Over the summer of last year, the British rapper Wiley delivered a multi-day antisemitic tirade over several social media networks, leading to a mass, online walkout. Following a protest by Campaign Against Antisemitism at Twitter’s London headquarters and interventions from the Prime Minister and Home Secretary, Twitter was finally forced to acknowledge the scale of antisemitic hatred on its platform and commit to addressing it. 

Within weeks, Twitter invited Campaign Against Antisemitism to become a “Twitter partner”, allowing us to report problematic material directly through the company’s “partner portal” to Twitter personnel (rather than machines) for review. We were led to understand that these personnel were trained to identify antisemitism. 

As well as submitting material for review on a regular basis, we also collated and summarised the material in monthly reports, which we submitted to Twitter at the end of December, January and February.

In aggregate, we submitted a selection of 1,000 of the most horrendous antisemitic tweets to Twitter incorporating classic antisemitic tropes, Holocaust denial and anti-Jewish incitement. Among them were numerous tweets incorporating the hashtag #HitlerWasRight or the phrase “Holohoax” and references to “fake Jewish Holocaust”, conspircaies about Jewish power and control, blood libels against Jews, calls to “Gas the Jews” and other extreme antisemitic hate speech and abuse.

The following is a sample of tweets from just one day – 4th December 2020 – all of which Twitter deemed acceptable for its platform.

  • “Wow. Biden’s now over 81 million votes? It’s like the Holohoax: you can just keep making up numbers” [complaint ticket 0183098131]
  • “G-d forbid anyone running for office condemn Israel for what they did and are currently doing to the Palestinians. They wouldn’t get elected considering Jews control our government, MSM [mainstream media], social media, Hollywood, financial institutions” [complaint ticket 0183100735]
  • “Except Hitler was right” [complaint ticket 0183140200]
  • “It’s probably the same useless junk that is in any other vaccines. All vaccines were created by Jews to control the population of the goyim. (((Jonas Salk)))” [complaint ticket 0183100251]
  • “What the f*** is this joke man???? What year are we living? THIS F***IN[‘] PROVES ZIONIST JEWS R PART OF THIS. WHY? VERY SIMPLE. THEY CONTROLLING THE WORLD. THEY CONTROL MEDIA. YET NOTHING IS GOING ON. THEY ENJOYING JUST LIKE THEY ENJOYED 1915 ARMENIAN GENOCIDE. SO F*** U ALL! [sic]” [complaint ticket 0183099274]
  • “3 baby Jew rats. 1 will grow up and Rob empires. 1 will go up committing sex act. 1 will grow up and become a Rabbi and will commit Jewish Talmudic Hebaric Terrrorism [sic]” [complaint ticket 0183140615]

This sample of tweets from just one single day showcases the variety of antisemitic tropes and the diversity of Anglophone Twitter users promoting them. But the degree of anti-Jewish racist vitriol on Twitter is well-established, and it has only intensified during the pandemic. What was remarkable, however, was that all of these tweets – and hundreds of others like them – were brought to Twitter’s attention over the course of several months by Campaign Against Antisemitism but were expressly deemed by the company to be acceptable on its platform.

Astonishingly, about 60 percent of the tweets that we submitted were not deemed to have breached Twitter’s policies on hate. For example, in December we reported 239 tweets, of which only 43 were found to be in violation of Twitter’s rules.

Meanwhile, although 194 of those tweets were found not to have violated the rules, the material in permitted and prohibited tweets was often the same. Moreover, 37 of the permitted tweets were subsequently reversed on re-submission or escalation, a token gesture that raised further questions about the consistency of Twitter’s implementation of its own rules: Why are some tweets removed while others incorporating the same antisemitic content are permitted to remain? Why do some Twitter operators deem certain tweets to be antisemitic but other operators take a different view on the same tweets?

At no time has Twitter adequately explained to us the parameters for removing or permitting tweets or who is reviewing hateful material or how they have been trained. Campaign Against Antisemitism’s offers of training for Twitter staff have been ignored.

After we raised concerns about the implementation of Twitter’s policies – following the grime artist Wiley’s antisemitic rampage on social media last summer – Twitter agreed to meet with us monthly to discuss progress. However, after the first meeting in December, notwithstanding that we continued to send reports over the ensuing months, Twitter cancelled further meetings. The tech giant welcomed the continued submission of the reports but asserted that the monthly meetings – of which only one had taken place – could not proceed. Although we continued to send reports, these have no longer been acknowledged or acted upon. In short, Twitter cut off contact with us after we provided clear evidence that their policies on hateful material were failing.

Remarkably, it was Twitter that invited Campaign Against Antisemitism to become its partner on tackling antisemitism on its platform, and it was Twitter that suggested monthly meetings to progress matters. But when its own partner alerted the social media giant to the scale of anti-Jewish hatred and the inconsistency of the implementation of its own rules, Twitter decided not to proceed at all. These are not the actions of a company interested in addressing antisemitism on its platform.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We do not have confidence in Twitter’s capacity to address the rampant antisemitism on its platform. As Twitter’s partner in trying to combat anti-Jewish hate, we have not come to this conclusion lightly. But the opacity of Twitter’s parameters, its inconsistent implementation of its own policies, its lack of interest in our offers of training for its personnel, and its decision ultimately to stop engaging with us at all, are not the actions of a company that takes antisemitism seriously.

“If Twitter brought us on as a partner as some sort of fig leaf for its inaction, we are now laying bare the true picture of the company. Having cut off contact with us after we provided clear evidence that Twitter’s policies on hateful material are failing, it is clear that the company is neither capable nor interested in tackling antisemitism, and it must now fall to an independent regulator to assume that role instead. We continue to urge the Government to take action now to stem the tide of antisemitic hate online.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms. We also continue to make representations to the Government on this matter.

A teenager has been charged with a religiously aggravated public order offence after a Jewish man was targeted with antisemitic abuse inside Oxford Circus Underground station on 4th July.

The seventeen-year-old suspect is due to appear at Highbury Corner Magistrates’ Court on 2nd August.

The boy in question is believed to have been involved in an incident where a person shouted “I f***ing hate the Jews” at a Jewish man whilst he was travelling down the escalators at Oxford Circus station.

In a statement, British Transport Police said: “We’re aware of a video posted online of…antisemitic behaviour on a London Underground escalator. We take such incidents very seriously and are investigating. If anybody has any information contact us on 0800 405040 or text 61016 quoting ref 90 of 4 July 2021.”

Immediately following the incident, Campaign Against Antisemitism released a statement thanking the victim’s brother for publicising the incident. The statement added: “We will be following up privately, but for those reading the thread [on Twitter] we wanted to note that police investigations have now been opened and we are in touch with police and Transport for London. #ZeroTolerance”

Earlier that night, the same Jewish man reported a separate incident of antisemitic abuse, in which an aggressive passenger can be heard threatening him and saying: “I’ve got a shank, I will slit your throat for Palestine” and “I’ll beat the s**t out of you.”

The passenger was then ordered off the bus, where he proceeded to swear at the Jewish man and bang on the doors of the bus.  

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently launched an appeal for information about the suspect in the earlier incident.

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently met with Transport for London as part of work to improve the response to antisemitic incidents on public transport.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A lay magistrate in Scotland is alleged to have promoted an antisemitic video.

According to the JC, a video from 2016 remains visible on the Facebook profile of Amjid Bashir, a broadcaster and Justice of the Peace, which contains a link to a five minute video that claims that the Rothschild family – common protagonists in antisemitic conspiracy theories – “maintains its control through the US Federal Reserve”.

The video’s accompanying caption read: “Not really one for conspiracies but this is interesting on how 5 ultra wealthy families have some [sic] much power.”

A Judician Communications spokesperson reportedly said that “this matter is now under consideration by the Judicial Office for Scotland,” adding: “All judicial office holders receive training about, and are bound by, the Statement of Principles of Judicial Ethics, and must uphold high standards of professional conduct.”

Mr Bashir reportedly wrote on social media last week that he stood “against all hate and discrimination #islamophobia #racism #antisemitism #hate”.

Image credit: JC

Labour Party panel conducting an internal review into the Party’s local operations in Liverpool was reportedly “presented with evidence of a history of antisemitism that already has led to expulsions and suspensions.”

The review was launched after allegations arose of “bullying”, “misogyny” and a “toxic culture” in the Labour Party in the city. The panel received 77 written submissions and conducted 53 interviews with 60 individuals, concluding that “Nothing less than a full reset of the Labour Party in Liverpool is needed.”

Included amongst the various problems were allegations of antisemitism, with the panel recommending compulsory antisemitism training for all elected officeholders, from MPs to branch officers. The panel has also recommended that such training should be mandatory for all candidates as well, a policy that Labour’s ruling National Executive Committee (NEC) endorsed this week.

During the period of Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership of the Labour Party, two Jewish women MPs from Liverpool – Luciana Berger and Dame Louise Ellman – were hounded from the Party, amid other local controversies relating to antisemitism.

The revelation came in the week of a major meeting of Labour’s NEC, in which it take numerous significant steps in the fight against antisemitism in the Party.

Those steps, however, come following weeks of support by Labour MPs and officeholders of anti-Israel rallies that featured antisemitic chanting and placards and strained relations with the Jewish community yet further. Just this week, another such rally, in Newcastle, was exposed, in which one NEC member and former Labour MP, Laura Pidcock, Cllr Ann Schofield and Daniel Kebede, the Senior Vice President of the the controversial National Education Union, spoke. At the rally, the chant “Khaybar, oh Jews” was heard, a reference to the antisemitic “Jews, remember Khaybar, the army of Muhammad is returning” chant. The “Khaybar” chant is a classic Arabic battle cry referencing the massacre and expulsion of the Jews of the town of Khaybar in northwestern Arabia, now Saudi Arabia, in the year 628 CE. The chant has been heard in numerous anti-Israel rallies in Britain and abroad.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The man who shot and killed a 60-year-old woman in a California synagogue is set to be jailed for life without the possibility of parole. His sentencing is scheduled for 30th September.

John T. Earnest, the man who killed 60-year-old Lori Gilbert-Kaye in the Chabad of Poway Synagogue shooting in April 2019, pled guilty to the charges of murder and attempted murder earlier this week in a plea agreement that saw him avoid the death penalty.

Mr Earnest, who was nineteen at the time of the shooting, was said to have entered the synagogue with an AR-15 style rifle and opened fire on the 54 congregants inside, killing Ms Gilbert-Kaye and injuring three others, including an eight-year-old girl and the congregation’s founder, Rabbi Yisroel Goldstein, who lost a finger.

During the shooting, Mr Earnest’s rifle jammed, at which point several members of the congregation ran towards him, chasing him out of the synagogue. He was understood to have fled before calling the police himself to confess that he had committed a shooting at a synagogue because he believed that Jews were trying to “destroy all white people,” and was subsequently apprehended approximately two miles from the synagogue.  

Mr Earnest also confessed to committing arson at the Dar-ul-Arqam Mosque in March 2019 “for the purpose of terrorising Muslim worshippers,” it was revealed in a news release from the San Diego County District Attorney’s Office on Tuesday.

Addressing Mr Earnest’s motivation behind the Poway Synagogue shooting, the news release said that Mr Earnest “admitted that he committed those crimes because of his bias and hatred of Jews.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

“Jews are behind the pandemic” and “rule the world” chants were heard at an anti-vaccine rally in Poland on Sunday.

The rally in Głogów was held by supporters of the local football team who marched to protest COVID-19 restrictions and vaccines. The organisers were reported to have called on locals to join “the fight for our common future” against “the globalists”, a term that is often used in far-right conspiratorial circles to refer to Jewish people.

It was reported that at one point during the rally, a man with a megaphone asked the crowd: “We know who is behind this whole ‘plandemic’ and who rules the world, right?”, to which someone responded “Jews”, and the man replied, “Of course it’s the Jews”.

A chant of “Every Pole can see today that behind the ‘plandemic’ are the Jews” was then reported to have broken out amongst the crowd of over 100 people.

Three arrests were made after confrontations broke out between protestors and police officers. A video of police officers retreating was uploaded to Twitter by a nationalist account, along with the caption: “You will all be held accountable someday.”

Earlier today, the account also tweeted an image of the Nazi flag and wrote: “We will never bow our knees, we will never submit, we will never become one of your sheep! Stop sanitary segregation!”

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The Executive Director of the controversial activist group, Human Rights Watch, posted a tweet with the phrase “Antisemitism is always wrong, but…”.

Kenneth Roth, an attorney who has headed the organisation since 1993, wrote on Twitter: “Antisemitism is always wrong, and it long preceded the creation of Israel, but the surge in UK antisemitic incidents during the recent Gaza conflict gives the lie to those who pretend that the Israeli government’s conduct doesn’t affect antisemitism.”

His tweet captioned an article about the surge in anti-Jewish racism in Britain over the past few weeks during the conflict between the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group, Hamas, and Israel.

Mr Roth’s tweet appeared to victim-blame the Jews for antisemitism, seeming to justify antisemites holding Jews responsible for the actions or perceived actions of the Israeli Government. According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the State of Israel” is an example of antisemitism.

Many observed that Mr Roth would never countenance blaming other minorities for the hatred visited upon them.

Mr Roth initially doubled down, posting another tweet that said: “Interesting how many people pretend that this tweet justifies antisemitism (it doesn’t and I don’t under any circumstances) rather than address the correlation noted in the Haaretz article between recent Israeli government conduct in Gaza and the rise of UK antisemitic incidents.”

He then deleted the original tweet and reposted the article in a tweet with the following caption: “I deleted an earlier tweet because people misinterpreted its wording. I repost the Haaretz article here without commentary: ‘UK Antisemitism Rose to Record Levels During Israel-Gaza Fighting’ ‘The most intense period of anti-Jewish hatred in recent years.’”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

Neo-Nazi Andrew Dymock has been jailed for seven years, with a further three years on extended licence, for terror and hate crimes.

Andrew Dymock, a 24-year-old politics graduate from Aberystwyth University who was accused of creating and running the website of the neo-Nazi System Resistance Network group, was found guilty of fifteen terrorism and hate charges last month.

During the trial at the Old Bailey, the court heard that Mr Dymock wrote and shared several antisemitic and hate-motivated articles through the website. He was being prosecuted for fifteen offences including encouraging terrorism through the use of propaganda.

One article was allegedly titled “Join your local Nazis”, while another, “The Truth about the Holocaust”, said that “the only guilt felt by the Germanic race in regard to the Holocaust should be that we did not finish the job.” The article reportedly went on to say that Jews were a “cancer on this earth…that must be eradicated in its entirety”. Numerous antisemitic stereotypes and tropes were also said to have been included, such as conspiracy theories about Jewish control of the banks and the Government.

Another article reportedly written by Mr Dymock read that white people needed to “wake up and bring slaughter to Europa, cleansing it of the unclean filth that pollutes her lands”.

System Resistance Network is the successor to National Action, which the government proscribed as a terrorist organisation in 2016 following a long campaign by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others.

Mr Dymock was convicted of a total of fifteen offences, which include five counts of encouraging terrorism, four of disseminating terrorist publications, two of terrorist fundraising, one of possessing material useful to a terrorist, one of possessing racially inflammatory material, one of stirring up racial hatred, and one of stirring up hatred on the grounds of sexual orientation.

During the trial, Mr Dymock denied all charges, stating: “I’m doing my dissertation on the rise of nationalism and why, and how, ranging from moderate to extreme. I kind of thought I might as well start preparing for my third year in advance.”

Mr Dymock told jurors “thank you for killing me” as they delivered their verdicts.

Detective Chief Superintendent Martin Snowden, Head of Counter Terrorism Policing North East, the group that led the investigation into Mr Dymock, said: “Dymock represented a threat to our society, not simply because of his mindset but because of the considerable efforts he exerted spreading his ideology and misusing his abilities.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Image credit: Crown Prosecution Service

Kentaro Kobayashi, the Director for the Olympic Games’ opening ceremony, has been fired the day before the ceremony is scheduled to begin for making a joke about the Holocaust.

The joke in question occurred in 1998 when Mr Kobayashi, a former comedian, performed a live sketch in which he held up paper dolls and said to his comedy partner that they were “the ones from that time you said ‘let’s play the Holocaust’.”

A video of the sketch surfaced on Twitter yesterday, prompting outrage.

Mr Kobayashi has released a statement in light of his release as Director which read: “Entertainment should not make people feel uncomfortable. I understand that my stupid choice of words at that time was wrong, and I regret it.”

Last year, the International Olympics Committee (IOC) apologised for posting a tweet that appeared to celebrate the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games hosted by Nazi Germany.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Earlier this week, Metropolitan Police Commissioner Dame Cressida Dick said that she expects those behind the antisemitic attacks in May to be held responsible and face justice.  

In May, incidents of antisemitism in Britain skyrocketed after clashes erupted between Israel and Hamas, the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group. These incidents included signs that featured antisemitic themes at rallies, a rabbi in Essex being assaulted and hospitalised, and a convoy of cars that drove down the Finchley Road shouting “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” through a megaphone.

Dame Cressida said that her officers “still have a number of investigations to complete” while adding that she expects her team will be “bringing people to justice.”

It was confirmed that the allegations that are currently under investigation so far include “a very offensive placard” and “somebody who was shouting vile abuse as they were driving along.”

“Antisemitic attacks are obviously vile – we all wish they didn’t happen,” the Commissioner said. She added: “We are working really hard to make sure we get ahead of the problem…we saw, yes a spike, a high in reported antisemitic crime.”

Commissioner Dick noted that “a fair proportion of reported crime was online” but also added that this “does not excuse it.”

Speaking on the anti-Israel demonstrations where several antisemitic signs and chants were present, Commissioner Dick said: “Policing those protests was challenging, although the amount of disorder associated with those protests was very much less than on the last two occasions when tensions had been particularly high in that region.”

Following a complaint from Campaign Against Antisemitism, the Metropolitan Police Service is investigating multiple police officers over their participation in antisemitic protests whilst in uniform.

Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to Commissioner Dame Cressida Dick after two videos emerged, one showing a uniformed police officer embracing protestors and chanting “Free, free Palestine,” with another showing officers at the same demonstration greeting and shaking hands with the drivers of a convoy of cars that displayed Palestinian flags.

The protests were characterised by some of the worst incidents of antisemitism seen on the streets of London in recent years. Swastikas and pictures of Adolf Hitler as well as calls for Jews to be murdered and Jewish women to be raped were all accompanied by the constant beat of the same words that were chanted by the officer who appears in the first video.

The Chair of the Labour Party, Anneliese Dodds MP, has hailed Labour’s ruling National Executive Committee (NEC) as having “acted decisively to put our own house in order” after it passed a serious of significant measures in the fight against antisemitism in the Party.

In its marathon nine-hour meeting yesterday – the last before the Party’s annual conference in September – the NEC voted to proscribe Labour Against the Witchhunt – an antisemitism-denial group – and the disgraced former Labour MP Chris Williamson’s Resist group, as well as two further far-left groups, paving the way for automatic expulsion of their members.

The NEC has also resolved, in line with Labour’s Action Plan agreed with the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC), to put forward a semi-independent disciplinary system for a vote at this year’s Party conference. It is understood that an Independent Reviews Panel and an Independent Appeal Board will be formed, to deal with complaints involving protected characteristics, such as allegations of antisemitism. The Appeal Board will reportedly comprise four lawyers, four lay members, and four HR experts, with panels of 3 – including one from each category – hearing cases.It is believed that the process will only be “semi-independent” because, for reasons of cost and protection of the rights of members, it would not be feasible to outsource the complaints process entirely to an independent body.

Ms Dodds described the proposal as “the fairest, most robust process of any political party that we know of.” The National Constitutional Committee will continue to deal with complaints that do not involve protected characteristics. However, the proposal is still subject to approval at conference, and it remains to be seen whether Labour’s leadership is capable of implementing them in practice.

Another rule change to be proposed at conference, as agreed at yesterday’s NEC meeting, is that all Labour candidates seeking public office will need to undertake antisemitism training provided by Labour’s Jewish affiliate, in line with a requirement of the Action Plan.

The NEC was also apparently forced to agree to around one hundred redundancies due to the Party’s poor financial state, which is reportedly due in part to the legal ramifications of the raft of antisemitism cases that it has been involved in.

The Party’s General-Secretary, David Evans, also reportedly agreed to release “by the autumn” part of the Forde report into the leak of a spurious Party report into antisemitism conducted during the final weeks of Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership.

These steps are undoubtedly to be welcomed. However, much remains to be done. For example, organisations such as Jewish Voice for Labour, an antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, have not been proscribed. Neither has the Labour Representation Committee, a pro-Corbyn pressure group with a long history of belittling claims of antisemitism and publishing extremely disturbing articles, where the former Shadow Chancellor, John McDonnell, serves as President. Numerous individual councillors and members with records of antisemitic conduct are also yet to be disciplined.

Moreover, several of the key positive measures, including the independent disciplinary process and antisemitism training for all candidates, must be approved at Labour’s annual conference in autumn. Whilst this was expected, it is a reminder that the hardest step is yet to come. Even yesterday’s virtual NEC meeting was protested by a contingent of far-left activists, including “notorious antisemite” and expelled Labour member, Tony Greenstein, and the conspiracy theorist Piers Corbyn (brother of Jeremy). It is believed that Labour Against the Witchhunt will be holding events in Brighton during Labour’s conference in the city.

Then there is the problem of the far-left MPs in Labour’s Parliamentary Party. In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates. On the day of the publication of the EHRC’s report, we submitted a major complaint against Jeremy Corbyn and other sitting MPs, which are yet even to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated only by an independent disciplinary process once it is installed. The incidents in those complaints were recently exacerbated by the involvement of numerous MPs in anti-Israel rallies that were addressed by antisemitic speakers and where antisemitic placards were seen and antisemitic chanting was heard. That period has strained relations between the Labour Party and the Jewish community even further.

Yesterday’s NEC meeting represented the revolt of those who have enabled the far-left over the past several years, including Sir Keir Starmer, who backed the antisemite Jeremy Corbyn “100%” even as Jewish MPs were hounded from the Party and others courageously left in solidarity with them. The enablers themselves have much to answer for, but yesterday’s meeting was a step in the right direction.

Joe Glasman, Head of Political Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Throwing out the cranks, which no decent political party should have tolerated in the first place, is a positive step, but it is not a cure for a Party that became institutionally antisemitic. The problem is less the bad apples than the culture that enabled them to grow and rot. A new disciplinary process and mandatory training are part of the remedial process. The NEC has spoken, but now the Party must decide at conference, which means the hardest part is yet to come.

“The Parliamentary Labour Party must also confront those in its ranks who have made antisemitic comments, both within and beyond its Corbynist contingent. The indefinite suspension of Jeremy Corbyn was a start, but just as it was wrong for Labour to have tolerated Mr Corbyn over all his years on the backbenches, so it would be intolerable to ignore other MPs facing allegations of antisemitic conduct. We have outstanding complaints against many of these MPs, several of whom also recently endorsed rallies that featured antisemitic placards and chanting while the Party’s leadership stayed silent.

“Today’s announcement is a welcome step on what remains a long road to the possibility of Labour’s rehabilitation, which, given the Party’s record to date, is not a certainty.”

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A sign for a COVID-19 vaccination centre has been vandalised with swastikas and the word “extermination”, it was reported earlier today.

“9/11 lies” was also scrawled on the sign. This refers to the widespread, antisemitic conspiracy theory which says that Jews, not Islamist terrorists, were responsible for flying passenger jets into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, so that they would profit from the resulting war. This is backed up by the equally false belief that no Jews were killed in the attack, as they had all been warned to stay at home that day.

A photograph of the defaced sign was posted on Twitter by the Holocaust Educational Trust after it was discovered by one of its staff members. The British charity wrote: “Spotted on the way to work by one of our staff. This is vile, deeply offensive and antisemitic. Invoking the memory of the Holocaust does nothing but cause pain and hurt to Jews. There is no basis in reality. It is just wrong.”

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Image credit: The Holocaust Educational Trust

A Scottish National Party (SNP) MP has apologised for, and deleted, a tweet in which he wrote that “Murdering babies wasn’t on the Nazi manifesto.” However, another tweet in which he appeared to compare the Conservative Party to the Nazis still remains on his Twitter account.

Peter Grant, MP for Glenrothes, posted the now-deleted inflammatory tweet last Thursday in reply to veteran broadcaster Andrew Neil after Mr Neil had shared a post from the Auschwitz Memorial. The post told of how a Jewish toddler from Hungary was murdered before his first birthday.

Mr Neil shared the post, adding: “As accusations of fascism are bandied about today like confetti by the ignorant, ludicrously devaluing the word of any meaning, a reminder of what real fascism can do. And of its unconscionable evil.”

Mr Grant replied to this tweet by saying: “You’re more right than you care to admit. Murdering babies wasn’t on the Nazi manifesto. Not until they’d been in power several years & stoked up fear & hatred against innocent citizens. Then, and only then, did they show their true colours.”  

Mr Grant was heavily criticised for his tweet. Scottish Conservative Chief Whip, Stephen Kerr, said: “For an elected SNP MP to post this was hugely offensive as well as being completely inaccurate. It beggars belief that any elected representative would think this sort of language was appropriate as part of a political debate. It has absolutely no place in civil discourse. This was a warped tweet and gave a worrying insight into what this SNP MP believes. Peter Grant must urgently apologise and reflect on this shameful behaviour.”

Mr Grant posted an apology on Twitter for his tweet, writing: “I want to apologise unreservedly for a highly insensitive tweet I posted. While I strongly believe we must always be vigilant to the seeds of racism, antisemitism, and fascism, I deeply regret how I made that point and I have deleted the tweet.”

However, Mr Grant posted another inflammatory tweet only five minutes after his first, in which he appeared to compare the Conservative Party to the Nazis. Replying to fellow SNP MP Anne McLaughlin’s tweet, in which she also replied to Mr Neil’s post, Mr Grant wrote: “Nobody in Germany voted for the Holocaust. Murderous regimes don’t get elected because people deliberately vote for them. Elected governments evolve into murderous regimes very slowly and hope nobody will notice.”

While this tweet still remains on Mr Grant’s Twitter account, Ms McLaughlin’s tweet has since been deleted.

This is the third instance this year that reports of SNP members making gratuitous comparisons between a major political party to the Nazis have surfaced.

In April, an SNP candidate apologised after comments from 2017 emerged in which she had reportedly compared tactics by the Conservatives to Hitler and the Holocaust.

Two weeks later, it had been revealed that another SNP candidate posted a comment on Facebook comparing the Labour Party’s political strategy in Scotland to that of the Nazi propagandist Joseph Goebbels.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Nazi comparisons abounded at a far-left demonstration outside Labour Party headquarters earlier today, with support for the antisemitic former Party leader Jeremy Corbyn on show and several references to antisemitism as a “smear“ campaign made by participants.

Among the speakers at the demonstration, which was observed by Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Demonstration and Monitoring Unit, were “notorious antisemite“ Tony Greenstein and the conspiracy theorist and Mr Corbyn’s brother, Piers Corbyn, both of whom made comparisons to the Nazis.

The demonstration was organised by far-left Labour activists who were protesting Sir Keir Starmer’s reported decision to purge the Party of “toxic” fringe groups, including Labour Against the Witchhunt, as well as to demand that Jeremy Corbyn have the whip reinstated after his suspension from the Parliamentary Labour Party.

One of the organisers of the demonstration was Labour Against the Witchhunt, which was set up to protest the expulsion of Labour members for alleged antisemitism and which opposes “the false antisemitism smear”. It is one of the groups whose members are reportedly threatened with expulsion from Labour.

Mr Greenstein, who was recently declared bankrupt by a judge after failing to comply with court orders to pay Campaign Against Antisemitism after his humiliating abortive defamation claim against us, was one of the speakers at the rally. In his speech, he referenced his past suspension for comparing Israel to the Nazis, in breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Alluding to the “fake antisemitism campaign”, Mr Greenstein said: “I was told I was suspended for comments I’d made. They didn’t tell me what I’d said. But two weeks later, I read in The Telegraph and The Times that I had compared Israel’s marriage laws to that of Nazi Germany. So, I told my inquisitor, ‘Well, yes. The great political philosopher of the last century, Hannah Arendt, herself a refugee from Nazi Germany, made exactly that point’. So, let’s be clear. It’s not about antisemitism.” Mr Greenstein was also recorded giving an inflammatory interview at the rally.

Sheila Day, a former Labour councillor in Hove, said that a motion to boycott Israel that she had promoted was blocked on the basis that it would encourage antisemitism. Ms Day mentioned that she was advised that Jewish members may feel unsafe in discussion about boycotting the world’s only Jewish state, to which Ms Day recounted that remarked that she “doesn’t know how anyone can feel unsafe in a Zoom meeting,” and that if “they [the Jewish members] feel unsafe talking about Israel, let them go to Gaza and let them sit there with one of the women and one of the children that are being bombed, that are being starved, that are being mutilated, that are being oppressed like this.” Ms Day then confirmed that, while she had not been suspended, she was under investigation for allegations of antisemitism.

Greg Hadfield, a disgraced Labour activist who had reportedly been caught supporting Labour candidate Alex Braithwaite who was suspended from the Party for a series of tweets which included conspiracy theories about Israel and the Rothschild family, proudly told the crowd that he was suspended from the Labour Party for tweeting: “The State of Israel is a racist endeavour and always has been.” According to the Definition, “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour)” is another example of antisemitism.

Mike Cushman, a member of antisemitism-denial groups Jewish Voice for Labour and Labour Against The Witchhunt, also spoke. Mr Cushman has previously claimed that he has never observed antisemitism in the Labour Party and that the evidence on which antisemitism allegations are based emanates either from the Israeli Mossad or British security services, which he insists oppose the election of a Labour Government.

One speaker adapted Martin Niemöller’s “First they came” poem, which describes the guilt of not standing up to the Nazis in Germany as they persecuted minority groups, by instead referring to the perceived persecution of Labour Party members.

Two speakers, who stated that they were speaking on behalf of Labour members from North Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Constituency Labour Party, referred to the “false charges” of antisemitism whilst holding a sign that read: “NW Cambs & Peterborough Members smeared & silenced”.

Other signs included advocating for the opposition to the International Definition of Antisemitism and calling for justice for a group of eight Labour activists after the High Court recently dismissed their case that argued that an investigation into antisemitism-related allegations brought against them by the Party was unfair. Another sign alleged that only “informed Jews” were aware of the perceived actions of the Israeli Government.

The event attracted counter-demonstrators who bore signs that stated that Mr Corbyn is an antisemite. However, some far-left demonstrators made an effort to cover these signs up in an attempt to prevent them from being seen.

Towards the end of the rally, an anti-vaccination protest merged with the far-left demonstration. Piers Corbyn, who recently compared vaccinations to Nazi policy outside the Houses of Parliament after being arrested following a similar incident in February, took to the mic to speak about vaccinations.

Speaking about the Covid-19 vaccination and the lockdown, Mr Corbyn said: “You know what happened in Germany. The left there, they were begging Hitler to support them. They believed in Hitler. You know what happened. The rest is history…the Jews were labelled as a danger and were locked up.”

Mr Corbyn also gave an interview in which he denied that he, or his brother Jeremy, were antisemites.

The rally was intended to coincide with a major meeting of Labour’s ruling National Executive Committee, although the meeting is being held over Zoom rather than at the the Party’s headquarters where the rally was taking place. In addition to an anticipated vote on a purge of toxic groups and members, it is being reported that discussions will also be held over the Party’s dire financial state, blamed in part on the legal repercussions of the various antisemitism cases in which the Party has been involved. There will also reportedly be a vote on mandating that all candidates for elected public office representing the Part will be required to undertake antisemitism training provided by Labour’s Jewish affiliate.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Groups like Labour Against the Witchhunt have no place in Labour if the Party truly wants to tackle its antisemitism problem, which is exacerbated by its deniers. This ban, if successfully introduced, will be a welcome and necessary step forward in detoxifying the Labour Party. There remains a great deal more to do to address Labour’s institutional antisemitism – represented by the cranks who attended today’s rally – but this policy shows renewed seriousness on the part of Labour’s leadership.”

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

In its latest attempt at recruiting young members, the far-right group, Patriotic Alternative, has held a “family summer camp” in the Lake District.

The fascist group was said to have waved signs that read “We will not be replaced” and “White lives matter.”

Shortly after the summer camp, several members allegedly sent racist abuse to black footballers online.

However, Patriotic Alternative’s Deputy Leader, Laura Towler, said that the group is a “family-focused organisation” that “gives young nationalists a positive direction in life”.

The group is known for its efforts to recruit youth to its white nationalist ideology. Previously, the far-right group published an online “alternative” home school curriculum condemned as “poison” and “hateful” and attempted to recruit children as young as twelve through livestreaming events on YouTube, according to The Times.

According to Hope Not Hate’s report, Patriotic Alliance is “a racist far-right organisation with antisemitism at its very core. They aim to combat the ‘replacement and displacement’ of white Britons by people who ‘have no right to these lands’.” The group reportedly holds that “it is Jewish elites, particularly, who are orchestrating the ‘replacement’ of white Britons.”

The group is led by the former head of the youth wing of the BNP, Mark Collett, who is reported to have dabbled in Holocaust denial, collaborated with the infamous American antisemite David Duke, and espoused antisemitic and racist views.

Earlier this year, the far-right group was found to be using the social media platform Telegram to create neo-Nazi channels dedicated to sharing vile messages, antisemitic conspiracy theories and images glorifying Hitler. 

report into Patriotic Alternative published last summer found that several members of the group engaged in Holocaust denial.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Sir Keir Starmer is reportedly set to ban 1,000 far-left Labour Party members active in four “toxic” fringe groups.

Labour’s National Executive Committee, the Party’s ruling body, will be asked to disaffiliate the four organisations, including Labour Against the Witchhunt, a group that was set up to protest the expulsion of Labour members for alleged antisemitism and that opposes “the false antisemitism smear.”

The other groups are Resist, Socialist Appeal and Labour In Exile Network, a group that welcomes suspended or expelled Party members. Membership within these groups will carry with it an automatic expulsion from the Party.

One Labour source said: “Under Corbyn those from the far-left fringes with poisonous beliefs and warped world-views were welcomed into the Party. Keir [Starmer] is right to stamp out antisemitism and toxic extremism and get the Party back into the decent mainstream of Labour values.”

Recently, the High Court rejected a case by eight Labour activists who argued that an investigation into antisemitism-related allegations brought against them by the Party was unfair. 

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A Wolverhampton man has been handed a community order after he filmed his dog in a microwave and made antisemitic comments about the Holocaust.

Stephen Lee Short, 32, made five videos where he filmed a woman placing a dog into a microwave and other kitchen appliances.

In one of the clips, Mr Short was understood to have made antisemitic comments about the Holocaust.

At Wolverhampton Magistrates Court in May, Mr Short pleaded guilty to sending an offensive message by public communication. He was given a twelve-month community order which included fifteen rehabilitation activity requirement days, an alcohol treatment requirement and a 21-day thinking skills programme.

The court also ordered Mr Short to undergo 200 hours of unpaid work which, considering the racial aspect to the offense, had been increased by 50 hours.

Image credit: Google

Scottish Labour councillor Jim Sheridan has been suspended from the Party for a second time after his inflammatory comments led to an antisemitism investigation last month.

The investigation came after he appeared to double down on previous inflammatory comments, as well as claiming that former Party leader Jeremy Corbyn was suspended from the Party simply for “expressing free speech.”

Cllr Sheridan made the comments during a debate at Renfrewshire Council on the effect on free speech of the recently-passed Hate Crime and Public Order (Scotland) Bill.

Cllr Sheridan was quoted as saying: “I feel I must make a contribution to this debate about free speech. As someone who was personally attacked for contributing, or making, what I thought was perfectly reasonable comments about antisemitism, I was attacked for free speech.

“And I also include, Provost, the former leader of the Labour Party, who was thrown out of the Labour Party for expressing free speech.”

Cllr Sheridan appeared to be referring to a comment that he posted on his Facebook page in 2018, saying: “For almost all my adult life I have had the utmost respect and empathy for the Jewish community and their historic suffering. No longer due to what they and their blairite [sic] plotters are doing to my party and the long suffering people of Britain who need a radical Labour government.”

He subsequently deleted the post, but, following a complaint, he was suspended by the Labour Party pending investigation. Last year, his suspension was reportedly lifted without explanation or apology from the councillor, who now seems to be doubling down on his previous comments as well as excusing the antisemitic former leader of the Labour Party.

A Scottish Labour spokesperson said: “The Labour Party takes all complaints of antisemitism extremely seriously and they are fully investigated in line with our rules and procedures, and any appropriate disciplinary action is taken.”

complaint by Campaign Against Antisemitism against Cllr Sheridan remains outstanding.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The Sunday Times has removed a reference to Orthodox Jews in an article about “vultures preying” on shopping centres after a complaint from Campaign Against Antisemitism.

The article, titled “Vultures prey on bombed-out shopping centres”, focussed on investors who are purchasing the now-derelict shopping centres in Britain, with particular emphasis on vultures, which are a type of investor. However, the publication initially included a gratuitous reference to Orthodox Jews and thereby implied comparisons between Jews and vultures.

The article, brought to our attention by CAMERA UK, an organisation promoting fair coverage of Israel in British media, read: “Mark Garmon-Jones, head of shopping centre investing at Savills, said over a quarter of the buyers were backed by Israeli money, often invested via the UK’s Orthodox Jewish community.”

After Campaign Against Antisemitism contacted The Sunday Times to raise our concerns that the reference to Orthodox Jews was gratuitous and may promote the stereotype of Jewish greed or predatory behaviour, the publication advised us that it was removing the reference from the article.

We are also writing to Savills.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

A cartoonist, known as Mumph, has been suspended from YesCymru, an organisation that campaigns for an independent Wales, after posting a cartoon on Twitter which has been described as a “blatantly antisemitic caricature” of a fellow member.

The incident was initially raised on Twitter by the group “Labour for an Independent Wales.” It stated that one of its members, who also sits on the YesCymru Central Committee, was the subject of antisemitic abuse and labelled the cartoon “a blatantly antisemitic caricature” that was “evocative of the darkest of the last century.”

The group continued: “As members of the Labour Party we’re acutely aware of how pernicious and dangerous antisemitism is and, as human beings, we’re shocked by its prominence in the indy movement. We are unequivocal in our opposition to any individual or organisation that tolerates antisemitism.”

The cartoon in question depicts the YesCymru member with exaggerated facial features, which one Twitter user described as “uncomfortably similar to Nazi antisemitic propaganda,” and is also shown carrying a sign that says “Yes But No” above a silhouette of Wales.

According to the Labour-affiliated group, the cartoon insinuated that the YesCymru member was “behind a conspiracy to bring down the independence movement internally due to a ‘dual loyalty’.” 

The charge of dual loyalty and disloyalty is among the most widely held antisemitic slurs. According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Accusing Jewish citizens of being more loyal to Israel, or to the alleged priorities of Jews worldwide, than to the interests of their own nations” is an example of antisemitism.

YesCymru released a statement in which the group announced Mumph’s suspension from its organisation. The statement read: “This morning YesCymru’s attention was drawn to a cartoon attacking a member of CC by a former service provider and member of YesCymru. We believe that this illustration repeats antisemitic tropes and is designed to cause hurt to the CC member.

“While YesCymru encourages debate and discussion amongst its members, supporters and the wider community, we cannot tolerate bullying, harassment or antisemitism and need to take action by suspending the member with immediate effect and withdrawing his work from our welcome pack while pending investigation.”

While Mumph has not released a statement of his own regarding the suspension, he has retweeted a post from a Twitter user which appeared to dismiss the allegations of antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

The Green Party has failed to respond after Campaign Against Antisemitism notified the Party’s leadership of severe antisemitic conduct by two prominent members of the Party.

Claudine Letsae, who recently served as the Green Party Equalities and Diversity Coordinator and now holds the International Coordinator portfolio, has among the worst and most prolific record of antisemitic comments of any political officeholder that we have ever seen.

Using an anonymous account which has recently been suspended by Twitter, she has tweeted that “the Zionists Own the media and everything else inbetween [sic]” and said of London’s Royal Free Hospital that “They are run by Zionists, they are one NHS Trust that is extremely corrupt”.

She described antisemitism in the Labour Party as “the biggest con of the electorate”. She has also defended Ken Livingstone.

In reference to the Western coalition’s retaking of the Iraqi city of Mosul from ISIS, Ms Letsae commented: “The cruelty of this Zionist nations [sic] knows no limitations to their barbarity and cruelty #FreePalestine.”

Protesting the closure of the controversial Exhibit B installation at the Barbican Centre, she wrote: “It would not happen if it was Jewish exhibition #ExhibitB @BarbicanCentre because it is minority that has less of a voice-if its black people [sic].” Then, responding to a question by another user, she replied: “well the Jews are no longer persecuted and they have received their reparation. None for the African slaves yet.”

She has also promoted the antisemitic Khazar myth, which claims that Jews are descended from a Central Asian people and have no connection to the Land of Israel.

Ms Letsae was also a signatory to a letter published in the London Green Left blog that accused Campaign Against Antisemitism of being “a campaign which systematically makes accusations of antisemitism against pro-Palestine activists (esp. Jewish ones)” and that opposed the International Definition of Antisemitism.

These are just a sample of the incidents relating to Ms Letsae. It is astonishing that she could have been considered appropriate to serve as the Party’s Equalities and Diversity Coordinator or that she is deemed fit to continue to serve in a different portfolio now, as well as having been a Parliamentary candidate.

We have also drawn the Green Party’s attention to Jeremy Parker, a former Parliamentary and local council candidate who has applauded the description of Facebook as a “weapon of mass Zionist attack” and has repeatedly compared Israel to the Nazis, as well as having shared an article describing Zionism as “a variant of white supremacy”. According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

He has also claimed that Israel controls the United States, writing, “Time for Trump to be honest and recognise Israeli sovereignty over the United States of America. #IsraelFirst,” and he has promoted articles undermining the fight against antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has previously submitted numerous cases to the Green Party relating to antisemitism on the part of its officeholders and candidates. The Party’s response to these cases has largely been characterised by a lack of transparency, compounded by the failure to apply the International Definition of Antisemitism, which has been adopted by the British Government and all other major political parties, or indeed any discernible or consistent definition or metric, within the disciplinary process. Without the public adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism, it is difficult to see how justice can be done and seen to be done for both victims and accused. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism submitted this article to the Green Party for comment but did not receive a response.

Joe Glasman, Head of Political and Government Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “The various cases that we have brought to the attention of the Green Party are deeply concerning. It is remarkable that one of the worst cases we have ever encountered is the Party’s International Coordinator who until recently held the Equalities and Diversity portfolio, which is emblematic of how the far-left has a blind spot when it comes to antisemitism.

“The cases are bad enough, but the combination of the Party’s unwillingness to address the issue and its constitutional limitations on doing so point to more severe problems beneath the surface. In its report on antisemitism in the Labour Party, the EHRC was clear that parties must have the capacity to tackle discrimination and inequality within their membership and structures, and that its findings applied to all political parties.

“For the Greens to keep ignoring antisemitism among some of their leading officeholders, election candidates and members is unsustainable. We will continue to hold the Greens, and all parties, to account over anti-Jewish racism.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

The Democratic Republic of Congo is reportedly mulling a controversial law in order to prevent a candidate of Jewish descent from running for President.

Lawmakers loyal to the incumbent President Felix Tshiseked have introduced a bill to the African nation’s Parliament that would restrict the Presidency to candidates with two Congolese parents in a move believed to be intended to try to prevent the popular Moise Katumbi from running for the office.

Mr Katumbi’s father, Nissim Soriano, was a Greek Sephardi Jew who fled Rhodes during the Holocaust and settled in the Katanga province of the Congo, where he married a granddaughter of the local King Msiri, Mr Katumbi’s mother. Mr Soriano later emigrated to Israel, where he lived until his death and was buried. Mr Katumbi reportedly often visits relatives in Israel.

Mr Katumbi, a former regional Governor of Katanga and one of the country’s most popular politicians, has previously stated his intention to run for President, and last month secured a political pact with a former rival, paving the way for him to do so.

According to Rabbi Menachem Margolin, Chairman of the European Jewish Association, Mr Katumbi does not identify as Jewish “but he has a warm connection to Judaism and Israel.” He frequently refers to his Jewish roots in speeches, including calling himself “the Moses of Katanga, back to lead his people”, in a play on his first name, which means Moses.

The bill, which has not yet been scheduled for a vote, has reportedly already angered Mr Katumbi’s supporters and raised concerns about renewed instability in the volatile country, where secessionist tendencies are already particularly strong in Katanga, the most mineral-rich of the nation’s regions.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A journalist who tweeted “Hitler was right” and other antisemitic comments and images has revealed that she was fired from the BBC in a supposedly “heartfelt apology” in which she blames “industrial scale pro-Israel censorship” for her termination.

Tala Halawa, until recently a Palestine Affairs Specialist at the BBC Monitoring Service, posted a series of antisemitic tweets in 2014, including one that read: “#Israel Is more #Nazi than #Hitler! Oh, #HitlerWasRight #IDF go to hell. #PrayForGaza”. She also asserted that “ur media is controlled by ur zionist government in order 2 produce ignorant people [sic]”, shared the graphic that caused Naz Shah MP to be suspended from the Labour Party several years ago as well as an image of a child being burned on a menorah, and posted on Facebook: “They [Zionists] are crying the holocaust every single moment but they’re practicing it every single moment as well.” The social media posts dated from prior to Ms Halawa’s employment at the BBC.

Campaign Against Antisemitism and others submitted complaints to the BBC, which subsequently announced that she no longer works for the BBC.

But in a social media post, Ms Halawa has revealed that the BBC fired her.

The post was ostensibly a “heartfelt apology”, focusing on the one Hitler tweet to the exclusion of her other inflammatory posts. She wrote: “The offensive and ignorant words I posted at the time do not reflect my political views then as much as they do not today. I hope those who were hurt by them will accept my heartfelt apology for posting without thinking”.

However, Ms Halawa then went on to blame “pro-Israel interest groups”, “right-wing media outlets”, a “pro-Israel mob” and a “pro-Israel censorship campaign…industrial in scale and international in its reach” for her termination, thereby implying that her posts were not in fact antisemitic and that those who campaigned for her to be disciplined or removed were acting in bad faith and potentially at the behest of Israel – accusations that, falling firmly within the Livingstone Formulation, are themselves antisemitic.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has “graded” Ms Halawa’s “apology” and found it severely wanting.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

Labour Party MP Richard Burgon and prominent member and former candidate Salma Yaqoob are set to share a platform with the antisemitic former Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn at a demonstration in Bradford this evening.

Mr Burgon, the former Shadow Justice Secretary and MP for Leeds East, is best known for having stated that “Zionism is the enemy of peace” and then lied about having done so. He has also participated in rallies with suspended Labour activists without sanction. Mr Burgon is the subject of a complaint to the Labour Party by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Ms Yaqoob, the former Respect Party leader, is a relatively recent member of the Labour Party who unsuccessfully ran for Mayor of the West Midlands this year, and has her own deeply troubling record in relation to the Jewish community. In a 2013 tweet that she has since deleted, Ms Yaqoob stated: “Iceland arrests 10 Rothschild bankers…wow”, and linked to an article making this false claim and featuring a prominent image of the banker and philanthropist Lord Jacob Rothschild. The article linked in turn to a longer piece on the “Political Vel Craft” website, which is known for disseminating extreme conspiracy theories.

Also scheduled to appear at the event is the former Liberal Democrat MP David Ward, who has had a number of antisemitism-related incidents, one of which involved him tweeting: “#Auschwitz happened and never can be compared but would be betrayal of its victims to use it to protect #Israel Govt from condemnation”. Mr Ward lost his council seat in this year’s local elections, running as an Independent after being expelled by the Liberal Democrats in 2017 for standing against the Party in an election, having previously been disciplined for comments about Jews, the Holocaust and Israel. He recently appeared at another anti-Israel rally in Bradford, along with the disgraced Labour MP Naz Shah, where calls were made to “lift the curse of the Jews off the Muslims in Palestine!”

Lindsey German, also billed to speak, is a controversial activist who has a history of denying antisemitism in the Labour Party and who backed the disgraced former Labour MP, Chris Williamson. She is a convener of the dubious group, Stop The War Coalition, which has appeared in the past to advocate war against Israel and whose marches routinely feature antisemitic tropes.

Mr Corbyn was suspended by the Labour Party following his disgraceful comments on the publication of the report into Labour antisemitism by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) and a complaint by Campaign Against Antisemitism. He was then rapidly and controversially readmitted to the Party but the whip has not been restored to him, leaving him as an Independent MP outside of the Parliamentary Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has lodged a complaint against Jeremy Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day of the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the EHRC to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

In a recent interview, Robert Rinder has said that there is an existential threat to Jews in Britain.

Discussing his nephews’ Jewish school in North London, the barrister and television personality spoke of how their school hires private security guards and is surrounded by barbed wire. “So anybody who is sceptical about the idea that there is an existential threat [to Jews] needs to know that,” Mr Rinder said.

He also described former Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn’s defending of the antisemitic mural in East London in 2018 as “a moment of real tragedy and crisis.” 

However, Mr Rinder was adamant that he still has hope for the future of British Jewry, stating: “It’s important to be mindful that there is still something in the British culture that eschews hate. 

“I have an enduring belief in the British public. That ultimately, for every one loud antisemite, there are hundreds, no, thousands of people that have the courage to stand up to it. I really do believe that.”

Mr Rinder is very active in the field of Holocaust education and recently received an MBE, along with his mother, for services to Holocaust Education.

In 2019, Mr Rinder spoke at the #TogetherAgainstAntisemitism rally in Parliament Square.

Weapons belonging to a neo-Nazi biker gang were seized in a police raid in Austria, it was reported earlier this week. 

The police were said to have confiscated automatic weapons, bullets, hand grenades, Nazi paraphernalia, and drugs. The raid came after reports from authorities of an unnamed neo-Nazi leader who was planning to orchestrate a miliz der anständigen (militia of the respectable) in order to “overturn the system.”

A network of bikers who are said to be affiliated with neo-Nazis has also been uncovered in Austria and Germany, with fourteen suspects under investigation. 

A similar raid of weapons occurred in Austria last December. Karl Nehammer, the Austrian Interior Minister, said: “I am deeply concerned when such a group has fully automatic weapons or hand grenades in their possession. The uninterrupted use of our security forces against right-wing extremism must continue without compromise.”

In March, a new survey of antisemitism in Austria showed mixed results. While the survey suggested a significant fall in antisemitic attitudes compared with the same past surveys, it also showed a much higher level than surveys by other organisations.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Mark Zuckerberg has been targeted with antisemitic abuse on Facebook.

On Tuesday, Mr Zuckerberg, the founder of Facebook, posted a collection of photos depicting his dog wearing different items of clothing. One of the photos showed his dog wearing a Jewish skullcap, or “kippah”, and a prayer shawl, or “tallit.” 

In response, the photo’s comment section was swarmed with antisemitic images and memes. Some of the comments included caricatures of Jews with long, hooked noses, allusions to Jews in control of the media, and other widely used antisemitic memes. 

Numerous anti-Israel comments and images were posted as well. According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Accusing Jewish citizens of being more loyal to Israel, or to the alleged priorities of Jews worldwide, than to the interests of their own nations” is an example of antisemitism. 

Last year, the satirical puppet show, Spitting Image, came under fire for a caricature of Mark Zuckerberg with a gratuitously big nose.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

A post office worker has reportedly demanded that a Jewish man denounce Israel in order to receive his biometric residence permit.

Johnathan Levartovsky, 30, is a new Israeli Jewish immigrant to the UK who was required by law to collect his permit in order to prove his legal residency in the country. The permit also contains a new immigrant’s national insurance number, enabling them to work and entitling them to public services. Mr Levartovsky has come to the UK on a Skilled Worker visa as a post-doctoral researcher in the chemical engineering department of a leading London university, where he will be funded by the Faraday Institute in the field of battery research.

On 5th July, less than a week after arriving in the UK, Mr Levartovsky visited the Post Office on Euston Road in King’s Cross to collect his permit and was reportedly treated with suspicion by the clerk, who, he claims, provided minimal assistance. He eventually asked the clerk why he was treating him “like a criminal”, to which the clerk reportedly responded that it was because he is a “criminal” and is “murdering Palestinians”.

He then told Mr Levartovsky that he would not provide him with service, and only after Mr Levartovsky begged him to give him his documents and was forced to assent to the clerk’s inflammatory opinions that the clerk provided the documents. Mr Levartovsky then told him that he is a racist and that he would report him.

The clerk refused to provide his name – and his colleague also declined to disclose it – but was reportedly in his forties or fifties and of Asian or Middle Eastern descent. He was the only male working in the post office at the time; his colleague, a woman, witnessed the exchange.

Mr Levartovsky has reported the incident to the police, who are investigating. He has also written to his local MP, Sir Keir Starmer, who is also the leader of the Labour Party.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We are appalled at the abuse that Mr Levartovsky has suffered. New immigrants have to navigate complex bureaucratic and logistical challenges and should be welcomed and supported in doing so, rather than subjected to abuse because of their race, religion or nationality. We urge the police to investigate and are in contact with the victim. We shall also be writing to the Post Office to investigate.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 showed that three in five British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

Image credit: Google

Hastings Council has reportedly refused to condemn calls for the destruction of the Jewish state.

The chant, “from the river to the sea, Palestine will be free”, which only makes sense as a call for the destruction of the world’s only Jewish state – and its replacement with a State of Palestine – and is thus an attempt to deny Jews, uniquely, the right to self-determination, was heard in an anti-Israel rally in Hastings town centre in May.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination” is an example of antisemitism.

Hastings Borough Council, which is led by the Labour Partyadopted the Definition last year after a campaign by Dany Louise, a councillor who had bravely resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism.

Ms Louise, no longer a councillor, called on the Council to implement the Definition and condemn the recent chanting, which she described as “naked antisemitism on the streets of Hastings.” Ms Louise told Campaign Against Antisemitism that two other residents (one Jewish, one not) also sent in written questions to the Council on the same subject, but the Chief Legal Officer rejected all three questions late enough not to leave time for revised questions to be submitted.

The Officer wrote to her: “I have considered your question in accordance with…the Constitution and decided to reject your question as it is not about a matter for which the Council has a responsibility, power, duty or function.”

Ms Louise said: “I was absolutely shocked by the Chief Legal Officer’s rejection of my written questions. In truth, I doubted that the Council leader would take them seriously, but it did not occur to me that they would be rejected entirely, for spurious reasons unrelated to the content of the questions. I find it altogether unsatisfactory – it is an anti-democratic and morally bankrupt action from the Council.”

She added: “I’ve been dealing with this Labour group for about four years now. It has been heart-breaking and phenomenally frustrating attempting to encourage this group to engage or deal with the antisemitism in their ranks. They have simply refused to acknowledge the issue, let alone discuss it in any sensible adult manner.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by local councils.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 showed that three in five British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

The University of Kent has purported to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism but has done so by unconscionably adopting the controversial Jerusalem Declaration as well.

In an update from the Vice-Chancellor on the University’s website that was published on 30th June, it was confirmed that “following a formal Government request,” the University has adopted the Definition.

However, the University has also chosen to adopt the Jerusalem Declaration of its own volition, a wrecking document intended to undermine the globally recognised Definition.

The University stated that this adoption was “to support with interpretation after feedback from staff, students, Senate and wider legal advice” and described it as “an important step in ensuring our Jewish community feel safe on campus and we will be shortly sharing more information on implementation as part of our continued work to tackle discrimination and racism.”

The University must revisit its decision and adopt, exclusively, the International Definition of Antisemitism.

A spokesperson from Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “By undermining the International Definition of Antisemitism in this way, the University shows no regard for the wellbeing and consideration of its Jewish students. The Definition is widely accepted by the mainstream Jewish community and has been adopted by the British Government, public bodies and over half of British universities. To adopt alongside it a second definition, designed to contradict and sabotage the first, is entirely counterproductive.”

Following a speech to students at the University in 2016 in which journalist Amira Hass reportedly claimed that the “Elders of Zion” planned “colonial” hegemony over Palestinians, the Head of the Office of the Vice-Chancellor told Campaign Against Antisemitism that no action would be taken.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

A Conservative councillor in Bury who had the Party whip removed after he allegedly made antisemitic comments in a job interview has reportedly been reinstated by the Party “with immediate effect”.

Cllr Robert (Bob) Caserta was found to have breached the Code of Conduct for Councillors and Other Voting Representatives four times when he appeared before the Standards Sub-Committee earlier this year.

The comments in question were apparently made during an interview to recruit a senior officer at the Council in July 2019, when Cllr Caserta is alleged to have referred to “grot spots” in Sedgley and said that it would be difficult to communicate with residents “unless you are able to speak Hebrew”.

He was found to have “used inappropriate language that was disrespectful and wholly inappropriate” which “may affect Bury Council’s ability to recruit high calibre candidates in the future”, and was suspended pending a full investigation.

However, it has now been reported that Cllr Caserta, who represents the Pilkington Park ward on Bury Council, has been reinstated. A message reportedly disseminated to Bury Council members read: “I want to inform you that Cllr Caserta has been re-instated as a member of the Conservative with immediate effect.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “A suspension pending investigation is not in itself generally an appropriate sanction, and the Conservative Party must disclose the outcome of that investigation and what sanctions or training have been imposed on Cllr Caserta.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

UPDATE: In the evening following the publication of our article, the full statement was made available: “Bury Conservative council group can confirm that the Party whip has been restored to Councillor Robert Caserta following his suspension in March 2021. This follows an extensive internal inquiry which came to the same conclusion that Bury Council’s Standards panel found. We are satisfied that all sanctions decided by the Council’s Standards panel have now been fulfilled by Councillor Caserta. He has also undertaken the Conservative Party’s diversity training. Bury Conservatives will make no further comment on this matter.”

The Home Secretary, Priti Patel, has called for the proscription of The Base, a neo-Nazi group based in the United States. This would make being a member of the group, or showing support for it, punishable by up to fourteen years in prison.

Founded in 2018, The Base is an American neo-Nazi hate group comprising of self-proclaimed white supremacists and fascists. The group’s founder, Rinaldo Nazzaro, reportedly once told a potential recruit that The Base was mostly made up of “National Socialists and/or fascists, although we also have some run-of-the-mill white nationalists.” He added that the recruit would “be stepping into probably the most extreme group of pro-white people that you can probably come across.”  

The Home Secretary said: “We continue to take robust action against evil white supremacist groups, who target vulnerable people across the world to join in their hateful ideologies and their sick promotion of violence. I am committed to making it as difficult as possible for these organisations to operate in the UK, both by banning them and increasing the penalties for membership or support, in order to protect the public and our national security.”

Earlier this year, Ms Patel called for the proscription of the neo-Nazi group, Atomwaffen Division (AWD). This would make membership of the group punishable by up to ten years in prison.

Last year, Ms Patel proscribed the neo-Nazi Sonnenkrieg Division as a terrorist group. This followed the proscription of National Action in 2016, for which Campaign Against Antisemitism had called.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

A court case in which a Baltimore lawyer had sued a civil rights organisation for defamation based on articles it had written that exposed his former neo-Nazi ties has been dismissed.

Glen K. Allen, a lawyer and former member of the National Alliance, a neo-Nazi and white supremacist group, sued the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) for defamation on the grounds that his membership to the group wasn’t a matter of public concern. However, this was rejected by a three-judge panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

The panel made note of the fact that whilst Mr Allen was still a member of the National Alliance, he was chosen to defend the city of Baltimore against a claim from a Sabein Burgess, a black man who alleged that he was wrongfully convicted of murder and had spent nineteen years in prison.

Mr Allen was fired from his role as a lawyer for the city of Baltimore after the SPLC published an article in August 2016 where they addressed Mr Burgess’ case and labelled Mr Allen a “well-known neo-Nazi lawyer.” Included in the article were receipts of Mr Allen’s National Alliance membership fees, as well as evidence of his attendance to a “Holocaust Revisionist Conference.” The article also said that Mr Allen held the role of “Vice Chairman/Parliamentarian” in the American Eagle Party, a white nationalist political party.

In 2017, the SPLC produced a “hate map” that included a photo of Mr Allen alongside the caption: “Exposing Racists Who Infiltrate Public Institutions.”

In 2018, Mr Allen unsuccessfully sued the SPLC, as well as two of its former employees, for defamation. In 2019, he appealed his case’s dismissal, but this effort also proved unsuccessful.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Antisemitic graffiti has been discovered on the side of a Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA) building in Ohio, as well as on the side of a bridge.

The graffiti on the side of the YCWA in the city of Alliance depicts a white Star of David inside a red circle with a line going through it. 

The organisation posted a photograph of the graffiti on Facebook, accompanied by a statement which read: “We, at the YWCA of Alliance are saddened and outraged that someone or a group of individuals used our building at 239 E. Market Street to propel hate and an antisemitic message. This message was in form of vandalism spray painting on our historical building which has stood as a beacon of hope, love, and inclusion in the Alliance Community for 95 years. We were not the only place in the community targeted, many locations through out the downtown area were.

“We would like to join forces with those who wish to see this form of hate gone, and our community washed clean of these symbols of racism to come together and be able to unite against hate. Please contact the Alliance YWCA if you would like to help at 330-823-1840. Please contact the Alliance Police Department if you have any information on the vandalism that has occurred.”

Other Facebook users posted photographs of similar graffiti found nearby on the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Viaduct, which included the phrase “Down with ZOG.” 

ZOG” is an acronym often used by white supremacists that means “Zionist Occupied Government.” This idea holds that the official government of a country is just a puppet, while the real control is exercised behind the scenes by a cabal of Jews.

Alliance Police have confirmed that an investigation is underway. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A judge has today declared Tony Greenstein legally bankrupt in a brief hearing that follows his predictable failure to comply with court orders to pay Campaign Against Antisemitism tens of thousands of pounds after his humiliating failed defamation claim against us.

Mr Greenstein has been ordered by judges to pay Campaign Against Antisemitism £81,854, over a libel claim brought by Mr Greenstein after we called him a “notorious antisemite”. In an example of litigation humiliatingly backfiring, the High Court struck out Mr Greenstein’s libel claim against us, ruling that it was permissible for us to call the co-founder of the Palestine Solidarity Campaign and expelled Labour Party member a “notorious antisemite” in articles on our website. Mr Greenstein then brought an appeal against aspects of the High Court ruling, which he also lost earlier this month.

Following an Insolvency and Companies Court hearing today that lasted only a quarter of an hour, Judge Catherine Burton, noting that Mr Greenstein has been properly served and failed to attend or make representations, concluded proceedings by saying: “I make a bankruptcy order this day against Tony Greenstein at 10:46am.”

Today’s declaration makes it far more difficult for Mr Greenstein to litigate against individuals and organisations, as he is wont to do.

Additionally, it means that Mr Greenstein may now meet the criteria for automatic disqualification as a charity trustee. We have written to the Charity Commission in order to notify them of his bankruptcy order given that he is listed as a trustee of The Brighton Trust, formerly known as the “Trust 4 Unpopular Causes”.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The wheels of justice may grind slow at times, but they grind sure. Our defamation win against Tony Greenstein secured our ability to call out anti-Jewish racism in order to combat it. The bankruptcy order against Mr Greenstein will greatly reduce his capacity to litigate against others without any ability or intention to pay when he loses. Today’s ruling should serve as a warning to others that we will be unrelenting in the pursuit of justice for the Jewish community.”

At the insolvency hearing, Campaign Against Antisemitism was represented by Karl Anderson. Over the course of the legal case, Campaign Against Antisemitism was represented by Adam Speker QC, to whom we are extremely grateful for appearing at the appeal hearing pro bono, instructed by solicitors Keith Mathieson and Alex Wilson of RPC, and advised pro bono by solicitor Dr Mark Lewis who is an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

The Church of England is set to apologise next year for its contributions towards antisemitism in England during the Middle Ages, which included creating several antisemitic laws that ultimately led to the expulsion of the Jews.

The apology is set to coincide with the 800th anniversary of the Synod of Oxford in 1222, the council that created the antisemitic laws. These laws included the forcing of Jews to wear badges, limiting them to certain occupations, and prohibiting new synagogues from being built. Eventually, King Edward I would expel England’s 3,000 Jews in 1290. 

Although the Church was not established until the 16th-century, it was stated that its apology will act as a “symbolic repentance.” This comes after the recent increase in antisemitic incidents in Britain, which include a Jewish man having faced two separate antisemitic incidents on London transport within one hour, a rabbi in Essex being assaulted and hospitalised, and a convoy of cars that drove down the Finchley Road shouting “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” through a megaphone.

The Bishop of Lichfield and Right Reverend Dr Michael Ipgrave said: “The Archbishop’s office has indeed received a letter proposing a service that might offer an act of repentance at the 800th anniversary of the Synod of Oxford and its antisemitic laws. We are exploring the idea of such a service to be planned in conjunction with the Council of Christians and Jews, as well as the potential for a liturgical resource that might be offered to local churches to model an appropriate symbolic repentance.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The Church of England, inspired by decrees from Rome, was absolutely central to the horrific antisemitism suffered by English Jews in the Middle Ages, including religious propaganda, badges of shame, the invention of the blood libel, massacres and the first national expulsion of an entire Jewish community from a European country.

“There is much to repent for in this ignominious record. For the Church to confront its past is laudable, and we commend the Church of England for taking this historic step, which sends a powerful message not just about historic misdeeds but about how our faiths and society can better themselves today.”

The Culture Secretary has written a letter to social media giants urging them to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Oliver Dowden’s letter to Facebook, Twitter, Google, Snapchat, and TikTok has said that although the Definition is not legally binding, it is “an invaluable tool for organisations to understand how antisemitism manifests itself in the 21st century and to tackle it.”

“It will require platforms to take effective steps to remove and limit the spread of illegal content, including criminal antisemitic abuse,” the letter added.

We recently reported that antisemitism on TikTok had increased by 912%, while on Twitter, abhorrent hashtags such as #HitlerWasRight, #HitlerTheGreat and #Holocaust_was_right were all trending internationally. However, Twitter has confirmed that it is reviewing Mr Dowden’s letter and reaffirmed its condemnation of antisemitism. 

Recently, speaking at Bevis Marks, the oldest synagogue in Britain, about the Definition, Mr Dowden said: “There may be some practicalities about exactly how [social media giants] incorporate it, but the essence of the International Definition [of Antisemitism] I want them to adopt, just as the Government has committed to that.”

Last year, the Culture Secretary announced that social media companies will have a duty of care to users under new legislation, and that “criminal antisemitic posts will need to be removed without delay.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been at the forefront of calls for Online Harms legislation, and last year joined a global coalition calling on Facebook to adopt the Definition.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authoritiesuniversities, public bodies and other institutions. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

A man has admitted to defacing a war memorial with antisemitic graffiti in Wales.

The graffiti on the memorial in Rhyl, Wales was discovered in February and included swastikas and vile messages which refer to the murder of Jews and gassing of soldiers.

The graffiti also contained the line, in German, that “the time has come for a Reich [empire]: we must exterminate the Jews.”

Gareth Bradley, 31, confessed earlier this week to committing the act of hateful vandalism. He also pleaded guilty to defacing his prison cell with graffiti of a swastika in April. 

Mr Bradley was granted bail and is due to be sentenced by a crown court judge next month. 

District Judge Paul Conlon said at Llandudno court: “The offences are too serious for this court to deal with.”

Image credit: Richard Kendrick

The Joint General Secretary of the National Education Union (NEU), Kevin Courtney, appeared today at a testy hearing of the House of Commons Education Committee, where he attempted to defend a number of controversial stances that he and his union have taken in relation to antisemitism.

The Committee Chair, Conservative Robert Halfon MP, shifted the conversation to “the very difficult area of antisemitism” and asked about a number of matters of grave concern to the Jewish community.

First, he asked why the NEU has not adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism. He noted that the Definition has been adopted by the British Government, all major political parties and anti-racism organisations, including Campaign Against Antisemitism. He also quoted a Jewish former member of the NEU who has pushed for adoption of the Definition by the union.

Mr Halfon further noted that there is nothing stopping the NEU’s executive from adopting the Definition, and asked: “Why does the NEU think it knows better and why do you as yet refuse to adopt the Definition, and why won’t you adopt it and use it as a starting point to address issues within your membership body?”

Mr Courtney replied that he would like the former member to re-join, and disclosed that he has written to several Jewish members recently, emphasising that “there is definitely a very strong place for them in this union. For people who see Israel as the homeland of a nation, who see it as a refuge of last resort, who see it as a response to the Holocaust, there is a place for people with those views in the union.”

Mr Halfon pressed Mr Courtney specifically on the matter of adoption, however, asking: “As a leadership why not adopt it?” Mr Courtney replied: “That is an option that’s open to us.” Mr Halfon: “Why haven’t you done it?” Mr Courtney responded that “We haven’t even discussed it actually…we are definitely a union that is working very hard against antisemitism, we are organising training against antisemitism,” suggesting that there was no impediment to the NEU adopting the Definition other than that it has not bothered to discuss the matter and apparently has no plans to do so.

Mr Halfon then asked Mr Courtney about the more than 100 Jewish members who have quit the NEU because of their concerns over how it handles antisemitism. “Why do you think they have resigned from the union?” Mr Halfon asked. Mr Courtney replied that he has written to the members, and that he has also addressed the NEU’s National Executive and branch secretaries on the topic.

In this connection, Mr Halfon also asked about the conflict between Israel and Hamas, an antisemitic genocidal terrorist organisation. The conflict inspired numerous demonstrations across Britain over the past two months and a surge in antisemitism, including in schools and on campuses. Mr Courtney replied in respect of the “dispute between Israel and Hamas” that “we started getting involved in those demonstrations. I personally spoke at those demonstrations. And they were about the evictions of Palestinian families from Sheikh Jarrah. Now those evictions…were condemned by the British Government. They were condemned by the United Nations…”

Mr Courtney was interrupted by Mr Halfon who observed that “Jewish members of your union feel that their union support is secondary to their campaigns criticising the State of Israel for one action or another.” Mr Courtney denied this, insisting that “it’s really relevant that the demonstration was about Sheikh Jarrah” before going on to say that “the union put out statements saying that both Israel and Hamas should stop the bombings” and that “when I spoke at the demonstrations, I said that.”

Mr Courtney did not appear to be prepared to accept that the NEU or its officers may be responsible for why so many Jewish members have resigned.

The conversation then turned to a recent controversial series of antisemitism training sessions organised by the Warsaw Ghetto vandal and NEU official, Ewa Jasiewicz. Campaign Against Antisemitism recently revealed that, although Ms Jasiewicz did not lead the sessions herself, she did organise them and they were led by two activists from the far-left fringe Jewish group, Jewdas.

Mr Halfon pointed out that Ms Jasiewicz is “infamous for defacing the walls of the Warsaw Ghetto” and that “Campaign Against Antisemitism has noted that the sessions were led by two activists from a fringe organisation called Jewdas.” He asked Mr Courtney: “Why did you choose a controversial fringe group to do this when you could have used many mainstream Jewish organisations?”

Mr Courtney responded: “I welcome these questions, and I would like an opportunity to talk with you in more detail about them.” In the meantime, he offered a “potted history” of the matter, noting that the NEU allocates staff to work with the union’s various forums, including the black members’ forum in the North West, which requested sessions on racism, Islamophobia and antisemitism, including dealing with the topics from a more “intellectual” and historical perspective. He said that “Ewa did a very good job of sourcing the sort of people that that group wanted.”

Pressed on the Warsaw Ghetto vandalism, Mr Courtney insisted that Ms Jasiewicz “didn’t teach about it” and that “she [merely] sourced the people”.

Mr Courtney thus confirmed that, despite Ms Jasiewicz’s appalling history in relation to antisemitism, it was she who was empowered to invite the fringe activists to deliver antisemitism training.

Mr Courtney also disclosed, regarding the vandalism, that “it was completely wrong. We didn’t know about it when we employed her. We didn’t know about it until 2018. When we did know about it, we met with her immediately at a very senior level in the union, with her union rep, we discussed the fact that that action was absolutely wrong, that defacing a Holocaust memorial was wrong, that drawing an equivalency between the Israeli Government and the Nazis was wrong. We went through with her that we weren’t saying those things because we thought they might cause bad publicity or because they were at variance with the [International] Definition but because we believed them to be wrong in absolute terms. They [the actions] were wrong. We discussed that with her.” He added: “She had apologised for them before that time. She repeated that apology at that moment. And I believe in redemption. She has apologised for those actions and they were wrong.”

Mr Halfon proceeded then to ask about the recent antisemitism-infested anti-Israel rallies. Mr Halfon noted that many of these rallies, including at least one which Mr Courtney addressed, featured antisemitic placards. “You failed to condemn them yet you spoke at that rally,” Mr Halfon observed, adding that another NEU official, Louise Regan, had also spoken at a rally in Nottingham at which another speaker had openly supported Hamas and spoke of “resistance by any means necessary”. Ms Regan was suspended by the Labour Party last year over a motion of support for Jeremy Corbyn at the Nottingham East Constituency Labour Party, which she chairs, and has reportedly been reinstated in recent weeks.

“Do you believe it is appropriate for you to speak at rallies with antisemitic placards and chants?” Mr Halfon asked.

Mr Courtney declared: “I condemn all acts of antisemitism”. He also insisted that antisemitic placards were not everywhere, and that the “vast majority of placards at that demonstration were not antisemitic.” He also emphasised that “there were hundreds my members of my union at those demonstrations,” singling out “young Muslim members of my union” in particular as having participated. He went on to say that “at the demonstration, I made a point of saying that we are all here in our diversity against all forms of racism, against all forms of Islamophobia, and against all forms of antisemitism. That line from my speech was the most applauded line of my speech.” He declared that “I’m proud of speaking at the demonstration. All three of the demonstrations that I spoke at.”

Mr Courtney thus justified his appearances at antisemitism-infested rallies while insisting that he condemns “all forms of racism, against all forms of Islamophobia, and against all forms of antisemitism”.

Mr Halfon ended his questioning by asking: “Do you feel that the NEU is safe for Jewish people, because I can’t see it from where I’m sitting?” He added that it seemed that “Jews don’t count” at the NEU, where there appears to be a “hostile environment” for Jewish people.

Mr Courtney, by this point aggravated, replied that “Jewish people absolutely count in our union. And we want those 100 people to re-join. There are many more Jewish people who haven’t left our union, because they see that we are a union committed to opposing all forms of racism, and Islamophobia, including Islamophobia [sic], including antisemitism.”

Mr Halfon interjected: “Except when it comes to antisemitism, when you turn a blind eye.”

Mr Courtney’s temper appeared to flare as he responded: “That is absolutely untrue. That is a disgraceful slur on me and my union.”

It is notable that, throughout the proceedings, Mr Courtney used the familiar refrain of speaking of antisemitism almost exclusively alongside “Islamophobia” and “all forms of racism”, rather than exclusively about anti-Jewish racism, even though that was the topic that he was being asked about.

Having concluded his questioning, Mr Halfon then yielded to his committee colleague, Ian Mearns, the Labour MP for Gateshead, who opened by noting that he did not have advance warning of Mr Halfon’s line of questioning and said: “Personally I think it’s regrettable what you’ve done.” It is not clear why Mr Mearns thinks that asking the Joint General Secretary of a controversial union about how it is addressing the mass resignation of Jewish members is a regrettable line of questioning.

Mr Halfon referred to research by Campaign Against Antisemitism over the course of his questioning of Mr Courtney.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We commend Robert Halfon MP for his robust examination of Mr Courtney. It is not often that the leadership of a controversial union is held to account, and it was clear from Mr Courtney’s answers that he and his union see no shortcomings in their conduct in relation to antisemitism and the Jewish community, despite the mass resignation of Jewish NEU members.

“While Mr Courtney professes his opposition to antisemitism, he nevertheless addressed rallies featuring antisemitic placards, allowed the Warsaw Ghetto vandal to invite fringe figures to deliver antisemitism training to his members, will not commit to adopting the International Definition of Antisemitism, and, above all, has presided over a union that has lost a significant portion of its Jewish membership, for which he apparently offers no apology.

“The Jewish community has long had concerns about the NEU, and Mr Courtney’s performance today showed him to be unapologetic and without any kind of plan to take robust action.”

Antisemitic content on the social media platform TikTok has increased by 912%, according to a new study.

According to research from Dr Gabriel Weimann of the University of Haifa and Natalie Masri of IDC Herzliya’s Institute for Counter-Terrorism, antisemitic comments on TikTok grew 912% from 41 in 2020 to 415 in 2021, and the platform saw 61 antisemitic postings so far this year compared to 43 last year. 

Antisemitic tropes and images that were used in video content included Nazi salutes, diminishing the impact of the Holocaust, and propagating caricatures of Jews with long, hooked noses. 

Antisemitic usernames, such as “@holocaustwasgood” and “@eviljews”, increased a staggering 1,375% from four in 2020 to 59 in 2021. 

Dr Weimann expressed concern that the platform’s algorithm lends itself to suggesting further hateful content to users who may have clicked on dangerous videos, rather than restricting them. He said that “TikTok’s catering to young, impressionable and naive audiences, combined with bad-faith actors who are posting hateful content online, is something that should be taken very seriously,” before warning that some users may fall down “a rabbit hole of hatred.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “This dramatic increase in antisemitism on TikTok is an urgent concern, particularly because of the platform’s appeal to younger users.

“Social media platforms can act as hotspots for the dissemination of racist tropes and conspiracy theories. Technology companies, therefore, have a responsibility to enforce their own policies, ensure their algorithms do not promote antisemitic material and remove dangerous posts and ban repeat offenders.

“Last year, a TikTok Director declared the company’s intention to intensify its removal of antisemitic content. Instead, the reverse appears to be the case. TikTok must prove it is serious about tackling antisemitism not with empty words but with real action.”

This report follows a similar one released last year which revealed that the social media platform was infested with far-right antisemitism and Holocaust denial.

In May, Lily Ebert, a Holocaust survivor and educator, had her TikTok videos targeted by antisemitic trolls praising Hitler.

In October of last year, a director at TikTok told a Knesset Committee that hatred had “no place” on the video-sharing platform and that they would increase their efforts to remove antisemitic content.

Last summer, we reported that numerous users of the social media video platform were pretending to be Holocaust survivors in an abominable new antisemitic trend dubbed “trauma porn”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

Dieudonné has been fined by the Swiss courts for denying the existence of Nazi gas chambers in a sketch just days after being handed a prison sentence in France.

Dieudonné, whose real name is Dieudonné M’Bala M’Bala, is a French comedian and political activist who has been convicted for hate speech and advocating terrorism, among other offences, in France and Belgium.

A complaint was made in 2019 after Mr M’Bala M’Bala performed the sketch in Switzerland. Last week, the Swiss courts found him guilty of violating laws on racist and antisemitic content and fined him 170 CHF (the equivalent of £134) a day, for 180 days.

Mr M’Bala M’Bala, 55, claimed that the views expressed in the sketch belonged to the on-stage character and not to him. However, this excuse was not accepted by President of the Geneva Police Court Sabina Mascotto, who said: “In view of his previous statements, his positions and the absence of any humor in his remarks, he will be found guilty of racial discrimination.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Denying the fact, scope, mechanisms (e.g. gas chambers) or intentionality of the genocide of the Jewish people at the hands of National Socialist Germany and its supporters and accomplices during World War II (the Holocaust)” is an example of antisemitism.

Last week, we reported that Mr M’Bala M’Bala had been sentenced to four months’ imprisonment for producing videos of an “antisemitic nature.” Mr M’Bala M’Bala was also fined €10,000 last Friday after he was found guilty of “public insult to an official,” namely Frédéric Potier, the former interministerial delegate for the fight against racism, antisemitism and anti-LGBT hatred.

Earlier this year, Mr M’Bala M’Bala was instructed by the Paris Court of Appeals to pay a fine of €9,000 (over £7,700) for mocking the Holocaust in a video.

Mr M’Bala M’Bala has attacked the “Zionist lobby”, claiming it controls the world, and he has been convicted more than twenty times on charges that include defamation, hate speech and endorsing terrorism in Belgium and France. Last year, he was given a two-year jail sentence and fined for tax fraud and money laundering.

In 2013, Mr M’Bala M’Bala was recorded during a performance suggesting that it was a pity that a Jewish journalist was not sent to the gas chambers. The then-French interior minister, Manuel Valls, declared that Mr M’Bala M’Bala was an “antisemite and a racist” and he would seek to ban all his events as public safety risks.

Last summer, as social media platforms claimed to be stepping up their fight against hate content, Mr M’Bala M’Bala was permanently banned from several major online platforms, including YouTube, Facebook, TikTok and Instagram, for his use of “dehumanising” terms in relation to Jews.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

John McDonnell, the Labour MP former Shadow Chancellor, has tweeted his support for The Canary, a controversial hard-left blog, despite the fact that it is under investigation by the Government’s Independent Advisor on Antisemitism and its editor’s history of antisemitic statements.

Mr McDonnell was supporting a crowdfunding campaign for the website, even though its editor, Kerry-Ann Mendoza, has repeatedly compared Israel to the Nazis, in breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Ms Mendoza has also previously attacked Campaign Against Antisemitism using violent language, saying “The antisemitism witch hunt is seriously about to face off with #BlackLivesMatter I’m telling you now, those anti-Black, anti-Palestinian racists are gonna get their asses dragged all over town. And they have no clue. Because…entitlement.”

Recently, Mr McDonnell tweeted a photo of an antisemitic sign which was featured at a rally that he himself attended.Last year, Mc McDonnell was accused of sharing a platform with expelled Labour members at the Labour Representation Committee’s Annual General Meeting, namely Jackie Walker and Tony Greenstein, but he claimed that it was “ridiculous” to suggest that as it was an open meeting and that he could not control who spoke. He remains the Honorary President of the controversial group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Footage taken earlier today has shown Piers Corbyn comparing vaccinations to Nazi policy outside the Houses of Parliament, despite being arrested after a similar incident in February.  

The video shows Mr Corbyn and another man standing in front of a sign which reads “No Nazi forced jab” and yelling “arrest Matt Hancock” through a megaphone. 

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is tempting not to take conspiracy theorists Piers Corbyn seriously, but simply dismissing his antics without calling them out is how he and others like David Icke are given the space to promote their absurd and inflammatory nonsense to the public.

“Whatever one thinks of pandemic lockdowns and vaccination drives, they are not comparable to Nazi Germany and the systematic slaughter of millions of Jews. Mr Corbyn has repeatedly shown his contempt for the Jewish community, including by distributing flyers in Jewish neighbourhoods equating lockdown rules to Auschwitz. If one is seeking reasonable debate about how governments and populaces have responded to the pandemic, Piers Corbyn is no role model.”

This incident echos a similar one from earlier of this year when Mr Corbyn was arrested after distributing grotesque flyers comparing lockdown rules to Auschwitz.

Responding to his arrest, Mr Corbyn absurdly argued that he could not be antisemitic because he had been married to a Jewish woman and once employed a Jewish person who was a “superb worker.” Mr Corbyn reportedly protested: “The idea we’re antisemitic in any way is completely absurd. I was married for 22 years to a Jewess and obviously her mother’s forebears fled the Baltic states just before the war because of Hitler or the Nazis in general. I’ve worked with Jewish leading world scientists over the last 30 years. I’ve also employed Jewish people in my business Weather Action, one of whom was a superb worker.”

A spokesperson for the Metropolitan Police Service has since confirmed to Campaign Against Antisemitism that no further action would be taken against Mr Corbyn.

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Mr Corbyn has a history of controversy in relation to antisemitic conspiracy theories. He has previously retweeted @whiteknight0011, a notorious neo-Nazi who declared that “They will force Trump in to war What do you think happened to Hitler? Bilderberg CIA IMF Banker Gangsters They are the problem” along with four images. The @whiteknight0011 account has since been suspended. One image showed Lord Jacob Rothschild, the Jewish banker and philanthropist, against the background of a Nazi flag, claiming that he controls the world. A second showed Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu as a puppeteer controlling ISIS through Israeli intelligence agency Mossad, orchestrating the war in Syria and Paris attacks as Lord Rothschild and the Queen look on approvingly. A third image showed the faces of supposed Jewish conspirators who run the world to society’s detriment, proclaiming: “Know your enemy”. The last image showed a family photo of the Royal Family, claiming that they are in cahoots with these Jewish conspirators in committing “the worst genocides, invasions and theft in all history.”

Mr Corbyn has also claimed that “Zionists” were conspiring against his brother: when Jewish then-MP Louise Ellman complained of antisemitic attacks against her, Piers accused her of using it as a cover for political attack, tweeting: “ABSURD! JC+ All #Corbyns are committed #AntiNazi. #Zionists can’t cope with anyone supporting rights for #Palestine”.

Jonathan Gullis, the Conservative MP for Stoke-on-Trent, has written a letter to the University of Warwick in which he has stated that the University’s academics have “sought to provoke Jewish students and prolong their suffering” by passing a motion to challenge the International Definition of Antisemitism

Mr Gullis wrote to Professor Stuart Croft, Vice Chancellor and President at the University, voicing his concern at the University Assembly’s motion to challenge the Definition. Mr Gullis labelled the motion “disgraceful” before alleging that the University’s delay in adopting to Definition, as well as its hesitancy in tackling on-campus antisemitism, had caused “extreme distress for both Jewish students and the wider Jewish community.” 

Mr Gullis went on to say that he was “appalled”, accusing the University’s academics of seeking to “provoke Jewish students and prolong their suffering.” Referring to the Macpherson principle on anti-racism, Mr Gullis reaffirmed the importance of allowing Jewish students to determine what constitutes antisemitism. 

The MP for Stoke-on-Trent concluded by highlighting the University’s own statement on the welfare of its Jewish students and asking whether or not Prof. Croft would condemn the Assembly’s motion. 

Mr Gullis’ letter comes after the University released a statement clarifying that the University’s Assembly is not a decision-making body, and that motions are not binding. It has also stated that the Definition will continue to be utilised in disciplinary matters relating to antisemitism.

Last month at an Education Select Committee, Mr Gullis asked the Secretary of State for Education, Gavin Williamson, about the adoption of the Definition by universities and whether those that failed to do so would be penalised financially. Mr Williamson said that he backs the campaign for widespread adoption of the Definition, and observed that “We’ve had an exceptionally large rise in the number of universities that have signed up”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Gab’s Twitter account has been suspended after tweeting that antisemitism is “anything Jews don’t like.” 

Gab is a social-media platform that was founded in 2016 with a claim to “champion free speech,” and has become a haven for supporters of the QAnon conspiracy theory and other far-right groups and individuals banned from mainstream platforms.

The inflammatory tweet reads: “‘Antisemitism’ has become ‘ban and censor anything Jews don’t like,’ and well, that’s not gonna fly on a pro-first amendment pro-free speech website. Sorry.”

The post continues: “Use the block button, or stay on Twitter. No special privileges on Gab for any groups.”

While Gab proclaims to be “pro-free speech,” others have described the network as racist and alleges that it promotes several conspiracy theories. 

Earlier this year, the founder of Gab, Andrew Torba, was accused of wooing far-right figures to his platform with promises of greater visibility.

Far-right figures have turned to sites such as Gab to avoid restrictions on hate-content on more mainstream platforms such as Facebook and Twitter. Mr Torba has tried to distance Gab from the far-right groups that have made it their home. In 2018, on a podcast, he said: “Do we have alt-right users? Certainly. Alt-right users also exist on Facebook, on Twitter, on Reddit, and everywhere else on the Internet.” He went on to insist that Gab had “good people” who “believe in individual liberty…and free expression.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

A Jewish fan has reported that he received abuse last night as he entered Wembley to watch the Euro 2020 final between England and Italy.

Jolyon Rubeinstein, a satirist, recounted on Twitter: “I was racially abused last night as I was entering Wembley stadium. My shirt has Rubinstein on the back. I took my coat off & immediately: ‘Are you even from this country’ & ‘he’s a Jew’ followed by laughs & jeers by a group of 6 men in their 50’s.”

He said that he “told them that my Granddad fought the Nazi’s. They laughed. My message to them is that you will never win. That this team represents unity & diversity. You are the past. You’re dying out.”

He added: “Your hatred only strengthens my Anti-racist belief. I stand with progress and a new progressive patriotism that is about inclusion and respect. We have work to do in this country. Those at the very top need to lead by example.”

The match, which England lost on penalties, has been marred with deplorable racist abuse online against three of the team’s black players.

Earlier this year, the Football Association (FA) adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

A cryptocurrency company has used a Rothschild conspiracy theory in a marketing campaign, it was reported last week. 

The British fintech company, Crypterium, sent out a customer e-mail that contained a quote which has been falsely attributed to the 18th-century Jewish banker, Baron Rothschild.

The line that was used by the company, “The best time to buy bitcoin is whenever blood is on the street, everyone is panicking and no one’s talking about it,” is a variation on the classic trope, “The time to buy is when there’s blood on the streets, even if the blood is your own.”

The line is attributed to Baron Rothschild who is falsely accused of having exploited the public’s panicked state after the Battle of Waterloo in order to turn a profit. However, the line and the story have since been debunked as without foundation and inspired by anti-Jewish hatred, and at one point were even weaponised by the Nazis to spread hatred towards Jews.

George Krasukhin, the Chief Marketing Officer for Crypterium, who is himself Jewish, said: “It is not related to antisemitic theme[s] at all. It was the quote from one of the richest [men] on the earth.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Rather than simply using clichéd phrases without a second thought, marketers should research where the phrases come from and why they become cliches. Using a classic antisemitic trope associating Jews, Rothschilds and money is an inappropriate and insulting way to promote a financial product. The campaign should be withdrawn with an apology and the company must think again.”

The Labour MP for Riverside has denied that Dame Louise Ellman was forced out of the Party over antisemitism.

Dame Louise quit the Labour Party in late 2019 after 22 years as an MP and 55 years as a member, claiming that she made the “agonising” decision because “the Labour Party is no longer a safe place for Jews and Jeremy Corbyn must bear responsibility for this.” She added that “Jewish members have been bullied, abused and driven out. Antisemites have felt comfortable and vile conspiracy theories have been propagated. A party that permits anti-Jewish racism to flourish cannot be called anti-racist.”

However, in a segment on misogyny against Muslim women in the Labour Party on BBC Politics North West yesterday, Kim Johnson MP denied that Dame Louise had quit over antisemitism.

In a dispute with the Conservative MP, Chris Green, Ms Johnson said that “The Labour Party acknowledges where we have failed. We did have an issue with antisemitism. We do have an Action Plan. We have improved our position on that. However, Baroness Warsi, who has called Islamophobia out in the Tory Party, nothing has happened there. So at least we acknowledge and deal with the issues within our Party.”

Mr Green reacted by recounting instances of alleged discrimination against women in the Labour Party, concluding with Dame Louise: “You look at Liverpool and the clearing out of Louise Ellman and other Jewish Labour members.”

Ms Johnson interjected, saying, “That’s ridiculous,” before Mr Green continued: “Labour is the only party to join the British National Party to be found guilty of racism by the Equality and Human Rights Council [sic]”. Mr Green was referring to the report by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) that found that the Labour Party had unlawfully discriminated against Jewish people. Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant in the EHRC’s investigation. The only party to have been probed by the EHRC before Labour was the BNP, but unlike in the case of the Labour Party, the previous probe was not a full statutory investigation.

However, Ms Johnson then insisted: “Louise Ellman was not forced out. She took a decision to resign from the Party after 22 years as an MP.”

Ms Johnson succeeded Dame Louise as MP for Riverside, where there was a vacancy after Dame Louise resigned from the Party after suffering antisemitic abuse in the local Constituency Labour Party. Dame Louise later recounted: “The change in Liverpool Riverside, then my constituency, was speedy and traumatic. Membership increased from 500 to 2,700. The atmosphere in the regular meetings became deeply unpleasant. It was made clear that I was the target and I was to be removed. My crime was that I was a ‘Zionist’.”

Dame Louise has reacted to Ms Johnson’s claim, saying: “I am appalled by this statement. Keir Starmer has already apologised to me for the antisemitism that drove me out of the party.” She also accused her successor of gaslighting her, saying: “I’m appalled tha 4th current MP denies what I experienced. This is gaslighting.”

This incident comes just a month after Jeremy Corbyn made a similar claim about Luciana Berger in an interview at the Cambridge Union. When asked about Ms Berger being “hounded out” of the Labour Party due to antisemitism, Mr Corbyn insisted that “Luciana was not hounded out of the Party; she unfortunately decided to resign from the Party”. Ms Berger was among a number of MPs who quit the Labour Party in protest at its institutional antisemitism.

Sir Keir Starmer has previously declared that anyone who thinks that accusations of antisemitism in the Labour Party are “exaggerated or a factional attack…are part of the problem” and “should be nowhere near the Labour Party”.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The tradition of downplaying antisemitism in the Labour Party clearly endures. First, Jeremy Corbyn denies that Luciana Berger was hounded out of the Party, and now Kim Johnson, who only became an MP because of the vacancy left by Dame Louise Ellman’s resignation over antisemitism, denies that Dame Louise was forced out of the Party. Sir Keir Starmer has previously declared that anyone who thinks that accusations of antisemitism in the Labour Party are exaggerated are part of the problem and should be nowhere near the Labour Party. What will he now do about a member of his own Parliamentary Party who apparently thinks such things?”

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Antisemitic vandals have used a blowtorch to engrave a Holocaust memorial with swastikas in Grenoble, France.

The assailants targeted the commemorative plaques dedicated to the memory of deportees to Auschwitz concentration camp.

Police are investigating the vandalism which was discovered on Wednesday morning.

Last month, the President of France condemned antisemitism in an historic address. President Macron began his ten-minute long video address to the American Jewish Committee by reaffirming France’s “commitment to defending religious freedom and tolerance.”

After praising the contributions of French Jews, President Macron stated that “antisemitism is, as it has always been, an unacceptable, unjustifiable, menace, in the face of which we must relentlessly mobilise all our energies.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Three Lord and Lady Justices sitting at the Court of Appeal have dismissed an appeal by Tony Greenstein against aspects of a High Court ruling, deciding in favour of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

The High Court had struck out Mr Greenstein’s libel claims against us, ruling that it was permissible for us to call him a “notorious antisemite” in articles on our website, in an example of litigation humiliatingly backfiring.

Mr Greenstein’s attempt to appeal our successful defence over references to him as a “notorious antisemite” failed earlier this year when the Court of Appeal refused him permission to appeal. They did, however, allow him a hearing to argue that his claim that Campaign Against Antisemitism’s reference in one of the articles to his string of spent criminal convictions was made out of malice. That appeal has now been dismissed as well.

The Court of Appeal’s decision adds to Mr Greenstein’s financial woes. The High Court had ordered Mr Greenstein to pay £67,886 to Campaign Against Antisemitism, of which £10,000 had been stayed pending the outcome of the appeal. Now that the appeal has been dismissed, the £10,000 is now payable, along with £13,968 of additional costs relating to the failed appeal, making a total of £81,854.

Mr Greenstein now faces being made bankrupt at a hearing on 14th July after he failed to comply with a court order to send us payment, leading us to petition the High Court to appoint an Official Receiver in Insolvency to take control of Mr Greenstein’s assets and pay our costs from them.

Campaign Against Antisemitism was represented in the appeal by Adam Speker QC, to whom we are extremely grateful for appearing at the hearing pro bono, instructed by solicitors Keith Mathieson and Alex Wilson of RPC, and advised pro bono by solicitor Dr Mark Lewis who is an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Jeremy Corbyn is under investigation by Parliament’s watchdog over allegations that he did not properly declare financial support given to him to pay for the legal fees behind antisemitism-related claims. 

The former leader of the Labour Party is being investigated over the “registration of an interest under the Guide to the Rules” by the Parliamentary Commissioner for Standards.

This comes after Labour MP Neil Coyle wrote a letter to the Commissioner, alledging that Mr Corbyn may have broken the code of conduct for MPs in regard to support for his legal disputes.

Mr Coyle said that Mr Corbyn had “received financial support for legal cases involving him in various legal disputes, principally surrounding antisemitism” which had not been properly declared. 

Mr Corbyn stated that he would be “liaising with the Commissioner in response to Neil Coyle’s correspondence.” 

Last year, a crowdfunder which raised hundreds of thousands for Mr Corbyn’s legal expenses drew attention after it was reported that the woman behind the initiative was involved with a company that aims to “end the politicisation of Jewish suffering,” and that donations had been received from donors calling themselves “Adolf Hitler” and “B*stard Son of Netanyahu and Starmer”.

Following claims of antisemitism, Mr Corbyn had the whip removed last year. However, according to a newly published YouGov poll, 60% of Labour members think that the antisemitic former leader should have the whip restored.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has lodged a complaint against Jeremy Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s (EHRC) shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day of the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the EHRC to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The High Court has rejected a case by eight Labour activists who argued that an investigation into antisemitism-related allegations brought against them by the Party was unfair. 

The ruling, made earlier today, concerned the group of claimants who call themselves “Labour Activists For Justice”. The group claimed that the Labour Party had broken its contractual agreement to treat the group fairly during the investigation process.

The group invoked the report from the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) and argued that the Party refused to disclose certain procedural codes, used an outdated code of conduct, and misled the group regarding matters of confidentiality. 

However, Mr Justice Butcher, presiding over the case, dismissed their claim, stating: “I do not consider that the Claimants are entitled to any of the three declarations sought, and their claim for them will be dismissed.”

The judge concluded: “I do not consider that it is correct to say that the [EHRC] found that the Party’s disciplinary processes, as recently improved, were fundamentally unfair. While it was certainly the case that the [EHRC] considered that there were still matters which could be further improved, and that the commissioning of an independent process was necessary to rebuild trust and confidence, this did not amount to a finding or indication that the present system could no longer be used.”

A Labour spokesperson said: “We welcome this important ruling that confirms our right to determine how we handle complaints. We are getting on with the job of reforming our processes, structures and culture for the benefit of all of our members and to ensure Jewish people feel safe and welcome in our Party.”

Last year, the Labour Activists For Justice group launched a crowd-funder to cover its legal costs, describing itself as “Labour Party members who have been caught up in the absurdities of [its] disciplinary processes.” 

The crowd-funder was backed by the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, Jewish Voice for Labour (JVL), some of the members of which were also among the claimants in the case.

The Labour Party was found by the EHRC to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Thirteen Jewish gravestones in Baltimore were found desecrated with swastikas last Sunday. 

A spokesperson for the Baltimore Police Department confirmed that officers are looking into the vandalism that took place at the German Hill Road Cemetery. 

Baltimore County Councilman Izzy Patoka uploaded photographs of the vandalism to Facebook, along with a statement. Mr Patoka wrote: “This weekend, someone spray-painted swastikas on more than a dozen gravestones at the German Hill Road Jewish Cemeteries in Dundalk. 

“As the son of Holocaust victims and survivors, this symbol hits hard. We cannot allow fear, prejudice, division and hate to win out. We must stand actively engaged in the fight to combat antisemitism in all forms.”

Recently, Baltimore City Councilmember Zeke Cohen stated on Twitter that a man who is believed to be connected with a recent spate of antisemitic graffiti across Fells Point, Baltimore has been issued a criminal summons. However, Mr Cohen is also pushing for a hate crime charge. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

It has been reported that a Director at a London accountancy firm is no longer working there after Stephen Pollard, Editor at the JC, contacted the firm to report the accountant’s history of trolling Jewish people and organisations.

Tom Gauterin, “Director, Private Client Tax Services for Smith and Williamson”, went by the Twitter username of @Ruralmaestro, had a record of harassing Jewish people online, which included labelling Mr Pollard a “lifelong hard right racist.”

Regarding the Board of Deputies of British Jews (BOD), a Jewish community charity, Mr Gauterin said that Labour Party leader Keir Starmer would “do exactly as the BOD — a hard right, fanatically pro-Israel group — tells him.” Mr Gauterin went on to label the Jewish organisation a “hard right racist group” who would “attack” Sir Keir “the moment he says anything progressive or egalitarian they don’t like.”

On Rachel Riley, the Jewish TV personality and campaigner against Jew-hatred, the Mr Gauterin wrote: “No idea what Riley thinks she is doing and why, but she’s a proven liar and a fraud who harms those Jews who really *are* suffering from antisemitic abuse. She’s utterly vile and to pretend otherwise is to deny reality. Plus: if you know her, tell her to stop it pronto.”

Mr Pollard reported the tweets to the Chairman of Smith and Williamson. Within a matter of days, Mr Gauterin’s tweets had been made private, and within a few weeks, the firm’s CEO had called Mr Pollard to confirm that “Mr Gauterin no longer worked for Smith and Williamson.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

A Jewish inclusion officer for a children’s book society resigned last month after she received a barrage of death threats and abuse for speaking out against antisemitism.

April Powers, the former Chief Equity and Inclusion Officer at the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI), posted a statement on Twitter in response to the recent spate of antisemitic attacks that occurred across the United States.

The statement, released on behalf of the SCBWI, read: “The SCBWI unequivocally recognises that the world’s 14.8 million Jewish people (less than 0.018% of the population) have the right to life, safety, and freedom from scapegoating and fear. No person should be at risk because of their heritage, religion, disability, or whom they love.

“In the last several years, antisemitism has been on the rise globally, and has fuelled a 75% increase in hate speech and random violence against Jewish people in the last few weeks alone. Because antisemitism is one of the oldest forms of hatred, it has its own name. It is the example from which many forms of racism and violence are perpetrated.”

Ms Powers received online abuse for the statement, as some Twitter users argued that she should have also included a statement on Islamophobia in the release. Ms Powers engaged in an online debate with one of the users before blocking them. However, she regretted her handling of the incident and resigned as a result.

Speaking on her experience, Ms Powers said: “This person is calling me a white supremacist and that I deserve to die and so does my family. It doesn’t matter if it’s credible or not, the feeling that you have when someone threatens your life and that of your family online and publicly is a terrorist act.

“I am so sad and disheartened that this is the world that we live in right now because none of them deserve any of this and their lives, safety and careers are on the line because of it.”

The SCBWI received criticism for its handling of the situation and was even accused of not standing with Jewish people. One of those criticising the SCBWI included PEN America, a non-profit organisation that aims to protect free speech through literature and human rights.

On its website, PEN America said: “Issuance of a factual public statement within the scope of a professional’s job should not be grounds for discipline or resignation under pressure. Biases and bigotries take on many variations and targets – anti-Black racism, Islamophobia, antisemitism, homophobia, sexism, and other forms each have their own distinct characteristics and are worthy of forceful denunciation in their own right. The fight for human rights and dignity must oppose such hatreds in all their forms…absent any such indication, the condemnation of one form of hatefulness should not be read to imply indifference toward others.”

Following Ms Powers’ resignation, the SCBWI released a statement that said: “As an apolitical literary organization, it is not our mission to promote any specific political viewpoint or policy. Instead, we provide our members the opportunity, space, tools, exposure, and empowerment they require to make the high-quality, diverse children’s books that all children need.

“Recently, our Equity and Inclusion officer resigned by her own choice, not at any request or demand of our organisation, as she felt she had made mistakes in her professional decisions in managing social media. Today, we want to be sure that our community understands our core mission as an organisation of children’s book writers, illustrators, and translators.”

Last week, Ms Powers released a Facebook post in which she clarified that the SCBWI did not fire her or ask her to resign, going on to say that “there are good, kind people who work and volunteer there, many of whom are from marginalised, minority, or underrepresented backgrounds (including Jewish) themselves who have also been harassed and trolled relentlessly.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is extraordinary that an inclusion officer at a major organisation has seen the need to resign following a negative reaction to her bravely calling out antisemitism. It is all the more outrageous that she was pilloried for having spoken out against a form of racism to which she, as a Jewish woman, would be particularly sensitive.

“This incident stands in stark contrast to the mere reassignment a few weeks ago by Google of its Head of Diversity Strategy after he was revealed to have made antisemitic comments. Yet again, it seems that diversity is inclusive of all minorities except Jews, and opposed to all forms of discrimination except antisemitism.

“If it becomes impossible to call out antisemitism in the corporate world, it will become even harder to combat it. It is past time that corporations and unions live up to their values and protect their Jewish workers and members.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Jewish students have been left feeling “disgusted” after academic staff at the University of Warwick passed a motion to challenge the International Definition of Antisemitism.

More than 200 members of the University of Warwick Assembly – the representative body of the University’s academic staff – voted to “overwhelmingly” pass the motion on 21st June.

Members of staff also called upon the University to create a working group designed to handle matters relating to all allegations of antisemitism and other forms of racism that might be made against staff and students.

As a result, an amendment that called for the application of the Definition to be suspended in disciplinary matters was also passed until the findings from the working group could be reported back at the end of the year.

Speaking in support of the motion, Professor Maureen Freely of the Warwick Writing Programme, School of Creative Arts, Performance, and Visual Cultures said: “We are thrilled that this motion passed…the [D]efinition is not fit for purpose.”

She added: “The working party will give us the chance to develop an integrated set of policies that will balance academic freedom with our statutory and moral duty to protect all members of our community.”

A spokesperson for the Warwick Jewish society spoke of their disappointment to the news, saying: “We are absolutely disgusted with Warwick University Assembly’s rejection of the [D]efinition of antisemitism…this sends a clear message that they are not willing to listen to Jewish students and, frankly, hold us in contempt for simply trying to define prejudice against us.”

However, they also said in a separate statement that they “welcomed the University Assembly’s overwhelming vote to establish a working party that will make recommendations on the handling of allegations of all forms of racism, including antisemitism.”

The University has since released a statement clarifying that the University’s Assembly is not a decision-making body, and that motions are not binding. They have also stated that the Definition will continue to be utilised in disciplinary matters relating to antisemitism.

Last December, dubious disciplinary charges against a Jewish student who complained about antisemitism were dropped by the University.

In March, the University’s official Twitter account ‘liked’ a tweet endorsing inflammatory comments by the academic and conspiracy theorist David Miller, with the University subsequently deleting the ‘like’ and blaming “unauthorised access” to the account.

Last month, a controversial Warwick lecturer reportedly claimed that the Definition is part of a Conservative plot to “legitimate racist speech and de-legitimate anti-racist and anti-colonial research, teaching and activism”.

In the past, other concerns have been raised over the University’s failure to address a scandal over a group chat which gained national attention, in which antisemitic, misogynistic, abusive and threatening messages, including rape threats, were uncovered.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

A far-right Bulgarian politician has been condemned after he reportedly praised Adolf Hitler and denied the Holocaust in a television interview.

Ultranationalist Bulgarian politician Miroslav Ivanov, a representative of the Bulgarian National Union – New Democracy (BNU-ND) Party who is running for a position in the National Assembly, made the comments in a television interview for Bulgarian broadcaster Nova Televizia ahead of Bulgaria’s upcoming elections.

The BNU-ND is a far-right party that professes to believe in “Bulgarian values,” although it has been stated that many consider them to be neo-Nazis.  

Mr Ivanov reportedly made several antisemitic and false claims, which included saying that Nazism wasn’t fascist but was national socialism, arguing that Jews lived happily under Hitler’s regime because they could work freely, and that the gas chambers which were operated by the Nazis were actually used for deworming.

Mr Ivanov also defended a photograph of himself performing a Nazi salute by claiming that it was actually a “Roman salute.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Denying the fact, scope, mechanisms (e.g. gas chambers) or intentionality of the genocide of the Jewish people at the hands of National Socialist Germany and its supporters and accomplices during World War II (the Holocaust)” and “Accusing the Jews as a people, or Israel as a state, of inventing or exaggerating the Holocaust” are both examples of antisemitism.

Mr Ivanov and the BNU-ND Party have been condemned by the Bulgarian Jewish group, Shalom. The group has said that they “call on the prosecution to take a stand on this case, based on both Bulgarian legislation and European practices related to the spread of fascist and antisemitic propaganda and Holocaust denial.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The Labour Party has begun an investigation after a Party member and former councillor allegedly claimed that “some Jewish people” didn’t learn the lessons of the Holocaust.

It was reported that the comment was made at a Hornsey and Wood Green local party meeting last Wednesday by former councillor Lucy Craig, after a motion was moved in which she condemned the recent actions of the Israeli Government during its conflict with Hamas.

It was allegedly at this point when Ms Craig made a comment blaming Jewish people for the perceived actions of the Israeli Government and claimed that “some Jewish people” had not learnt the lessons of the Holocaust.

An attendee at the local party meeting said: “The mover of the motion Lucy Craig began talking about Israel’s ‘power and wealth’ and then went on to condemn ‘some Jewish people’ who despite the Holocaust were now attacking Palestinians.

“The member who seconded the motion then went on to claim Israel had in fact ‘created Hamas’…both of the speeches caused a lot of anger amongst many members…several people, including myself raised concerns about antisemitism in the speech.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the State of Israel” and “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” are both examples of antisemitism.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The President of Belarus has said that the whole world “bows to Jews” because of the Holocaust.

Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko made the inflammatory remark last week at a memorial service for Soviet soldiers who died during World War II.

“Jews were able to make the world remember [the Holocaust], and the whole world bows to them, being afraid of saying one wrong word to them,” the Belarusian dictator said, adding: “On our part, we, being tolerant and kind, did not want to hurt anyone’s feelings and let the things down to the point when they have started to hurt us.”

Accusing Jewish people of using the Holocaust in order to wield power is an antisemitic trope that perpetuates the conspiracy theory that Jews control the world.

President Lukashenko’s speech revolved around Belarus’ involvement in fighting the Nazis alongside Soviet forces, and stated that Belarus’ contributions in World War II needed to be recognised.

“This work has already begun with the investigation into the crimes of Nazism on the Belarusian soil. This is akin to the Holocaust of the Belarusian people,” President Lukashenko added.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Two Jewish pedestrians in North London were allegedly accosted on their way to synagogue on Saturday morning by a man who they said screamed at them that it is a “Shame Hitler did not wipe out all of you Jewish people!” and then followed them shouting “Hitler done a good job!”

The incident took place outside 198-202 Stamford Hill, and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information or recognise the male pictured, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: 4616315/21.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 showed that three in five British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

The French comedian Dieudonné has been sentenced to four months’ imprisonment for producing videos of an “antisemitic nature.”

Dieudonné, whose real name is Dieudonné M’Bala M’Bala, is a French comedian and political activist who has been convicted for hate speech and advocating terrorism, among other offences, in France and Belgium.

Mr M’Bala M’Bala, 55, was handed his prison sentence last Friday after being charged with “public insult of an antisemitic nature” and “contestation of a crime against humanity” as a result of two videos that date back to May 2020.  

During his trial last May, Mr M’Bala M’Bala insisted that the man in the videos was not him and that in fact his likeness was manufactured using deepfake technology. However, the court was not convinced, stating: “The character appearing on the screen, identified by investigators as Dieudonné M’Bala M’Bala, has the same name, the same appearance, the same voice and the same lexical references as the defendant.”

Mr M’Bala M’Bala was also fined €10,000 last Friday after he was found guilty of “public insult to an official,” namely Frédéric Potier, the former interministerial delegate for the fight against racism, antisemitism and anti-LGBT hatred.

Earlier this year, Mr M’Bala M’Bala was instructed by the Paris Court of Appeals to pay a fine of €9,000 (over £7,700) for mocking the Holocaust in a video.

Mr M’Bala M’Bala has attacked the “Zionist lobby”, claiming it controls the world, and he has been convicted more than twenty times on charges that include defamation, hate speech and endorsing terrorism in Belgium and France. Last year, he was given a two-year jail sentence and fined for tax fraud and money laundering.

In 2013, Mr M’Bala M’Bala was recorded during a performance suggesting that it was a pity that a Jewish journalist was not sent to the gas chambers. The then-French interior minister, Manuel Valls, declared that Mr M’Bala M’Bala was an “antisemite and a racist” and he would seek to ban all his events as public safety risks.

Last summer, as social media platforms claimed to be stepping up their fight against hate content, Mr M’Bala M’Bala was permanently banned from several major online platforms, including YouTube, Facebook, TikTok and Instagram, for his use of “dehumanising” terms in relation to Jews.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Two Polish ultranationalists have been given prison sentences in connection to chanting about hanging Zionists at a rally in 2016.

It was reported that one of the participants at the rally, which took place in the north-eastern city of Bialystok, led a chant about how “Zionists will hang from the trees instead of leaves.” It is understood that anti-Muslim chants were also heard.

The Criminal Tribunal in Warsaw imposed the sentences last Wednesday. The defendant who led the chants received a sentence of twelve months’ imprisonment, while the other defendant was handed a suspended sentence of six months.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Antisemitic graffiti was found spray-painted onto the side of a building in Wemmetsweiler, a village in the German state of Saarland, last week.

The graffiti depicts three black Stars of David along with the word ‘Jude’, the German word for Jew.

The perpetrators are still unknown. However, local police are investigating the matter.

This incident comes only weeks after Germany banned the Hamas flag as a response to the rise in antisemitic incidents.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Police are investigating after a Jewish man faced two separate antisemitic incidents on London transport within one hour. Campaign Against Antisemitism is in contact with the police and Transport for London.

A Twitter user uploaded audio and video footage of his brother facing the vile abuse aboard a London bus. The incident occurred on the 113 bus heading towards Oxford Circus this past Saturday at 23:33. An aggressive passenger can be heard threatening the Jewish man and telling him: “I’ve got a shank, I will slit your throat for Palestine.”

He can also be heard saying: “I’ll beat the s**t out of you, man.”

The passenger was then ordered off the bus, where he proceeded to swear at the Jewish man and bang on the doors of the bus.  

An hour prior to this incident, the Jewish man was subjected to antisemitic chanting whilst travelling down the escalators at Oxford Circus station. A man is heard shouting: “I f***ing hate the Jews.”

In a statement, British Transport Police said: “We’re aware of a video posted online of…antisemitic behaviour on a London Underground escalator. We take such incidents very seriously and are investigating. If anybody has any information contact us on 0800 405040 or text 61016 quoting ref 90 of 4 July 2021.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism replied to the Twitter user, saying: “Thank you for exposing this appalling abuse. We will be following up privately, but for those reading the thread we wanted to note that police investigations have now been opened and we are in touch with police and Transport for London. #ZeroTolerance”

Earlier this year, we reported on a man who subjected a Jewish couple – including a disabled man – to ten minutes of verbal abuse on a London bus.

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently met with Transport for London as part of work to improve the response to antisemitic incidents on public transport.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The deputy leader of the neo-Nazi organisation Golden Dawn has been arrested after he was found hiding in Greece.

Golden Dawn is an extremist group that was founded in 1985 and was registered as a political party in 1993. In the 2012 elections, against a backdrop of financial chaos that led to stringent austerity measures, the Golden Dawn Party became the third largest in the Greek parliament.

Last year saw the end of one of the most high-profile trials in modern-Greek history where Greek judges ruled that the extreme right-wing neo-Nazi political party operated as a criminal gang.

As a result of the decision in October, Golden Dawn’s deputy leader, Christos Pappas, was issued a thirteen-year prison sentence. However, he went missing one day later, which prompted some to believe that he had fled the country. 

Police arrested Mr Pappas, 60, on 1st June in an apartment in the central Athens district of Zografou. A woman, 52, was also arrested and it has been reported that she will be charged with aiding and abetting a criminal. 

Government spokesperson Aristotelia Peloni said: “With Christos Pappas’s arrest, the chapter of organised crime closes definitively.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Disgraced Bristol University professor David Miller has been accused of using a research grant of £401,552 to further his research on the “British Zionist scene.”

It was reported that between 2013 and 2016, Prof. Miller used this funding to produce a paper called “The Israel Lobby and the European Union”, in which he accused Israel “lobby groups” of coercing politicians and the public into looking favourably upon Israel.

He was also said to have made a map of the “British Zionist scene”, where he attempted to draw a link between the Israeli Government and pro-Zionist groups to political parties in Britain, and in an article that was based on his own research, Prof. Miller stated that the “Zionist movement” was one of the “five pillars of Islamophobia.”

Prof. Miller, a Professor of Political Sociology at the University of Bristol, is a conspiracy theorist with a history of controversy relating to Jewish students. In his latest outburst, which is being investigated by the University and the police, he asserted that “Zionism is racism”, declared his objective “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world” and accused the Bristol University Jewish Society of being part of a worldwide Zionist conspiracy, adding that it is “fundamental to Zionism to encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”. At the same online event, Prof. Miller also observed that the Jewish Society and the Union of Jewish Students are Zionist, thereby implying that Jewish students (and the wider Jewish community) inherently “encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”.

He also portrayed the International Definition of Antisemitism as an attack on free speech and accused the Israeli Government of engaging in an “all-out attack” on the global Left as part of an “attempt by the Israelis to impose their will all over the world”. In comments reminiscent of the darkest years of the United Nations, Prof. Miller insisted that “Zionism is racism” and asked how “we defeat the ideology of Zionism in practice”, “how is Zionism ended” and about the way “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world”.

Two months ago, it emerged that The University has permitted Prof. Miller to return to teaching, as it appears to drag its heels over its investigation.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities. Recently, we passed the threshold of over half of British universities having adopted the Definition.

Earlier this week, we reported that the Education Secretary, Gavin Williamson, said of the disgraced academic: “I do not expect universities to tolerate racists”.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

A Chabad rabbi was held at gunpoint and stabbed eight times outside of a synagogue and Jewish school in Boston, yesterday afternoon.

The attack on Rabbi Shlomo Noginsky occurred at 13:19pm, where it was reported that the assailant held Rabbi Noginsky at gunpoint and attempted to force him into his car, at which point the rabbi fled. The attacker was then believed to have chased after him, stabbing him in the arm eight times. After Rabbi Noginsky called for help, the attacker fled the scene before being apprehended by police shortly after.

The suspect, 24-year-old Khaled Awad, will be tried in Brighton District Court under the charges of assault and battery by means of a dangerous weapon and assault and battery on a police officer.

Speaking from his hospital bed, Rabbi Noginski said of the attack: “I am grateful to the Boston Police Department for their rapid response, and relieved that the perpetrator is in custody. I am looking forward to returning to my work as soon as possible.”  

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

An Ohio man who spat on his Jewish neighbours and told them that Adolf Hitler should have gassed them has been jailed.

Court documents reveal how Douglas G. Schifer, 66, broke his neighbours’ windows, spat on them, and hurled antisemitic abuse and threats towards them.

Mr Schifer was quoted as saying: “All you f***ing people, it’s no wonder Hitler burned you people in ovens,” “f***ing Hitler should have gassed you,” and “Jews burn, you belong in ovens.” He also threatened to shoot both his neighbours and their dog.

Mr Schifer, 66, pleaded guilty in federal court to criminally interfering with the right to fair housing and faces up to one year’s imprisonment. He may also have to pay a fine of $100,000.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

It was reported earlier this week that Naomi Wimborne-Idrissi has been removed from Chingford and Woodford Green constituency Labour Party’s (CLP) executive committee.

Ms Wimborne-Idrissi, the co-founder and Media Officer of Jewish Voice for Labour, an antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, was serving as the Vice-Chair of Chingford and Woodford Green’s CLP. However, the recent elections for the East London constituency saw Ms Wimborne-Idrissi, along with supportive CLP Chair Gary Lafley, replaced in a shake-up that was spearheaded by local members.

This latest development comes after it was reported last year that Ms Wimborne-Idrissi had been suspended from Labour pending an investigation after a rebellious meeting of her local Chingford and Woodford Green CLP.

The meeting reportedly featured speeches from both the former Chair, Gary Lefley, and Ms Wimborne-Idrissi criticising Sir Keir Starmer and General-Secretary David Evans over their response to the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s (EHRC) damning report into antisemitism in the Labour Party.

In her comments, Ms Wimborne-Idrissi allegedly said: “The cynical manipulation of Jewish fears and concerns is unforgivable and undermines all our work against racism of all kinds.” She also reportedly criticised the “weaponisation” of antisemitism, saying: “May I just say there are many Jews in the party, including me, who endorse 100 percent what Pippa said about the weaponisation.”

Earlier this week, we reported on the election of a Jewish woman as the Chair of Hendon Constituency Labour Party’s (CLP) executive committee, with supporters of both Jeremy Corbyn and Momentum being ousted from their positions.

The Labour Party was found by the EHRC to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

According to a newly published YouGov poll, 60% of Labour members think that the antisemitic former leader Jeremy Corbyn should have the whip restored.

This worrying result from the poll, which was conducted among a sample size of 871 Labour members in Britain and ran for a total of five days, comes nearly one year after he was initially suspended from the Party, and though he was readmitted only weeks later, the whip has still not been restored to him.

It is clear that Mr Corbyn has still not recognised the antisemitism problem that was prevalent within the Labour Party during his tenure. Last month, in an interview at the Cambridge Union, when asked about Luciana Berger being “hounded out” of the Labour Party due to antisemitism, Mr Corbyn insisted that “Luciana was not hounded out of the Party; she unfortunately decided to resign from the Party”. Ms Berger was among a number of MPs who quit the Labour Party in protest at its institutional antisemitism.

In another recent poll of Labour members, conducted in late March by YouGov, it was revealed that over two thirds believe that the problem of antisemitism in the Party has been “exaggerated” or that there is not a serious problem. Given that a separate poll by Lord Ashcroft shortly after the 2019 General Election found that nearly three quarters of Labour members believed that the issue of antisemitism in the Party was “invented or wildly exaggerated by the right-wing media and opponents of Jeremy Corbyn”, it is difficult to see how progress has been made in changing the culture of the Party over the past year.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s latest Antisemitism Barometer, published at the start of the year (with polling conducted well over six months into Sir Keir’s tenure as leader), showed that British Jews feel that the Labour Party is more than twice as tolerant of antisemitism than any other political party. Remarkably, compared to the previous year’s figures (polled while Mr Corbyn was still leader of the Party), Labour performed worse, with 88 percent of respondents considering that the Party was too tolerant of antisemitism under Sir Keir compared with 86 percent the year before under Mr Corbyn. At times, this sentiment has spilled into the open.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has lodged a complaint against Jeremy Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s (EHRC) shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day of the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the EHRC to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Graffiti reading “Zionist Fascist Police State” was found scrawled on a structure in a park in Stamford Hill. 

The graffiti was spotted at the corner of Lee Valley Park by the River Lea, near Bakers Hill, and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123.

Similar graffiti has been found in London on numerous occasions this year and in the past.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 showed that three in five British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

Police have identified minors who are suspected of vandalising a synagogue in Romania.

The Orăștie synagogue in southwestern Transylvania, which was built in the late 1800s, had its windows smashed, with rocks found inside the building. The suspects are believed to be between the ages of nine and fourteen.

The act of vandalism comes only days before the 80th anniversary of the Iași pogrom, a series of violent, murderous attacks that were carried out against Romanian Jews in Iași during the Holocaust. The killings lasted from 29th June until 6th July 1941 and over 13,000 Jews were murdered.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The closely-watched Batley and Spen by-election, which takes place on Thursday, has been rocked with both allegations and evidence of antisemitism.

Much of the campaign has been focused on the ‘Free Palestine’ protests of recent weeks – a focus inflamed by the provocative and controversial politician George Galloway, who is running in the by-election for the Workers Party of Britain. Those protests have been associated with an unprecedented surge in antisemitism.

Newspapers have been full of reportage of concerns by local residents of the Labour Party’s handling of the issues, with one reportedly telling The Observer: “Keir [Starmer] took the time to condemn two idiots for being antisemitic last month but he won’t condemn the Israeli government for killing innocent people.” 

Last week, it was alleged in The Mail on Sunday that an unnamed Labour official said that “We’re haemorrhaging votes among Muslim voters and the reason for that is what Keir [Starmer] has been doing on antisemitism. Nobody really wants to talk about it, but that’s the main factor. He challenged [Jeremy] Corbyn on it, and there’s been a backlash among certain sections of the community.”

Labour’s Deputy Leader Angela Rayner strenuously dissociated the Party from that comment. Ms Rayner is herself the subject of an outstanding complaint by Campaign Against Antisemitism, and recently appeared on a platform with an antisemite – Jeremy Corbyn – suspended by the Party over antisemitism.

There have also been claims of opposition to Sir Keir Starmer because his wife is Jewish or because, it is alleged, he is a “Zionist”.

Over the past few days, these allegations have apparently come to be supported by further evidence. One volunteer was dropped from Mr Galloway’s campaign after it emerged that he had denied the Holocaust, writing on social media that “I am not antisemitic” but claiming that “the holohoax…commonly referred as the holocaust” was “the big fat Zionist cow that’s been milked for the last 80 years” and describing the Holocaust as “an exaggerated version of events to beg indefinite public sympathy”.

Meanwhile, according to the JC, residents told the newspaper that one of the reasons they would not vote for Labour because its leader, Sir Keir, “follows the Zionist lobby”.

The election takes place on Thursday with candidates from all the major parties and smaller parties, as well as independents, running.

Digital billboards that feature slogans which aim to tackle antisemitism have been launched as part of a campaign in Times Square.

The billboards, which were revealed earlier this week, were created by JewBelong, a non-profit organisation that aims to promote inclusivity among Jews.

One of the billboards read: “You didn’t like it when we didn’t defend ourselves. And you don’t like it when we do. Doesn’t leave much wiggle room.”

Another powerful message states: “We’re just 75 years since the gas chambers. So no, a billboard calling out antisemitism isn’t an overreaction.”

“3,500 years of antisemitism doesn’t make it right,” reads another.

Archie Gottesman, Co-founder of JewBelong, said: “I think it makes people feel a little less alone. Like, gosh, you’re not the only person who people threw pennies at when they were little and you’re not the only person who someone said you killed Jesus.”

The campaign will remain in Times Square for a month and is expected to expand across further cities within the United States, including Philadelphia, Miami, Washington D.C., and San Francisco. However, according to Ms Gottesman, there were some cities that were not receptive to the idea.

Regarding the campaign, the organisation tweeted: “Antisemitism is real, dangerous and growing. It’s time for the Jewish community to fight back. That’s why we launched this campaign in Times Square yesterday. Please share and repost. Together we can help stop antisemitism in its disgusting tracks.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reported on the recent wave of antisemitism which has continued across the United States.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Stop Funding Hate (SFH), a campaign that encourages advertisers to boycott media whom they consider hateful, has been accused of “militant prejudice” after it was revealed by the JC that one of their strategic advisors had defended inflammatory tweets made by others.

Stu Moran, the CEO of Web Foundry, a consultancy that provides logistical and strategic support for SFH, took to Twitter in an attempt to justify tweets that promoted hate from both Labour MP Rebecca Long-Bailey and Kerry-Anne Mendoza, the editor of The Canary,  who has a history of antisemitic comments and whose website is under investigation by the Government’s Independent Advisor on Antisemitism.

After Ms Long-Bailey was removed from the Shadow Cabinet by Sir Keir Starmer for sharing an article that promulgated an antisemitic conspiracy theory concerning the death of George Floyd, Mr Moran tweeted: “How have we ended up with criticism of the Israeli state – openly involved in US police training it seems – being branded antisemitic @Keir_Starmer?”

Associating the Jewish state with the murder of George Floyd is an antisemitic trope.

Mr Moran also defended Ms Mendoza after she received backlash for equating Brexit with Nazism by tweeting: “Get Brexit done; Build, build, build; Jobs, jobs, jobs; Arbeit macht frei.” He wrote: “Yes, I get that it’s not good but compared to things I’ve seen in almost every tabloid, the Times, Telegraph and even the BBC that cause hate crime on our streets a daily basis – I’d argue that tweet won’t – I’m struggling to understand the size of the furore against the Canary?”

Sir John Hayes MP said: “As is so often the case, the view of virtue amongst these groups and individuals is warped by militant prejudice. On both the hard left and hard right this cancerous preoccupation is rife and it’s time this cancer was cut out and the people involved cut off from civilised society.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “For Stop Funding Hate to collaborate with people making these sorts of comments is the height of hypocrisy. They should stop funding the hate spread by their own contractor.

“Sadly this seems to be yet another case of an extreme far-left worldview becoming entrenched amongst those who claim the mantle of campaigners against hatred. It is shameful.”

Numerous MPs from across parties appeared to excuse antisemitism in Palestinian Authority textbooks in a debate in Parliament today.

The debate focused on a recent “EU Review into Palestinian school textbooks”, which revealed that Palestinian Authority textbooks are rife with antisemitism. As Caroline Ansell MP put it, opening the debate, “The EU report clearly identifies evidence of anti-Jewish racism within the curriculum.”

Nevertheless, despite the evidence of incitement to murder Jews and glorification of terrorism against Jews in those textbooks, several MPs in the debate obscenely appeared to claim, without foundation, that Israeli textbooks might exhibit similar incitement, or that Israel was somehow to blame for the incitement in Palestinian Authority textbooks, or that the incitement did not really matter.

Labour Party MP Julie Elliott made the case for moral equivalence, insisting that “There is no doubt that there is room for improvement, but there is also room for improvement in Israeli schools. That is the nub of the problem.”

Her colleague Andy Slaughter blamed the Jewish state for anti-Jewish racism in the textbooks, conceding that there are “regrettable passages” in the textbooks but proceedings to say: “Above all, there is an inequality of arms. What the Israelis have been able to do to the Palestinians over 53 years of military occupation, with 650,000 Israelis in illegal settlements, and many other things during this crisis, needs to be addressed. That is the real root of the problem that has to be dealt with.”

The SNP’s Brendan O’Hara made a similar argument: “Perhaps we would pay greater heed to the howls of protest from the Benches opposite about the content of Palestinian children’s schoolbooks if they were equally vociferous in calling out the outrageous human rights abuses that those same Palestinian schoolchildren face every single day of their young lives.”

Alistair Carmichael of the Liberal Democrats seemed to suggest that antisemitic incitement did not really matter, saying: “If we really are concerned about the impact on young Palestinians…we should be considering that many Palestinian children may soon be fortunate to have any schools at all in which to have textbooks, because the hard fact is that no fewer than 53 Palestinian schools are slated for demolition by the Israeli Government. If there are no schools, frankly the content of textbooks becomes pretty academic.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is extraordinary that MPs from a variety of parties would look not to condemn antisemitic incitement in textbooks but to excuse or downplay it. There is little point condemning antisemitism when it arises in British schools while rationalising it when it occurs abroad. Racism is racism, and it should have no place in the education of children, no matter where in the world they happen to be learning.”

Earlier this year, Australia announced a review into UNRWA funding after a watchdog monitoring peace and tolerance in the Middle East accused UNRWA of distributing educational materials containing antisemitism and calling for jihad.

Antisemitism in Palestinian Authority and UNRWA textbooks funded by Britain, the EU and Western nations has been an ongoing problem for many years.

A controversial former United States congresswoman and presidential candidate posted an antisemitic meme earlier this week which suggests that “Zionists” were responsible for the 9/11 terrorist atrocities.

Cynthia McKinney, the 2008 presidential nominee for the Green Party and congresswoman who served from 1993 to 2003 and from 2005 to 2007 as a Democratic Representative from Georgia, tweeted an image of a jigsaw puzzle which bore a photo of the 9/11 attacks along with a final jigsaw piece which reads “Zionists.” The caption below the photo says: “The final piece of the puzzle.”

The tweet was temporarily removed by Twitter for violating its policy but has since been restored.

Despite several users voicing their disgust in reaction to Ms McKinney’s abhorrent tweet, the former congresswoman doubled down by retweeting an article shared by a YouTuber, who herself has been accused of antisemitism, which attempted to back up the hateful conspiracy theory.

Ms McKinney is promoting the widespread, antisemitic conspiracy theory says that Jews, not Islamist terrorists, were responsible for flying passenger jets into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, so that they would profit from the resulting war. This is backed up by the equally false belief that no Jews were killed in the attack, as they had all been warned to stay at home that day.

Similarly, Ms McKinney’s usage of the phrase “Zionist” has been increasingly utilised in circles that promote antisemitic theories as a way to avoid saying “Jew.” People who do this will usually also exhibit other forms of antisemitic behaviour.

This is not Ms McKninney’s first instance of antisemitic behaviour. It was reported in the New York Times that in 2002, Ms McKinney made “a series of other incendiary, often racial comments” towards Jewish people.

Ms McKinney has regularly posted tweets which promulgate antisemitic tropes and conspiracy theories. This includes tweeting about central banks that are supposedly controlled by the Rothschilds family, multiple references to “Deep state ZioCons,” and alleging that Jewish people seek to harbour control of the black community. She has also referred to Donald Trump as a “Zionist puppet.”

Earlier this year, Ms McKinney promoted an antisemitic book which proposes several antisemitic conspiracy theories and stereotypes, which includes the assertion that Jewish people “control America” and accuse people of being antisemitic in order to deflect criticism of Israel. She shared a link to the book along with the comment: “One of the most important reads if you want to know what’s really happening and who the main actors are.”

Ms McKinney’s history of antisemitism also extends to Holocaust denial. Earlier this year, she retweeted an article which stated that Amazon had removed books that promoted Holocaust denial from its website, and added the comment: “More thought control and intolerance from the tolerance people.”

In May 2020, Ms McKinney posted a tweet in which she doubted that the figure of Jews killed during the Holocaust amounted to six million.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Accusing the Jews as a people, or Israel as a state, of inventing or exaggerating the Holocaust” is an example of antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A Jewish woman has been elected as the Chair of Hendon Constituency Labour Party’s (CLP) executive committee, with supporters of both Jeremy Corbyn and Momentum being ousted from their positions.

The shake-up that occurred resulted from Hendon CLP’s AGM this past Sunday.

Hendon CLP’s leadership was previously a stronghold for Momentum, the grassroots organisation that supported Mr Corbyn and his wing of the Labour Party. Numerous controversial individuals have been associated with it, including Jackie Walker, a former Vice Chair who rejected the International Definition of Antisemitism before eventually being expelled from the Labour Party.

Last November, committee members of Hendon CLP even passed a motion in order to express solidarity with Mr Corbyn after his suspension from the Party due to allegations of antisemitism, which they said was “dramatically overstated for political reasons.”

A spokesperson from Hendon CLP said: “The last two years in the local Labour Party in Hendon have been incredibly challenging. But after the election of a new executive committee over the weekend, we have turned a page and now head into a new era of sensible and moderate leadership.

“We’re delighted to have a top team, with a Jewish woman as chair, who will have zero tolerance for antisemitism, work hard to continue to root it out from the local party, and will increase our engagement with Jewish residents.”

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Nassau County Executive Laura Curran signed an Executive Order last week officially recognising the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The Order directs all departments and officials in the Long Island county to be guided by the Definition in identifying and enforcing laws against antisemitic discrimination and harassment.

Ms Curran said: “In order to combat antisemitism effectively, it is important to be clear about what it is and how it may manifest itself. With antisemitism on the rise, Nassau County stands with our Jewish brothers and sisters and will continue fighting to ensure hatred never finds a home in our communities.”

Britain was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism and Lord Pickles worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

A Scottish Labour councillor has come under investigation from the Labour Party after appearing to double down on previous inflammatory comments and claiming that former party leader Jeremy Corbyn was suspended from the party simply for “expressing free speech.”

Cllr Jim Sheridan made the comments last week during a debate at Renfrewshire Council on the effect on free speech of the recently-passed Hate Crime and Public Order (Scotland) Bill.

Cllr Sheridan was quoted as saying: “I feel I must make a contribution to this debate about free speech. As someone who was personally attacked for contributing, or making, what I thought was perfectly reasonable comments about antisemitism, I was attacked for free speech.

“And I also include, Provost, the former leader of the Labour Party, who was thrown out of the Labour Party for expressing free speech.”

Cllr Sheridan appeared to be referring to a comment that he posted on his Facebook page in 2018, saying: “For almost all my adult life I have had the utmost respect and empathy for the Jewish community and their historic suffering. No longer due to what they and their blairite [sic] plotters are doing to my party and the long suffering people of Britain who need a radical Labour government.”

He subsequently deleted the post, but, following a complaint, he was suspended by the Labour Party pending investigation. Last year, his suspension was reportedly lifted without explanation or apology from the councillor, who now seems to be doubling down on his previous comments as well as excusing the antisemitic former leader of the Labour Party.

A complaint by Campaign Against Antisemitism against Cllr Sheridan remains outstanding.

A Labour Party spokesman said: “Scottish Labour takes all complaints of antisemitism extremely seriously and they are fully investigated in line with our rules and procedures, and any appropriate disciplinary action is taken.”

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The Education Secretary, Gavin Williamson, has said of the disgraced academic David Miller: “I do not expect universities to tolerate racists”.

Mr Williamson made the comments at an Education Select Committee hearing last Wednesday after being asked for his position on the sociology professor by the Chair, Robert Halfon.

Mr Williamson responded: “I would never expect a university to tolerate racists and I would never expect a university to tolerate antisemitism. Where there is racism – whether that is manifested in antisemitic remarks – I would naturally expect there to be a proper and full employment procedure. I wouldn’t expect any form of racism to be tolerated and I would expect those people who are committing antisemitism to be dismissed from the staff.”

Prof. Miller, a Professor of Political Sociology at the University of Bristol, is a conspiracy theorist with a history of controversy relating to Jewish students. In his latest outburst, which is being investigated by the University and the police, he asserted that “Zionism is racism”, declared his objective “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world” and accused the Bristol University Jewish Society of being part of a worldwide Zionist conspiracy, adding that it is “fundamental to Zionism to encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”. At the same online event, Prof. Miller also observed that the Jewish Society and the Union of Jewish Students are Zionist, thereby implying that Jewish students (and the wider Jewish community) inherently “encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”.

He also portrayed the International Definition of Antisemitism as an attack on free speech and accused the Israeli Government of engaging in an “all-out attack” on the global Left as part of an “attempt by the Israelis to impose their will all over the world”. In comments reminiscent of the darkest years of the United Nations, Prof. Miller insisted that “Zionism is racism” and asked how “we defeat the ideology of Zionism in practice”, “how is Zionism ended” and about the way “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world”.

Also at the Committee hearing, Jonathan Gullis, the Conservative MP for Stoke-on-Trent, asked the Secretary of State about the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities and whether those that failed to do so would be penalised financially. Mr Williamson said that he backs the campaign for widespread adoption of the Definition, and observed that “We’ve had an exceptionally large rise in the number of universities that have signed up”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities. Recently, we passed the threshold of over half of British universities having adopted the Definition.

Mr Williamson continued: “Some [universities] have required a little bit of extra time, but if we’re in a position where there is a complete reluctance to be able to do this, we will look at taking other actions that may be available.”

According to the JC, a spokesperson for the Support David Miller campaign said: “Gavin Williamson and other Government ministers should find their backbone instead of repeatedly giving in to a vast censorship campaign being pushed by Israel lobbyists onto British schools and universities.”

The claim that combatting antisemitism is merely a cover for censoring debate about Israel or is conducted at the behest of the Jewish state are themselves antisemitic tropes.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

A neo-Nazi teenager from Derbyshire has admitted terror offences after threatening an attack on migrants at Dover.

The fifteen-year-old, who cannot be named for legal reasons, discussed the attack on a far-right Telegram channel that he had created, explaining his intentions and potential weapons.

He appeared on Monday at Westminster Magistrates’ Court and pleaded guilty to encouraging terrorism and possessing and disseminating a terrorist publication.

He had a previous conviction for threatening to blow up a mosque last year but was given a slap on the wrist for what was described as a “bomb hoax, a prank and a joke”. However, at that time he appeared alongside a sixteen-year-old co-defendant from southeast London who admitted dissemination of a terrorist publication. An investigation showed that he had made videos featuring Hitler, Nazis murdering victims in concentration camps and a woman singing “All Jews should die, race mixing is a sin”, and had searched the internet for weapons.

The Senior National Coordinator for Counterterrorism Policing, Dean Haydon, said: “We cannot hope to arrest our way out of this problem – the only way we can hope to reverse this worrying prevalence of children in our arrest statistics is to stop them from being radicalised in the first place.”

Far-right terrorist activity among British youth has become a very concerning trend. Just last month we reported that, according to recent figures that were released from the Home Office, out of over 300 people who were identified in 2019-2020 who could be seen to harbour radical views, 175 were below the age of twenty, with 70 being below the age of fourteen.

Earlier this year, a teenager from Cornwall became the UK’s youngest terror offender, after he admitted twelve terrorism offenses, while another teenager from Newcastle who called himself Hitler on numerous social media platforms and an online group that he created glorifying far-right violence pleaded guilty to terrorism offences.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Priti Patel has reportedly demanded that the Metropolitan Police does more to prevent ‘Free Palestine’ convoys driving to London after the previous two convoys – as well as countless demonstrators around the country – were rocked by antisemitism.

According to a report in The Mail On Sunday, an ‘insider’ said: “The Home Secretary is not happy with the Commissioner [of the Met Police] on this issue and has repeatedly made her view clear that more should have been done to stop the convoys.”

The report went on to quote a ‘source close to the Home Secretary’ as saying that “These antisemitic incidents were designed to intimidate Jewish people. Clearly Priti was concerned about the impact.”

The report comes after a second convoy was permitted by the police to travel to London, under certain conditions, even after Campaign Against Antisemitism took legal advice which we provided to the police and the Home Office setting out the legal basis for prohibiting the returning convoy on the basis that it constitutes a “public procession” likely to cause “serious public disorder”, engaging section 13 of the Public Order Act 1986.

In the event, the Metropolitan Police chose not to avail itself of this legislation, even though it is specifically designed to prevent this kind of intimidation. This decision by the police was particularly disappointing after the previous ‘Free Palestine’ convoy drove through a Jewish neighbourhood shouting “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” through megaphones, and a vehicle, believed to be from the convoy, chased a Jewish mother down a London street and rammed her car whilst she was driving her four-year-old child. Four men were arrested and bailed over the former incident and an alleged antisemitic incident committed in Manchester before the convoy arrived in London.

Although the second convoy was tailed by police, apparently from its inception in Bradford, it too exhibited antisemitism. The driver of one car shouted antisemitic abuse at a Jewish pedestrian in London, while passengers on the leading coach in the convoy were recorded having a conversation with antisemitic tropes. The convoy ended at a rally in Downing Street the featured numerous antisemitic signs and placards. The rally was addressed by Jeremy Corbyn and John McDonnell.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The US Government has announced its intention to restore funding to the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) but with conditions on the resumption of aid.

Secretary of State Antony Blinken has called for reforms of UNRWA textbooks including “taking steps to ensure the content of all educational materials currently taught in UNRWA-administered schools and summer camps is consistent with the values of human rights and tolerance and does not induce incitement.”

Secretary Blinken made the remarks in this presentation of the 2022 State Department budget to the Appropriations Committees of the House of Representatives and Senate.

He stated that UNRWA “disseminates antisemitic and anti-Israel material in its curricula,” and advised that the State Department would be “looking very, very carefully” at the processes UNRWA uses to deal with hateful educational materials.

The Secretary of State also called for an end to the use of UNRWA facilities by antisemitic terrorist organisations.

Earlier this year, Australia announced a review into UNRWA funding after a watchdog monitoring peace and tolerance in the Middle East accused UNRWA of distributing educational materials containing antisemitism and calling for jihad.

Earlier this month, the European Union reportedly tried to suppress a report that reveals that antisemitism is rife in EU-funded Palestinian Authority textbooks.

Antisemitism in Palestinian Authority and UNRWA textbooks funded by Britain, the EU and Western nations has been an ongoing problem for many years.

A neo-Nazi who wrote that ethnic minorities should be “sent home” and “sterilised” has been jailed on terror offences.

Michael Nugent, 38, used online chat groups to disseminate violent, neo-Nazi ideas, which included advocating terrorism. He also shared information of how to make explosives.

According to police, he used Telegram where he ran and contributed to “extreme right wing chat groups,” where he adopted different personas in order to spread “abhorrent, extremist” ideas.

The jury were read extracts from Mr Nugent’s diary. In addition to his abhorrent views on ethnic minorities, the court heard that he also wrote: “We are being genocided in our own homes.”

“Terrorism is the only way out of it,” read another extract.

Mr Nugent pleaded guilty to five counts of dissemination of terrorist publications and eleven of possessing information likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism.

Last week, at Kingston Crown Court, Mr Nugent was sentenced to three and a half years’ imprisonment.

Judge Peter Lodder QC told the court that Mr Nugent “posted toxic offensive material to websites and administered groups which were dedicated to violent racist, antisemitic, and neo-Nazi ideology.” Judge Lodder added: “You used your channel as a safe haven to post messages expressing and encouraging extreme racial hatred and violence towards black people, and in setting up this channel you provided others with access to terrorist publications and encouraged terrorist acts.”

Earlier this year, Campaign Against Antisemitism reported on the concerns that were raised over the alleged increase in neo-Nazi content on Telegram.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Image credit: Counter Terrorism Policing

The Jewich Community Centre of New Haven, CT was evacuated last week after a bomb threat was called in.

Police are investigating the call made to the Centre, which forced an early end to the day’s children’s camp, among other activities.

According to the Centre’s leadership, a staffer received a the call at the welcome desk from a caller who “[started] out with some antisemitic comments and also made a threat”. The staffer was not able to extract information about the caller’s identity, and alerted Woodbridge Police, which advised that the Centre be evacuated.

Later on, Police Chief Frank Cappiello insisted that there is no continuing threat to the Centre, and that “our department is currently working with representatives from the FBI and other local law enforcement agencies to identify the caller.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image Credit: JCC of Greater New Haven

A Jewish shopper in Toronto posted a video on Facebook showing a fellow shopper screaming “dirty Jew” at him.

The Jewish shopper was abused while in a city-centre pharmacy by a woman shopper who had refused to put on a mask offered by an employee. She screamed “homosexual” and “dirty Jew” at him, in addition to other, inaudible comments. On leaving the pharmacy she again shouted “dirty Jew.”

The author of the Facebook post said that he had “considered not sharing” the video but “realised silence will not stop this sort of thing from happening again.” He added: “Let this be a reminder that hate is alive and well in our city” and said he had sent the video to B’nai Brith Canada which monitors antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

An Austrian solider has been imprisoned for sharing photos of his swastika tattoo online.

The man had already received a suspended sentence for previously disseminating photos of Nazi memorabilia from World War II online, the displaying of which is illegal in Austria.

The online distribution of his tattoo photos then activated his sentence, and he has received nineteen months in prison.

The antisemitic tattoo appears on one of the soldier’s testicles. He stated that he was “very drunk” when he underwent the procedure.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has submitted a complaint against a teacher and former union official who has reportedly referred to “dirty Zionists” and made other inflammatory remarks.

Latifa Abouchakra, who works in Ealing as a Citizenship and PHSE teacher, has reportedly shared a post on social media saying that “Zionism is not just racist and genocidal. It’s stark raving mad”; described the antisemitic terrorist and Iranian military leader Qasem Soleimani as a “hero”; and claimed that the antisemitic US Congresswoman Ilhan Omar is “considered a threat to the Zionist and Islamophobic elite in America”.

She has also share an image of a Jewish effigy represented as the devil and a post appearing to question why the Holocaust is memorialised at the expense of other genocides. She has further reportedly described Israel as an “illegal” and “colonial” state; talked of “Zionist elites” and complained of “Zionist influence in American politics”.

She also claimed, after a football player unveiled a Palestinian Authority flag at a match, that “Apparently the dirty Zionists have been complaining to Leicester City FC re the players showing their support for Palestine”.

At an event two years ago, the notorious antisemite Tony Greenstein reportedly stated that “Nazi Germany in a sense built the state of Israel at a crucial time and you can actually say that the state of Israel today is Hitler’s bastard offspring”. Ms Abouchakra, who was chairing the event, reportedly reacted saying “Can I just say that that was an excellent contribution and thank God it was a Jew that said it.” The antisemitic former Labour member Jackie Walker was among 50 attendees at that event.

Ms Abouchakra is a former official with the National Education Union (NEU), which has itself repeatedly come under fire lately in connection with antisemitism. When asked about Ms Abouchakra, who is apparently still a member, the union reportedly said: “The NEU deplores antisemitism and all forms of racism and treats these issues very seriously. The NEU is aware of the concerns raised. This matter will be dealt with as a matter of urgency and will be looked into according to the union’s internal processes relating to member conduct.”

According to her Twitter biography, Ms Abouchakra says that “References to Zionism = Israeli government and it’s [sic] supporters”. It is not clear when this misleading disclaimer was inserted.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “These inflammatory posts are not remotely appropriate for someone charged with the education of our children. Offensive comments about ‘Zionists’, ‘dirty Zionists’ and ‘Zionist influence in American politics’ and sharing posts equating Zionism to racism, not to mention minimisation of the Holocaust and praise for an antisemitic terrorist commander, are unacceptable in the teaching profession, and we shall be submitting a complaint to the Teaching Regulation Authority. Antisemitism has no place in our schools or unions, and we expect the NEU to take disciplinary action to demonstrate where they stand on anti-Jewish racism.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has submitted a complaint to the Teaching Regulation Agency in respect of Ms Abouchakra.

Campaign Antisemitism has produced teachers’ guides for classes on antisemitism, which have been endorsed by the BBC. We have also recently produced a short resource for pupils and parents who encounter antisemitism at schools.Do you or your friends/family have stories of schoolteachers or pupils facing antisemitism at schools in the UK? Contact us at [email protected] or call +44 (0)330 822 0321.

A controversial Imam with a history of inflammatory comments has been pulled from an event, where the disgraced Labour MP, Naz Shah, was due to appear alongside him, after concerns were raised.

The “Free Gaza, Free Palestine” fundraiser was advertised on social media and originally featured Imam Asim Hussain with Labour MPs Naz Shah and Imran Hussain also due to appear.

In his online talks, Imam Hussain has previously said that Gaza is “the largest concentration camp in the world” and that the “true Orthodox Jewish man” does not support Zionism.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

Imam Hussain also promoted the controversial ‘Free Palestine’ convoy, whose participants drove through a Jewish neighbourhood shouting “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” through megaphones.

On Facebook, Imam Hussain has reportedly alluded to “the media” being “controlled by certain lobbies” and that because Arabic is one of the “Semitic languages,” then “what the Jews and the west say about Palestinian Arabs is ‘antisemitic’.”

Appearing alongside the controversial Imam would not have been Ms Shah’s first brush with antisemitism. Ms Shah’s previous dalliances with antisemitism were so grave that they led to her suspension from the Labour Party even under Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership, and she has appeared in recent weeks to resent how she was held to account. She also recently shared a platform with Mr Corbyn but has not been disciplined, even though Mr Corbyn, like Ms Shah before him, was suspended from the Party for antisemitism. 

Earlier this month, Ms Shah reportedly spoke at a rally where calls were made to “lift the curse of the Jews off the Muslims in Palestine!”

A Wolverhampton Labour councillor has been criticised after footage emerged that showed her leading an antisemitic chant.

The incident took place at an anti-Israel demonstration on 15th May and was organised by the Wolverhampton Palestine Solidarity Campaign.

Cllr Obaida Ahmed was filmed at the event leading the chant “From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free,” which is a phrase widely understood as code for the destruction of the Jewish state.

Also present at the protest was a speaker who claimed that “what the Zionists are doing to Palestine is no different to what Hitler did in Germany. They are Nazis, they are killing the children.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

When subsequently asked about the rally, Cllr Ahmed reportedly said: “I believe in the fundamental right of Israel to exist and for its people to be able to live in peace and security. I also believe the Palestinian people have the right to live in peace and security.”

She added: “I used the slogan in the context of the need for a peaceful resolution to the conflict and as a call to end the occupation in Palestine. I understand that for some people it has another meaning and I will be mindful and respectful of this in the future. If we have learned only one thing from the decades of bloodshed and hurt in the Middle East it is that no one will be safe until everyone is safe.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is extraordinary that politicians and organisations continue to participate in and sponsor rallies that persistently feature antisemitic tropes. Despite being declared institutionally racist against Jews just six months ago by the EHRC, and notwithstanding the current special measures imposed on the Party to address its unlawful antisemitism, Labour officeholders appear to have learned nothing. Too many have joined antisemitic chants or encouraged, attended and addressed rallies featuring antisemitic banners and chants, contributing to the atmosphere conducive to the rampant antisemitism, physical assaults on Jews and damage to Jewish property that we have seen in recent weeks. Labour has managed to return to square one when it comes to antisemitism.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

There has been concern from both Jewish community leaders and Government officials over reports of growing far-right views among schoolchildren.

According to new figures that were released from the Home Office, out of over 300 people who were identified in 2019-2020 who could be seen to harbour radical views, 175 were below the age of twenty, with 70 being below the age of fourteen.

In addition to this, the majority of referrals for people with far-right views to the Government’s de-radicalisation scheme came after concerns had been raised either in school or from police.

A Home Office spokesperson said that the Government “is committed to confronting terrorism in all its forms, including from the extreme right wing. We remain focussed on disrupting the activities of the most dangerous extremists, supporting those who stand up to their hateful rhetoric, and protecting vulnerable people being drawn into terrorism.

“Protecting children from radicalisation forms part of schools’ wider safeguarding duties. We provide training, resources and direct support to help teachers understand when someone in their care may be at risk, and when to intervene.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently provided antisemitism training to the Department for Education.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

The trial that will determine the fate of a gang of nine men who are accused of beating and robbing a Jewish Parisian family in their own home has begun.

The alleged attack occurred on 8th September 2017, when, in the middle of the night, David Pinto found that the electricity in the family home had gone out. Going downstairs to see what the problem was, he fell into a trap allegedly set by the gang, who had cut off the electricity supply apparently in order to ambush whomever entered through the cellar door to check on the energy metre.

Three men then forced their way in, bound Mr Pinto and dragged him upstairs, where they then bound and gagged Mireille and Roger Pinto, his 73-year-old mother and his 83-year-old father.

“As I struggled, the first man threw me down,” Mrs Pinto later said. “He hit me. I really thought he wanted to rape me. The second one kicked me.”

The gang is accused of beating Roger Pinto into unconsciousness. As he came to, Mr Pinto reportedly recalled one of his assailants telling him: “You are Jewish, we know that the Jews have a lot of money and you will give us what you have. If you do not give us what we ask you, we’ll kill you.”

Mr Pinto went on: “The three men had a screwdriver and a knife, which they constantly threatened us with. They threatened to kill us. That was unbearable. These thugs took our credit cards, took all the goods we had, jewellery from my wife.”

Whilst the gang allegedly proceeded to burgle the residence, the family was tied up and locked in a room. After several hours, Mrs Pinto finally managed to call emergency services.  

However, lawyers for the defendants claim that the assault was not antisemitic in nature, as the assailants did not believe the family to be rich based on their religion, with one of the members even claiming not to have known that the family was Jewish.

The lawyer for the Pinto family rejected this claim, sating: “The Pinto family was assaulted because they are a Jewish family…the attackers told them, ‘You are Jewish, so you have money.’”

The trial is expected to last for nine days and will be closely monitored by the Jewish community, especially in the wake of the disappointing decision taken in the Sarah Halimi trial.

In April, France’s Court of Cassation ruled that Sarah Halimi’s killer could not be held to stand trial due to being high on cannabis whilst committing the murder. Campaign Against Antisemitism held a rally in solidarity with French Jews in opposition to the Court of Cassation’s ruling to let Sarah Halimi’s murderer go free.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The High Court has today ruled that a decision by the General Pharmaceutical Council’s (GPhC) Fitness to Practice Committee in the case of Nazim Ali must be quashed and “determine[d] afresh” after an appeal by the Professional Standards Authority (PSA) at the request of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Mr Ali is the leader of the annual pro-Hizballah ‘Al Quds Day’ march in London who made antisemitic statements during the 2017 march. Since Mr Ali is a pharmacist Campaign Against Antisemitism brought a complaint to his professional regulator, the GPhC.

Last year, the GPhC’s Fitness to Practise Committee found that Mr Ali had brought the pharmaceutical profession into disrepute, following a two-week hearing that culminated on 5th November. Although the Fitness to Practise Committee had found that Mr Ali’s words were offensive, it did not find that the words had been antisemitic, and the panel let him off with only a formal warning.

Following the GPhC’s ruling, Campaign Against Antisemitism made representations to the PSA, which oversees disciplinary decisions made by the GPhC. We asked the PSA to use its statutory power to appeal the GPhC’s decision to the High Court under the National Health Service Reform and Healthcare Professionals Act 2002, on the grounds that the decision made by the GPhC panel was insufficient to protect the public because it was “irrational and perverse”.

In particular, we asked the PSA to review the GPhC’s ruling that Mr Ali’s statements were not antisemitic, including by attempting to distinguish between “antisemitism” and “antisemitic”. We have asked the PSA to consider the International Definition of Antisemitism, which has been adopted by the British Government, and the Guidance to all Judiciary in England and Wales produced by the Judicial College that makes clear that the word “Zionist” or “Zio” as a term of abuse has no place in a civilised society.

Furthermore, we argued that the ruling misapplied the law when asking whether a “reasonable person” would have considered the comments made by Mr Ali as being antisemitic. The GPhC’s Fitness to Practise Committee ruled that Jewish bystanders who saw the demonstration or watched the recording of it posted online could not be considered to be “reasonable persons” in the legal sense because of their “selective view of events”.

The PSA made the referral that we requested, opening the way for the High Court to decide whether to quash the GPhC panel’s decision. Subsequently, the GPhC itself also agreed with Campaign Against Antisemitism and declared that it would not oppose the appeal at the High Court, leaving Mr Ali to do so himself.

The hearing took place on 9th June, and today the High Court has issued its decision, allowing the PSA’s appeal, which was made following a request by Campaign Against Antisemitism. The High Court has ruled that the case is to be remitted to the Fitness to Practice Committee to redetermine whether Mr Ali’s comments had been antisemitic.

In reaching his decision, Mr Justice Johnson noted: “In determining whether the [GPhC] has established that the remarks are antisemitic, the [Fitness to Practise Committee] should assess the objective meaning of the remarks…[taking] account of their meaning taken as a whole, and it should not take account of Mr Ali’s subjective intention; Mr Ali’s good character; [and] the reaction of other audiences in other contexts.”

Duncan Rudkin, Chief Executive of the General Pharmaceutical Council, said: “We agree that the Fitness to Practise Committee erred in its approach to deciding whether or not the comments made by Mr Ali were antisemitic and we did not contest the appeal by the PSA. We will make sure the learnings from this case and the High Court judgment are shared across the organisation and our committees. The further Fitness to Practise hearing for Mr Ali will be scheduled at the earliest opportunity.”

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “The High Court has agreed with us that the decision on whether Nazim Ali’s remarks at the pro-Hizballah ‘Al Quds Day’ march in 2017 were antisemitic was woefully inept. As we hoped, the High Court has now quashed the original decision of the Fitness to Practise Committee of the General Pharmaceutical Council in relation to Mr Ali’s antisemitism and ordered it to reach a new decision. This is exactly why we referred the matter to the Professional Standards Authority.

“We commend the Professional Standards Authority and the General Pharmaceutical Council itself for recognising the injustice of the earlier decision.

“We hope that the Fitness to Practise Committee will arrive at a new decision that accepts that Mr Ali’s comments were antisemitic and that on that basis the previous sanction was inadequate and wrong. The road to justice in this case has proved long and winding, but we are again heading in the right direction.

“We said that we would not allow this injustice to stand and we are delighted by this new judgement. Campaign Against Antisemitism will always be unrelenting in pursuit of justice.”

We are extremely grateful to Simon Braun, a partner at Perrin Myddelton solicitors, and barrister Thomas Daniel of 2 Bedford Row Chambers, who acted for and assisted Campaign Against Antisemitism in this matter. We additionally commend all those who also contacted the GPhC and PSA to protest against the initial unjust decision.

A Labour Party councillor in Sheffield is reportedly under investigation for allegedly posting on social media: “O Allah, destroy Israel. O Allah, have mercy on us Muslims.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism previously reported that two anonymous Labour councillors in Sheffield were under investigation by the council and the Labour Party, and it appears that Cllr Abdul Khayum may be one of them.

Cllr Khayum, who is also a magistrate, is reported to have shared another post as well with the caption: “Even the real Jews are anti-Zionists.”

Sheffield Council releases a list of complaints to the standards board every year but does not name individuals.

The Director of Legal and Governance at Sheffield Council said: “All complaints received are taken seriously. We are unable to confirm details of any complaint or individuals identified in order to protect all affected parties.”

Sheffield City Council has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

A spokesman for the Labour Party said: “The Labour Party takes all complaints of antisemitism extremely seriously and they are fully investigated in line with our rules and procedures, and any appropriate disciplinary action is taken.” 

Campaign Against monitors adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by local councils.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

An Orthodox Jewish school in Melbourne has been vandalised with graffiti that depicts the slogan “Free Palestine.”

The words were spray-painted on the driveway of the Cheder Levi Yitzchok school. It is understood that Victoria state police are investigating the incident.

The graffiti was reported to the Anti-Defamation Commission (ADC), an Australian organisation that tackles antisemitism. The group then informed Port Philip City Council which removed the graffiti.

ADC Chair Dvir Abramovich said of the incident: “To attack a Jewish institution in order to express a hatred against Israel is antisemitic, and these activists have torn up the rule book of decency and are now targeting Jewish schools with their vicious propaganda and calls to destroy Israel.

“Their desire to intimidate and sow fear knows no bounds…to defile a place where children play and learn is beyond words and beyond contempt and it is not a surprise that parents would be very concerned about the safety of their children. This is not what Australia is about.”

He added, “I hope that those cowards who committed this sickening outrage are identified and prosecuted to the full extent of the law.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: ADC

An independent investigation has found that a high school American football team in Massachusetts whose coach was recently suspended after the team used antisemitic language during a game may in fact have been using anti-Jewish racist language for a decade.

Duxbury High School, 30 miles from Boston, “severed ties” with Head Coach David Maimaron earlier this year following the allegations. Mr Maimaron, also a special-needs teacher, was placed on paid administrative leave pending the investigation. The school also hired attorney and educational consultant Edward Mitnick to assist its investigation into reports that team members used the offensive language – including a reference to Auschwitz – in its on-field play-calling. The words “rabbi” and “dreidel” were also heard.

In recent years Duxbury has been one of the most successful teams in Massachusetts, with five state championships since 2005. In a statement, the administration said: “The outrage is real, warranted, and we hear it. The fact that members of our school community used such offensive language…is horrifying and disappointing.”

District Superintendent John Antonucci noted that the offensive words had not been directed at the opposing team or at a particular player.

Mr Maimaron released a statement in which he apologised for “the insensitive, crass and inappropriate language used in the game on 12th March.” The language was “careless, unnecessary…hurtful and…inexcusable,” he said.

Mr Mitnick conducted the investigation at the request of Duxbury Public Schools. After interviewing dozens of witnesses, he released a 56-page report tfinding that there was “sufficient credible evidence to conclude that offensive and inappropriate conduct occurred” in violation of numerous school district policies, and that the problem was systematic and potentially dated as far back as 2010. It is believed that plays called “rabbit” soon evolved in “rabbi”, and other Jewish terms followed.

Elsewhere in the state, officials at Hurley Middle School said that a group of eighth-graders wrote antisemitic, sexual and racist messages in yearbooks at the Seekonk, MA school’s annual yearbook signing event.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Germany has banned the Hamas flag after a rise in antisemitic incidents.

The ban, agreed upon by all parties in Germany’s grand coalition government, is believed to have been spearheaded by Chancellor Angela Merkel’s Christian Democratic Union (CDU).

Thorsten Frei, the Deputy Parliamentary Spokesperson for the CDU as well as its Bavarian sister party, the Christian Social Union, said: “We do not want the flags of terrorist organisations to be waved on German soil.”

Hamas, the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group, clashed with Israel last month, which lead to widespread antisemitism in Germany with several people arrested.

Recently, it was announced that German soldiers who sang antisemitic and racist songs would be “vigorously prosecuted and punished”, according to the country’s Defence Minister.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A French former general who has been accused of spouting antisemitic rhetoric on live television has come under investigation.

In an interview on CNews, General Dominique Delawarde alluded to a group of people who control the global media.

When the Jewish interviewer asked who he was referring to, General Delawarde said: “This is the community that you know well.”

Although the general did not mention the Jewish community explicitly, the host of the show, Jean-Marc Morandini, abruptly cut him off and ended the interview segment.

The Paris prosecutor’s office has begun an investigation into General Delawarde, stating: “The Paris prosecutor’s office today opened an investigation into the heads of public defamation and incitement to hatred and violence on the grounds of origin or belonging to an ethnic group, nation, race or religion.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

An alleged follower of the Islamist group, Hizb ut-Tahrir, who called for a “jihad” to wipe out the Jewish state, is now under investigation by police, following publicity campaign by Campaign Against Antisemitism on social media and reports to the police by Jewish groups.

Captured on video last month, the man said directly into the camera: “This goes out to the Muslim armies, what are you waiting for? Jihad is responsibility on you. Wipe out that Zionist entity. How dare they occupy Masjid Al-Aqsa [the Al-Aqsa mosque in Jerusalem].

“The Muslim youth here, we the Muslims in the West, we are with you…We don’t fear the United Nations, British government. We don’t give a damn. We only fear Allah. Jihad fi sabilillah via the armies.”

The individual made the comments in a video filmed during an anti-Israel rally outside the Pakistani consulate in Birmingham.

A West Midlands Police spokesman said: “We are aware of a video posted on social media taken during a pro–Palestine event in Centenary Square in May. We have received a report raising concerns over the nature of the language used by one of the speakers, alleging it was antisemitic hate speech.

“A hate crime has been recorded and it’s currently with our investigators for an assessment. We will not tolerate hate crime, and we would always encourage people to report offences to us so we can take appropriate action.”

It was reported that on 11th May, Hizb ut-Tahrir issued a statement saying:  “The monstrous Jews are spreading their brutal aggression on all parts of Palestine.”

Hizb ut-Tahrir was mentioned in a report from the Tony Blair Institute for Global Change titled “Narratives of Division: The Spectrum of Islamist Worldviews in the UK,” which found that a number of UK Islamic activist groups promote views that align with proscribed extremist groups.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 showed that over eight in ten British Jews consider the threat from Islamists to be very serious.