviewed Mr Chrzanowski, no charges were brought. He always denied being a war criminal and died in 2017. His stepson died six months later, but after handing a BBC journalist his dossier, for which the BBC has reportedly since found further supporting evidence.

It is believed that MI6 may have recruited Mr Chrzanowski at a refugee camp in Berlin, and experts believe that the agency would have known about Mr Chrzanowski’s past. However, in the late 1980s and 1990s, the agency destroyed tens of thousands of files pertaining to its agents to protect them from more draconian laws that would have put them at risk of prosecution. Mr Chrzanowski’s files may have been among them.

Conservative MP Robert Halfon called the BBC’s findings “horrific and frightening” and said that he intends to call on the Parliamentary Security Committee to investigate.

A coach has been suspended from a high school in Massachusetts while an investigation takes place over its American football team’s use of antisemitic language during a recent game.

Duxbury High School, 30 miles from Boston, has “severed ties” with Head Coach David Maimaron, following the allegations. Mr Maimaron, also a special-needs teacher, was placed on paid administrative leave pending the investigation. The school has also hired attorney and educational consultant Edward Mitnick to assist its investigation into reports that team members used the offensive language – including a reference to Auschwitz – in its on-field play-calling. The words “rabbi” and “dreidel” were also heard.

In recent years Duxbury has been one of the most successful teams in Massachusetts, with five state championships since 2005. In a statement, the administration said: “The outrage is real, warranted, and we hear it. The fact that members of our school community used such offensive language…is horrifying and disappointing.”

District Superintendent John Antonucci noted that the offensive words had not been directed at the opposing team or at a particular player.

Mr Maimaron released a statement in which he apologised for “the insensitive, crass and inappropriate language used in the game on 12th March.”

The language was “careless, unnecessary…hurtful and…inexcusable,” he said.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A man has been found guilty of three charges of possessing information useful for terrorism after stockpiling neo-Nazi memorabilia and downloading guides to bombmaking and knife-fighting.

Nicholas Brock, 53, who reportedly has tattoos of prominent Nazis and symbols, had a flag showing an eagle and swastika on his bedroom wall and a Nazi badge in his drawer, as well as other symbolic neo-Nazi items. The material was found in a raid on his home in Maidenhead as part of an unrelated investigation in which he was never charged. Further material was found on electronic devices, as well as flyers for the National Front, a copy of Hitler’s Mein Kampf and books about the Ku Klux Klan.

The prosecutor told Kingston Crown Court that his room was “filled to the brim with an eclectic mix of items, amongst them, items demonstrating an interest in extreme right wing and white supremacist ideology.”

The hard drive contained images of Mr Brock posing with swastikas and other items, as well as two manuals for an AK47 assault rifle and others for US army pistol training and explosives. There was also an “al Qaeda manual”. Among the documents were three that reportedly are useful for terrorists.

According to the prosecution, he had “no legitimate reason for possessing such information. He is not, for example, an academic, or a self-defence specialist. These are not everyday items or collectable memorabilia, but publications which contain detailed advice on how to create explosive devices, on how to kill and how to maim. They may of course be of use to someone planning any kind of violent attack; and they would certainly be of use to someone planning a terrorist attack.”

Sentencing is expected in May.Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image Credit: Counter Terrorism Policing South East

Police are investigating after two swastikas were found etched into a wall at a New Jersey high school.

In a statement, police said that they were investigating the antisemitic symbols found on the wall of a lavatory stall at Westfield High School. The President of the Board of Education, Amy Root, and the Principal, Mary Asfendis, both condemned the “disturbing” antisemitic vandalism.

Ms Root said: “I am very disappointed that there are those in our community who fail to understand the serious impact caused by these hateful symbols.” She added: “We will continue to look for ways to reinforce the message…that hate will not be tolerated.”

In an email to parents, Ms Asfendis said that the symbols had been “promptly removed” and added: “This act of antisemitism is disturbing as we work each day to…teach our students that hateful words and acts are inexcusable.”

Noting that Westfield students had recently led a “community conversation on antisemitism”, she said: “We need to engage in more of these dialogues, at home and in school, to help others understand the power of that symbol of hate, and the pain that it continues to cause.”

Despite how upsetting it was, said Ms Asfendis, it was the act of an individual and “does not represent who we are as a community or that we tolerate any acts of hatred, antisemitism or racism at Westfield High School.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Google

A man wearing a cap emblazoned with a swastika was observed at Melbourne’s train station last Friday.

The man, spotted shortly after a football match, was photographed by a 23-year-old descendant of Holocaust survivors.

The Chariman of the Anti-Defamation Commission said: “From the special spot in hell reserved for such monsters, Hitler must be smiling, knowing that his followers are continuing his destructive legacy.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Anti-Defamation Commission

The Student Association of Syracuse University in New York has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The resolution, which condemns acts of racism and violence against the Jewish community and proposed “actionable steps” for education about antisemitism, passed unanimously.

A previous version of the bill which included a clause denouncing the movement to boycott Israel failed to pass in February.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Police in Rome are reportedly searching for a Deliveroo courier suspected of stabbing a fellow deliveryman in an antisemitic spat.

The incident took place outside a McDonald’s over the weekend, with the assailant reported to have ranted about the Jews as he and the other deliveryman, of Just Eat, waited. It is understood that the victim protested and the perpetrator stabbed him with a knife.

The victim was apparently left with lacerations on his face but was otherwise not seriously harmed. The assailant fled on his bicycle.

It is understood that both men are middle-aged.

Earlier this year, it was reported that Deliveroo and two delivery men in France are facing legal action  after two kosher restaurant owners in Strasbourg claimed that the delivery men had refused to deliver their food because for reasons of antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The municipality of the Turkish city of Istanbul has reportedly named a park after a Nazi sympathiser.

Although the naming took place last November, it is only coming to light now that the city government named the park after Hüseyin Nihal Atsız (1905–1975), who is believed to have held antisemitic and pro-Nazi views.

“As the mud will not be iron even if it is put into an oven, the Jew cannot be Turkish no matter how hard he tries,” Mr Atsiz wrote in 1934.

He also wrote that “Turkishness is a privilege; it is not granted to everyone, especially to those like Jews…If we get angry, we will not only exterminate Jews like the Germans did, we will go further…”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Anti-lockdown protestors in Kiev have been seen dressed in concentration camp uniforms and donning yellow stars.

The 20th March ‘Rally For Freedom’ in the nation’s capital city was organised by the ‘Stop Fake Pandemic’ group, which claimed that more than 1,000 people participated.

The Ukrainian Jewish Committee called the use of the costumes in the protests “a cynical and shameful desecration of the victims of the Holocaust.”

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image Credit: Eduard Dolinsky (Facebook)

A legislator in the German state of Saxony has observed that, while antisemitic crimes are rising, prosecutions remain low.

Kerstin Köditz, of Die Linke (The Left Party), told journalists that 173 antisemitic crimes were recorded in 2020 – a fourth year-on-year increase – but only fourteen were successfully prosecuted.

Ms Köditz said: “The prosecution pressure is not even close to sufficient.”

She added: “One thing is clear: every act is one too many, no matter what area it comes from – hatred of Jews cannot be justified, there can be no tolerance whatsoever for antisemitism.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A Brazilian political leader has accused the Jews of sacrificing children.

Roberto Jefferson posted on Instagram: “Baal, Satanic deity, Canaanites and Jews sacrificed children to receive their sympathy. Today, history repeats itself.”

The comment is reminiscent of the classic blood libel against the Jews, and Instagram has removed the post.

Mr Jefferson leads the Labour Party (PTB), which holds twelve seats of the 513 in Brazil’s lower Chamber of Deputies.

The Brazilian Israelite Confederation described Mr Jefferson’s comment as “one of the vilest ways” to attack Jews, and he responded by calling them “morons”.

Mr Jefferson has previously been found to have been involved in a corruption scandal and barred from elected office until 2015.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Toronto police have identified a person of interest in a case of antisemitic insults at a bakery in the city.

The incident took place on 12th March at a bakery near Avenue Road and Eglinton Avenue and amounted to a “suspected hate-motivated assault”, according to police.

The bakery is located in a vibrant Jewish community.

A police spokesperson explained that “the man stepped outside with a witness when disagreement became heated. Outside, the man continued to make offensive comments. The victim intervened and challenged the suspect. He then punched the victim in the face.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A leading Argentine Jewish group is to file a complaint over antisemitic slurs heard chanted by football fans in the streets of the capital prior to a match.

The chants reportedly took place before a Buenos Aires derby between Atlanta, a team historically associated with the Jewish community, and Club Atletico Chacarita Juniors.

The complaint charges that around 1,000 of the Club Atletico Chacarita Juniors fans sang antisemitic chants after being unable to enter the stadium due to pandemic restrictions.

They reportedly chanted: “Here comes Chaca in the street, killing Jews to make soap.”

This is not the first time antisemitism has surfaced in clashes between the two clubs.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Antisemitic graffiti has been found on a synagogue in Belarus.

A swastika and SS mark were spray-painted on to the entrance of the Jewish Community of Gomel building earlier this month.

Gomel is 200 miles south-east of Minsk, and, while the city has historically hosted many Jews, there are currently only a few hundred remaining.

The glorification of Nazism is rare in the pro-Russian country, where the Nazis

There are no suspects.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: European Jewish Congress

A Cornish man has been charged with five offences under the Public Order Act 1986 after reports from Campaign Against Antisemitism prompted an investigation by Devon and Cornwall Police.

Graham Hart, 68, of Penponds, Camborne, has been charged with five counts of using offending words or behaviour in a programme involving threatening, abusive or insulting visual images or sounds which was included in a programme service, intending thereby to stir up racial hatred or, having regard to all the circumstances, whereby racial hatred was likely to be stirred up.

The offences fall under sections 22(1) and 27(3) of the Public Order Act 1986.

Mr Hart is bailed to appear at Truro Magistrates Court on 26th April.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Graham Hart has  been charged with five offences under the Public Order Act after our reports prompted an investigation by Devon and Cornwall Police. We are following the case with interest.”

The controversial website, Dorset Eye, has dubiously joined the relatively new media regulator, Impress.

Dorset Eye now displays the regulator’s kitemark on its website purportedly guaranteeing its “commitment to the principles of journalism”.

In 2019, the website accused the Jewish television presenter and anti-extremism activist, Rachel Riley, of working for the “Israeli state propaganda machine” and claimed that “her goons” will be responsible for “another Jo Cox moment”, a reference to the murder of the MP by a white supremacist. “Whether she is paid for her hate and propaganda is not for me to say but she is quite obviously (if only to me) a fascist and an Israeli state terrorist sympathiser,” the article went on to say.

Another article on the website described Chief Rabbi Ephraim Mirvis as “a modern day Judas” and “paid agent” of Israel. The article, which has since been removed, also warned of “another Kristallnacht”, referencing the infamous antisemitic Nazi pogrom in 1938.

Impress is officially recognised by the Government’s Press Regulation Panel and is partly funded by the family foundation of Max Mosley. Its members are required to abide by “minimum professionals standards” and must not “make prejudicial or pejorative reference to a person on the basis of that person’s…race, religion…or another characteristic that makes that person vulnerable to discrimination”.

An Impress spokesperson reportedly said: “The role of an approved press regulator is not to endorse the actions of those it regulates but to fairly and neutrally investigate and assess the newsgathering practices and content.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Questions must be asked of Impress for this decision. No serious regulator would take on Dorset Eye, a community website and resource which purports to have a warm and fuzzy image to publish antisemitic articles that clearly breach the International Definition of Antisemitism.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

The official Twitter account of the University of Warwick ‘liked’ a tweet endorsing recent inflammatory comments by the academic and conspiracy theorist David Miller, with the University subsequently deleting the ‘like’ and blaming “unauthorised access” to the account.

The tweet, which was part of a thread from an account called Socialist Campaign Group Highgate, read: “We agree with Dr Simon Behrman, @Warwick_Law and @Warwickuni of @RussellGroup that David Miller @Tracking_Power is right to say that Jewish students are agents of a Foreign Power and would like to male [sic] a job offer. Name your price.”

A spokesperson for the University said: “The tweet in question was ‘liked’ following unauthorised access to the account. The unauthorised access and ‘like’ was quickly spotted by the social media team and the tweet was soon ‘unliked’, and the matter has been referred to Twitter.”

The University of Warwick has had problems with addressing antisemitism on its campus in the recent past, and was reluctant to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism, which it ultimately did under pressure on 12th October 2020.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Plaid Cymru has published its internal report on antisemitism following a review led by its Westminster leader, Liz Saville Roberts MP.

Campaign Against Antisemitism made submissions to the review – in the form of a series of cases that were intended both to inform the review and to function as complaints about the subjects. The review came in the wake of the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s (EHRC) devastating report into antisemitism in the Labour Party. Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant in the EHRC”s investigation.

Plaid Cymru has now published its report – titled “Plaid Cymru commissioned Review into Antisemitism undertaken by Liz Saville Roberts MP” – and it makes numerous worthwhile recommendations. The Party, for example, has previously adopted an amended version of the International Definition of Antisemitism, and the report now rightly recommends that the Party adopts the full and unamended Definition. It also makes prudent recommendations to improve the Party’s disciplinary process.

However, the recommendations are only as useful as the Party’s willingness to tackle the problem of anti-Jewish racism, and the Party’s actions in the weeks since the review was announced and in the days since the report’s publication late last week, give cause for concern.

The Party has, for example, stood by at least two of the subjects of our complaint who are standing as a candidate for the Party in the Senedd election in May.

Our inquiries with the Party as to the status of these complaints has also so far not been met with a response (in contrast to the Party’s collaborative approach with us in recent months).

Joe Glasman, Head of Political Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We are grateful to Liz Saville Roberts MP for her internal review into antisemitism in Plaid Cymru. We have concerns over the Party’s failure to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism in full, and it is right that the report recommends that the Party rectifies this shortcoming. We hope it will do so immediately.

“Numerous other recommendations in the report pertaining to disciplinary procedures and raising awareness of antisemitism are also very welcome.

“However, we do not yet have clarity on whether the individuals whom we have reported to the Party will be investigated, and our inquiries with the Party have so far gone unanswered, which does not bode well for an improved disciplinary process. We also regret that the Party is reportedly standing by at least two of these individuals, who are standing as Plaid Cymru candidates in May’s Senedd election. Good words and fine reports are no substitute for real action against antisemitism, and it is a shame that this report is undermined by the Party’s apparent continued confidence in problematic figures.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.