Teachers in Southlake, Texas were told that if they have a book about the Holocaust, they also need to have one that offers “opposing” perspectives, it was reported yesterday.

Gina Peddy, the Carroll school district’s Executive Director of Curriculum and Instruction, allegedly made the remarks last week, a few days after a fourth-grade teacher received a complaint from a parent for having an anti-racist book. 

In audio from a meeting that was secretly recorded by one of the staff members, Ms Peddy can reportedly be heard telling teachers to “remember the concepts of [House Bill] 3979.” The bill refers to a new Texas law that requires teachers to offer differing views when discussing “widely debated and currently controversial” issues.

Ms Peddy reportedly added: “Make sure that if you have a book on the Holocaust, that you have one that has an opposing…that has other perspectives.”

One woman can be heard replying: “How do you oppose the Holocaust?” “Believe me,” Peddy appeared to respond. “That’s come up.”

Carroll spokesperson Karen Fitzgerald wrote that the school district “recognises that all Texas teachers are in a precarious position with the latest legal requirements,” referring to the new law. “Our purpose is to support our teachers in ensuring they have all of the professional development, resources and materials needed. Our district has not and will not mandate books be removed nor will we mandate that classroom libraries be unavailable.”

Ms Fitzgerald added that teachers who are unsure about a specific book “should visit with their campus principal, campus team and curriculum coordinators about appropriate next steps.”

One Carroll teacher, who kept her identity anonymous, said that “Teachers are literally afraid that we’re going to be punished for having books in our classes. There are no children’s books that show the ‘opposing perspective’ of the Holocaust or the ‘opposing perspective’ of slavery. Are we supposed to get rid of all of the books on those subjects?”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

An analysis by Campaign Against Antisemitism of new Home Office statistics released this week shows that Jews are more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Police forces across the country record hate crimes against Jews as religious hate crimes, and these records show that in the year 2020/21, 1,288 hate crimes were committed against Jews, making Jews the target in 20% – more than one in five – of the total number of religious hate crimes.

These figures mean that there is an average of over three hate crimes directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales. Hate crimes against Jews are also still widely believed to be under-reported, and also do not reflect the extent of antisemitic material and abuse on social media.

However, when one accounts for the miniscule size of the Jewish population, it emerges that Jews are statistically more than four times more likely to be the targets of hate crimes than any other religious group, with some 489 hate crimes per 100,000 of the Jewish population in 2020/21.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Once again, Home Office figures show that Jews are far more likely to be victims of hate crimes than any other religious group. Contrast this with the pitiful number of prosecutions for antisemitic hate crimes, and it throws into high relief the failure of the Crown Prosecution Service to take proportionate action against racism directed at the Jewish community. With England and Wales’ minuscule Jewish community suffering an average of more than three hate crimes every single day, identifying, prosecuting and punishing perpetrators is absolutely urgent.”

It has been reported that a woman doused a Brooklyn Yeshiva in gasoline and set it on fire.

The alleged incident happened last night at 19:27 at the Yeshiva of Flatbush on Avenue J. Camera footage released by police shows a woman, dressed in black, carrying a red gasoline canister.

A security guard inside the school claims to have witnessed the woman then set fire to the gasoline before fleeing. The guard then extinguished the fire with water before calling the police. 

Police are investigating the incident as a hate crime and are searching for the woman. 

Anyone with information in regard to this incident is asked to call the NYPD’s Crime Stoppers Hotline at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477) or for Spanish, 1-888-57-PISTA (74782).

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.  

Dr Alex George, the UK Youth Mental Health Ambassador and former Love Island star, has spoken out against the antisemitic abuse that his girlfriend, who is Jewish, has received on Instagram.

Dr George took to the social media app to repost his girlfriend Ellie Hecht’s Instagram story in which she highlighted some of the antisemitic abuse that she had been receiving. These messages included: “Jew? Need to check unfollow or not”, “Back to Nazi camp you go”, and “Jew should of been died in the war”.

Ms Hecht said: “Here are a handful of shocking messages I have received for my family heritage, from some uneducated trolls. I wasn’t going to post this but I have seen a lot of antisemitism recently and it isn’t talked about enough and I am shocked by the silence of the majority in the wake of very recent antisemitism.

“Jewish people have been persecuted for hundreds of years and it is still NOT okay. I couldn’t be more proud of my family heritage and on that note, I urge people to educate themselves before committing a hate crime. THINK before you send a horrible message. THINK before you are cruel to someone else for NO reason.”

She added: “Sadly, hate crime has gone up by 9 percent in the UK after the pandemic. This makes me so sad. Think about it like this: even after the Holocaust, even after all of those millions of people died because they were Jewish or gay or had a disability, and this is still happening. It makes me realise how bleak the future will be for my children.”

Dr George, commenting on the incident from his perspective, wrote: “I will not tolerate antisemitic abuse (nor any other abuse) towards Ellie in any way, shape or form. I can’t believe I am actually having to type this. Disgusting.”

He continued: “I feel awful now, all Ellie has done is be my gf. Feels like in a way I have brought this to her door. No one deserves that kind of abuse.

He later thanked his followers for sending in messages of support, writing: “Thank you for all the kind messages to Ellie and I. Things do need to change. The good people in the world outweigh the bad.”

A few hours later, Dr George spoke directly to his Instagram followers in a video posted on his story, in which he said: “I just want to say thanks to everyone for your messages. I know I’ve kinda said that already but yeah, just to reiterate, and had a lot of messages from Jewish people, people from Jewish background, culture, who’ve experienced antisemitism and yeah, it’s pretty shocking.”

He continued: “It’s not okay really is it but we need to do more to tackle this.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.  

A poster with the words “Achtung Juden”, which is German for “Attention Jews”, put up by the Millwall Berserkers hooligan group was found near Millwall Football Club stadium.

The poster also featured the cockerel from Tottenham Hotspur Football Club’s logo with its head detached from its body and lying in blood.

Millwall Football Club removed the poster and said: “Millwall Football Club has a zero-tolerance policy against discrimination of any kind. This is a disgraceful action which the club immediately reported to the British Transport Police. Millwall will provide them with full and comprehensive cooperation with their investigation and any individual or group identified will be banned from the club for life.”

Millwall FC Supporters Club also condemned the poster, saying that it “abhors any such comment or content and that such material has not been produced or distributed by anyone with our knowledge. Whoever did so does not represent the Millwall fan base.”

On the Millwall Berserkers’ Instagram page, they have uploaded several of their logos and posters, two of which bear a striking resemblance to Nazi symbols. 

One poster displays the words “South London Hooligans” alongside an image of a bird that appears almost identical to that of the Nazi eagle. Another logo seemingly utilises the Othala Rune, a symbol that is a part of the Runic alphabet which was co-opted by the Nazi Party and has since been used as a symbol of white supremacy. 

Swastika graffiti has been discovered in the North London area of Mill Hill East, it was reported today. 

A photograph uploaded to Twitter shows two swastikas that have been daubed onto the pavement outside of a bus shelter.

It was also reported earlier this week that antisemitic graffiti was found in a toilet on a construction site in Hertfordshire. The photograph shows a swastika next to the words “f**k off yid c**ts.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Image credit: Danny Cohen

A politician in Ireland has claimed that Israel is trying to accomplish “Jewish supremacy”, it was reported earlier this week. 

Catherine Connolly, the Deputy Chairperson of the Lower House of Ireland’s Parliament, allegedly asked Irish Foreign Minister Simon Coveney if by his ministry’s “indicating support for the Jewish character of the Israeli state”, it agrees with “the treatment by Israel of Palestinian communities in its attempts to accomplish Jewish supremacy.”

It was also said that she asked Minister Coveney about “his views on whether these attempts to perpetuate the supremacy of Jews over Palestinians amount to apartheid, and if he will make a statement on the matter.”

The phrase “Jewish supremacy” is regarded by many as an antisemitic conspiracy theory which states that Jews harbour the goal of world domination, a false allegation that the Nazi Party used to justify its persecution against Jewish people.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy or of Jews controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions” is an example of antisemitism. 

The Foreign Minister reportedly said that he “respect[s] the strong connection between the Jewish people and the State of Israel.” 

“By their very nature, all states have certain inherent characteristics,” he said, using “socialist, democratic, united, Islamic, Arab or Jewish” as examples, but he added that those states should have “full respect for the equal rights of all citizens, irrespective of ethnicity, religion or other similar factors.”

Jewish Representative Council of Ireland Chairperson Maurice Cohen said that Deputy Connolly had “strayed into classic antisemitic language by perpetuating the trope of ‘Jewish supremacy.’”

“The Jewish Representative Council of Ireland urges all political parties, as well as both Houses of the Oireachtas [legislature] to immediately adopt the [Definition] of antisemitism to which the government is already a European signatory,” he added.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

World leaders called for further measures to tackle antisemitism and Holocaust denial yesterday at the Malmö International Forum on Holocaust Remembrance and Combating Antisemitism.

Swedish Prime Minister Löfven spoke of previous milestones in the fight against antisemitism, naming the Stockholm International Forum on the Holocaust of January 2000, which led to the creation of the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance, and the 2020 IHRA Ministerial Declaration as important moments. “We are not looking for another declaration, we are looking to translate these principles of these documents into reality,” the Prime Minister said.

He continued: “I have therefore encouraged delegations that are representative here in Malmö today to present concrete measures to promote Holocaust remembrance and to combat antisemitism, anti-Gypsism and other forms of racism.”

Antisemitism is currently present in “extreme right-wing groups, parts of the Left, in Islamist environments and among ordinary citizens,” Prime Minister Löfven said, and said that it was also present “among adults and children who fled to Europe from countries where hatred of Jews is promoted in schools and through state-propaganda.”

Israeli President Isaac Herzog spoke of online antisemitism and the danger of violent attacks from extremists. He said: “We have witnessed thousands of antisemitic assaults, vandalism and threats from extremists all over, including in Malmö. This rise in antisemitic attacks on the streets, the physical attacks and assaults and verbal assaults, offensive articles and increasing intimidation on the web have been fueled, in large part, by the explosion of antisemitic incitement online.”

The President added that tackling antisemitism necessitates “working aggressively on social media, including with and confronting social media companies to ensure that hateful incitement is quickly removed,” while also adding that legislation, litigation, adjudication and law enforcement were also necessary tools in the fight against antisemitism. 

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, who spoke out against antisemitism in Canada earlier this year during the conflict between Israel and Hamas, said that “we’ve seen so many different radical extremist groups of various types lashing out at so many different things, but one of the few, common things that so many of them have is an acceptance of antisemitic stereotypes and tropes that slip into their discourse, and that they build on so much of their other hatred on [sic].”

The President of France, Emmanuel Macron, who earlier this summer condemned antisemitism in a historic address, said that “each time someone denies the Shoah, each time an antisemitic act is committed, each time that a grave is desecrated, each time our memory is trampled on, it’s our shared humanity that is threatened.” 

Ursula Von Der Leyen, President of the European Commission, spoke of how the threat of antisemitism still exists for Jewish people, adding that it is also a “poison for our democracies, our values, and our open societies.” She continued: “We have to fight it, offline and online, and hate speech, disinformation and the denial of facts are everywhere online.” 

The United States Secretary of State Antony Blinken, who is Jewish himself and was recently urged by a group of 70 Jewish officials from the United States Department of State to fire an “openly antisemitic” employee, delivered a statement at the conference in a recorded video in which he stated that the United States is “committed to remembrance and to fighting antisemitism, Holocaust denial, and hate in all of its modern forms.” He added that “The dangers of the Holocaust are not simply problems of the past..antisemitism is on the rise in many parts of the world.”

Secretary Blinken continued by outlining the steps that the United States has taken towards fighting antisemitism, which included pledging $1 million to counter antisemitic hate speech “online, in the Middle East, and North Africa”. He also stated that the United States was starting an expanded series of international visitor leadership programmes” which will work with “government and civil society representatives to confront Holocaust distortion and antisemitism in North Africa, Middle East, Europe, and Latin America.” The Secretary of State said that through working with congress, another $1 million will be given to tackle Holocaust denial in central Europe. 

Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg also spoke at the event, saying that “At Facebook, we stand against hate of all kinds. We are working with governments and NGOs to fulfill the promise of ‘never again’.” 

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A twelve-year-old girl was assaulted by a woman with a buggy in Stamford Hill.

The incident took place at 16:15 on Clapton Common on 7th October and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD8531 07/10/2020.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Antisemitism is being “introduced to teenagers” through Instagram and TikTok, according to a new report from the anti-racism organisation Hope Not Hate. 

The report also found that users were being led down a “rabbit hole of political extremism” due to the social media platforms’ algorithms and that users were spreading antisemitic sentiments using emojis and filters. 

Common, antisemitic hashtags used on the platforms allegedly included #JewWorldOrder and #synagogueofsatan. In addition, hashtags seemingly belonging to broader conspiracy theories such as #illuminati and #NWO (New World Order) embedded hidden content that redirected users to antisemitic tropes. It was also reported that Instagram’s algorithm would present people looking at these hashtags with far-right accounts for them to follow. 

We reported last year that Instagram and Facebook came under pressure to take action following the revelation that a network of 80,000 white supremacists was operating on its platform. 

A spokesperson for Instagram said: “Antisemitism is completely unacceptable and we don’t allow it anywhere on Instagram. We’ve always removed attacks against people based on their religion, and last year we made important updates to our policies, to remove any content that denies or distorts the Holocaust, as well as more implicit hate speech, such as harmful stereotypes that Jewish people control the world.”

Hope Not Hate’s report said that while TikTok banned hashtags that appear blatantly antisemitic, such as #killthejews, other hashtags that may not include an overt reference to Jewish people but would still be considered antisemitic or direct people to antisemitic content, such as #rothschildfamily, #synagogueofsatan and #soros, had been viewed 25.1 million times in six months.

A spokesman for TikTok said: “TikTok condemns antisemitism, and we work aggressively to combat hate by proactively removing accounts and content that violate our policies and redirecting searches for hateful ideologies to our community guidelines.”

We recently produced a series of posts highlighting TikTok’s problem of allowing content that promoted Holocaust denial. 

In July, we reported that according to a new study, antisemitic content on the social media platform TikTok had increased by 912%. According to research from Dr Gabriel Weimann of the University of Haifa and Natalie Masri of IDC Herzliya’s Institute for Counter-Terrorism, antisemitic comments on TikTok grew 912% from 41 in 2020 to 415 in 2021, and the platform saw 61 antisemitic postings so far this year compared to 43 last year. Antisemitic tropes and images that were used in video content included Nazi salutes, diminishing the impact of the Holocaust, and propagating caricatures of Jews with long, hooked noses. 

Last week, we wrote that new measures laid out by Ofcom could mean fines for video-sharing platforms like TikTok and Twitch.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

The car belonging to the rabbi at Chabad at Santa Monica College (SMC) was defaced with a swastika and other antisemitic sentiments.

Last Thursday, Rabbi Eli M. Levitansky’s car was vandalised with the Nazi symbol as well as a Star of David next to the words “is illegal”. Rabbi Levitansky spoke of how the vandalism was “a shock” and that “it obviously was a targeted crime” as his was the only car that was defaced.

In response to the vandalism, Rabbi Levitansky took to the Chabad’s Facebook page to encourage people to carry out a mitzvah (a good deed stemming from religious observance). “The idea was really to give this message that, in such an event, the best response is to combat it with action and with positivity,” Levitansky said, adding: “People have written that they will be lighting Shabbat candles because of this, or they will be doing charity because of this, things of that nature. That is very, very heartwarming to see…it’s not just an outpouring of support, which is nice to see, but it’s an outpouring with the next step, with action taken.”

Michael Tuitasi, Vice President of Student Affairs, said that he was “sickened” by the “horrible, hateful incident”, calling Rabbi Levitansky “a great mentor to the Jewish students at Santa Monica College and whom I consider an integral part of the extended college community.” “While the incident did not occur at the college, it is felt by our community and strongly condemned.”

Mr Tuitasi also said that SMC is creating “a space for students who may have been impacted by this incident” and urged students to contact the SMC Center for Wellness and & Wellbeing.

“At Santa Monica College, there is no room for hate. SMC stands firmly against antisemitism just as the college stands against all forms of discrimination and hate. While we cannot control hateful actions that take place away from Santa Monica College, this college is dedicated to creating a safe environment for all our students, and denounces hate speech or actions,” Mr Tuitasi said. He went on to call Rabbi Levitansky’s response to the vandalism “inspiring.” “Instead of letting this act of darkness take him away from efforts to do good during the Jewish holidays, he has redoubled his efforts to help the community come together and spread light.”

In July, a swastika was found spray-painted onto the pavement next to a car belonging to the Jewish son of Holocaust survivors.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: StopAntisemitism.org

Tejinder Lohia, who subjected members of the Jewish community to a “torrent of racist abuse” which included “Kill you Jews, F**k Jews” and invoking Adolf Hitler’s name, has pleaded guilty to multiple offences.

The alleged incident took place on Clapton Common and was reported on 10th September by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

Mr Lohia was charged with one count of using threatening/abusive/insulting words with intent to cause fear of/provoke unlawful violence, two counts of racially/religiously aggravated fear/provocation of violence by words, and three counts of possession of a controlled Class A drug (cocaine).

He pleaded guilty and was sentenced last week at Thames Magistrates Court to a twelve-week prison term, suspended for twelve months, and unpaid work and alcohol treatment.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Stamford Hill Shomrim

A Toronto law professor has apologised for changing his Twitter profile photo to an image of a Jewish judge with a quote attributed to a well-known Nazi written over it. 

Professor Mohammad Fadela, who teaches Business Organisations at the University of Toronto Faculty of Law, changed his Twitter profile photo last week to that of Justice David Spiro, a Jewish member of Canada’s Tax Court, with the words “The sovereign is he who decides the exceptions” written below. This is a quote from Carl Schmitt, who was an active member of the Nazi Party. Prof. Fadela also changed his Twitter name to “Schmitt lives in Toronto.”

Prof. Fadela has since released an apology in which he said that although he “never intended to compare Justice Sprio to a Nazi,” he understood in retrospect why people accused him of making the connection. He went on to say that he was “deeply sorry for the pain” that he “unintentionally caused them.” 

In August, the University of California Merced launched a formal investigation into the alleged antisemitism of Prof. Abbas Ghassemi after he reportedly tweeted that “Zionists” controlled the American economy, government policy, banking, and media.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A Jewish man leaving a synagogue in Clapton Common was punched in the face, it was reported on Friday.

It was also alleged that the attacker filmed the incident. 

The incident was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 3799 07/10/21

In April, a rabbi was assaulted in Clapton Common by a man yelling “Dirty Jew, I am going to kill you!”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

An Australian anti-vaccination blogger has received backlash after uploading photographs to social media in which she placed yellow stars on her children and wore a concentration camp inmate’s uniform.

Sarah Mills, who is popular in anti-vaccination circles, has a following of more than 100,000 followers across Instagram, TikTok and Facebook.

In one photo, which she accompanied with the words, “history is repeating itself”, the mother of three can be seen with her children posing whilst wearing the yellow star that was forced upon Jews during the Holocaust with the words “No Vax” written on them. The caption to the photo read: “As of today I may no longer enter restaurants, cafes, theatres, cinemas, concerts, museums, sporting events, pools, clothing stores or anything deemed non-essential. I live in regional [New South Wales] so we’ve been living freely for a while now, until today. Yesterday I was safe to be in public, today I am a threat.”

In another image captioned “Prisoner 385968 reporting for duty”, Ms Mills can be seen wearing the blue and white uniforms that prisoners in concentration camps were forced to wear with a number tag. She added: “Does anyone know where we get our full uniform? I’ve found the shirt but wasn’t sure if there’s anywhere you can get them as a set? or are we just provided them upon arrival? Sending love to my future inmates.”

In a previous post in which she referred to her perception of a division between people who chose to have the COVID-19 vaccination and those who did not, the blogger wrote: “I’m starting to learn who would have hidden Anne Frank and who would have turned her over to the Nazis.”

Ms Mills denied comparing unvaccinated people to Holocaust victims, telling Daily Mail Australia: “I am in NO way comparing the deaths of millions of people to not being allowed into Kmart, but people need to look at where that ‘them/us’ situation began.”

The inflammatory and misleading comparison has been used among anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks, which have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

In August, antisemitic protest signs have prompted hate speech and incitement of violence investigations in France. Earlier this year, organisers of an anti-vaccine demonstration in the city of Avignon were described as “brainless” for using the Nazi yellow star in their protest. Joseph Szwarc, a Holocaust survivor, spoke out against these use of the yellow star, saying: “You can’t imagine how much that upset me. This comparison is hateful. We must all rise up against this ignominy.” With tears in his eyes, Mr Szwarc added: “I wore the star, I know what that is, I still have it in my flesh. It is everyone’s duty to not allow this outrageous, antisemitic, racist wave to pass over us.”

The comparison has been made across the world, including in the United States, Canada, Ukraine and elsewhere.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Facebook

The Labour Party is set to name and accuse five of its former staff of leaking a controversial report into the handling of antisemitism cases at Party headquarters.

The mammoth report was compiled in the final months of Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership and was titled “The work of the Labour Party’s Governance and Legal Unit in relation to antisemitism, 2014 – 2019”. Although the report – which was reportedly the product of a review of 10,000 separate emails and thousands of private WhatsApp communications between former senior party officials – said that its “findings prove the scale of the problem, and could help end the denialism amongst some part of the Party membership,” it nonetheless insisted that there was “no evidence” of antisemitism complaints being treated differently to other forms of complaint, or of “antisemitic intent” among current or former staff.

Crucially, the report argued that Labour headquarters was beset by factionalism and attempts to undermine the Corbyn leadership, which laid the groundwork for a ‘stab in the back’ myth that the Labour Party machine betrayed the far-left in order to prevent Mr Corbyn from electoral victory.

At the time, Campaign Against Antisemitism described the report as a “last ditch attempt to discredit antisemitism allegations.”

At first, the report, believed to have been commissioned by then-General Secretary Jennie Formby, was not released to the public, and was intended to be sent to the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) as part of its investigation into Labour antisemitism, in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant. Based on legal advice, however, the report was not submitted.

Instead, within a short time, an unredacted version of the 860-page report was leaked by unknown persons and then disseminated by some twenty individuals, including Lloyd Russell-Moyle MP, putting Jewish people mentioned in the report at risk.

Individuals named in the report – including former staffers criticised over factionalism – launched legal proceedings against the Labour Party for breach of their privacy, while Labour launched an internal investigation led by Martin Forde QC (publication of the results of which has been delayed indefinitely due to the ICO’s investigation) and a further independent inquiry, while the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO), the data regulator, also commenced an investigation.

The claimants sought, in the course of the litigation, to force Labour to disclose the names of those believed to have leaked the report, which Labour resisted, arguing that, although it “reasonably believes” that it knows who leaked the report, it could not be certain beyond doubt and therefore that innocent individuals might be wrongly implicated. The court agreed that there was a “real risk” of this and rejected the attempt, made by a claimant via a Norwich Pharmaceutical order, to force disclosure.

However, the Party has now changed course and is reportedly planning to lodge papers with the High Court naming Seumas Milne, the far-left journalist who served as Mr Corbyn’s Executive Director of Strategy and Communications; Karie Murphy, a trade unionist and Mr Corbyn’s chief of staff, whose nomination for a peerage was blocked; Laura Murray, a disgraced Corbyn aide who was appointed to lead the Labour Party’s disciplinary process; Georgie Robertson, who worked in Labour’s communications team; and Harry Hayball, a staffer in Labour’s Governance and Legal Unit and former Head of Digital Communications at Momentum who was reportedly labelled as the author in the report’s metadata.

It is understood that both the Forde inquiry and the independent Labour investigation interviewed all five individuals, who deny that they are the source of the leak and are now reportedly considering bringing their own legal claims against the Party for breaching their confidentiality by naming them. A spokesperson for the individuals reportedly said that “They entirely reject these baseless claims. They did not leak the report, and fully cooperated with the Party’s independent investigation by an external investigator, and the inquiry led by Martin Forde QC. They understand that neither of those investigations concluded that they were responsible.”

It is believed that the Labour Party may now be naming the individuals in order to try to shift liability for any potential data breaches away from the Party and towards the individuals allegedly responsible. The individuals’ solicitors said:“To the extent that the Labour Party has explained its proposed action, it is clear that it will be naming the individuals in an attempt to deflect on to them its own liability in claims brought by a group of claimants who are suing the Party over the leak as well as the Party bringing a related claim direct against the five. The Party apparently admits that its case against the individuals is purely circumstantial and inferential, but has failed even to set out that case properly in correspondence, despite its obligations to do so under the relevant Court Protocol.”

The Labour Party was found by the EHRC to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A host club in Japan has come under fire after holding a Nazi-themed night, it was revealed recently. 

Host clubs are a type of nightclub where female staff members are paid to drink and spend time with male customers. In some instances, customers are presented with a “menu” of available hosts.

Twitter users were dismayed to find out that the Unfair Club in Osaka chose to host a theme night in which staff wore Nazi uniforms. 

In addition to this, the event released promotional material advertising the night featuring swastikas. A photo of the inside of the club shows someone surrounded by bottles of alcohol that display swastikas on them, and is sitting in front of a large swastika that has been mounted on the wall.

One user wrote: “This is what the inside of the Nazi host club looks like. Ignorance and stupidity at its finest.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A man accused of Holocaust denial and pedophilia has reportedly been found with a stash of Nazi memorabilia worth £2.5 million in Brazil. 

The Nazi items were allegedly discovered in a raid of the man’s home when police served him with an arrest warrant. The man has been accused of raping a minor and abusing other children at his home in western Rio de Janeiro.

The man was also charged with illegal possession of a weapon and racial discrimination.

The items reportedly included Nazi uniforms, images of Adolf Hitler, periodicals, Nazi insignia, flags and medals of the Third Reich at his home, as well as guns and ammunition from the era.

Luis Armond, the lead detective on the case, said that the individual is “a smart guy and articulate, but he’s a Holocaust denier, he’s homophobic, he’s a pedophile and he says he hunts homosexuals.” He added: “I’m no doctor, but he seems to me an insane psychopath. This is something that is totally unusual and shocking.”

Following the raid, police are said to be investigating the suspect’s connection to a number of far-right groups.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The UK and Australia have jointly repudiated a resolution at the United Nations Human Rights Council that pretended to condemn racism while endorsing the antisemitic Durban process.

The UK’s Permanent Representative in Geneva, Simon Manley, issued a Joint Statement on the Resolution Calling for Action Against Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance on behalf of both nations, in which he reiterated the UK and Australia’s “commitment to combating all forms of racism, racial discrimination and xenophobia and related intolerance whether that be at home or abroad.” He further insisted that the two allies are “committed to engaging on UN resolutions which consider how to eliminate racial discrimination.”

However, Mr Manely went on to declare that the UK and Australia “do not agree with the multiple references to the Durban Conference [in the resolution], given the historic concerns over antisemitism.”

Mr Manley was referring to the Durban conferences, while, while presented under the guise of combatting racism, have previously provided a stage for antisemitic hate speech and actions. At the original 2001 conference in the South African city, there were attempts to equate Zionism with racism, in an echo of the United Nations’ darkest period. Subsequent review conferences in the Durban series have included the distribution of the notorious antisemitic propaganda, The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, an early twentieth-century forgery long used to incite mob violence against Jews, as well as then-Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad referring to the Holocaust as “ambiguous and dubious.”

Mr Manley observed that “the UK and Australia did not attend the recent 20th anniversary commemorative event for the Third World Conference Against Racism. There were reportedly nearly 40 states who, like us, made the decision not take part.”

He said that the two Western nations “cannot accept the references [in the resolution] to the Durban Review Conference or the positive language welcoming the recent commemorative event in New York.”

He urged the Council to consider “why so many states stayed away and how we can move forward,” and declared that “racism should be tackled in all its forms and, regrettably, for far too long, the UN has downplayed the scourge of antisemitism. This must end. The UK is clear that we will not attend future iterations of the Durban Conference while concerns over antisemitism remain.”

He ended by calling for a vote on the resolution so that the UK and Australia could vote against it.

Foreign Secretary Liz Truss reiterated on Twitter that “The UK is committed to tackling antisemitism and racism around the world,” rightly observing that the UK and Australia’s stance on this resolution is entirely consistent with that commitment.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We welcome this joint statement by the Governments of the UK and Australia that calls out the UN Human Rights Council’s hypocrisy, claiming to fight racism on the one hand while endorsing antisemitism on the other. No fight against racism can succeed if it ignores, marginalises or enables racism against Jewish people. It is time that the UN and its institutions learned that.”

A candidate hoping to become elected as the next Mayor of Rome is facing backlash for comments he made about Jews and the Holocaust in an article

Enrico Michetti, the right-wing candidate who is also a radio presenter and lawyer, wrote an article last year in which he claimed that victims of other mass killings are thought of less than those who died in the Holocaust because they “did not own banks and did not belong to a lobby that is capable of deciding the destiny of the planet.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy or of Jews controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions” is an example of antisemitism.

Mr Michetti was criticised by Emanuele Fiano, a Jewish MP from the centre-Left Democratic Party, who said: “My grandparents, who were gassed at Auschwitz, were much poorer than you, Michetti, as were my uncle and aunt and my great uncles and aunts.”

Mr Fiano added that he hoped Mr Michetti would be “ashamed of these words for the rest of your life,” before adding: “I have no pity for adults, cultured, who in 2020 make such a remark. I will not accept excuses. You don’t deserve excuses.”

Ruth Dureghello, the President of the Jewish community of Rome, said that Mr Michetti’s remarks were “dangerous” and that they hid “a disturbing prejudice.”

In a statement on Saturday, Mr Michetti seemingly tried to retract his words, stating: “The Holocaust was unique in its inhumanity against men and women who had done no wrong whatsoever, the lowest point in history. The utmost vigilance and unity is required by everyone against all forms of antisemitism, so that what happened never happens again, not even in other guises.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Belarus state television has described a murdered Jewish dissident as “a cosmopolitan enjoying state benefits to fatten himself up and live in two countries, to make money here and spend it there.”

Andrei Zelzer, a 31-year-old programmer, was shot dead by security forces during a raid at his home in Minsk as part of a crackdown against dissidents by the Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko.

Plainclothes personnel from the State Security Committee of the Republic of Belarus reportedly entered Mr Zelzer’s home with orders to arrest him. According to the Government, Mr Zelzer killed one of them during the raid.

Ryhor Azaronak, a news anchor on STV, a state television channel, then described Mr Zelzer using tropes reminiscent of antisemitic Soviet propaganda, claiming also that Mr Zelzer was American. It is understood that no new outlet has confirmed this dubious claim about his nationality, although Mr Zelzer did work for a US-based information technology company founded by a Belarusian Jew who now lives in the United States.

During the monologue, Mr Azaronak reportedly employed a stereotypical accent of Yiddish-speaking Soviet Jews.

It is believed that there are about 9,500 Jews in Belarus.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A hotel where two employees have been suspended after a Jewish singer was reportedly told to hide his Star of David necklace in order to register as a guest faced protests last week, and reportedly hired a neo-Nazi security firm for protection.

In an Instagram video, musician Gil Ofarim looked shaken as he spoke of how other guests were being prioritised over him during the long line in the hotel. When he asked as to why, an employee of the Westin Leipzig hotel reportedly said that it was to “straighten the line” before allegedly adding that Mr Ofarim needed to “pack the star” if he wanted to register as a guest. A spokesperson for the hotel said that they were very concerned about the report and that they were taking the matter very seriously.

After news of the alleged incident spread online, a protest was quickly planned. During this time, it was reported that a Westin hotel manager said that two employees had been put on leave. It was also reported that whilst some people appeared happy at this result, others demanded the termination of the employees’ contacts.

The spontaneous protest lasted approximately an hour and fifteen minutes, and it was reported that at least 600 people turned up to demonstrate and listen to speeches.

Directors and employees from Pro GSL Security – the security firm allegedly hired by the hotel – are said to have affiliations with far-right and neo-Nazi movements. It was reported that in a now-deleted photo, the security firm posted a photo of two of its directors and three employees standing outside the hotel stating that the building had been “secured quickly!”.

One of the firm’s Directors, named Tobias B., was reportedly convicted in April after taking part in a violent rampage through Leipzig’s Connewitz neighborhood in August 2016 and was handed an eleven-month suspended sentence and a €2,500 fine. It was said that at least 250 neo-Nazi thugs smashed shop windows, demolished cars and set off an explosive device outside a kebab restaurant during the riot.

A second director known as Oliver R. was also in the photo, and it is understood that he was previously business partners with Ralph Marschner, a neo-Nazi with ties to far-right terrorists.

Andreas Hachmeister, the manager of the Westin Hotel, stated in a radio interview that Pro GSL was hired “at short notice” and that it was the first and last time that the firm would be hired.  

It has been reported that Mr Ofarim is taking legal action against the hotel. 

A spokesperson for Marriott International, the parent company of Westin Hotels, said that the company took “this matter extremely seriously” and pledged to “support the police investigation into this incident”.

“Marriott International is committed to welcoming all,” the spokesperson continued. “We condemn antisemitism in all its forms and any discrimination whether it be based on race, gender, religion, sexual orientation or abilities.” They added that Marriott was collaborating with “global advocacy organisations focused on combatting discrimination and hate” on diversity training for its employees.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Facebook via The Algemeiner

Campaign Against Antisemitism will be writing to Amazon after it was reported that the online marketplace has cut a book deal with Mark Collett, the leader of far-right group Patriotic Alternative

Patriotic Alternative is known for its efforts to recruit youth to its white nationalist ideology. Previously, the far-right group published an online “alternative” home school curriculum condemned as “poison” and “hateful” and attempted to recruit children as young as twelve through livestreaming events on YouTube, according to The Times. 

It is led by the former head of the youth wing of the BNP, Mark Collett, who is reported to have dabbled in Holocaust denial, collaborated with the infamous American antisemite David Duke, and espoused antisemitic and racist views.

Mr Collett’s book, The Fall of Western Man, says that Adolf Hitler’s Nuremberg rallies would have been “something that one would have been proud to be a part of”, adding that “Those in attendance wore uniforms, looked healthy and were of good breeding stock.” He also said that “when it comes to the notion of white guilt, nothing is pushed more strongly” than the “alleged extermination of six million Jews at the hands of the German people”.

He continues: “The Holocaust has been elevated to a level of importance so great that it has its own worldwide day of remembrance, and a multi-million dollar industry exists to push the established narrative. The Holocaust industry churns out movies, books and television shows on a regular basis to ensure that the Holocaust is constantly kept in the collective mind of Western man.

“Western man is also brainwashed and enslaved by notions of white guilt that stem from false historical narratives of his colonial past, slavery and the Holocaust,” Mr Collett writes.

The book’s website features reviews of the book, including one from David Duke, former Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan. Mr Duke said that the book was “An excellent and incisive work”, adding: “It’s a book I recommend to anyone who wants to understand the deeper mechanisms and processes that are leading to the ethnic cleansing of the European People from the civilisation which they created.”

According to The Times, Amazon is selling the book on its website for between £15 to £25 and has struck a deal with Mr Collett in which it receives 85% of the book’s earnings, despite its claim to not sell certain content including content that they determine is “hate speech” or other material they deem “inappropriate or offensive”.

Amazon has said: “As a bookseller, we believe that providing access to written speech is important, including books that some may find objectionable. We have policies that outline what products may be sold in our stores, and we invest significant time and resources to ensure our content guidelines are followed. We remove products that do not adhere to our guidelines.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism will be writing to Amazon to demand the book’s removal from its website, as well as an apology and for all proceeds from the book to be put towards Holocaust education programmes. 

According to Hope Not Hate’s report, Patriotic Alliance is “a racist far-right organisation with antisemitism at its very core. They aim to combat the ‘replacement and displacement’ of white Britons by people who ‘have no right to these lands’.” The group reportedly holds that “it is Jewish elites, particularly, who are orchestrating the ‘replacement’ of white Britons.”

Earlier this year, the far-right group was found to be using the social media platform Telegram to create neo-Nazi channels dedicated to sharing vile messages, antisemitic conspiracy theories and images glorifying Hitler. A report into Patriotic Alternative published last summer found that several members of the group engaged in Holocaust denial.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

The BBC has edited the blurb for a French period drama on iplayer that described the wrongly-convicted French military officer Alfred Dreyfus as a “notorious Jewish spy”.

In its description of the new BBC4 series, Paris Police 1900, the BBC wrote: “French period crime drama. The French Republic is in turmoil as rumours spread about the release from Devil’s Island of Dreyfus, the notorious Jewish spy.”

Alfred Dreyfus was a French army captain wrongfully charged with espionage in the 1890s because he was Jewish. He was tried and convicted, leading to an outcry and his eventual release. The real spy was caught and Dreyfus was reinstated into the army and served honourably in WWI. The Dreyfus affair is considered one of the most momentous incidents in the history of European Jewry and antisemitism.

The BBC must apologise for this incredible oversight, and we shall be writing to the Corporation.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Somehow, the most basic facts about the antisemitic Dreyfus affair eluded BBC producers in their description of a programme about this very period in French history. One wonders how authentic the period drama could hope to be if it fails to grasp such elementary background. The BBC must apologise, and we shall be writing to the Corporation.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

Tortoise news website has apologised after publishing a cartoon on social media showing Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg as a parasite controlling the world.

The cartoon reportedly referenced a story about a Facebook whistleblower who testified in the United States Senate last week, and was shared to Tortoise’s 19,000 followers on Instagram.

The cartoon, which showed Mr Zuckerberg as a parasite with octopus-like tentacles engulfing the planet, was captioned: “This parasite can now be found the world over! It is ever mutating to control more and more of our cognitive functions.”

Tortoise media, which was launched in 2019 by former BBC News director James Harding, describes itself as “slower, wiser news without all the noise.”

“We fully accept that the cartoons should not have appeared and apologise for the hurt they have caused. We are removing them immediately from the Tortoise website and social media,” Tortoise said in a statement, adding that the website recognised the “unintended echoes of antisemitic visual tropes” in the image.

The cartoonist, Edith Pritchett, also apologised, saying that it had not occurred to her that the cartoon could have caused offence in that way, but that “it should have done and I am extremely sorry to have caused such hurt.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “This appalling cartoon plays into age-old antisemitic tropes of parasitism, global power and media control. We welcome Tortoise’s prompt removal of the cartoon and apology, but the real question is how a media organisation led by some of the country’s leading journalists could design and approve such an image. The publication of this cartoon demonstrates that insensitivity and ignorance about the mutations and manifestations of antisemitism remain rampant in the media industry and how much more work there is to do to educate the most influential people in our society.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

The Argentinian Jewish community has resolved to appeal last week’s judicial decision to dismiss the case against former President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner over her alleged role in a cover-up of Iran’s involvement in the 1994 bombing of the AMIA Jewish community centre.

The terror attack on the Argentine Israelite Mutual Association (AIMA) building in Buenos Aires on 18th July 1994 killed 85 people and wounded hundreds.

Last Thursday, a judge in the Argentine capital dismissed the case against Ms Kirchner, who is a former President and is currently serving as Vice President in the administration of President Alberto Fernandez, her former chief of staff.

In 2018, a federal judge ruled that Kirchner, the former foreign minister and other aides would be tried in connection with a 2013 agreement with Iran that whitewashed the Islamic Republic’s involvement in the bombing.

The existence of the pact was exposed by Alberto Nisman, the federal prosecutor leading the AMIA investigation who was found murdered in his Buenos Aires apartment in January 2015 just before he filed a formal complaint against the Kirchner government over the agreement. Ms Kirchner falsely portrayed his death as a suicide, and questions have long lingered over whether any of the defendants might have been implicated in the assassination.

The head of the Argentine umbrella Jewish organisation DAIA said that “We continue to demand justice and the bringing of the accused to trial,” and pledged that DAIA would appeal the decision.

The Jewish community has long been frustrated and intimidated in its search for justice in the bombing.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A new poll has suggested that almost half of the British public believes that the police have a problem with antisemitism.

Left Foot Forward commissioned Savanta: ComRes to ask the public to what extent they thought that the police in general have a problem with antisemitism. 46 percent of respondents said that they did believe that the police have a problem with antisemitism, compared with 29 precent who said that they did not. A quarter of respondents said that they did not know.

Seventeen percent of respondents said that they thought that the police had a “significant” problem with antisemitism.

Geographically, 56 percent of Londoners – the highest proportion of any region – believed that police had a problem with antisemitism, with over half of respondents agreeing in Scotland, Wales and the North West.

Six in ten 2019 Labour and Liberal Democrat voters also agreed, compared to just over four in ten (42 percent) of Conservative voters.

Whilst concern about antisemitism in the police is high, concerns about problems with racism, sexism and class bias are even higher.

A spokesperson for the Home Office reportedly said: “We are clear that any form of prejudice in policing is unacceptable and the Government remains committed with police leaders to address these issues and keep our communities safe. Allegations of racism including antisemitism should be treated extremely seriously by the police and any allegations of misconduct aggravated by discrimination must be referred immediately to the IOPC [Independent Office for Police Conduct]. We are working closely with the police to deliver the diverse police workforce that our communities need.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s latest Antisemitism Barometer showed that 40 percent of British Jews do not believe that the police do enough to protect them. Still, the police are the most trusted branch of the criminal justice system among British Jews, with the courts and Crown Prosecution Service coming in for greater criticism.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “These are sobering figures that tally extraordinarily closely with how the Jewish community itself feels about the police. Our research has shown that four in ten British Jews do not believe that the police do enough to protect them. Jewish confidence in the police is not helped by revelations of police officers affiliated to neo-Nazi groups or who participate in racist WhatsApp groups. Nor is it boosted by questionable policy decisions, such as the Met’s refusal to prohibit a second ‘Free Palestine’ convoy to drive through London earlier this year, even after the first convoy was involved in wholesale harassment of Jewish neighbourhoods and numerous antisemitic hate crimes.

“This poll shows that, while the Jewish community is indebted to our police forces for the immense good that they do, our concerns with shortcomings in British policing are registering with the wider public. We hope that this will lead to the changes we need.”

Recently, an officer in the Metropolitan Police was convicted and imprisoned for being a member of the banned neo-Nazi terrorist group National Action, while the Met is also investigating multiple police officers over their participation in antisemitic protests whilst in uniform.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A man who was charged after a series of antisemitic, hateful, and racist tweets were identified by Chelsea Football Club has pleaded guilty. 

After an investigation by the Metropolitan Police, Nathan Blagg, 21, of Retford in Nottinghamshire was charged last month with seven counts of sending by public communication network an offensive/indecent/obscene/menacing message/matter which violate the Malicious Communications Act. The charges refer to seven tweets sent between 29th September, 2020 and 5th February, 2021. 

Mr Blagg pleaded guilty to all charges today at Westminster Magistrates’ Court. The court heard that Mr Blagg was initially reported by a West Brom fan before his posts were investigated by Chelsea Football Club’s security team and finally passed on to the police. The posts included images as well as tweets and retweets of offensive messages. 

Prosecutor David Roberts said that there was a “racially aggravated” element because of the “antisemitic nature” of many of the tweets. 

Maeve Thornton, defending, reportedly said that Mr Blagg had been suffering at the time from “low moods” due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Ms Thornton said: “He has got drawn into this in terms of a lack of awareness and understanding of the impact this was going to have.

“With hindsight, he now understands how wrong this is. He is indeed very remorseful and very apologetic and has taken steps to address his offending by removing himself from Twitter. There is not going to be a repeat of this behaviour moving forward.”

Mr Blagg has been released on unconditional bail until the date of his sentencing, which is expected to be held on 5th November.

In April, Chelsea Football Club announced that it had banned an abusive online troll from its matches for ten years after he hounded a Jewish journalist who came forward and received support from Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

Tower Hamlets and the Metropolitan Police are investigating an antisemitic sign in the window of a private residence on council property after being alerted by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

The sign, which read “Wake Up! We are living in a psychopathic Zionist military police state. Smash the Jewish white supremacist Nazis”, was displayed in the window on the corner of Virginia Road and Columbia Road and was reported to us by a member of the public.

We alerted the local council, which is investigating, as well as the Met police (reference number BCA-110897-21-0101-IR). If you have any more information, please contact us at [email protected] or the police on 101, quoting the reference number above.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Antisemitic incitement cannot be tolerated and we will always take action when victims and witnesses bring incidents to our attention. We welcome the investigations by Tower Hamlets and the Met Police into this distressing sign and expect its prompt removal.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Four men from Blackburn have entered pleas of not guilty after being charged in connection with the alleged antisemitic abuse shouted from a ‘Free Palestine’ convoy in North London in May.

Appearing yesterday at Westminster Magistrates’ Court, Mohammed Iftikhar Hanif, 27; Jawaad Hussain, 24; Asif Ali, 25; and Adil Mota, 26, all from Blackburn, pleaded not guilty to charges of using threatening, abusive or insulting words, or behaviour, with intent, likely to stir up racial hatred.

The charges relate to the convoy on 16th May, participants in which were caught on video allegedly shouting through a megaphone “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” as they drove through Jewish neighbourhoods waving the flag of the Palestinian Authority, during fighting between Hamas and Israel.

The incident took place a stone’s throw from a synagogue in West Hampstead and continued into St John’s Wood. The convoy had previously and provocatively passed through other Jewish neighbourhoods as well, including Hendon and Golders Green.

The abuse was condemned by the Prime Minister and Home Secretary.

In a statement, the Metropolitan Police Service admitted that they had failed so badly to monitor the convoy that it took hours to find the car in question, which was identified from photographs taken by a Jewish member of the public who had the presence of mind to capture images of the vehicles’ licence plates. Later that day, the four arrests were made.

The charges are punishable by up to three years in prison.

It is understood that Mr Mota’s lawyer told the court that his client was travelling as part of the convoy but was not involved in the alleged incident. 

All four defendants were released without bail conditions, with the trial scheduled for 3rd November at Wood Green Crown Court.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to the Home Secretary calling on her to proscribe Hamas in full in the UK, and has urged all MPs to do the same.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The Conservatives have reportedly confirmed that the inflammatory group that calls itself “Conservative Friends of Palestine” is not affiliated to the Party.

The so-called Conservative Friends of Palestine, which operates a website and a Twitter handle with a modest following, claims to “seek to promote conservative values and provide new thinking on the Israeli-Palestine conflict that acknowledges the reality on the ground and advances long term solutions based on principles of equality and justice.”

Its website continues: “Besides providing a space for conservatives to come together and challenge the current one-state reality of the conflict that is so damaging, we aim to promote Palestinian voices that so often get left out of the conversation.”

However, in reality the group has constantly courted controversy, for example talking about “false accusations of antisemitism” and complaining about the “weaponising of antisemitism”. The website also has a bookshop offering numerous controversial and inflammatory books, and the group is staunchly opposed to the widespread adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism, particularly by universities, which is a flagship policy of the Government, which was the first national government in the world to adopt the Definition.

The status of this controversial group in relation to the Conservative Party has been a matter of concern, and we are pleased that the Party has apparently confirmed that the group is not affiliated.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Nazi stickers with razor blades placed underneath have been found in Kent at a bus stop near a primary school.

The stickers were discovered at the Dunton Green bus stop on 22nd September.

The Vice-Principal of nearby Dartford Technology College wrote to parents to warn them of the stickers, saying: “The school has received a message from Kent County Council regarding an abhorrent incident of vandalism, whereby extremist and racist stickers were attached to a bus stop that was very close to a primary school. The worrying aggravating factor was that razor blades were slipped underneath the stickers, creating an injury risk when removing stickers.”

Sightings of other stickers were reportedly made on 5th September in Chatham and on 8th September on Henry Street. Kent Police said that the stickers in Chatham did not have razor blades behind them. 

Inspector Matt Atkinson from Sevenoaks’ Community Safety Unit said: “This is disturbing behaviour and while I do not want to cause people to panic, I do want to raise awareness of this issue. Publicly promoting offensive, hate-filled notices is not acceptable in itself but adding razor blades to potentially seriously harm somebody is despicable.”

“If anyone has information as to who placed these stickers in this location or sees anything similar of concern please do report it via 101 and do not attempt to remove them,” he added.

In June, a sticker belonging to the neo-Nazi group, British National Socialist Movement, was found on a lamppost near Manchester’s Charedi Jewish community.

Last year, members of the proscribed National Action group were sentenced to prison, having engaged, amongst other activities, in far-right stickering and recruitment campaigns. Campaign Against Antisemitism continues to monitor and report on far-right stickering campaigns.

Image credit: Google

Campaign Against Antisemitism is writing to the streaming giant Netflix over provocateur Dave Chappelle’s new ‘comedy’ special over antisemitic comments he makes during the programme.

In “The Closer”, released on Tuesday, Mr Chappelle makes off-colour comments about numerous minority groups. Regarding Jewish people, he says: “In my movie idea, we find out that these aliens are originally from earth — that they’re from an ancient civilization that achieved interstellar travel and left the earth thousands of years ago. Some other planet they go to, and things go terrible for them on the other planet, so they come back to earth, [and] decide that they want to claim the earth for their very own. It’s a pretty good plotline, huh? I call it ‘Space Jews’.”

The implication is that the inhuman Jews left their ancient homeland and other countries of their dispersion of their own volition. After causing destruction elsewhere they have now returned to reclaim what they had willingly abandoned, even at the expense of misery of others. As an analogy it shows breathtaking ignorance of Jewish and world history, not to mention current affairs, and plays into antisemitic tropes about Jewish otherness, world domination, insularity, parasitism and evil.

The incoherent ‘joke’ receives little applause, with Mr Chappelle reacting by saying: “All right, it’s gonna get worse than that, hang in there.”

Mr Chappelle later makes another comment referencing how Jews subject others to the atrocities that they suffered in the Holocaust. “How can a person perpetuate the same evil on a person that looks just like him?” he asks. “It’s mind blowing. And shockingly, they’re making a movie about him. Ironically, it’s called “Space Jews’.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis.” The claim is a form both of Holocaust inversion and also Holocaust denial, as the analogy minimises the scope of the genocide of the Jewish people by making baseless equations.

Mr Chappelle’s programme has also drawn the ire of other minority groups.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Antisemitism and minimising the Holocaust are no joke. Whilst there is always a place for light-hearted humour, Dave Chapelle’s so-called comedy is barely coherent and plays on the ignorant prejudices of his audience. It is bad enough to do so in the confines of a comedy club, but to be streamed into living rooms around the world courtesy of Netflix is an undeserved privilege for someone willing to mock the trauma of Jewish history and the memory of the six million Jewish victims of the Nazi genocide. We shall be writing to Netflix for the show to be pulled from its service.”

Earlier this year, Netflix rightly condemned antisemitism and Holocaust denial. We hope they now live up to that commitment.

The Polish Ministry of Foreign Affairs is expected to meet the British ambassador this week after a right-wing author accused of antisemitism was denied entry into the United Kingdom on Saturday.

A letter from the Border Force showed that Rafal Ziemkiewicz, a Polish author who has been accused of promoting antisemitism and homophobia, was denied entry into the country as his views were deemed to be “at odds with British values” that were “likely to cause offence” and was flown back to Warsaw. 

Mr Ziemkiewicz was accused of antisemitism by Poland’s Human Rights Ombudsman last year after he reportedly said on Polish television that Jews had cooperated with Germans in the Holocaust. In 2014, he was accused of justifying rape after he allegedly tweeted: “Whoever has never taken advantage of a drunk person, let him throw the first stone.” He has also reportedly made several homophobic comments and tweets.

Speaking on the incident, Mr Ziemkiewicz reportedly said on Sunday: “I fell victim to a really powerful hatred against Poland by Poles themselves.”

Polish Ministry of Foreign Affairs Szynkowski vel Sęk then tweeted about the event, saying: “I will invite Ambassador Anna Clunes to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs this week to make sure that freedom of speech belongs to the catalog of British values ​​and as it corresponds with the attitude of the British services in the case of R. Ziemkiewicz.”

However, he later clarified his comments. “I see the ambassador this week. The conversation is not an escalation, but the foundation and common denominator of the work of the entire Ministry of Foreign Affairs. We are also bound by the obligation to care for Polish citizens abroad and to respect freedom of speech. These revelations are worth so much,” the Minister said.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Concerns have been expressed over a Conservative councillor who appeared to entertain an equation of the COVID vaccine with Zyklon B on Twitter.

A Twitter user wrote, “I fear that this vaccination is this admins/pharma’s verision of zyclon B. Of course this is only my opinion [sic].” Zyklon B was the gas used to murder Jews in Holocaust extermination camps.

Cllr Steve Tierney, of Fenland District Council, then retweeted the tweet to his thousands of followers with a comment: “I hope, for all our sake, that turns out to be completely wrong. 🙁 :(“

While Cllr Tierney did not affirm the sentiment, engaging with it by expressing his mere hope that it will not prove to be accurate suggests that he entertains the possibility that the comparison might be valid. Instead, he should have either ignored the tweet or called out the comparison as inflammatory nonsense. Whatever one’s views on lockdown rules or vaccines, there is no basis for comparisons to the genocide of the Jewish people.

Over the past year, anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Cllr Tierney has been vocal on Twitter about antisemitism, especially in the Labour Party. This tweet therefore goes to show how even those sensitive to some manifestations of antisemitism can nevertheless have a blind spot when it comes to others.

We urge Cllr Tierney to delete the tweet and encourage his followers, whatever their views on vaccines, to avoid needless equations with the Holocaust.

Fenland District Council, where Cllr Tierney holds the Transformation, Communication and Environment portfolio, has adopted the International Adoption of Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A councillor for the Conservative Party has been suspended after he being accused of supporting the far-right group Patriotic Alternative.

The group is known for its efforts to recruit youth to its white nationalist ideology. Previously, the far-right group published an online “alternative” home school curriculum condemned as “poison” and “hateful” and attempted to recruit children as young as twelve through livestreaming events on YouTube, according to The Times.

Tim Wills, a borough councillor in Worthing, is alleged to have joined a Patriotic Alternative chat room on the social media platform Telegram in June, where he reportedly posted messages of support.

Earlier this year, the far-right group was found to be usingTelegram to create neo-Nazi channels dedicated to sharing vile messages, antisemitic conspiracy theories and images glorifying Hitler. 

On 22nd September, Cllr Wills is alleged to have written: “My view is Covid is a loss maker for us, we just need to centre on white genocide […] because many of our white race are convinced about vaccines, but not about our replacement, and need to be informed about this?”

In another message, he is alleged to have encouraged members to “Remember the fourteen words”, likely a reference to the neo-Nazi fourteen-word oath: “We must secure the existence of our people and a future for white children”, a slogan initially devised by David Lane, a member of the white supremacist terrorist group “The Order” which was responsible for the murder of Jewish radio host Alan Berg.

He also reportedly said that because Patriotic Alternative “have no chance of political power any time soon, sadly”, he viewed the Conservatives as “the best of a rotten lot,” as the group would still have a “right-wing minority who are on side”. He also reportedly said that if it were not for his “sensitive job” as a Conservative councillor, then he would take on the vacant regional organiser position in his local branch.

A Conservative Party spokesperson confirmed that “Cllr Tim Wills has been suspended pending the outcome of an investigation.”

Hope Not Hate describes Patriotic Alliance is “a racist far-right organisation with antisemitism at its very core. They aim to combat the ‘replacement and displacement’ of white Britons by people who ‘have no right to these lands’.” The group reportedly holds that “it is Jewish elites, particularly, who are orchestrating the ‘replacement’ of white Britons.”

The group is led by the former head of the youth wing of the BNP, Mark Collett, who is reported to have dabbled in Holocaust denial, collaborated with the infamous American antisemite David Duke, and espoused antisemitic and racist views.

report into Patriotic Alternative published last summer found that several members of the group engaged in Holocaust denial.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Last night, over 600 people gathered to protest outside a hotel in Leipzig where an employee reportedly told a Jewish singer to hide his Star of David necklace.

In an Instagram video, musician Gil Ofarim looked shaken as he spoke of how other guests were being prioritised over him during the long line in the hotel. When he asked as to why, an employee of the Westin Leipzig hotel reportedly said that it was to “straighten the line” before allegedly adding that Mr Ofarim needed to “pack the star” if he wanted to register as a guest.

A spokesperson for the hotel said that they were very concerned about the report and that they were taking the matter very seriously.

After news of the alleged incident spread online, a protest was quickly planned. During this time, it was reported that a Westin hotel manager said that two employees had been put on leave. It was also reported that whilst some people appeared happy at this result, others demanded the termination of the employees’ contacts. The Westin Leipzig also uploaded a photo to their Instagram of what appears to be hotel staff members holding a banner featuring Israeli flags and Islamic crescent moons outside of the hotel.

Last night’s spontaneous protest lasted approximately an hour and fifteen minutes, and it was reported that at least 600 people turned up to demonstrate and listen to speeches.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Antisemitic graffiti, including Holocaust denial slogans, has reportedly been discovered at the Auschwitz-Birkenau Memorial and Museum.

Auschwitz concentration camp, one of the most notorious concentration camps where over a million people were murdered, was officially converted into a museum and memorial site in 1947.

The museum released a statement on Twitter yesterday which said that “signs of vandalism” were discovered on “nine wooden barracks in Sector Blla of the Auschwitz II-Birkenau site: spray-painted inscriptions in English and German, some of them antisemitic in nature.”

It continued: “Two references to the Old Testament, often used by antisemites, and denial slogans draw special attention.”

The museum described the vandalism as “an outrageous attack on the symbol of one of the greatest tragedies in human history and an extremely painful blow to the memory of all the victims of the German Nazi Auschwitz-Birkenau camp.”

The statement added that video footage was being reviewed and that police are investigating the incident.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A video has emerged of Piers Corbyn claiming that allegations of antisemitism against him and his brother Jeremy Corbyn, the antisemitic former Labour Party Leader, are a “pack of lies”.

Speaking outside of the Conservative Party Conference, Mr Corbyn was asked if anyone at the conference had raised concerns of antisemitism to him, to which the controversial lockdown-sceptic replied that “nobody has said anything about that at all”, before adding: “It’s all a pack of lies and people know that.”

When asked what he meant by the phrase “pack of lies”, Mr Corbyn said: “The idea that me and my brother are antisemitic…he’s not antisemitic and neither am I.”

In August, Mr Corbyn suggested that “troublemakers” in Jewish areas posted leaflets created and distributed by Mr Corbyn, which compared the COVID-19 vaccines to the Auschwitz death camp, through their own doors in a “plot” to portray him as antisemitic.

When asked “Why was it leafleted in Jewish areas?”, Mr Corbyn replied: “It wasn’t specifically leafleted in any particular areas. That is a lie made up by the media. Or, some troublemakers leafleted it through their own doors, I suspect, and then came forward.”

“To try and portray you as antisemitic?”, Mr Riach asked, to which Mr Corbyn responded “Yes, yes.” When Mr Riach asked whether it was a conspiracy or not, Mr Corbyn replied: “Well, certainly a plot.”

Recent footage showed Mr Corbyn comparing vaccinations to Nazi policy outside the Houses of Parliament. The video showed Mr Corbyn and another man standing in front of a sign which reads “No Nazi forced jab” and yelling “arrest Matt Hancock” through a megaphone. 

On 20th July, Mr Corbyn, alongside other anti-vaccination protesters, showed their support at a far-left demonstration that was held outside of Labour Party headquarters. Speaking about the COVID-19 vaccination and the lockdown, Mr Corbyn said: “You know what happened in Germany. The left there, they were begging Hitler to support them. They believed in Hitler. You know what happened. The rest is history…the Jews were labelled as a danger and were locked up.” Mr Corbyn also gave an interview at the demonstration in which he denied that he, or his brother Jeremy Corbyn, were antisemites.

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Mr Corbyn has a history of controversy in relation to antisemitic conspiracy theories. He has previously retweeted @whiteknight0011, a notorious neo-Nazi who declared that “They will force Trump in to war What do you think happened to Hitler? Bilderberg CIA IMF Banker Gangsters They are the problem” along with four images. The @whiteknight0011 account has since been suspended. One image showed Lord Jacob Rothschild, the Jewish banker and philanthropist, against the background of a Nazi flag, claiming that he controls the world. A second showed Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu as a puppeteer controlling ISIS through Israeli intelligence agency Mossad, orchestrating the war in Syria and Paris attacks as Lord Rothschild and the Queen look on approvingly. A third image showed the faces of supposed Jewish conspirators who run the world to society’s detriment, proclaiming: “Know your enemy”. The last image showed a family photo of the Royal Family, claiming that they are in cahoots with these Jewish conspirators in committing “the worst genocides, invasions and theft in all history.”

Mr Corbyn has also claimed that “Zionists” were conspiring against his brother: when Jewish then-MP Louise Ellman complained of antisemitic attacks against her, Piers accused her of using it as a cover for political attack, tweeting: “ABSURD! JC+ All #Corbyns are committed #AntiNazi. #Zionists can’t cope with anyone supporting rights for #Palestine”.

A Jewish singer was reportedly told to hide his Star of David necklace by a hotel employee in Leipzig, Germany.

In an Instagram video, musician Gil Ofarim looked shaken as he spoke of how other guests were being prioritised over him during the long line in the hotel. When he asked as to why, an employee of The Westin Leipzig hotel reportedly said that it was to “straighten the line” before allegedly adding that Mr Ofarim needed to “pack the star” if he wanted to register as a guest.

A spokesperson for the hotel said that they were very concerned about the report and that they were taking the matter very seriously.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A Holocaust survivor has accused podcaster Joe Rogan of promoting antisemitism after he uploaded a video to his Instagram where comparisons were made between COVID-19 vaccines and the Holocaust.

The video in question featured an audio excerpt from one of Mr Rogan’s podcasts in which he reportedly professes the importance of freedom in response to the idea of having to show proof of a COVID-19 vaccination whilst various images are featured on screen, including footage from the Holocaust that shows Nazi officers, Adolf Hitler, white Star of David armbands and the Jewish ghettos in Europe.

Mr Rogan can be heard saying: “As soon as you give politicians power, any kind of power that didn’t exist previously, if they can figure out a way to force you into carrying something that lets you enter businesses or lets you do this or lets businesses open, historically, they are not gonna give that power up. They find new reasons to use it. We have to protect those freedoms at all cost, whether you agree with people’s choices or not, because it is the foundation that this country was founded on: freedom.”

“It is the literal structure that allows this country to be so f**king amazing…anything that comes along that can inhibit your freedom is, by definition, anti-American,” he adds.

The video is understood not to have been created by Mr Rogan but was uploaded to his Instagram account, and was posted with the caption: “FREEDOM. It’s the most important thing we have. It’s what makes this place special. It’s rare, and it’s fragile. Protect it at all costs.”

In response to this, 86-year-old Holocaust survivor Gideon Lev created two TikTok videos in which he criticised Mr Rogan for uploading and seemingly endorsing the video. In one of his videos, Mr Lev said: “I am an 86-year-old-survivor of the Holocaust and saw your video on American freedom and the COVID-19 vaccine. It included images of the Holocaust and of Adolf Hitler, the monster who murdered my father, 26 members of my family, and six million Jews and others in gas chambers, in ditches, in firing squads, and even in gas trucks.”

Mr Lev continues: “You are absolutely not promoting freedom, but promoting hate, antisemitism, and possibly even more violence and constant hate. You should apologise to us all, remove the video immediately. It is disgusting and thoughtless and careless and I am shocked by your lack of sensitivity. You want to speak about freedom? Come and speak to me.”

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

It was reported that the antisemitic rapper Wiley performed at a freshers’ event in Preston on Saturday despite protest from the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) Students’ Union beforehand.

On 24th July 2020, the rapper Richard Kylea Cowie, who is known as Wiley, spent days engaged in an escalating rant on social media against Jews. After likening Jews to the Ku Klux Klan and claiming that Jews had cheated him and were “snakes”, Wiley tweeted that Jews should “hold some corn”, a slang expression meaning that they should be shot. He added: “Jewish community you deserve it”. He then also called on “black people” to go to “war” with Jews.

Wiley repeatedly evoked conspiracy theories that Jews were responsible for the slave trade and that modern-day Jews are in fact imposters who usurped black people — a conspiracy theory that has incited acts of terrorism against Jews, such as a shooting in Jersey City and a stabbing attack in Monsey, NY during the festival of Chanukah last December.

In the days that followed, Wiley continued to rail against Jews on Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. Following discussions with Campaign Against Antisemitism, a major 48-hour boycott of Twitter and Instagram in which we participated, and our projection of antisemitic tweets onto Twitter’s London headquarters, which then went viral, TwitterFacebook (which owns Instagram), Google (which owns YouTube) and TikTok agreed to remove Wiley from their platforms, depriving him of access to his nearly one million social media followers.

On Friday, it emerged that UCLan Students’ Union released a statement condemning the news of Wiley’s scheduled performance at Preston’s Switch nightclub. The statement read: “UCLan Students’ Union sometimes signposts students to external events being run across the city, but we are always clear that these events are external to us and are not run by us. We are also able to confirm that this Switch club night was not one of these events. We condemn all forms of antisemitism and given the previous actions of Wiley, which include a series of antisemitic social media posts, we strongly encourage Switch to cancel this event and reconsider any further ties with Wiley and his management.”

The University adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism last November.

However, despite the students’ wishes, Switch persisted in hosting the rapper and has since uploaded a series of photos and videos of his performance to its Facebook page.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is continuing its response to Wiley’s antisemitic tirade, including:

  • Filing our criminal complaint against Wiley in the Netherlands;
  • Continuing to meet with executives from Twitter, Facebook and Google to address their response to antisemitism on their platforms;
  • Working with the Cabinet Office’s Honours Forfeiture Committee to ensure that Wiley’s MBE is revoked;
  • Seeking a change in policy so that racists are automatically stripped of their honours in future;
  • Urging the Government to bring forward legislation to regulate social networks and force them to remove racist incitement which has recently borne fruit; and
  • Working with the music industry to remove Wiley’s awards and ensure that he is shunned for his racism.

The trial has been set for a suspect in a series of alleged assaults in Stamford Hill in August.

Abdullah Qureshi, from Dewsbury in West Yorkshire, was charged last month at Thames Magistrates’ Court with one count of racially or religiously aggravated wounding or grievous bodily harm, four counts of racially or religiously aggravated common assault and one count of racially or religious aggravated criminal damage.

The charges relate to five incidents on 18th August investigated by Metropolitan Police’s Central East Command Unit. Groups including Campaign Against Antisemitism and Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol, put out witness appeals following the incidents, as three of the five alleged incidents were caught on video.

In one incident at 18:41, an Orthodox Jewish man was struck in the face with what appeared to be a bottle. In another at 19:10, a child was slapped on the back of the head, and in yet another at 20:30, a 64-year-old victim was struck and left unconscious on the ground, suffering facial injuries and a broken ankle. It is understood that two further incidents have been alleged.

A trial for Mr Quershi has been scheduled for 18th January at Stratford Magistrates’ Court.

It is understood that, in lieu of remand, Mr Quershi is prohibited from travelling into the M25.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “These attacks were not ‘random’ in the usual sense: these victims were chosen because they are Jews. We applaud the police for their swift investigation and expect the authorities to ensure that justice is done for the victims of these violent hate crimes.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

An Islamic charity is under investigation by the Charity Commission after Jihadist and antisemitic material was found on its website.

The Miftahul Jannah Academy, based in Waltham Forest, was reported by the National Secular Society to the Commission over lectures delivered by Islamic scholar Muhammad Patel that allegedly praised the Taliban, encouraged Muslims to fund Jihad and contained antisemitic references, including to the “dirty qualities” of the Jews.

One lecture is titled “A quality of the Yahood — to kill those who want to guide them towards the commands of Allah”. Yahood is the Arabic word for Jew. Mr Patel reportedly says in the lecture that the killing of Islamic scholars is among the “wretched” and “dirty” qualities of the Jews.

The Miftahul Jannah Academy says that its aims and objectives include “to further the true image of Islam”.

The Masjid-e-Umer Trust, which runs Walthamstow Central Mosque where Mr Patel has apparently given sermons and run youth activities, has also been referred to the Commission.

The Charity Commission said: “We contacted the Miftahul Jannah Academy on 24th September about audio recordings alleged to be from the charity’s website. We await the trustees’ response. We are now in receipt of additional information which we are carefully assessing.”

Image credit: Google

The antisemitic former Labour Party Leader Jeremy Corbyn shared a stage at yesterday’s rally, which marked the 85th anniversary of the Battle of Cable Street, with a suspended Labour member accused of bullying Luciana Berger, the former MP for Liverpool Wavertree.

Hazuan Hashim stood next to Mr Corbyn during his speech, seemingly recording it on video throughout. Mr Hashim, along with three other members of the executive of the Constituency Labour Party (CLP) in Wavertree, was reportedly suspended from the Party last year when the group criticised their local MP for expressing regret that her predecessor, Ms Berger, felt that she had to leave the Party.

Paula Barker, the Labour MP for Wavertree, wrote in the Jewish Telegraph that “Luciana leaving the Labour Party was a shock to many and I find it deeply regrettable that she felt she could no longer stay.” Ms Berger was hounded out of the Labour Party in early 2019 after years of antisemitism and threats of deselection.

However, four members of the executive committee of Ms Barker’s Constituency Labour Party (including its chair and secretary) issued a statement in the branch’s Member’s Bulletin accusing Ms Barker of presenting an “inaccurate and factionally-motivated position on antisemitism” that only “reflected the influence of a partial view that claims to speak for all Jewish people.” They further insisted that “our political disagreement with [Ms Berger] was cynically attributed to bullying, harassment and antisemitism on our part” and that “the suggestion that the Constituency Labour Party Executive is in any way a party to bullying and antisemitism is a false and slanderous accusation.”

Expressing outrage at the appearance of both Mr Corbyn and Mr Hashim at the rally, a Liverpool Labour activist said: “It makes my blood boil seeing Jeremy Corbyn give a speech at an event, that is meant to show solidarity with British Jews, alongside someone who has actively tried to harm relations with the local Jewish community in Liverpool. Hazuan Hashim should be nowhere near this event, and neither should Corbyn.”

Another speaker at the rally was Poplar and Limehouse MP Apsana Begum, who has previously been investigated for alleged antisemitism after accusing Tony Blair of spreading “Zionist propaganda”, claiming the leaders of Saudi Arabia were “inspired by Zionist masters” and sharing material by a political activist accused of antisemitism and 9/11 conspiracy theories. Members from Jewish Voice for Labour, an antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, also spoke.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is the height of chutzpah for the antisemite Jeremy Corbyn to appropriate the site and memory of a famous battle against racists who held the same prejudices against Jews as he does. That he shared the platform with someone suspended from the Labour Party for allegedly harbouring similar views is par for course for the former Labour leader. On this occasion, it appears to be Mr Corbyn who has shown that he does not understand English irony.”

Mr Corbyn has often been mocked for his denials of anti-Jewish racism despite his long record of appearing alongside extremely dubious figures, with the former Labour leader sometimes being dubbed the ‘unluckiest anti-racist’ for so often finding himself in the company of these people while insisting on his own blamelessness.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has lodged a complaint against Mr Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day of the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A man reportedly rode his bicycle into a group of visibly Jewish children aged three to fourteen before punching one in the face.

The attack took place on 3rd October at Woodbury Grove near Finsbury Part and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 4729 03/10/21.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Google

A Jewish woman has been left in terror after a brick was thrown through her kitchen window.

The attack took place at 14:00 on 1st October on Heathland Road in Stamford Hill and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD3316 01/10/21.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The Attorney General has asked the Court of Appeal to review the “unduly lenient” sentence given to a student who downloaded nearly 70,000 neo-Nazi and bomb-making documents but who was spared jail and told to read English literature instead.

Ben John, 21, was convicted by a jury at Leicester Crown Court on 11th August of possessing information likely to be useful for preparing an act of terror – a charge that carries a maximum jail sentence of fifteen years. The prosecution even told the court that the former De Montfort University student, who had collated 67,788 documents which contained a large quantity of National Socialist, white supremacist and antisemitic material, as well as information relating to a Satanic organisation, had previously failed to heed warnings by counter-terrorism officers.

Lincolnshire Police had also said that Mr John “had become part of the Extreme Right Wing (XRW) online, and was studying Criminology with Psychology in Leicester when he was arrested”.

Nevertheless, Judge Timothy Spencer QC said that he believed that Mr John’s crime was likely to be an isolated incident and “an act of teenage folly”. He labelled Mr John as a “lonely individual with few if any true friends” who was “highly susceptible” to recruitment by others more prone to action. Judge Spencer went on to say that he was “not of the view that harm was likely to have been caused”.

Speaking directly to Mr John, Judge Spencer asked him: “Have you read Dickens? Austen? Start with Pride and Prejudice and Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities. Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night.” The judge told the defendant to “think about Hardy. Think about Trollope”, before adding: “On 4th January you will tell me what you have read and I will test you on it. I will test you and if I think you are [lying to] me you will suffer. I will be watching you, Ben John, every step of the way. If you let me down you know what will happen.” The judge said of the defendant that “he has by the skin of his teeth avoided imprisonment.”

Mr John was instructed to return to Judge Spencer every four months in order to be tested on his reading. In addition, he was handed a two-year jail sentence suspended for two years plus a further year on licence, monitored by the probation service. Mr John was also given a five-year Serious Crime Prevention Order requiring him to stay in touch with the police and let them monitor his online activity and up to 30 days on a Healthy Identity Intervention programme.

However, Campaign Against Antisemitism and other concerned groups were incredulous that Mr John had been spared jail and was “let off with a mere suspended sentence and some English homework.” We added that “for all the novels that the judge has ordered Mr John to peruse as he enjoys his unearned freedom, it was notable that Crime and Punishment was not among them. Perhaps the judge himself ought to review that classic as he reflects on the risk that his sentence poses to the public.”

Now, however, Attorney General Suella Braverman has intervened, using her power to request that the Court of Appeal review the sentence.

A spokesperson for the Attorney General’s Office said: “I can confirm that the Attorney General has referred Ben John’s sentence to the Court of Appeal as she agrees that it appears unduly lenient. It is now for the Court to decide whether to increase the sentence.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Carla Denyer and Adrian Ramsay have been elected as the new co-Leaders of the Green Party, which may herald fresh impetus in the fight against antisemitism in the Party.

Ms Denyer, a councillor in Bristol, and Adrian Ramsay, a former Deputy Leader of the Party, replace the outgoing Sian Berry and her co-leader, Jonathan Bartley, who stepped down earlier in the summer.

Ms Denyer has been a consistent supporter of the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by the Green Party, which is the only major party in the UK not to have adopted it (in addition to the Party’s branch in Scotland, the Scottish Greens). However, notwithstanding goodwill on the part of its leaders, the Party would be reliant on its membership to back the adoption, which members have thus far been reluctant to do.

The new leaders indicated during the leadership primary that they took antisemitism seriously,

In a hustings, Ms Denyer observed that antisemitism within the Party would not be fixed overnight but insisted that “we need to take a clear and consistent line against antisemitism” and to ensure that the Party is more welcoming and inclusive, with workshops for members and a better resourced disciplinary committee to review antisemitism complaints. She also reiterated her and Mr Ramsay’s support for a motion at Party conference to include antisemitism guidance in the Party’s constitution. That guidance would include the International Definition of Antisemitism but, controversially, also other definitions.

The Denyer-Ramsay ticket elaborated on the issue of antisemitism in a response to a questionnaire from the Jewish Greens. They reiterated their support to the inclusion of the Guidance on Antisemitism being included in the Framework for Ethics and Conduct, inclusion of which is to be debated at the Party’s conference this month. They also committed to the principle of “nothing about us, without us” when talking publicly about issues relating to liberation groups, and pledged to attend antisemitism training and support its role out across the Party.

They further declared that “We have a particular priority in our first 100 days to support the Party’s liberation and policy groups to facilitate workshops and training (e.g. the Jewish Greens’ antisemitism training roadshow)” and that “We also believe that it is important that liberation groups are consulted on policy,” pointing to Ms Denyer’s having co-proposed a motion to this year’s Party conference that “would give liberation groups the right of reply on conference motions that affect their members.”

Although we welcome these commitments and look forward to working with the Green Party’s new leadership, the structures of the Party are such that the flexibility of the leaders to introduce new policies on antisemitism and overhaul the Party’s deficient disciplinary processes is limited.

Joe Glasman, Head of Political Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We congratulate the newly elected leaders of the Green Party and look forward to working with them on tackling the increasingly worrying issue of antisemitism in their Party. However, our recent experiences with the Party’s disciplinary processes give us ample reason for concern, and its new leadership has an uphill battle ahead. For our part, we will continue to support any officials and members in the Party who wish to fight antisemitism, and hope that the new leaders will join us.” 

Campaign Against Antisemitism has extensively documented alleged antisemitism among officers of the Green Party of England and Wales, including the Party’s former Equalities and Diversity Coordinator who now holds the International Coordinator portfolio, on which the Green Party has failed to act.

Recently, we revealed how certain policies of the Scottish Greens (the Green Party branch in Scotland) are cause for concern for the Jewish community, including the Party’s opposition to the International Definition of Antisemitism and other controversial items. Consequently, Scotland’s First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon, is under growing pressure over the SNP’s recent deal with the Scottish Greens.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

David Miller, an academic obsessed with anti-Jewish conspiracy theories, has been fired by the University of Bristol one month after Campaign Against Antisemitism commenced a lawsuit on behalf of current students against the institution.

Our legal case against the University concerned alleged unlawful harassment on the basis of Jewish ethnicity and Judaism, amounting to breaches of the Equality Act 2010, as well as breaches of contract. We launched proceedings in late August and the University swiftly realised that it was putting itself in legal jeopardy by sustaining Prof. Miller’s employment at the institution.

A number of brave students at the University stepped forward to act as complainants in the litigation. We also wish to thank Asserson Law Offices, led by senior partner Trevor Asserson, and barristers Derek Spitz of One Essex Court and Benjamin Gray of Littleton Chambers.

Having failed to act over Prof. Miller since his comments in February, in a statement released today by the University, it said that “following a full investigation”, Prof. Miller is “no longer employed by the University of Bristol,” explaining that “We have a duty of care to all students and the wider University community, in addition to a need to apply our own codes of conduct consistently and with integrity.” The statement admitted that “Prof. Miller did not meet the standards of behaviour we expect from our staff” and that accordingly, “the University has concluded that Professor Miller’s employment should be terminated with immediate effect.”

The lawsuit related to Prof. Miller’s speech on a Zoom webinar in February this year in which he said that the “Zionist Movement” is “the enemy” that must be engaged, that it is “the enemy of world peace,” and that those associated with Zionism, including Jewish students on Bristol campus, “must be directly targeted”.

Taken together, the implication of Prof. Miller’s remarks is that all decent people who support “world peace” should view Bristol Jewish Society and the Union of Jewish Students, and Jewish people, including those who identify with those bodies, and the vast majority of Jewish students as an “enemy” that must be “directly targeted”.

He also said that interfaith work between Jewish and Muslim groups is “a trojan horse for normalising Zionism in the Muslim community”. He also claimed that Jewish students, by virtue of being Zionist, “encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”.

Prof. Miller has a long record of inflammatory statements about the Jewish community. 

Bristol had come under increasing pressure from the Jewish community, which was united in its disgust at Prof. Miller’s comments and the drawn-out investigation that the University was conducting with no apparent end in sight.

Prof. Miller’s statements and the University’s failure to condemn them and take swift action against him have been the subject of a great deal of attention from the Jewish community as well as hundreds of academics and Parliament, including a written question by Lord Austin, as well as a recent intervention from Robert Halfon MP. Prof. Miller was also defended by an array of controversial ‘usual suspects’ whose interventions did nothing for his collapsing credibility.

The legal claim that we spearheaded contended that Prof. Miller’s statements sought to create a hostile environment for Jewish students. It further alleged that the University was liable for Prof. Miller’s conduct, and was further liable in its own right, for unlawful conduct in breach of the Equality Act, and for its breach of its contract with students.

Other than a final call for prospective claimants, we minimised the public profile of the case in order to protect the identities of the brave student claimants who not only believed that enough is enough but that, in order for things to change, they must also act on that belief. We are enormously grateful to them for their courage. Despite the lower public profile of the case, the University was in no doubt about our intentions and resolve.

We also wish to thank others in the Jewish community, MPs and academics for the pressure that they have brought to bear on the University of Bristol in recent months.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Within a month of us commencing proceedings against the University of Bristol on behalf of a group of courageous Jewish students, David Miller has been fired. We pay tribute to them for standing up against antisemitism and to our legal counsel for helping us secure this victory in the fight against anti-Jewish racism on campus.

“Following the launch of our lawsuit, it was clear to the University that it would be held to account in court and had to act to protect Jewish students in accordance with the law. Universities across the country should be warned that we will do whatever it takes to defend Jewish students from racists on campus by upholding their rights in court where necessary.”

The case was the latest step by Campaign Against Antisemitism to defend the rights of individual Jewish students. We believe that universities and students’ unions must be robustly held to account when they fail to defend Jewish students or when they allow their lecturers to discriminate against or harass them.

A sixteen-year-old has been suspected of assaulting a 60-year-old man at a vigil against antisemitism in Hamburg, Germany.

During the “Hamburg for Israel and against antisemitism” vigil, which took place on 18th September near the city’s central train station, a group of three or four people approached the participants and one of them – a male believed to be between the ages of eighteen and 25 – began yelling abuse.

When participants asked the offender to stop, he punched the victim in the face. Although police chased the group, they managed to flee on e-scooters.

After the attack, the victim was reportedly in hospital for six days with a broken cheekbone and nasal bone. Photos show the victim with a swollen eye and bloody face. In an interview, the victim was seen having to wear an eyepatch.

The teenage suspect identified by police as Aram A., who reportedly acted in a film about Holocaust survivors in which he played the role of a bully who harasses a Jewish boy, is being investigated for causing bodily harm.

Hamburg State Security was said to have identified Aram A. using video footage and then located him at his home in Berlin. Aram A.’s mother reportedly stated that her family was “against Israel” but that “what [her] son did is wrong”.

Stefan Hensel, Hamburg’s Commissioner on Jewish Life and the Fight against Antisemitism, said: “The rapid search success of the authorities is a reassuring signal after the disturbing images of the attack on the Hamburg vigil participant. The current case shows once again that even projects with the best intentions are no remedy against antisemitism. We see this incident as an appeal to intensify our work even further. In the long run, it will only be crowned with a consistent investigation of antisemitic crimes and criminal prosecution.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The man who shot and killed a 60-year-old woman in a California synagogue was sentenced to life in jail without the possibility of parole yesterday.

In July, John T. Earnest, the man who killed 60-year-old Lori Gilbert-Kaye in the Chabad of Poway Synagogue shooting in April 2019, pled guilty to the charges of murder and attempted murder in a plea agreement that saw him avoid the death penalty.

Mr Earnest, who was nineteen at the time of the shooting, was said to have entered the synagogue with an AR-15 style rifle and opened fire on the 54 congregants inside, killing Ms Gilbert-Kaye and injuring three others, including an eight-year-old girl and the congregation’s founder, Rabbi Yisroel Goldstein, who lost a finger.

During the shooting, Mr Earnest’s rifle jammed, at which point several members of the congregation ran towards him, chasing him out of the synagogue. He was understood to have fled before calling the police himself to confess that he had committed a shooting at a synagogue because he believed that Jews were trying to “destroy all white people,” and was subsequently apprehended approximately two miles from the synagogue.  

Mr Earnest also confessed to committing arson at the Dar-ul-Arqam Mosque in March 2019 “for the purpose of terrorising Muslim worshippers,” it was revealed in a news release from the San Diego County District Attorney’s Office. Addressing Mr Earnest’s motivation behind the Poway Synagogue shooting, the news release said that Mr Earnest “admitted that he committed those crimes because of his bias and hatred of Jews.”

At yesterday’s sentencing at San Diego’s Superior Court, testimonies from the attack’s victims and witnesses were given before Judge Peter Deddeh read Mr Earnest’s sentence. Mr Earnest’s lawyer stated that Mr Earnest wished to make a statement, though this request was denied by Judge Deddeh who said: “I’m not going to let him use this as a platform to add to his celebrity.”

Mr Earnest is set to be sentenced in December for committing the arson at the Dar-ul-Arqam Mosque.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Recently, swastika graffiti has been discovered around Manistee, Michigan.

After reports last week that swastikas were found painted on roads in Manistee’s Filer Township, a Manistee resident reported that similar graffiti was found in downtown Manistee.

Another resident, Rhonda Greene, stated that she discovered several swastikas downtown by Manistee’s Riverwalk. In an email, Ms Greene wrote: “My husband and I have removed multiple swastikas from the Riverwalk in the last few weeks. I have video of myself rubbing out one that was drawn in chalk near the U.S. 31 Bridge on 17th September, and we have also done the same on several other occasions at various points along the Riverwalk (and in the downtown district).”

Paul Bosschem also testified to witnessing the hateful symbol displayed around Manistee, stating: “I removed two of them at Veterans Memorial Park when I was power washing the stone and concrete. They were in chalk and came off with no problem. I just thought (it was) kids messing around. I did not report it to anyone.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

According to a report, the Labour Party has suspended the Vice Chair of Walsall South Constituency Labour Party after he allegedly claimed that Labour is changing for the worse because Sir Keir Starmer’s “wife is Jewish”.

Nick Dodds has reportedly been put on administrative suspension pending investigation after the Party was alerted to his comments about Lady Starmer, who has largely maintained her privacy during her husband’s leadership of the Party.

Mr Dodds also allegedly claimed that Sir Keir was surrounded by too many Jewish advisors.

It is understood that Mr Dodds’ wife was the first to heckle Sir Keir during his keynote speech at Labour’s annual conference this week.

A Labour Party spokesperson said: “The Labour Party takes all complaints of antisemitism extremely seriously and they are fully investigated in line with our rules and procedures, and any appropriate disciplinary action is taken.”

The Labour Party was found by the EHRC to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The far-right organisation Britain First has registered as a political party, it was revealed this week.

The Electoral Commission approved the group’s registration despite its reputation as a far-right organisation whose leaders have been convicted of, and imprisoned for, hate crimes. Britain First was previously registered as a political party but was deregistered in 2017 after failing to renew its registration on time.

In an email to its supporters, Britain First wrote: “This is a stupendous victory for the Britain First movement. Although our street activities will continue, this day marks the birth of Britain First as a traditional political party that will take the fight to the establishment through the ballot box.”

An Electoral Commission spokesperson said: “The application to register Britain First as a political party has been approved. We assessed this application against the criteria set out in law, including consideration of public comments submitted to us. The party’s application met the legal criteria and the party has therefore been registered.”

In 2019, Facebook reportedly banned a number of far-right groups and individuals, including Britain First leaders Paul Golding and Jayda Fransen.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

A driver’s alleged attempt to run over Jews observing the Jewish festival of Sukkot has prompted a police investigation, it was reported this week.

The reported incident took place last week at Congregation Shaarei Tefila, a synagogue in the Fairfax district of Los Angeles. Magen Am, a security team who were working with the event, said that a man walking a dog appeared to be canvassing the area which made congregants feel uncomfortable. The security team immediately reported the individual to the Los Angeles Police Department. It was said that according to witnesses, the man threatened: “I’m a real Muslim. I’ll show you what real terrorism looks like!”

When approached by Magen Am, the individual reportedly made derogatory comments about Jews, which elevated the team’s suspicions. The man then “returned with his vehicle approximately twenty minutes later and attempted to run over Jews at the event”, and “slammed the gas to full throttle down an alley full of people”. It was said that “People had to jump out of the way or they would have been run over” and according to witnesses, it appeared as though the suspect tried to target a woman and her teenage daughter. The car reportedly then stopped before the metal gates and screamed “F**k the Jews” before fleeing the scene.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Google

On antisemitism, this year’s Labour Party conference has exemplified the tension between public relations and substance and continues to raise questions about how and why the Party’s leadership is tackling the issue. Sir Keir Starmer’s follow-up comment this morning defending his backing of the antisemite Jeremy Corbyn by arguing that a Labour government is better than the alternative is a case in point.

Asked about his effort to de-Corbynise the Labour Party, Nick Robinson asked Sir Keir on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme this morning about a comment that he made during the 2019 General Election backing Mr Corbyn “100%”. Mr Robinson observed to Sir Keir that “you presented to the country with something that was not a plan for serious government…and not a man who was a serious candidate to be Prime Minister.”

Sir Keir responded, saying: “I am a member of the Labour Party and a Labour MP and like every member of the Labour Party and every MP we support a Labour Government. A Labour Government is always better than the alternative. And all of us supported a Labour Government at the last election, and quite right too.”

Sir Keir conveniently omitted that numerous Labour politicians of principle had by that point left the Party in disgust at its institutional racism and in solidarity with their Jewish peers who had been hounded out of the Party under Mr Corbyn’s leadership. Although Mr Robinson’s question was not specifically about antisemitism, Sir Keir mentioned earlier in the interview that antisemitism was one of the reasons that the electorate did not consider Labour under Mr Corbyn fit for government, and Sir Keir’s infamous “100%” backing for Mr Corbyn was never diluted by Mr Corbyn’s or Labour’s racism.

Sir Keir has now explained why he backed a Corbyn government while others left: because loyalty to party trumps fighting racism.

The comment comes the morning after the conclusion of Labour’s annual conference, in which Sir Keir claimed repeatedly to have “closed the door” on antisemites in the Party and on Labour’s “shameful chapter”, even though there was plenty of evidence that this was not remotely the case, with fears for the safety of Jewish attendees and Jewish former Labour MP Ruth Smeeth stating that “this is my 22nd Labour conference, and yet I feel sick about the idea of being in Brighton, knowing I will be a target for yet more racist abuse”; reports of expelled members permitted access to the conference; a speaker who has allegedly promoted Rothschild conspiracy theories invited to address the main conference hall; another outrageous fringe event hosted by the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, Jewish Voice for Labour; and Labour backbencher and one-time member of Sir Keir’s Shadow Cabinet, Lloyd Russell-Moyle, apparently complaining that Labour members were being “purged or set up with false allegations”.

In addition, illustrating the persistence of a particular mindset that continues to strain the Party’s relations with the Jewish community, delegates approved a provocative motion using extremely inflammatory language about the Jewish state that was proposed by the controversial faction Young Labour. Sir Keir and Shadow Foreign Secretary Lisa Nandy tried to distance themselves from the motion.

Then there was Mr Corbyn himself, who reportedly still refused at the conference to apologise for the comments that got him briefly suspended from the Labour Party and indefinitely suspended from the Parliamentary Labour Party (PLP), while apparently continuing to bring other MPs down with him, with longtime ally, Andy McDonald MP  coming under fire for appearing alongside him at a conference event. Mr McDonald subsequently quit the Shadow Cabinet, ostensibly over a policy issue.

Sir Keir apparently reiterated that Mr Corbyn needs to apologise to be permitted to rejoin the PLP (and new rules may mean that Mr Corbyn may never otherwise become a Labour MP again), but the charade of his concurrent membership of the Labour Party and exclusion from the PLP is a constant reminder of how broken Labour’s disciplinary process is. Is it tenable to argue that Mr Corbyn’s offenses are at once so great as to exclude him from the PLP but not so great as to prevent his membership of the Party? Is Labour’s message to be that racists are welcome in the Party but simply not as its public face?

It is that tension between public relations and substance that has become a theme of this year’s Labour Party conference.

Certainly, there were some welcome steps, such as the introduction of a semi-independent disciplinary process, as mandated by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) after it found Labour to be institutionally racist toward Jewish people following an investigation in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant. Yet although this change was legally required, over a quarter of those attending the Labour conference voted against it (as did eight members of Labour’s ruling National Executive Committee in the days preceding the conference) and some affiliated groups (such as the second-largest union, Unite) abstained. Evidently, for them loyalty to their version of Labour trumps not only fighting racism but also the law.

But Sir Keir’s claim to have “closed the door” on antisemitism in the Labour Party is not only absurd but a worrying insight into how he views the problem. At the beginning of the conference, Sir Keir heralded the new disciplinary process as “a major step forward in our efforts to face the public and win the next general election” (because he recognises, as he told BBC Four’s Today programme this morning, that antisemitism was one of the reasons Labour lost the election in 2019), rather than as a sadly necessary means of delivering justice for Britain’s Jews because his Party was found to have been so grotesquely racist as to have broken the law.

Later, at the end of the conference, he delighted in Dame Louise Ellman’s return to the Party — announcing at the beginning of his keynote speech, “welcome home Louise” to an ovation (and some hissing) — but that was the only nod to antisemitism in his entire address. 

Sir Keir will have to show that he sees fighting Labour antisemitism as more than just a public relations stunt necessary to win elections.

Joe Glasman, Head of Political and Government Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Sir Keir Starmer believes that he has closed the door on the shameful chapter of Labour antisemitism, but he is worryingly mistaken. Far from being the end of the matter, approving a semi-independent disciplinary process, as required by law, is merely the beginning of the real challenge of purging racists and their enablers from his Party and delivering justice for the Jewish community. That means implementing that new process, investigating our complaints against Jeremy Corbyn, Angela Rayner and others, and encouraging a major culture change in a Party that, as this conference has shown once again, remains obsessed with Jews and the Jewish state.

“It also means Sir Keir himself admitting that the period of Mr Corbyn’s leadership, which he actively supported, were inimical to his Party’s ideals. In this respect, his claim on Today that a Labour government led by an antisemite is ‘better than the alternative’ is not encouraging.

“Just as Dame Louise Ellman left the Party years after its antisemitism had taken institutional root, so the remedial process, if undertaken in good faith, will take years after her return to run its course, as she herself acknowledges.

“Above all, waging a public relations campaign and actually fighting antisemitism are two different things. Sir Keir has spent the last several days showcasing his ability to do the former, but he cannot pull the wool over the eyes of Britain’s Jews. He will be judged over whether he really reforms the Labour Party and delivers justice for the Jewish community.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has lodged a complaint against Jeremy Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day of the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs, including Angela Rayner. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the EHRC to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The Ukrainian Parliament passed a law last week which bans “antisemitism and its manifestations”.

The Law on Prevention and Counteraction to Antisemitism in Ukraine defines antisemitism as “a certain perception of Jews, expressed as hatred of Jews”.

283 lawmakers out of 450 voted to pass the law, though it must be signed by the President of Ukraine Volodymyr Zelensky, who is himself Jewish. However, the punishment for breaking this law has not been specified.

In August, pig skulls were used to desecrate the grave of Rabbi Nachman’s daughter in Kremenchuk. In June, a synagogue in Kremenchuk was found with bullet holes after being reportedly shot at.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Antisemitic graffiti has been discovered spray-painted on an IKEA store in Melbourne, Australia.

The shop, located in the suburb of Richmond, was reportedly defaced last Thursday with the words “No Jew Jab for Oz” and, on another wall, “No Jew Jab”.

It was noticed by a Jewish woman who reported the vandalism to Victoria Police. Richmond Council painted over the graffiti.

The Anti-Defamation Commission observed the “poisonous alliance” between anti-vaccination networks and antisemitic groups that are “feeding off each other’s conspiracy theories and wacky narratives.”

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Anti-Defamation Commission

Dame Louise Ellman, the last Jewish MP to have quit the Labour Party over antisemitism, has today announced that she is the first to rejoin.

Dame Louise resigned from Labour in October 2019, shortly before the General Election, after 55 years of membership, asserting that “Jeremy Corbyn is not fit to be Prime Minister” because he “spent three decades on the backbenches consorting with, and never confronting antisemites, Holocaust deniers and terrorists”, saying that he has “attracted the support of too many antisemites”.

She said that she made her “agonising” decision because “The Labour Party is no longer a safe place for Jews and Jeremy Corbyn must bear responsibility for this.” She warned: “We cannot allow him to do to the country what he has done to the Labour Party.”

Dame Louise was the last of several courageous MPs to be hounded out of the Party or leave the Party in disgust at its institutional racism, which was later affirmed by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC), following an investigation in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant.

In a statement today, Dame Louise said that she is returning to her “political home” because she is “confident that, under the leadership of Keir Starmer, the Party is once again led by a man of principle” who has “shown a willingness to confront both the anti-Jewish racists and the toxic culture which allowed antisemitism to flourish.”

However, Dame Louise warned that “there remains a great deal more to do to tackle antisemitism in the Party,” and said that she recognises that many others will not feel ready or willing to rejoin.

Yesterday, Labour’s annual conference approved the introduction of a semi-independent disciplinary process, as mandated by the EHRC, but with less than 75% support, showing that there is still considerable resistance within the Party’s membership to addressing its racism.

Indeed, only recently Dame Louise’s successor as MP for Liverpool Riverside, Kim Johnson, denied that Dame Louise had been hounded out of the Party at all, seemingly still denying the scale of the problem.

The Labour Party was found by the EHRC to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The Madrid Assembly, the local Parliament of Spain’s main region, adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism on Friday.

The Assembly also demanded that Spain’s national Parliament adopt legislation that would prevent it from giving any grant or public aid to entities that breach the Definition.

It was reported that Spain adopted the Definition last year. Britain was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism and Lord Pickles worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The outspoken activist Ghada Karmi has reportedly accused Sir Keir Starmer of “weaponising antisemitism”.

Dr Karmi is a former medical doctor and now a Research Fellow at the University of Exeter. She is a perpetual presence on the anti-Israel lecturing circuit in Britain and has a history of making antisemitic statements.

She was the keynote speaker at a meeting last Thursday of the Hackney North Labour Party and accused Sir Keir of using the “label of antisemitism as a weapon”. She further described allegations of antisemitism as a “smear accusation” which was being used as a “weapon” to suspend and expel members of the Labour Party.

The chair of the meeting, Sue Millman, reportedly cut Dr Karmi’s inflammatory address short, saying: “I know and respect your academic credentials, but as you know there are many sensitive issues within the Labour Party at this time. Some of your remarks have been extremely controversial. We have been very careful within this party, that we don’t allow ourselves to become riven over this matter. We have many, many Jewish members of all persuasions. Specifically, because it wasn’t the sort of talk we were expecting we need to draw it to a conclusion now. I really feel we can’t continue.”

Dr Karmi reportedly insisted that those who criticised Israel became “the victims of what I can only call a witch-hunt”, an example of the antisemitic ‘Livingstone Formulation’, by which allegations of antisemitism are dismissed as malevolent and baseless attempts to silence criticism of Israel.

In its report on Labour antisemitism, the Equality of Human Rights Commission (EHRC) determined that such denials of antisemitism were part of the unlawful victimisation of Jewish people by the Labour Party. The report following a statutory investigation by the EHRC in which we were the complainant.

Dr Karmi challenged the International Definition of Antisemitism in her speech and also made inflammatory remarks about Israel.

The Labour Party was found by the EHRC to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A former teacher at Eton College has shared an interview he conducted with an author who claimed that “Jews were always behind pornography”.

Will Knowland, who was reportedly sacked from his position as an English teacher at the prestigious school last year after accusations of sexism were raised against him, shared an interview online in which his guest was a controversial author.

During the interview, the topic of which was pornography and its place in society, author Dr E Michael Jones made several inflammatory remarks. At one point, Dr Jones says: “If you’re talking about, concretely, the rise of pornography in the twentieth century, you have to talk about Hollywood, and you have to talk about the Jews. The Jews were always behind pornography.”

Later in the interview, when Mr Knowland quizzed the author on whether pornography could exist as an expression of free speech, Dr Jones reportedly said: “It’s not part of free speech, no one ever said that dirty pictures were part of free speech, but that’s what the Jews did over this period of time.” He allegedly also called the ADL, an American Jewish organisation, “the SS of the Jewish Gestapo”.

According to the ADL, Dr Jones is “an antisemitic Catholic writer who promotes the view that Jews are dedicated to propagating and perpetrating attacks on the Catholic Church and moral standards, social stability, and political order throughout the world”. The group adds that he “portrays the Jewish religion as inherently treacherous and belligerent towards Christianity” and that he “describes Jews as ‘outlaws and subversives [who use] religion as a cover for social revolution,’ and claims that Judaism possesses ‘a particularly malignant spirit’.”

In 2008, Mr Jones defended the use of the terms “the synagogue of Satan” and “the vomit of Judaism”, stressing that they originate from religious sources.

Mr Knowland reportedly defended the interview yesterday, stating that “Clearly many Jews are aghast at pornography, but suppressing discussion is not healthy. Accordingly, Jewish involvement in pornography has been discussed in the Jewish Quarterly. If Dr E Michael Jones is mistaken in his views, giving them a platform is the best way to expose those mistakes.”

Mr Jones has denied all accusations of antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

The co-Chair of Jewish Voice for Labour, an antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, has been expelled from the Labour Party and thrown out of its annual conference, where JVL was hosting yet another outrageous event.

JVL claimed that Leah Levane was expelled “because she rightly said the Party has been cynically abusing antisemitism issues not to protect Jews but to make Labour a socialist free zone”.

In reality, Ms Levane was more likely expelled for her association with Labour Against the Witchhunt, an antisemitism-denial group that has been proscribed by the Labour Party. Ms Levane is a councillor at Hastings Borough Council, where she was reportedly the only councillor present at a vote to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism to abstain. In 2017, Ms Levane reportedly commented on Facebook on an item titled “Austria’s neo-Nazis find friends in Israel”, writing that it was “not surprising”. She also claimed online: “Jews are often agents rather than instigators of exploitation.”

JVL hosted a fringe event over the weekend at Labour’s annual conference. In the past, its events have attracted controversy. This year’s event – titled “Labour in Crisis – Tackling Racism in the Party” – came after numerous JVL members have found themselves threatened with expulsion from the Party.

The event welcomed numerous former Labour members who have been expelled from the Party, including the antisemites Jackie Walker and Tony Greenstein. The Party has claimed that it cannot prevent expelled members from attending fringe events, which, as one journalist rightly put it, “makes a mockery of claims in the Party’s own guide.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently bankrupted Mr Greenstein after his defamation lawsuit against us humiliatingly backfired.

Although the Party supposedly cannot prevent expelled members from attending fringe events, it does not mean that the Party cannot sanction those who shared a platform with such individuals, as per Sir Keir Starmer’s (poorly fulfilled) leadership election pledge. For example, the former Shadow Chancellor and current backbench MP John McDonnell attended the event.

Meanwhile, journalist Theo Usherwood was ejected from the event (before apparently being permitted re-entry), as was the Jewish activist David Collier.

Elsewhere, the pro-Corbyn MP and controversial former Shadow Minister, Dawn Butler, was also apparently seen wearing a JVL badge, while Andy McDonald, the Shadow Employment Rights Secretary, is reportedly due to host an event with the suspended Labour MP and antisemite Jeremy Corbyn in support of a Unite campaign.

Labour’s annual conference continues in Brighton until Wednesday.

The Labour Party was found by the EHRC to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

UPDATE: JVL has reportedly apologised “unreservedly” after LBC’s political editor Theo Usherwood was allegedly assaulted. Mr Usherwood accused Mr Greenstein of assaulting him and that the crowd had applauded when he was forcibly ejected from the room, before later being permitted re-entry.

According to BBC Click, antisemitism and other forms of hate, including racism towards other groups and homophobia, is being spread through video games.

Examples of such hate were found on the streaming platforms DLive and Odysee where players can stream themselves playing games like Call of Duty, Roblox and Minecraft whilst chatting with other users.

In Minecraft, an adventure game where users can build and create new environments, it was discovered that a user had built a Nazi concentration camp. It was also reported that in the game Roblox, a user had invited other users into a driving game where they could “become a racist” by running over and killing non-white characters.

A spokesperson for Minecraft said: “Terrorist or violent extremist content is strictly forbidden by our community standards and we take action to remove such content if it appears on our systems.”

Roblox spokespeople similarly condemned such actions, stating: “We work relentlessly to ensure our platform remains a safe and civil space, and with a combination of machine learning and a team of over 2,000 moderators, we monitor for safety 24-7 to detect and swiftly act on any inappropriate content or behaviour.” A spokesperson for Call of Duty said: “The actions we have taken to confront racist behaviour include banning players for racist and hate-oriented names, implementing new technology and making it easier for players to report offensive in-game behaviour.”

It was also said that these conversations can then move onto the social media platform, Telegram. In March, we reported that the far-right group Patriotic Alternative was using Telegram to create neo-Nazi channels dedicated to share vile messages, antisemitic conspiracy theories and images glorifying Hitler.

Over a quarter of attendees at the Labour Party’s annual conference voted this weekend against the introduction of a new semi-independent disciplinary process.

The changes are required by the Party’s Action Plan, agreed with the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC), which found Labour to be institutionally racist toward Jewish people following an investigation in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant.

Labour’s ruling National Executive Committee recently endorsed the changes, albeit with eight members voting against and eighteen in favour. Together with the conference vote, it is clear that the Labour Party remains divided on whether to tackle antisemitism in its ranks.

The pro-Corbyn Momentum faction reportedly instructed its delegates to vote against the changes at the Party’s annual conference, which has been marred by the prospect of Jewish delegates being heckled and high-profile Jewish figures being offered security.

Although the passage of the vote was welcome, Sir Keir Starmer absurdly responded by tweeting that “This is a decisive and important day in the history of @UKLabour. By implementing the EHRC rule changes, we’ve closed the door on a shameful chapter in our history. And we have taken a major step forward in our efforts to face the public and win the next general election.”

It is apparently lost on the Labour leader that the introduction of a new disciplinary process is only the beginning, as the new process must now actually be implemented, with outstanding and any new allegations of antisemitism investigated and appropriate sanctions applied. Otherwise, this is nothing more than an exercise in public relations. Sir Keir’s suggestion – in the same breadth – that this is merely “a major step forward in our efforts to face the public and win the next general election” is not encouraging. Tackling racism should not be about winning elections but about doing the right thing.

Joe Glasman, Head of Political Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We welcome the long overdue overhaul of Labour’s disciplinary process, which is at the heart of the Party’s institutional antisemitism. But the devil will be in the implementation, and we will be watching closely to see whether and how Labour investigates our outstanding complaints against numerous sitting MPs, including Jeremy Corbyn and Angela Rayner, under the new process. With over a quarter of conference attendees voting against these changes to Labour’s rules, even though they are mandated by the EHRC, this weekend’s vote shows that these changes are not a silver bullet. Labour members, even today, remain bitterly divided over whether or not Jews should be welcome in their Party.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has lodged a complaint against Jeremy Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day of the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs, including Angela Rayner. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the EHRC to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Today, during party conference season, Campaign Against Antisemitism releases its review of the state of Britain’s major political parties vis-a-vis antisemitism, with particular focus on relevant developments over the past twelve months.

This review of the parties (ordered alphabetically) supplements our ongoing Antisemitism in Political Parties monitoring project, which documents specific cases of antisemitic conduct and how the parties have addressed them.

These findings are based not only on publicly available information but also on our own investigations and dealings with the parties (where those dealings have not been on a confidential basis), except in the case of the Labour Party, which is the only party that refuses to engage with us.

To download a PDF copy of this report, please click here.

Conservative and Unionist Party

There have been a number of cases over the past year where the Conservatives have sought to kick allegations of antisemitism into the long grass, promising investigations and then conducting them in secret, if at all, over long periods, seemingly in the hope that the problem is forgotten and enabling the Party to issue a mere slap on the wrist to the parliamentarians or councillors in question. We at Campaign Against Antisemitism do not forget, however, and we continue to call out the Conservatives over these failures.

Beyond the disciplinary processes themselves, concerns have been raised over the past year in relation to the use of certain tropes about ‘elites’ which, while not inherently antisemitic, have been used to stoke anti-Jewish sentiment within far-right circles in Britain, Europe and the United States. We continue to urge Conservative politicians to employ responsible language and make the context of their views clear to listeners, so that their remarks cannot be construed or misunderstood as endorsements of far-right positions.

At times, there can also be a mismatch between the national Party and local branches, with, for example, ministers repeatedly calling for local authorities to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism but Conservative-led local councils falling behind in doing so.

Shortcomings notwithstanding, the Conservatives – both in their capacity as the party of Government and among backbenchers in Parliament – have been at the forefront of the fight against antisemitism in Britain and abroad, including being the first national government in the world to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism and threatening the funding of local authorities and universities that do not adopt it, as well as proscribing the neo-Nazi terrorist group National Action and the antisemitic genocidal terrorist organisation Hizballah, both following urging by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others.

We continue to work with the Government to advance the security of the Jewish community and to call out shortcomings in the Conservative Party.

Green Party of England and Wales and Scottish Greens

The Green Party is the only major political party in England and Wales not to have adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism, and its sister branch in Scotland, the Scottish Greens, is likewise the only political party not to have done so north of the border. While the Green Party’s outgoing leaders have supported its adoption, both in private conservations with Campaign Against Antisemitism and in their capacity as local councillors in London (where both their councils have adopted the Definition), the membership as a whole has failed to endorse the measure at a Party conference, as is required under Party rules.

While we continue to hold discussions with the Party’s leadership, its disciplinary structures are amateurish and utterly deficient. It has minimal professional infrastructure and, unlike in other major parties, its members retain considerable control over policy. Its constitution has failed to keep up with the Party’s electoral rise. One symptom is the failure to adopt the Definition; another is the Party’s woeful disciplinary process, which we have experienced firsthand. We have submitted numerous complaints to the Party over officeholders and candidates, only to find that the complaints are ignored for long periods of time and then adjudicated against arbitrary standards or dismissed for novel constitutional reasons. The effect is that the Party has failed to take any real action against prominent members who have expressed antisemitic sentiments, including the Party’s recent Equalities and Diversity Coordinator who now holds the International Coordinator portfolio. Finding redress for racism against Jews in the Green Party is thus extremely difficult, and all the more worrying as the Party is also particularly vulnerable as a possible destination for far-left Labour members expelled over antisemitism.

These shortcomings do not go unnoticed by the Jewish community. Our Antisemitism Barometer survey of British Jews late last year found that the Greens were second only to Labour in how many respondents felt that the Party was too tolerant of antisemitism (43%).

The Greens are currently holding a leadership election, with candidates taking different positions on whether and how to fight antisemitism in the Party. We continue to monitor this primary with interest, but we are mindful that unless the Party’s internal procedures change, it may have a problem ever winning the trust of the Jewish community.

In Scotland, the Scottish Greens hold more expressly virulent positions which we have publicised. In 2015, the Party adopted a motion, which has never been rescinded, condemning “Israel’s claim to be ‘the Jewish State’” and “Zionism as a racist ideology.” According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour)” is an example of antisemitism.

The motion also committed the Party to opposing “Aliyah” (Jewish immigration to Israel, including by British Jews) and Israel’s Law of Return, the Jewish state’s answer to centuries of persecution of diaspora Jewry. The motion further called for the removal of Hamas, an antisemitic genocidal terrorist organisation, from its designation by the British Government as a terrorist organisation, and supported the BDS movement — the campaign to boycott the Jewish state — the tactics of which an overwhelming majority of British Jews find intimidating.

The debate on this motion was held on a Saturday, when observant Jews would be unable to participate, and it passed easily. It became Party policy and remains so even as the Scottish Greens recently joined the Scottish devolved Government for the first time. Indeed, it is the first time that a Green Party has joined any Government in the United Kingdom. We remain deeply concerned about these policies of the Scottish Greens and call for the Party to rescind them immediately in order to reassure the Jewish community of its good faith.

Labour Party

The Labour Party is the only political party to have been found to be institutionally racist against Jewish people by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC), following a statutory investigation in which we were the complainant. It is thus in a category of its own when it comes to assessing its record on racism against Jews over the past year.

The Parliamentary Labour Party and Shadow Cabinet comprise politicians who either actively supported an antisemitic leader — and Sir Keir Starmer himself is on record as having given his “100% backing” to Jeremy Corbyn — and those who did nothing as their principled and courageous colleagues quit the Party or, in the case of several Jewish MPs, were hounded out of it. Winning back the trust of the Jewish community — which, historically, has been very supportive of the Party that recently betrayed it — was always therefore going to take real and compelling action.

There have been examples of such action over the past year, including Mr Corbyn’s ongoing suspension from the Parliamentary Labour Party (even as his suspension from the Labour Party was disgracefully short-lived and he is now eligible to attend the Party’s annual conference); proclamations by Labour’s General-Secretary to Constituency Labour Parties to avoid discussing antisemitism; the proscription of the antisemitism-denial group Labour Against the Witchhunt and the disgraced former Labour MP Chris Williamson’s so-called “Resist” faction, with all of their members threatened with automatic expulsion from the Party; the expulsion of Ken Loach; the ruling National Executive Committee’s (NEC) resolution to introduce (subject to approval at Labour’s annual conference) a semi-independent disciplinary process; and, at the local level, the good record of Labour-controlled local authorities of adopting the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Nevertheless, positive steps have been slow, incremental and at times undermined by contradictory maneuvers. For example, Mr Corbyn’s suspension from the Labour Party was inexplicably lifted using precisely the disciplinary process that the EHRC had just ruled was unfit for purpose; numerous MPs and officeholders have not been sanctioned for sharing platforms with members suspended or expelled over antisemitism, despite Sir Keir’s leadership election pledge to do so; and disciplinary actions in other high-profile cases have been reversed, the disciplinary process remains a mess and, when first published, Labour’s proposed complaints handbook was a joke. Furthermore, the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, Jewish Voice for Labour, has not yet been proscribed. Neither, for that matter has the pro-Corbyn Momentum faction, whose co-Chair denied that a Jewish MP was hounded out of the Party, while Young Labour’s controversies are ignored and the Palestine Solidarity Campaign, which a past investigation by Campaign Against Antisemitism found was riddled with bigotry, has been positively welcomed by the Party.

Moreover, the goodwill and trust between Labour and the Jewish community that did build up in the months since Sir Keir won the leadership of the Party was wasted during the conflict between Hamas and Israel, when Labour MPs and councillors, though not alone, were too often involved in stoking communal division, ignoring displays of antisemitism at rallies and on some occasions even joining in with them.

We have also lodged a complaint against Mr Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if our complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day of the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs, including Deputy Leader Angela Rayner. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and indeed there have been reports that our complaint against Ms Rayner has been dismissed without so much as an acknowledgement (contrary to the Party’s new complaints handling policy), let alone an investigation.

Not only have our complaints not been acknowledged almost one year since they were submitted, but Sir Keir has also repeatedly refused to engage with us, despite our being the complainant in the EHRC’s investigation into antisemitism in his Party. Indeed, Labour is the only major political party that has not been willing to work with us when approached.

All of this has been noted by the Jewish community. Our latest Antisemitism Barometer, published at the start of the year (with polling conducted after Mr Corbyn’s suspension and well before the conflict between Hamas and Israel), showed that British Jews feel that the Labour Party is more than twice as tolerant of antisemitism than any other political party. Remarkably, compared to the previous year’s figures (polled while Mr Corbyn was still leader of the Party), Labour performed worse, with 88 percent of respondents considering that the Party was too tolerant of antisemitism under Sir Keir compared with 86 percent the year before under Mr Corbyn, perhaps due to disappointment caused by the evaporation of Sir Keir’s bold promises. At times, this sentiment has spilled into the open.

The Party now faces its next test at its annual conference. The contours of the Party’s internal struggle are clear, with Jewish Voice for Labour due to hold a fringe event; Labour Against the Witchhunt to hold parallel events; Welsh First Minister Mark Drakeford scheduled to speak at a concurrent conference alongside Mr Corbyn and Mr Loach; pro-Corbyn members intending to push a motion to restore the whip to the former leader; and attendees due to be asked to approve mandatory changes to the Party’s disciplinary committee that almost one third of the Party’s ruling National Executive Committee nevertheless still thought fit to oppose.

Even if the leadership succeeds in redirecting the Party and recasting its rules, in the background is Labour’s vast membership, over two thirds of which believe that the problem of antisemitism in the Party has been “exaggerated” or that there is not a serious problem (findings similar to those in a poll conducted shortly after the 2019 General Election), and the Parliamentary Labour Party, too much of which remains populated by Mr Corbyn’s allies and acolytes, who hold similar views to him in relation to the Jewish community. The real challenge — to which our complaints speak — will be applying the new direction and rules to those in the Labour Party who supported or enabled the unlawful victimisation of Jewish people.

We continue to encourage the Labour Party in its positive steps and fulfilment of the Action Plan agreed with the EHRC, but we will also continue to pressure the Party on its failures and inconsistencies, and ultimately expect to see our complaints investigated and upheld so that the Jewish community gets justice.

Liberal Democrats

Whether as a result of their reduced size, lack of media interest or a genuine willingness to tackle antisemitism when it arises — and there is evidence of the latter — the Liberal Democrats appear to have performed rather well over the past year in relation to antisemitism in Britain. The Party has improved markedly since the days of David Ward and Jenny Tonge (who mercifully retired from the House of Lords, where she sat as an independent, earlier this year).

The Party has generally moved quickly to investigate allegations when they have arisen, and even dropped a prospective London mayoral candidate after her past comments emerged — although as the Party’s own leader admitted, questions remain about how she was permitted to stand in the first place.

However, the Party still has something of a blind spot regarding antisemitism abroad. For example, in a debate earlier this year on antisemitism in Palestinian Authority textbooks, one of the Party’s veteran MPs appeared to imply that the issue does not really matter. Meanwhile, at its recent annual conference, the Party adopted a motion about the Middle East that made explicit reference to the Palestinian Authority’s and Hamas’s persecution of the “LGBT+ community and women” but, disappointingly, made no mention of their antisemitism. This was particularly concerning given the surge in antisemitism in Britain during the conflict between Hamas — which is an antisemitic genocidal terrorist group — and Israel earlier this year. The Party did condemn that antisemitism at the time.

We look forward to continuing to work with the Liberal Democrats over the coming year, both to build upon their improvements in dealing with domestic antisemitism and to engage them on the issue of anti-Jewish racism abroad.

Plaid Cymru

Plaid Cymru, the Welsh nationalist party, made a great deal of its internal review into antisemitism, to which we made submissions. The review came following the devastating report into antisemitism in the Labour Party by the EHRC. However, for all the Plaid Cymru report’s worthy conclusions — including that the Party should update its definition of antisemitism to conform precisely to the International Definition of Antisemitism — the Party has taken no real steps at all to deal with its rather public antisemitism problem.

The report made recommendations to improve the Party’s disciplinary process, but these have yet to be implemented. Moreover, the Party showed no willingness to prevent a candidate from standing for election despite her disgraceful record. The Party has also repeatedly failed to update us on the states of complaints that we have submitted. The report and its recommendations are only as useful as the Party’s willingness to tackle the problem of anti-Jewish racism, and the Party’s actions in the months since the review was announced and published give cause for concern.

There is a conflict within the Party as to whether and how to tackle antisemitism. For example, former leader Leanne Wood appeared on Twitter to endorse the claim that antisemitism has been “exploited” to “smear” Jeremy Corbyn and to defend Rebecca Long-Bailey, who was sacked from Labour’s Shadow Cabinet after she promoted an article containing an antisemitic conspiracy theory. Meanwhile, another former leader of Plaid Cymru, Lord Wigley, asserted that “it’s absolutely clear that Plaid Cymru cannot tolerate antisemitism or any other form or racism.”

Late last year, our Antisemitism Barometer surveyed whether British Jews felt that any political parties were too tolerant of antisemitism. Plaid Cymru saw the largest increase compared to the previous year, with a rise from 9% to 23%. Although this year’s figure is still lower than that for other major parties, given Plaid Cymru’s limited geographical focus compared to national parties and its lesser media exposure, the Party should take no comfort from this statistic.

We continue to work with allies within Plaid Cymru to improve the Party’s position on racism against Jews.

Scottish National Party (SNP)

Numerous SNP politicians have been revealed over the past year to have irresponsibly compared their political opponents to Nazis, which we have repeatedly called out, usually leading to apologies. Another MP has also made regrettable comments about antisemitism in Palestinian Authority textbooks. Also this year, an SNP MP previously suspended from the Party over allegations of antisemitism and subsequently readmitted was selected to sit on the Party’s internal conduct committee (the MP has since left the Party for unrelated reasons).

The leader of the SNP and First Minister of Scotland, Nicola Sturgeon, recently sought to reassure the Jewish community that she “understood the community’s anxieties” and is “committed to tackling” antisemitism. It was therefore disappointing that she struck a deal with the Scottish Greens, despite their policies on certain sensitive issues for the Jewish community. Ms Sturgeon now finds herself under pressure over the arrangement.

However, there are also bright spots. The first local authority in Scotland to have adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism is the body controlled by the SNP, namely the Scottish Government. It is important, however, that Ms Sturgeon and the SNP — and indeed all parties — recognise that adoption of the Definition must be followed by its application in disciplinary cases, and that reassuring words must be accompanied by principled action against anti-Jewish racism.

We continue to monitor and cooperate with the SNP in tackling antisemitism in its ranks and within Scotland, where the SNP is the party of Government.

Summary

Joe Glasman, Head of Political Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “There is antisemitism in all political parties, be it expressed, enabled or ignored. But not all parties are equal offenders, with some improving over the years and others moving in the wrong direction. Others still try to tick boxes and say the right things but fail at times to take real action.

“Growing concerns about the Green Party notwithstanding, Labour remains the only major party with a problem of institutional racism, as confirmed by the EHRC following our referral. It is astonishing that, despite being the complainant in the EHRC’s investigation, the Labour Party is alone among national political parties in refusing to engage with us. Under its current leadership, Labour has taken welcome steps to tackle the Party’s racism, but progress has been slow and unsteady. This year’s annual conference could be make-or-break for the Party, with the Jewish community and all decent Britons watching to see what kind of party Labour wants to be.

“We will continue to monitor, expose and cooperate with all parties to educate on and stamp out antisemitism from our public life.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

To download a PDF copy of this report, please click here.

Jewish delegates have reportedly been warned that they may face heckling at this year’s Labour Party conference, which begins this weekend.

The reports are particularly concerning given what has transpired at recent Labour conferences, for example in 2017 the historicity of the Holocaust appeared to be up for debate, in 2018 a Jewish Labour MP needed police protection, and in 2019 antisemitic posters and pamphlets were displayed and distributed. There was no physical conference in 2020 due to the pandemic.

It is understood that veteran Jewish Labour MP Margaret Hodge has also been offered security advice by the Party, and additional protection has been offered to those who may need it.

Tension is building around a vote to approve a new semi-independent disciplinary process, which Labour’s ruling National Executive Committee recently endorsed (albeit with eight members voting against and eighteen in favour). The pro-Corbyn Momentum faction has apparently instructed its delegates to vote against the changes, even though they are legally mandatory as part of the Labour’s Action Plan agreed with the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC), which found the Party to be institutionally racist toward Jewish people following an investigation in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant.

There are also reports that some attendees have been distributing leaflets about the “exaggerated claims on antisemitism” at entrances to the Brighton Centre, where the conference is taking place. Sir Keir Starmer has previously said that those who deny the scope of antisemitism in the Labour Party are part of the problem, and Jeremy Corbyn was briefly suspended from the Party for making similar claims.

There are also more positive reports emerging from the conference, however, confirming the internal divisions in the Party membership which have grown increasingly evident in recent months. One example came this weekend when Labour’s General Secretary, David Evans, a close ally of Sir Keir, asked delegates why they joined the Labour Party, only to be heckled with chants of “Oh Jeremy Corbyn”. He was nevertheless confirmed to his role in a vote of 59 percent to 41 percent.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The only thing more outrageous than the prospect of Jewish delegates facing heckles and possibly requiring security at Labour’s annual conference is that there is not more outrage about it. If any other ethnic or religious minority faced such treatment by the membership of a major political party in Britain, the media and police would give it the utmost attention. It is a testament to how far we have sunk as a nation that we have become so de-sensitised to antisemitism in the Labour Party that this news barely registers.”

The Labour Party was found by the EHRC to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The French courts have given eight defendants who have been convicted of antisemitic harassment a two-month suspended prison sentence.

April Benayoum, who won the title of Miss Provence 2020 and was the runner-up in the Miss France 2021 contest, received antisemitic abuse online after it was revealed that her father was Israeli, including one tweet which read: “Hitler forgot to exterminate you, Miss Provence.”

It was reported that on Wednesday at Paris Criminal Court, most of the defendants appeared to show remorse for their actions. Ahmet I., one of the defendants, reportedly said: “I am ashamed to be here, to be seen as an antisemite or a racist. I apologise to Ms. Benayoum for having made remarks like that.” Another defendant, Rayanne M., allegedly said that he was “ashamed that people have this image of me as an antisemite.”

Mr Benayoum said that she accepted their apologies, but added that “Forgiving will be more difficult, this is something that hurt me a lot and spoiled an exceptional adventure.”

Mr Benayoum reportedly received an outpouring of support, including from the French Interior Minister, Gerald Darmanin, who said that he was “deeply shocked by the shower of antisemitic insults against Miss Provence”, adding: “Shame on their authors.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: The Algemeiner Journal via Twitter

Controversial activist Jim Curran was spotted at a protest against Puma last weekend holding a sign reading “Gaza is a Holocaust”.

Mr Curran was participating in a protest on 18th September outside the Puma shop in London. The demonstration was organised by the Palestine Solidarity Campaign, which a past investigation by Campaign Against Antisemitism found was riddled with bigotry.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

Mr Curran is a regular attendee at a group called Keep Talking, a group of far-right and far-left conspiracy theorists who come together to promote antisemitism.

Last year, Best for Britain, an influential activist group, apologised for tweeting a viral picture of Mr Curran attending an anti-racism rally in view of his links to the antisemitic group.

Image credit: Sussex Friends of Israel

Eight members of the Labour Party’s ruling National Executive Committee (NEC) voted against rule changes mandated by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC).

Eighteen members of the NEC voted in favour of the semi-independent disciplinary process that Labour is required to implement under its Action Plan agreed with the EHRC, outweighing the eight who opposed the measure. It is not clear how the minority expected their Party to fulfil the EHRC’s legally-mandated conditions had the vote failed.

It is understood that the eight to vote against were Mish Rahman, Gemma Bolton and Nadia Jama, who represent Constituency Labour Parties (the Party’s grassroot local branches); Ian Murray of the Fire Brigades Union; Andi Fox of the TSSA union; Yasmine Dar, the pro-Corbyn former chair of Labour’s disputes panel who did not believe that the Party has a problem of institutional antisemitism even as her brother was suspended over antisemitism allegations; Mick Whelan of the ASLEF union; and Andy Kerr of the Communication Workers Union.

Meanwhile, a new poll by Yonder (formerly Populus) for Labour Uncut shows that just over a quarter (26%) of non-Labour voters would consider voting for the Party at the next election, but six in ten of this group (60%) said that they would be more likely to vote for the Labour Party if Jeremy Corbyn is expelled if he fails to apologise over antisemitism.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We have been calling for the expulsion of Jeremy Corbyn for a long time over his Party’s institutional antisemitism and his own. This poll shows that the public agrees with this stance, as ordinary decent people recognise that Labour cannot return to its anti-racist legacy while Jeremy Corbyn and his acolytes retain such influence.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has lodged a complaint against Mr Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day of the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Prosecutors have filed hate crime charges against two suspects in connection with an attack earlier this year on a group of Jewish diners at Sushi Fumi, a kosher restaurant in Los Angeles.

Xavier Pabon, 30, and Samer Jayylusi, 36, are accused of participating in a group of eight people who approached the restaurant and abused Jewish patrons, leading to violence. They have each been charged with one count of assault with a hate crime enhancement.

Video footage of the 18th May incident, which took place during the conflict between Hamas and Israel, showed a group of men, mostly in black, in a car waving Palestinian Authority flags and yelling at diners outside the restaurant. They are later seen outside of the restaurant attacking the diners, reportedly having yelled antisemitic slurs. The attackers were said to have also thrown bottles and pepper sprayed a member of the public who tried to defend the Jewish diners, causing them to go to hospital.

According to one witness, “Those people [the attackers] know who lives in this area, that there is a big Jewish community, that’s why they arrived here, they were looking for Jews to attack. They were demanding to know who is Jewish and were very aggressive. I’m still shaken by what had happened.”

They went on to say that the incident was “worse than what the clip is showing. You can’t hear the profanity and antisemitic slurs they were using. Here were guys who were minding their own business, not bothering anyone, and they were attacked just for being Jewish. I am disgusted. I’ve lived in L.A. all my life and never encountered anything like this. I’m now fearful to identify myself as a Jew. I can’t believe this is happening here, I don’t feel safe anymore.”

A brother of one of the victims wrote about the experience on Facebook. He wrote: “Tonight was the scariest night of my life…two of my brothers’ friends identified themselves as Jewish and got beaten down as a result. I’m pretty speechless at the moment but all I can say is be very careful out there if you are Jewish. Not many people have our back or truly understand this situation we are facing. People will forever be blindsided by the media and unfortunately it’s out of our control.”

Los Angeles County District Attorney George Gascón said: “A hate crime is a crime against all of us. My office is committed to doing all we can to make Los Angeles County a place where our diversity is embraced and protected.”

When elected last year, Mr Gascón had announced an end to sentencing enhancements, but after a backlash he reversed the policy for crimes against victims whom he deemed extremely vulnerable, including hate crimes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A 60-year-old man was injured at a vigil against antisemitism in Hamburg, Germany, after a group of youths insulted the participants with antisemitic abuse.

During the “Hamburg for Israel and against antisemitism” vigil, which took place last Saturday near the city’s central train station, a group of three or four people approached the participants and one of them – a male believed to be between the ages of 18 and 25 – began yelling abuse.

When participants asked the offender to stop, he punched the victim in the face, necessitating treatment in a hospital.

Although police chased the group, they managed to flee on e-scooters. Police are appealing for witnesses and information.

Stefan Hensel, Hamburg’s Commissioner on Jewish Life and the Fight against Antisemitism, said: “Violence driven by hatred of Israel and Jews is a disgrace to our city. This heinous attack must be condemned in the strongest possible terms. The act shows once again that so-called Israel-related antisemitism is increasingly turning into real violence. The perpetrators must be caught as soon as possible and brought to justice.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Three French unions representing school teachers have condemned antisemitic tropes that featured at demonstrations against ‘vaccine passports’.

In a joint statement, CGT Education 43, FSU 43 and SUD Education 43, all of the Haute-Loire region of south-central France, observed that “for several weeks now, a handful of ultra-right activists have been instrumental in using the Saturday demonstrations against the health pass to display signs with hate messages with impunity,” and declared that “words and acts that target French people of Jewish faith, culture or tradition or attack their existence, their memory or their identity, hurt the whole of France.”

Placards at the rallies apparently bore slogans including, “Non a la manipula-Sion” (“No to manipulation”) with “Sion” (“Zion”) underlined; “En marche vers le chaos mondial” (“Forward to global chaos”), a pun on the political party of French President Emmanuel Macron and a slogan associated with convicted Holocaust denier Alain Soral; and “Je suis Cassandre” (“I am Cassandre”), declaring solidarity with controversial activist and former far-right Parliamentary candidate Cassandre Fristot.

The unions’ statement went on to assert that “Antisemitism is a crime condemned by law. It should be neither excused nor trivialized,” before calling on local residents “to stand up in the face of the return of the ‘Filthy Beast’ and of any form of racism.”

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Police are reportedly investigating after a video emerged appearing to show children in a Catholic school shouting antisemitic language and performing Hitler salutes in Ontario.

North Bay police are examining the video, in which pupils at École Secondaire Catholique Algonquin appear to be marching around a field shouting antisemitic language and performing Nazi salutes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

An alleged co-founder of the proscribed neo-Nazi National Action group has denied seven terror offences.

Ben Raymond, 32, appeared at Bristol Crown Court to enter a plea of not guilty against the charge of membership of a proscribed organisation contrary to Section 11 of the Terrorism Act.

National Action was banned in the UK in 2016 following pressure by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Mr Raymond also pleaded not guilty to six counts of possessing a document or record of use to a terrorist contrary to Section 58 of the Terrorism Act.

The material allegedly includes documents titled “Ethnic Cleaning Operations”, “2083 – European Declaration of Independence by Anders Breivik”, “Homemade Detonators by Ragnar Benson”, “TM 31-210 Improvised Munitions Handbook”, “Homemade Molotov Cocktail” and “Cluster Bomb”.

Mr Raymond’s trial is expected to begin on 1st November and last for three to four weeks, with the defendant released on conditional bail until then.

Last year, members of the proscribed National Action group were sentenced to prison, having engaged, amongst other activities, in far-right stickering and recruitment campaigns.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years.

The Liberal Democrats have passed a motion that makes explicit reference to the Palestinian Authority’s and Hamas’s persecution of the “LGBT+ community and women” but makes no mention of their antisemitism.

Motion “F39: Towards a Lasting Peace in Israel and Palestine”, which has been passed at the Liberal Democrats’ annual Party conference this week, condemns the Palestinian Authority, Hamas and Israel and pushes for “trade [to be] used as a tool for peace and shared prosperity”, among other resolutions.

However, although the motion calls on the British Government to “Apply pressure on the Palestinian Authority and Hamas, where appropriate, to halt persecution of or discrimination against marginalised groups, including the LGBT+ community and women, civil society organisations and democratic opposition,” the motion makes no mention of the rampant antisemitism in the territories controlled by the Palestinian Authority and Hamas. Anti-Jewish racism is sadly central to the ideologies, policies, educational materials and civil society activities of these entities.

Hamas in particular is an antisemitic genocidal terrorist organisation, and its recent conflict with Israel was a pretext for an outpouring of hate towards Jews in Britain and around the world. It is therefore extraordinary that, in light of Hamas’ very real impact in this country, the Liberal Democrats failed to call out its (and the Palestinian Authority’s) antisemitism.

Although the Party has condemned antisemitism in the UK – including Layla Moran MP, the Party’s Spokesperson for Foreign Affairs who moved the motion – nevertheless it is disappointing that this motion failed to mention the point, despite its gravity and indeed centrality to the motion’s subject matter.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A conspiracy theorist has admitted defacing seventeen bus stops in London with graffiti, including the words “Jews and gays are aliens”.

Nicholas Lalchan, 47, has admitted criminal damage, causing £100 worth of damage to each stop and to the windows of an accountancy firm. However, he denied any religious or racial motivation, in spite of what he wrote on the bus stops in heavily-Jewish neighbourhoods such as Finchley, Hendon and Edgware.

The prosecutor told jurors that the graffiti “encouraged people to make searches on the internet” which would lead them to “think badly” of Jewish people. He added that “they were seen by Jewish people and non-Jewish people who were distressed by what they saw and reported it to the police.”

A still image of the vandal was recognised by a community support officer and he was arrested at his home in Edmonton. A search of his home reportedly revealed leaflets, pens and a memory stick holding material referencing Jewish people and conspiracy theories.

When he was charged, Mr Lalchan allegedly said: “New world order. The fourth Reich. We will see.”

Mr Lalchan was charged with racially and religiously aggravated criminal damage and with possessing a marker pen with intent to cause criminal damage and stirring up racial hatred, and his trial continues at Aldersgate House in the City of London, a Nightingale court opened to speed up the backlog of cases caused by the pandemic.

The antisemitic former leader of the Labour PartyJeremy Corbyn, is scheduled to appear at an event with an actor who tweeted about Jewish toddlers having their “cute little horns filed off”.

Numerous past comments by Rob Delaney have surfaced in advance of his event on 4th October with Mr Corbyn, organised by the People’s Assembly to protest the Conservative Party’s annual conference.

Mr Delaney wrote in 2009: “When I think of adorable Jewish baby boys getting circumcised AND having their cute little horns filed off, I get so sad!”

In 2011, he tweeted: “Somebody probably has the phone number 1-800-JEW-FART.” Jews are often subjected to crude flatulence references to the gas chambers, where many of the six million victims of the Holocaust were murdered. 

In 2012, he joked about wishing to atone on Yom Kippur, the most solemn day in the Jewish calendar, “for the weeks I’ve wasted on chubby naked Jewish girls on bikes dot com”, and described a song by Van Halen as being “worse than 3 holocausts”.

Some social media users defended the tweets as satire, and Mr Delaney, a Catholic who reportedly attended a Jewish nursery school, has previously that he “wouldn’t even think of living somewhere that wasn’t swarming with Jews.”

Mr Corbyn has often been mocked for his denials of anti-Jewish racism despite his long record of appearing alongside extremely dubious figures, with the former Labour leader sometimes being dubbed the ‘unluckiest anti-racist’ for so often finding himself in the company of these people while insisting on his own blamelessness.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has lodged a complaint against Mr Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day of the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The town of Huntington in Suffolk County, NY, has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The Definition was adopted following the passage of a majority resolution, without objection, at a meeting last week of the town’s governing board.

Earlier this year, Suffolk County, where Huntington is located, and neighbouring Nassau County adopted the Definition.

Britain was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism and Lord Pickles worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Australian activists have condemned antisemitic graffiti in a park in Keilor, a suburb of Melbourne.

Swastika graffiti was found in Caroline Chisholm Park, which has since been removed by Brimbank Council and reported to the police.

A Council official said that the hateful graffiti “has no place in our community,” and police pledged to step up patrols. Local MP Andrew Giles launched a petition calling on the community to “reject this sort of hate.”

Antisemitic graffiti has also been found in Broadmeadows and Mernda, also Melbourne suburbs, over the past month.

A spokesperson for Victoria Police said: “We understand incidents of antisemitism can leave communities feeling targeted, threatened and vulnerable. These incidents have no place in our society. There is no excuse to engage in behaviour that promotes fear or hate in our community. We treat any report of antisemitism seriously, whether it happens on the street or online.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Google

A suspect has been charged in connection with an alleged antisemitic assault on an elderly Jewish employee at a Toronto shop.

The victim was reportedly punched unconscious in the incident, which took place on 28th July at an off-licence liquor store in the Canadian city.

According to a local group, the 26-year-old suspect allegedly attempted to purchase beer but, when asked by the cashier for proof of age, became belligerent, allegedly calling the victim “a dirty f***ing Jew” and lunging at him with a wine bottle and other items before punching him in the face, knocking him briefly unconscious. He required stiches and more than a week off work as a result of the incident.

A suspect was arrested three weeks later and charged with two counts of assault and two counts of assault with a women, and three further criminal counts in what Toronto Police treated as a hate crime.Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A French court has acquitted an imam of incitement to racial hatred over a 2017 sermon in which he declared that “Judgement Day will not come until the Muslims fight the Jews”.

Mohamed Tataiat, the Imam of the Grand Mosque of Toulouse since 1987, was quoting a hadith popular among Islamists that “Judgement Day will not come until the Muslims fight the Jews. The Jews will hide behind the stones and the trees, and the stones and the trees will say, oh Muslim, oh servant of Allah, there is a Jew hiding behind me — come and kill him.”

A legal case was pushed by numerous French Jewish organisations and anti-racism groups, but, following a three-month trial, the President of the Toulouse Criminal Court concluded that the sermon was not intended to “provoke hatred or discrimination,” and that “the words could have been said recklessly, but not with the desire to discriminate.”

Jewish leaders were unimpressed with the verdict, which some compared to the recent case of Sarah Halimi, whose antisemitic murderer was held to be unable to stand trial due to being high on cannabis at the time of the crime.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: MEMRI

The co-Chair of the pro-Corbyn pressure group Momentumv is alleged to have previously claimed that the former Labour Party MP, Luciana Berger, was “disingenuous” about antisemitism in the Party.

In a message on Facebook, Gaya Sriskanthan responded to an interview in which Ms Berger revealed that six people had been convicted of antisemitic hate crimes against her, by saying that Ms Berger “disingenuously conflats the increase in antisemitism across the country (and Europe) with the Labour Party.”

She went on to insist that “Labour has nothing to do with the broader trend, which is in fact being driven by the rise of the far-right. The best reemdy for the far-right and the racism that comes along with it, is a strong united Left. Therefore the actions of the ‘Independent Group’ [which Ms Berger had helped to launch following her departure from Labour] actually further right-wing extremism.”

The comments allegedly appeared on the Labour International Left Alliance Facebook group in March 2019.

Ms Berger was hounded out of the Labour Party due to antisemitism. Her departure from the Party followed years of harassment abuse and death threats from far-left Party activists, particularly those who supported Jeremy Corbyn.

It is understood that a complaint has been submitted to the Labour in respect of Ms Sriskanthan’s remarks. She was elected co-Chair of Momentum last year.

A spokesman for the Labour Party said: “The Labour Party takes all complaints of antisemitism extremely seriously and they are fully investigated in line with our rules and procedures, and any appropriate disciplinary action is taken.”

Earlier this year, Mr Corbyn himself also asserted that “Luciana was not hounded out of the Party; she unfortunately decided to resign from the Party”, despite Ms Berger being one of a number of MPs who quit the Labour Party in protest at its institutional antisemitism.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Four men from Blackburn have been charged in connection with the alleged antisemitic abuse shouted from a ‘Free Palestine’ convoy in North London in May.

Participants in the convoy were caught on video allegedly shouting through a megaphone “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” as they drove through Jewish neighbourhoods waving the flag of the Palestinian Authority, during fighting between Hamas and Israel.

The incident took place a stone’s throw from a synagogue in West Hampstead and continued into St John’s Wood. The convoy had previously and provocatively passed through other Jewish neighbourhoods as well, including Hendon and Golders Green.

The abuse was condemned by the Prime Minister and Home Secretary.

In a statement, the Metropolitan Police Service admitted that they had failed so badly to monitor the convoy that it took hours to find the car in question, which was identified from photographs taken by a Jewish member of the public who had the presence of mind to capture images of the vehicles’ licence plates.

Later that day, the Met made four arrests, and today the police force has announced that it has charged Mohammed Iftikhar Hanif, 27; Jawaad Hussain, 24; Asif Ali, 25; and Adil Mota, 26, all from Blackburn, with using threatening, abusive or insulting words, or behaviour, with intent, likely to stir up racial hatred.

They were charged on 16th September and are due to appear at Westminster Magistrates’ Court on 6th October.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “This was an extremely distressing incident. Jewish families have told us that they were sent running in fear as a convoy of cars drove through London flying the flag of the Palestinian Authority and shouting ‘F*** the Jews…rape their daughters’. We are pleased that suspects have now been charged but the convoy should never have been allowed in the first place and there remain many other unsolved crimes committed against British Jews from that same period of fighting between Hamas and Israel. The perpetrators in these cases must be brought to justice.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to the Home Secretary calling on her to proscribe Hamas in full in the UK, and has urged all MPs to do the same.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The image on this article has been partially obscured due to legal restrictions on the reporting of active criminal cases.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has published a new teachers’ guide on antisemitism for non-denominational schools, to complement our existing guides designed for Church of England and Catholic Schools which have been endorsed by BBC Teach.

The new guide, Love Your Neighbour, is, like the other two guides, intended for use with an accompanying student-friendly PowerPoint presentation, which is also available on our website and through BBC Teach.

Our existing guides – Love Thy Neighbour, designed specifically for Church of England schools, and Love Your Neighbour, for Catholic schools – have also been updated to cover new cultural developments and manifestations of anti-Jewish racism, including with reference to the social media platform TikTok, Black Lives Matter and the antisemitic grime artist Wiley.

These guides, like so many of our projects, represent the hard work of our dedicated expert volunteers, who have poured their wealth of experience in education and teaching antisemitism to young people into these guides.

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We are extremely proud of our teachers’ guides, which, thanks to the efforts of our tireless volunteers, have enabled countless schoolchildren of all ages to learn about antisemitism from their own teachers. These guides provide teachers with accessible resources to teach a complex topic and satisfy important requirements of the national curriculum. Following the success of our guides in the Church of England and Catholic school systems, we are delighted to launch our non-denominational guide for wider use in schools across the country. We continue to pursue innovative ways to discharge our mandate to educate society, including our youth, about the dangers of antisemitism and what they can do to stand up against it.”

You can download the guides here or visit BBC Teach here

The candidates for the leadership of the Green Party have elaborated on their views on tackling antisemitism in the Party.

Jewish Greens, a Jewish faction within the Green Party of England and Wales, provided each of the five candidate teams (three pairs and two individuals) with a questionnaire to survey their views.

Candidates were asked whether they agree to the following pledges, and were also asked further questions for responses in prose.

  • Would you support the Guidance on Antisemitism being included in the Framework for Ethics and Conduct? (inclusion of the “Antisemitism: A Guidance” document is to be debated at the Party’s conference next month)
  • Would you commit to the principle of “nothing about us, without us” when talking publicly about issues relating to liberation groups?
  • Would you attend antisemitism training and support its role out across the Party?

The leadership ticket of current Deputy Leader Amelia Womack and Tamsin Omond agreed to all three pledges, as did the Carla Denyer and Adrian Ramsay partnership.

In their fuller responses, Ms Womack and Ms Omond said that “tackling both intentional and unintentional discrimination and prejudice is essential to building an accessible, inclusive, and representative movement” and observed that the Party’s leadership has a responsibility to use its influence to “tackle discrimination of all kinds, including antisemitism.”

They declared that “we will support efforts of members to introduce a definition of antisemitism in our members’ Code of Conduct to establish clear guidelines of what does and does not constitute antisemitism, so that we can begin to educate our members on how to spot antisemitic tropes, and how to avoid further propagating them themselves. This will also give the Disciplinary procedures within our party the confidence they need to ensure that those who perpetuate antisemitism, prejudice, and hate within our party are held accountable.”

They added that “We will also encourage the use of external specialist advice for complex and technical disciplinary cases, to ensure that nobody is denied the justice they deserve,” which is particularly welcome, in view of our experiences with the Green Party’s disciplinary processes.

Carla Denyer and Adrian Ramsay declared that “We have a particular priority in our first 100 days to support the Party’s liberation and policy groups to facilitate workshops and training (e.g. the Jewish Greens’ antisemitism training roadshow)” and that “We also believe that it is important that liberation groups are consulted on policy,” pointing to Ms Denyer’s having co-proposed a motion to this year’s Party conference that “would give liberation groups the right of reply on conference motions that affect their members.”

Former Deputy Leader Shahrar Ali (who is running alone) agreed to the second and third pledges but not the first, likely because the “Antisemitism: A Guidance” document includes the International Definition of Antisemitism, which he opposes. Mr Ali erroneously described the Definition in his response as “a bad definition of antisemitism [which] could disproportionately affect Palestinians, or their allies, as well as Jews – precisely because it would be counterproductive on its own terms and not help to tackle genuine antisemitism by conflating legitimate political criticism.” Mr Ali supports the adoption by the Green Party of the Jerusalem Declaration, which he describes as a “good definition” but which is actually a wrecking document intended to undermine the globally recognised Definition.

Mr Ali also singled out Campaign Against Antisemitism “which promotes adoption of the highly problematic IHRA [International Definition of Antisemitism].” We are indeed a leading and proud advocate of the internationally-recognised Definition, which enjoys consensus support in the British Jewish community and has been adopted by all major political parties except the Green Party.

Martin Hemingway and Tina Rothery, another leadership pair, declined to answer the first two questions, insisting that they required a more “nuanced” response, but agreed to the third. In their replies to further questions, they stated that “We think real antisemitism in the Party i.e. hatred or distrust of Jewish people is very rare. We are concerned about the potential for what might be called ‘definitional antisemitism’ to create differences where these are not real. For this reason we think it is important that the Party thinks carefully about how it is to define antisemitism.” They prefer the Jerusalem Declaration to the International Definition of Antisemitism but “ideally both would be available on the Party’s ‘Framework for Ethics & Conduct’, and we need to work together to ensure that this happens.”

The final candidate, Ashley Gunstock was, according to the Jewish Greens, advised by the Electoral Returning Officer “to refuse to answer yes/no questions”, therefore he did not respond to the pledges. In his replies to questions, however, he stated that “the Green Party should be condemning all antisemitic and racist groups and campaign for any such to be removed from social media,” although it is not clear what standard he would expect to be used to identify antisemitic discourse. Several of the other candidates also expressed concern over antisemitism and hate on social media.

The full responses of all the candidates to all of the questions can be accessed here.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has extensively documented alleged antisemitism among officers of the Green Party of England and Wales, including the Party’s former Equalities and Diversity Coordinator who now holds the International Coordinator portfolio, on which the Green Party has failed to act.

We continue to monitor the Green Party’s leadership contest and the candidates’ policies on antisemitism within the Party and wider society.

Recently, we revealed how certain policies of the Scottish Greens (the Green Party branch in Scotland) are cause for concern for the Jewish community, including the Party’s opposition to the International Definition of Antisemitism and other controversial items. Consequently, Scotland’s First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon, is under growing pressure over the SNP’s recent deal with the Scottish Greens.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Antisemitic books were on sale outside a Warsaw Church that was hosting a beatification ceremony of revered Catholic figures, attended by Polish leaders.

The books, with titles such as Scum and the Jews in Today’s Poland and Judeopolonia II — Anatomy of Enslaving Poland, were met with no protest from the thousands of worshippers attending Warsaw’s Temple of Divine Providence for the beatification of Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski and Mother Elzbieta Roza Czacka.

Polish President Andrzej Duda, Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki and Jaroslaw Kaczynski, the leader of the ruling Law and Justice Party, were all in attendance for the beatification Mass, which was led by Vatican representative Cardinal Marcello Semeraro.

In addition to the antisemitic books was anti-vaccination literature and other conspiratorial material.

The ceremony took place while Pope Francis was in Hungary condemning antisemitism, which he did again two days later in Slovakia.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Wojciech Karpieszuk

Jeremy Corbyn’s controversial liaison to the Jewish community is under investigation by the Labour Party in connection with alleged antisemitism-denial.

Heather Mendick’s appointment to the role by Mr Corbyn in 2019 was criticised by Jewish groups due to her views, which included that antisemitism claims had been “weaponised” and opposition to Labour’s adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism. She also joined disgraced MP Chris Williamson on his “Democracy Roadshow” and expressed “solidarity” for Jenny Manson, a Chair of Jewish Voice For Labour (JVL), an antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation. Ms Mendick even signed a letter in The Guardian claiming that Mr Corbyn was a “formidable” opponent of antisemitism after Luciana Berger resigned from Labour over its institutional antisemitism.

Ms Mendick was a member of Momentum, the pro-Corbyn campaign group, and worked as a research consultant and Secretary of Hackney South Labour Party. Despite her unfitness, Mr Corbyn appointed her to the role, which reportedly involved working in his office one day a week.

She now faces scrutiny by the Labour Party over a litany of claims that she has made in relation to antisemitism, which have been set out in a letter to her. According to the letter, she is alleged to have described antisemitism allegations as a “smear” and a “false narrative”, among other outrageous claims.

The letter to Ms Mendick is part of a wider crackdown by the Labour Party on members who have affiliated to proscribed factions or expressed views that are either antisemitic or deny the Party’s institutional antisemitism problem. This crackdown has affected members of various factions, including JVL and Labour Against the Witchhunt, the latter of which has been proscribed.

JVL is reportedly planning a fringe event at Labour’s conference later this month called “Labour in Crisis – Tackling Racism in the Party”. Previous JVL fringe events have been forums of controversy. This latest planned event comes after numerous JVL members have found themselves threatened with expulsion from the Party.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

An attempted Islamist terrorist attack on a German synagogue on Yom Kippur has reportedly been thwarted.

Services in Hagen Synagogue in North Rhine-Westphalia were called off on Wednesday after “very serious and concrete information” was received by German officials, according to the Interior Minister of the country’s most populous State.

The information was reportedly received from a foreign intelligence service, rumoured to be Israel.

A sixteen-year-old Syrian national who lives in the city was detained yesterday morning, with three other people arrested in a raid on an apartment in connection with the incident.

According to Der Spiegel, the teenager mentioned in an online chat that he was planning an attack on a synagogue using explosives, which led investigators to the boy, who lives with his father in Hagen.

Police cordoned off the synagogue for the Kol Nidrei service on Wednesday night and sniffer dogs were deployed, although no dangerous objects were found in or around the synagogue. The investigation is ongoing.

Armin Laschet, the State Premier, said that “It appears that prior to today on Yom Kippur, an Islamist-motivated attack was averted,” adding: “We will do everything we can to clarify which networks may have been behind” the plot. Mr Laschet is running to succeed Angela Merkel as Chancellor of Germany.

German Justice Minister Christine Lambrecht said: “It is intolerable that Jews are again exposed to such a horrible threat and that they cannot celebrate the start of their highest holiday, Yom Kippur, together.”

The incident comes two years after a neo-Nazi attack on Yom Kippur targeted a synagogue in Halle. Although the synagogue’s security door thwarted that attack, the perpetrator, Stephan Balliet, went on to murder a passer-by and the patron of a nearby kebab shop before being arrested following a firefight with police. Last December Mr Balliet was given a life sentence.

Earlier this year, the Muslim-owned kebab restaurant in Halle that was targeted in the attack was saved from bankruptcy by a fundraising campaign led by the Jewish community.

Germany has seen a spate of Islamist terrorist attacks in recent years.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

For the second time in two weeks, Campaign Against Antisemitism will be writing to an auction house over the selling of Nazi memorabilia.

Earlier this month, Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to Tennants auctioneers expressing dismay and outrage at the sale, which they have readily agreed not to replicate in future.

However, Easy Live Auction continues to sell an assortment of Nazi memorabilia that includes weapons, coins, medals, and clothing, which appears to amount to a staggering 172 lots.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “These items belong in a museum, not in the hands of sick collectors acquiring them from an auction house that stands to profit from these sales. We shall be writing to the auctioneers to inquire why they are offering for sale memorabilia and mementos from a genocide.”

Recently, a BBC Bargain Hunt expert apologised after it was revealed that Nazi memorabilia was due to be sold at his auction house.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

A trial date has been given for a man accused of creating the website “Radio Aryan” in order to upload antisemitic and racist podcasts.

James Allchurch, 49 from Pembrokeshire, appeared at Haverfordwest Magistrates’ Court last month where he denied all fifteen counts of distributing a sound recording stirring up racial hatred.

Mr Allchurch reportedly wore a mask, visor and sunglasses, and asked that people refer to him as “Sven Longshanks”. When asked why Mr Allchurch wished to be called Sven Longshanks, he allegedly replied: “This is my life’s work that is on trial and that’s the name that my work is published under.”

The court reportedly heard that Radio Aryan had been running since 2015 and that twelve of the charges related to material allegedly offensive to people from black or ethnic minority communities while three relate to podcasts accused of being antisemitic.

On Wednesday, Mr Allchurch appeared at Swansea Crown Court where he reportedly denied fifteen charges of distributing a sound recording stirring up racial hatred on or before 17th May, 2019, to on or before 18th March, 2021. He allegedly only spoke to say his name and “not guilty” in response to each of the charges that were read out.

The charges allege that Mr Allchurch distributed recordings that included the titles “Rivers Of Blood”, “Banned In The UK”, “The Leftist Supremacist Mindset”, and “The Usual Suspects”. The alleged offenses were said to have taken place in Gelli, a village in south Wales.

Judge Paul Thomas released the defendant on unconditional bail, stating: “Your trial will be on 27th June but there will be a further hearing either in March or April.”

Police are searching for a suspect believed to be responsible for yelling antisemitic threats and committing vandalism in Ontario, Canada.

This week, police officers in the city of Vaughan responded to a call from a residence on Conley Street where they spoke with an alleged victim of an antisemitic incident. The police were told that a male, who is believed to be Russian and between the ages of 28 and 30, yelled antisemitic threats towards the alleged victim whilst cycling down the street.

The following day, the alleged victim reported antisemitic sentiments scratched into his vehicle. Police believe that the individual responsible is the same person behind the antisemitic threats.

Anyone with information can contact the York Regional Police #4 District Criminal Investigations Bureau at 1-866-876-5423, ext. 7441 or call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS. They can also leave an anonymous tip online at www.1800222tips.com.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Google

The Pope has condemned antisemitism in papal visits to Hungary and Slovakia.

In a brief visit to Hungary, the pontiff told an ecumenical meeting in Budapest with leaders of other Christian denominations and the Jewish community: “I think of the threat of antisemitism still lurking in Europe and elsewhere.” He added that “this is a fuse that must not be allowed to burn. And the best way to defuse it is to work together, positively, and to promote fraternity.”

He urged Christian leaders top commit to an “education in fraternity” to stand up against hatred.

The Pope then travelled to Slovakia, where he told the Jewish community: “Your history is our history, your sufferings are our sufferings.”

Speaking in Rybné Námestie Square, which used to be the heart of Bratislava’s Jewish quarter, the Pope said that “G-d’s name was dishonored” in “a frenzy of hatred” during WWII.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A Labour Party councillor has been reported to the Party after video footage emerged that seemingly showed him partaking in the antisemitic “from the river to the sea” chant at an anti-arms rally in Liverpool.

Sam Gorst, Labour councillor for Liverpool’s Cressington ward, is believed to have been one of the protesters leading the crowd on Saturday. At one point, the crowd can be heard chanting “from the river to the sea, Palestine will be free”.

The chant, “from the river to the sea, Palestine will be free”, only makes sense as a call for the destruction of the world’s only Jewish state – and its replacement with a State of Palestine – and is thus an attempt to deny Jews, uniquely, the right to self-determination, which is a breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Labour Against Antisemitism said on Twitter that in light of Mr Gorst’s alleged behaviour at Saturday’s demonstration, as well as his reported membership in the now-proscribed Labour fringe groups, Labour Against the Witch-hunt (LAW) and Labour in Exile Network (LIEN), the group has reported the Labour councillor.

Mr Gorst released a statement on Twitter in response to the backlash of his supposed appearance at the rally which stated that his record “stands for itself” and that “bullies will always be bullies”. He added: “They will not break me with their nastiness especially when all I am doing is showing opposition to injustices of the world.”

Dame Louise Ellman, the former MP for Liverpool Riverside – who was allegedly branded a “disgrace” by Mr Gorst for quitting the Labour Party due to antisemitism – condemned Mr Gorst’s reported involvement and said: “I was appalled to see a Labour councillor singing Hamas chants about annihilating Israel. This brings the Labour Party into disrepute.”

It has also been reported that Mr Gorst was recently reinstated after being suspended from the Party for twelve months, though the reason is not publicly known. In 2019, Mr Gorst was cleared of antisemitism accusations, later claiming that he was the victim of a “smear campaign”.

Video footage also appeared to show the antisemitic former Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn marching at the front of the crowd, and it was reported that he spoke at the demonstration.

It is understood that other speakers included former Shadow Chancellor and Labour Party MP John McDonnell, who it is believed used the occasion to call again for the whip to be reinstated to Mr Corbyn it was removed from him last year, and Maxine Peake, the controversial activist-actress who promoted an antisemitic conspiracy theory last year.

In May, Mr McDonnell tweeted a photo of an antisemitic sign which was featured at a rally that he himself attended. Last year, Mc McDonnell was accused of sharing a platform with expelled Labour members at the Labour Representation Committee’s Annual General Meeting, namely Jackie Walker and Tony Greenstein, but he claimed that it was “ridiculous” to suggest that as it was an open meeting and that he could not control who spoke. He remains the Honorary President of the controversial group.

One of the main organisers of the Liverpool rally is believed to have been Audrey White, an activist who is being investigated for claims of antisemitism. At one point during the rally, Ms White reportedly said that “socialists in our Party, like me, like Chris Williamson” were being “witchhunted” as a result of the Party’s recent proscription of far-left groups.

We reported earlier this month that the Leader of Calderdale Council has refused to act against a fellow councillor who organised an anti-Israel rally where the same antisemitic chant was allegedly present, and in July, Hastings Council also reportedly refused to condemn the same antisemitic “from the river to the sea” chant.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Image credit: Twitter via the JC

A man has been charged after a series of antisemitic, hateful, and racist tweets were identified by Chelsea Football Club.

After an investigation by the Metropolitan Police, Nathan Blagg, 21, of Retford in Nottinghamshire has been charged with seven counts of sending by public communication network an offensive/indecent/obscene/menacing message/matter which violate the Malicious Communications Act.

The charges refer to seven tweets sent between 5th February, 2020 and 3rd February, 2021. Mr Blagg was reportedly arrested in February of this year and is due to appear before Westminster Magistrates’ Court on 8th October.

In April, Chelsea Football Club announced that it had banned an abusive online troll from its matches for ten years after he hounded a Jewish journalist who came forward and received support from Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

700 Muslims from around the world, led by the divisive British politician Salma Yaqoob, rapper Lowkey and leaders of the controversial CAGE activist group, have signed an open letter claiming that Prof. David Miller is being censored from criticising Israel.

The letter states that “as British Muslims” the supposed “orchestrated pile-on by pro-Israel groups, politicians and public figures against Professor David Miller is a tactic we recognise very well.”

Prof. Miller, a Professor of Political Sociology at the University of Bristol, is a conspiracy theorist with a history of controversy relating to Jewish students. In his latest outburst, which is under investigation, he asserted that “Zionism is racism”, declared his objective “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world” and accused the Bristol University Jewish Society of being part of a worldwide Zionist conspiracy, adding that it is “fundamental to Zionism to encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”. At the same online event, Prof. Miller also observed that the Jewish Society and the Union of Jewish Students are Zionist, thereby implying that Jewish students (and the wider Jewish community) inherently “encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”.

He also portrayed the International Definition of Antisemitism as an attack on free speech and accused the Israeli Government of engaging in an “all-out attack” on the global Left as part of an “attempt by the Israelis to impose their will all over the world”. In comments reminiscent of the darkest years of the United Nations, Prof. Miller insisted that “Zionism is racism” and asked how “we defeat the ideology of Zionism in practice”, “how is Zionism ended” and about the way “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world”.

The letter goes on delusionally to declare that Prof. Miller’s “work on Islamophobia is among the most highly respected in the world” and that “the campaign against Professor Miller is about censoring speech on Islamophobia and Israel. This campaign is carefully calibrated to muddy the waters between anti-Zionism (opposition to a dangerous, racist political ideology) and hatred of Jews. The attacks on Professor Miller are an example of how the IHRA Working [International] Definition of Antisemitism is being weaponised by supporters of Israel and by Islamophobes.”

The letter is a fine example of the ‘Livingstone Formulation’, by which allegations of antisemitism are dismissed as malevolent and baseless attempts to silence criticism of Israel. In its report on antisemitism in the Labour Party, the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) found that suggestions of this nature were part of the unlawful victimisation of Jewish people in the Party.

Moreover, according to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour)” is an example of antisemitism.

The letter ends by demanding that the University of Bristol releases a statement in support of Prof. Miller and meets with activist groups who back him. The letter comes in spite of (indeed because of) the united revulsion of the Jewish community towards Prof. Miller and the University’s failure to discipline him. The University insists that its investigation into Prof. Miller is ongoing.

The leading signatory of the letter is Ms Yaqoob, the former Respect Party leader and now member of the Labour Party who unsuccessfully ran for Mayor of the West Midlands this year. She has her own deeply troubling record in relation to the Jewish community. In a 2013 tweet that she has since deleted, Ms Yaqoob stated: “Iceland arrests 10 Rothschild bankers…wow”, and linked to an article making this false claim and featuring a prominent image of the banker and philanthropist Lord Jacob Rothschild. The article linked in turn to a longer piece on the “Political Vel Craft” website, which is known for disseminating extreme conspiracy theories.

Other signatories include staffers from the controversial groups Interpal, Muslim Engagement and Development (MEND) and CAGE, the latter two of which have previously been criticised for promoting problematic or extreme views, which they deny. They do not advocate violence.

Just last month, the Chief Executive of MEND was revealed to have compared Israel to Hitler in a Facebook post. According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

Another signatory is the rapper Kareem Dennis, known as Lowkey. Mr Dennis is a patron of the Palestine Solidarity Campaign (PSC). A month-long investigation by Campaign Against Antisemitism in 2017 exposed extensive antisemitic bigotry amongst PSC supporters on social media. Mr Dennis has previously described Israel as a “racist endeavour” in direct and deliberate contravention of the International Definition of Antisemitism, described Zionism as “antisemitic”, spoken of the “Zionist lobby” in the context of global capitalism, has reportedly backed the disgraced former Labour MP Chris Williamson and has repeatedly supported the antisemite Jeremy Corbyn.

A further signatory of the letter is Tariq Ali. It is not clear if it is the same Tariq Ali who has previously tried to link Israel to the killing of George Floyd and declared that some Israelis “have learnt nothing from what happened in to them in Europe. Nothing. They talk a lot about saying all those marching for Palestine are antisemites. This of course isn’t true, but I will tell you something, they don’t like hearing. Every time they bomb Gaza, every time they attack Jerusalem – that is what creates antisemitism. Stop the occupation, stop the bombing and casual antisemitism will soon disappear.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

A man alleged to have performed a Nazi salute before assaulting a woman in a Toronto subway has been arrested.

It was reported by Toronto police in a statement that at approximately 12:30 on Saturday, a woman was sitting on a bench at Lawrence Station when a man approached her before assaulting her and fleeing the scene.

Sarah Gillis, who said that she is not Jewish, identified herself as the alleged victim and said that a man approached her while she was sitting on the platform and asked her twice: “Are you Jewish?”

Ms Gillis added: “He then did a Nazi salute and asked me if I knew what it meant. So I said to him, ‘Have a nice day.’ That’s when he said, ‘You are a Jew,’ and he came towards me.”

Ms Gillis alleges that the man then put her in a headlock before being pulled off by another man. The suspect reportedly then fled the scene by boarding a subway train.

“I wanted people to be aware that he was still out there and although he was saying hateful things towards Jewish people…it wasn’t necessarily Jewish people that he was targeting,” Ms Gillis said. She added: “It could’ve [been] anyone because personally I’m not Jewish but I still became a victim of him.”

Police released images of the suspect on Saturday and announced on Sunday that an arrest had been made. According to a police spokesperson, the suspect is the same individual who was arrested in connection with two previous antisemitism-related incidents.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Toronto Police Service

It was reported that a man who is alleged to have verbally abused Jewish people attending a synagogue was arrested for a hate crime and possession of cocaine in East London.

The suspect is alleged to have subjected members of the Jewish community to a “torrent of racist abuse” which included “Kill you Jews, F**k Jews” and invoking Adolf Hitler’s name.

The alleged incident took place on Clapton Common and was reported on 10th September by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 4717 10/09.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Stamford Hill Shomrim

Graffiti reading “Jews did 9/11” and “Jews ran the slave trade” has been discovered in Toronto.

The National Executive Director of the Canadian Shaare Zedek Hospital Foundation reported that his friend took a photograph of the graffiti, which also included a reference to the hate website “Goyim.tv”, at the intersection of Knox and Eastern.

“We have a major antisemitism issue in Toronto,” Mr Yablonsky wrote. “We need more than words from our elected officials, we need action. The Jewish community need to feel safe in our city.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Rafi Yablonsky