A Parliamentary antisemitism watchdog has discovered that Alexa, Amazon’s smart speaker that provides answers to questions by reference to online resources, presents antisemitic conspiracies as truthful.

The leadership of the All-Party Parliamentary Group Against Antisemitism has written to Amazon UK’s Vice President to alert him to Alexa’s propensity to answer antisemitic questions by directing users to websites “using selective quotes and misleading sources” and without providing any context.

For example, when asked “Do Jews control the media?”, a classic antisemitic trope, Alexa reportedly answers: “Here’s something I found from the article ‘Jew Watch’ on Wikipedia: Jew Watch claims that Jews control the world’s financial systems and media”. Using an obviously dubious source, Alexa presents the nonsense antisemitic conspiracy theory as factual.

To the question “Was the Holocaust a hoax?”, Alexa reportedly answers: “Here’s something I found from the article ‘Holocaust Denial’ on Wikipedia: ‘Most Holocaust deniers claim…that the Holocaust is a hoax – or an exaggeration – arising from a deliberate Jewish conspiracy designed to advance the interest of Jews at the expense of other people.” The Wikipedia article in question notes that Holocaust denial promotes “false” statements about the Holocaust, but Alexa omits this from the answer.

The letter to Amazon, which can be read below, provides further examples.

This is not the first time artificial intelligence has spewed antisemitism or appeared to endorse antisemitic conspiracy theories. Microsoft’s chatbot Tay, and Facebook’s version, Blender, although different from Alexa, both came under fire for racism almost immediately after being launched. As Campaign Against Antisemitism said at the time, these AI programmes learn from watching human behaviour online, and are “a mirror of the discourse facilitated by social media outlets.”

Swastikas have been discovered etched into the headstones and spray-painted across memorials at a Jewish cemetery in Haren, Germany.

On 17th November, the vandalism was reported to the local authorities. According to the evidence, however, it is believed that numerous carvings may have been chiseled into the gravestones several months ago, and many remain clearly visible. With rising incidents targeting the Jewish community in the country, the police have described the recent desecration as overtly antisemitic and the case has been taken over by state security.

In Chemnitz, a similar incident occurred in which a swastika was spray-painted on memorial “stumbling stones”. The brass street tiles were placed at the former homes of Holocaust victims to commemorate and honour their lives.

A local politician has expressed growing concern at the many similar acts of vandalism across Germany that seek to disrespect and marginalise it’s Jewish residents.

Police investigating the recent vandalism on the Jewish cemetery are appealing to the public for any possible information on the crime and for witnesses to come forward to aid the identification of the perpetrators.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Jewish Community of Haren/Eli Nahum/Monitoring Antisemitism Worldwide

A California high school was in the spotlight for the second time last week after it emerged that students had been subjected to a second wave of offensive social media posts that included Holocaust denial and threats of rape.

In an email to parents, the principal of Redwood High School in Marin County, David Sondheim, revealed that the most recent social media posts again targeted Jewish students and families “with hateful messages” including denying the Holocaust, rape and homophobia.”

The disclosure marks the second time this year that Redwood High School has experienced antisemitism directed at its students.

In September, an Instagram account was found to be targeting specific Jewish students at Redwood. The account, which has now been removed, was named “Redwood students organised against Semitism.” It was accompanied by an antisemitic caricature.

Local schools’ superintendent, Tara Taupier reportedly said that it was not clear who was behind the latest incidents, but that the perpetrators had used the same caricature as appeared on the earlier Instagram account. Ms Taupier said that her office was “still engaged with law enforcement” to try to identify the perpetrator of the earlier antisemitic posts.

One Redwood parent reportedly told the media that antisemitism at the school had often gone unaddressed over the years, but that this occasion was “different, because they’re threatening to rape students.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

An imam in British Columbia has recently been found to have shared on his official Facebook page Islamic prayers that call for violence against the Jewish people.

In July 2014 Younus Kathrada, who is also an Islamic Studies teacher, public speaker and community and youth activist, posted a religious prayer that included lyrics such as: “Count them and kill them selectively, and do not leave a single one of them, and make them an example for their likes among the [Jews], [Christians], and [polytheists]” and “Purify it [Al-Asqa Mosque] from the brothers of monkeys and khanzeer [Jews]…Tear them [Jews] to pieces, and sow dissension between them and their followers.”

The imam reportedly has a history of antisemitic and hateful remarks. In October 2019, he advised his congregants not to vote in the Canadian federal election and argued that all Jewish and Christian candidates were “evil” and “filthy”. In March and April this year, YouTube videos by Mr Kathrada, aimed at a young target audience, urged followers to “destroy the enemies of Islam, the heretics and the atheists.” The videos are yet to be removed.

B’nai Brith Canada reported the incidents to the police after Mr Kathrada first called Jews “brothers of monkeys and swine” in 2004, and the organisation has since reached out to the British Columbia Hate Crimes Unit concerning his more recent attacks and outbursts. The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) that has listed Mr Kathrada’s Muslim Youth of Victoria Society as a registered charity, and there have been calls on the Minister of National Revenue to investigate these incidents.

The Chief Executive Officer for B’nai Brith Canada has stated that hate-mongering “under the guise of religious discourse” is inexcusable and must be investigated to guarantee that antisemitic sentiments are not ignored or facilitated.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A Jewish couple in Columbus, Ohio say that they received antisemitic abuse and threats, and had rocks thrown at their home earlier this month.

According to the local TV news, the incident is being investigated as a hate crime by Federal, State and County authorities.

Nick and Tiffany Kinney claim that on the night of 7th November, which was Election Day in the United States, a neighbour who allegedly knows that they are Jewish approached them and spat at them.

According to Mr Kinney, the neighbour allegedly told him that he was “tired of liberals” and that it “was no wonder Hitler burned your people.”

Mrs Kinney claims that the neighbour said: “I’ll put a bullet through your head like Hitler.”

The couple believe that the neighbour then threw the rocks that smashed their window and door.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A professor at a Michigan university has been placed on administrative leave after allegedly posting tweets which contained antisemitic tropes and conspiracy theories relating to the coronavirus pandemic.

The tweets by Thomas Brennan, a professor of physical science at Ferris State University (FSU), included references to a “Jewish mafia” and a claim that COVID-19 was “another Jewish revolution” and a “stunt” to create a “new world order.”

FSU President David Eisler announced on Monday that Prof. Brennan had been placed on administrative leave following his comments, and said that the University condemned the professor’s offensive statements. “We strongly reject these statements, condemn them and will not tolerate them,” Mr Eisler declared. The Board of Trustees also issued a statement backing the move to our Prof. Brennan on leave.

Prof. Brennan denied being an antisemite. In a statement he said: “I do not believe that middle-class Jews are involved in an international conspiracy, only that a small number of their elites are.” He continued: “Israel and the Jews should not be blamed for the crimes of a small number of mobsters like Jeffery Epstein or Ghislane Maxwell [sic] who used paedophile blackmail to control American politicians. I’m not an antisemite. I love and respect Jews just as I do all races, and I pray for Israel, just as I pray for America.”

Prof. Brennan went on to warn that the “entire world has fallen under the spell of a satanic, globalist elite” whose “end-goal is a technocratic, one-world government, where everyone, Jew and Gentile, will be micro-chipped and tracked 24/7.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The All-Party Parliamentary Group Against Antisemitism (APPG) has warned a group of Conservative MPs and peers against the use of the controversial phrase “cultural Marxism”, noting that the term could “inadvertently” act as a “dog-whistle for the far-right”, where the phrase is increasingly popular.

28 MPs and peers used in the phrase in a letter to The Telegraph regarding what they perceived to be the adverse politicisation of numerous cultural institutions, criticising a political slant that they described as “coloured by cultural Marxist dogma, colloquially known as the ‘woke agenda’.”

Andrew Percy, a Tory MP and co-Chair of the APPG, said that some of his colleagues were surprised at the popularity of the phrase on the far-right and undertook not to use it again.

The signatories included Sally-Ann Hart MP and Lee Anderson MP, both of whom were put under investigation by the Conservative Party over alleged antisemitism late last year. Campaign Against Antisemitism has previously criticised the Party for taking so long over the investigations, which we can only assume are still ongoing until the results are disclosed.

When the story of the letter broke, a spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Terms such as ‘cultural Marxism’ and ‘elitist bourgeois liberals’ can function as antisemitic dogwhistles, even if they are not always intended as such, while the dangers of promoting conspiracies about powerful minorities controlling society are obvious. The authors of this letter should endeavour to find less toxic language to promote their politics.

“We also note that two of the signatories – Sally-Ann Hart and Lee Anderson – are, to our knowledge, under apparently interminable investigations by the Conservative Party in relation to alleged antisemitism. Until the results of those investigations are made known, we can only assume that they are still in progress, which is unacceptable after so long. The Party must immediately explain what conclusions have been reached.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The main student body of the University of Sydney has criticised the Labour Party in the UK for suspending Jeremy Corbyn, alleging that the measures were designed to “intimidate and silence” the political Left and criticism of Israel.

The Students Representative Council (SRC) of the University of Sydney passed a motion on 10th November condemning Labour for its suspension of Mr Corbyn. The resolution stated that through the suspension Labour was promoting a “cynical lie intended to intimidate and silence the Left” and its “criticism of Israel.”

The motion said that accusations against Corbyn represented “an attack upon the anti-racist and anti-imperialist Left.” It also claimed that there was “no evidence that he [Mr Corbyn] has ever done or said anything indicating prejudice against Jewish people.”

Opponents of the resolution described it as “drivel” and as “antisemitic gaslighting at its worst.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Antisemitic graffiti has reportedly appeared on walls in the French city of Mulhouse.

Graffiti first appeared in early November on walls near the centre of the city, which is located in Alsace in north-east France. This was quickly removed by municipal services.

But new graffiti has now been discovered in the same neighbourhood.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Poland’s Embassy in the UK has been accused of “glorifying” a Polish nationalist politician believed to have collaborated with the Nazis.

A Polish anti-racist organisation has criticised the Embassy over its involvement in the restoration of the grave of Władysław Studnicki, who died in London in 1953.

Mr Studnicki espoused antisemitic views saying that Jews were “parasites on the healthy branch of the Polish tree.” He also proposed the forced removal of 100,000 Polish Jews every year to bring about the “de-Judaization” of Poland.

The row erupted after it was reported that a member of the Embassy’s political staff was involved in restoring Mr Studnicki’s grave in London and was actively promoting the project online. The Embassy official, Agata Supińska, said on Twitter that Studnicki  was “one of the greatest Polish thinkers of the 20th century,” who had not “been accorded respect and was forgotten for many years.”

In a statement, the Polish Embassy said that Ms Supińska “got involved in this project in a purely personal capacity” but that it was “supportive of her efforts to restore Studnicki’s grave,” adding that the efforts to restore the grave was a civic initiative.

 The Embassy statement went on to note that it supported “all grassroots civic initiatives aimed at preserving the memory of Poles and their achievements in Great Britain.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

For the second time in recent months, neo-Nazi white supremacist leaflets have been seen in Lexington, KY.

A photo of the offensive antisemitic and anti-Black fliers was shared by local rabbi, Rabbi Shlomo Litvin. The leaflets said that Jews were “the masterminds” in the media, “behind every anti-white post” and “defend your children, Hitler was right.”

In a statement, Rabbi Litvin said that hateful words against the Jewish community must be “countered” or could “lead to hateful deeds.”

A spokesperson for Lexington police reportedly said that the department was investigating after a report about the leaflets was filed on 19th November. The fliers appear to have been distributed by a neo-Nazi group calling itself 14First The Foundation.

In August similar offensive, racist leaflets, were sent to homes in Kentucky. At the time, a man claiming to be Vice-President of the group behind the leaflets claimed that they already had up to 60 members in the state and had “received interest” from prospective members. He explained that the group puts its pamphlets in plastic bags “with a rock” and throws “them onto properties” because placing offensive material “in a mailbox” is illegal.

Cherlynn Stevenson, the State Representative for the County said the group’s threats must be taken seriously. In a tweet, Ms Stevenson said: “I am beyond heartbroken that we have this type of hatred in our community and that these fliers were distributed in my district.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Rabbi Shlomo Litvin

A large concrete block shattered windows of a synagogue in Essen, Germany, in what is being investigated as an antisemitic attack. 

A suspect was caught on security footage at the weekend throwing the block at the synagogue after being seen wandering the area by members of the Jewish community.

The block landed in the office of the rabbi.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The US Department of Education Office for Civil Rights (OCR) announced on 17th November that it has officially launched a formal investigation into a complaint of antisemitic harassment, spanning over five years, at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC).

The federal investigation will examine the complaint, submitted on behalf of UIUC’s Jewish student body, into allegations of numerous antisemitic and anti-Zionist incidents at the University. Several instances include offensive graffiti, particularly swastikas, discovered across campus, the vandalism of religious items and frequent harassment and abuse by members of the student activist group, Supports for Justice in Palestine.

The recent complaint also outlined how administrators and UIUC leaders have continually allowed a hostile environment to develop, with University employees, on occasion, being complicit in the facilitation of a hateful atmosphere on campus in what was alleged to be a direct violation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act. The complaint maintains that all Jewish college students deserve the right to learn and live peacefully and freely in a safe, welcoming academic setting.

Various other higher education institutions agreed to implement steps to combat rising antisemitism and discrimination threatening the wellbeing and experiences of Jewish students.

In a public statement, the UIUC expressed a commitment to create and implement concrete solutions, alongside the Jewish community, to encourage Jewish students to express their heritage, faith and support for Zionism. Several Jewish groups involved in collating the complaint stated that they look forward to “ongoing collaborative work” with the Chancellor and his team to convert promises and objectives into successful action.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Arthur Topham has been sentenced to a 30-day conditional sentence plus three years probation, following a failure to comply with the terms of his previous probation period.

The recent sentencing on 20th November comes after Mr Topham had been found guilty of breach of probation and a prior conviction in 2017 for wilfully promoting hatred against Jews.

In November 2015, Mr Topham was convicted by a jury for calling for the forceful sterilisation of the Jews, claiming that the country is “controlled by the Zionist Jewish lobby” and referring to Jewish places of worship as “synagogues of Satan”. However, he launched a failed constitutional challenge to Canada’s hate speech legislation, which subsequently delayed his sentencing until March 2017.

Despite a possible maximum sentence of two years imprisonment, he received a six-month curfew and a ban on online engagement requiring him to abstain from posting any content related to the Jewish people for two years. Earlier this year, he proceeded to violate these terms by sharing antisemitic material and imagery.

The conditions of his updated three-year probation period include a ban on posting any online content related to the Jewish people, the Jewish religion, Israel, Israelis and Zionism. B’nai Brith Canada has praised the sentencing decision and welcomed this as a reminder that there are consequences for such offensive actions against Jewish citizens.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: B’nai Brith Canada

The board of the youth branch of the Dutch right-wing Forum for Democracy expelled several of its members on 21st November, following several antisemitic posts and messages shared through groups in social networking platforms.

Across the messaging app WhatsApp and Instagram, young members had reportedly expressed sympathetic attitudes towards Nazi and fascist ideologies. A 23-year-old student, appointed as the coordinator of the Zuid-Holland branch of the Party, stated that: “Jews have international pedo networks and help women en masse into pornography”, and argued socialism would be the desirable solution. Within one group, multiple antisemitic songs, used originally as Nazi propaganda to incite hatred against Jews, were shared and praised.

Thierry Baudet, the leader of the group, has resigned as a result and claimed that assuming responsibility for the antisemitic content was not an immediate reason for stepping down from his position, despite calls for his removal prior to the internal disciplinary review.

Mr Baudet said, in a video published on his social media pages, that he was announcing his resignation and feared a “trial by the media” would ensue, with claims that Party members were willing to “throw people under the bus”. He has, however, urged all Party members responsible for the antisemitic materials and their enablers to leave the Party immediately.

The Party’s youth division is currently under investigation to establish how the messages were distributed and to identify all perpetrators.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Antisemitism is a threat to civilisation, according to Albania’s Prime Minister, who made the statement within days of his Government adopting the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Speaking at a forum against antisemitism organised in partnership with the Jewish Agency for Israel, Albanian Prime Minister Edi Rama said: “We need to continue and fight any form of antisemitism, which is a threat to our own civilisation.”

The first such forum to be staged in the Balkans, and held online owing to the Coronavirus pandemic, it was attended by top diplomats, including US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. The event was held just days after the Muslim state’s Parliament voted unanimously to adopt the Definition.

During the forum, it was stated that Jews were protected in Albania during WWII, and that no Jews were handed over to the Nazis, despite occupation by Nazi Germany from 1943 to 1944.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

An inquiry was launched over the summer into antisemitic bullying at Brighton Secondary College (BSC) in Melbourne, Australia following an investigative report by a local Jewish newspaper.

The 124-page report discovered an extensive list of alleged incidences of bullying “that spanned years”. It included descriptions into how one Jewish student had been lured to a local park where he was subsequently robbed and assaulted by fellow students, another had been the target of students shouting, “Get in my oven” and “Heil Hitler”, and yet another was reportedly threatened with a knife in a school bathroom.

The independent inquiry was commissioned by the Victorian Department of Education and Training, and concluded with eighteen recommendations for the school alongside a plan, with the Jewish Community Council of Victoria, to improve understandings of the specific nature and manifestations of antisemitism. This will be made available to all educators and teaching staff in the Australian state.

The BSC principal has welcomed the recommendations, pledging to introduce an online form for students to report antisemitic behaviour and incidents and committing to the ongoing monitoring of all school facilities to prevent hateful graffiti and to guarantee its immediate removal. Following the report, the school is holding a prompt review of school policies that will broaden the definition of racial harassment to include religious vilification and discrimination.

However, legal representatives of the parents of the young victims have expressed regret that the report failed to hold the current leadership of the school to account. In a public statement it was argued that the families do not believe the findings acknowledge the experiences of those affected, with many students fearing a hostile environment and suffering “genuine distress” as a consequence. The majority of Jewish students impacted had to leave BSC due to rising levels of antisemitism within the institution and the failure of the college to protect their safety and mental wellbeing.

As a result, families are reportedly seeking to continue the fight for justice for their children.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Hackers raided a recent Zoom event titled “My Jewish Italy” and chanted support for Al Qaeda and Hitler.

On the evening of 18th November, the creators of the app “My Jewish Italy” held an event to advertise and present the features of the new social networking platform that allows users to discover important cultural sites, locate local kosher products, and so on.

The Turin-based Jewish app, designed by the Ucei and promoted by the Ari Foundation and Jewish Cultural Heritage, was created to raise awareness of the Jewish community and heritage and its positive influence in the country.

During the presentation, however, a series of offensive imagery and swastikas appeared on the screens of the speakers and participants, and the voices of the hackers could be heard shouting fascist and hateful slogans. The hackers managed to break into the platform through the security embankment and warned the guests that they had seized their personal data, including their credit card details.

The event was subsequently terminated.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Manchester Metropolitan University and Buckingham New University have both reportedly adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Buckingham New University’s Vice-Chancellor Professor Nick Braisby reportedly said: “Antisemitism is repugnant. It is a form of racism, has no place within society and will not be tolerated at our University. Our decision to adopt the [International] Definition of Antisemitism demonstrates our commitment to be an inclusive community that welcomes and celebrates all of our members irrespective of their background or ethnicity. Adopting the Definition is an important step in our ongoing work towards eradicating racism, harassment, discrimination and prejudice.”

They join Lancaster University and the University of Cambridge as recent adopters of the Definition.

Recently, Gavin Williamson, the Education Secretary, called on universities to adopt the Definition.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities and public bodies. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Eric Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Labour’s Opposition Chief Whip, Nick Brown, has written to Jeremy Corbyn, the former Leader, urging him to apologise in return for a restoration of the whip.

Mr Corbyn was recently suspended for downplaying the extent of antisemitism in the Party but was then rapidly readmitted to the Party in a shambolic process that represented a con of the Jewish community. Under pressure, Sir Keir Starmer declined to restore the whip to Mr Corbyn, however, maintaining the suspension for three months and implying that the suspension would roll over repeatedly.

Now, Mr Brown has written to Mr Corbyn, urging him to “unequivocally, unambiguously and without reservation” apologise for his inflammatory comments and commit to cooperating with the Labour Party in its implementation of the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s (EHRC) recommendations.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “An apology is no substitute for justice. If Labour wishes to be taken seriously, it must investigate both of our major complaints against Jeremy Corbyn under an independent disciplinary process, as well as our complaints against other sitting MPs, and take decisive action. If our complaint against Mr Corbyn is upheld, he must be expelled. The Jewish community and the British public deserve justice from Labour, not more excuses. Labour’s offer to Mr Corbyn to apologise in return for a restoration of the whip is decidedly a step in the wrong direction.”

Previous research by Campaign Against Antisemitism has shown that Mr Brown, who also served as Opposition Chief Whip under Mr Corbyn, has had little to say on Labour’s antisemitism crisis over the past several years.

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently lodged a complaint against Mr Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A man charged with stirring up racial hatred with an antisemitic coronavirus hoax is understood to have appeared in court wearing a Nazi armband.

Matthew Henegan, 35, faces seven charges of publishing, distributing and possessing material in March and April that is likely to stir up racial hatred. It is also claimed that he distributed leaflets in Cambridgeshire, where he resides, and possessing a document titled “How To Make Armour Piercing Bullets”, which apparently contains information likely to be useful in terrorism.

Mr Henegan is currently on bail and reportedly appeared at a preliminary hearing at the Old Bailey wearing dark glasses, a hairband and an armband with a red swastika.

According to a report, the judge asked the defendant’s lawyer: “Can you see what he’s wearing?”, and ordered Mr Henegan to leave the courtroom. The defendant asked: “Are we done for the day then?” The judge replied: “We are not.” The defendant replied: “I have a right to freedom of expression, freedom of dress, freedom of religion. They are rights not for debate.” The judge instructed the lawyer to give his client advice and said: “Next time it will not be out in the public corridor.” Mr Henegan returned to the courtroom with a jacket, with the armband no longer visible.

A pre-trial hearing was scheduled for 12th March and a provisional trial date at the Old Bailey for 8th November. The defendant remains on bail.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years, continues to urge the Jewish community to remain vigilant and welcomes the seriousness with which the authorities are treating the danger.

Facebook is under pressure following the revelation that a network of 80,000 white supremacists is operating on its platform, as well as on Instagram, which is owed by Facebook.

The network reportedly includes more than 40 neo-Nazi websites, has links to the far-right in Britain and offers merchandise incorporating Nazi symbols. According to the Centre for Countering Digital Hate, which is based in London, these merchandise sales fund two far-right groups in the Ukraine, Azov Battalion and Misanthropic Division.

Azov Battalion is believed to have recruited far-right Britons to fight in the Ukraine, while a British man is facing twelve terror charges after being found in possession of material linked to Misanthropic Division. One of the Azov Battalion’s Facebook pages is called “Gas Chambers”, and visitors are directed to websites where imagery of white skinheads standing next to murdered Jewish and black men are featured, and products for purchase.

According to the Coalition for a Safer Web, Facebook was first warned of this network two years ago and failed to act, and it has only grown since then.

It is understood that after being contacted by The Observer, Facebook reportedly began removing the neo-Nazi material, and a spokesperson has reportedly said: “We have removed the content which violates our policies prohibiting dangerous organisations. We regularly work to improve our technology to find and remove this content faster, and, while there is more work to do, we are making progress. We’ve banned over 250 white supremacist organisations from Facebook and Instagram.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years, continues to urge the Jewish community to remain vigilant and welcomes the seriousness with which the authorities are treating the danger.

Lancaster University has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism after a campaign by Jewish students.

The University agreed to adopt the Definition at a meeting of the University Council on 20th November.

The University’s Vice Chancellor, Professor Andy Schofield, said: “This is one important element of the University’s wider commitment to ensure that the University is fair and inclusive. We will be continuing to work with our partners in both Israel and Palestine to increase our awareness and understanding of the major issues that affect our diverse community.”

Previously, Jewish students at Lancaster had protested perceived inaction by the University following a call from the Education Secretary for universities to adopt the Definition. The Jewish Society’s President had said: “We will not stop working until this Definition is adopted.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities and public bodies. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Eric Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

The Court of Appeal has halved the sentence of a convicted neo-Nazi terrorist.

Connor Scothern was convicted earlier this year of membership of the proscribed National Action neo-Nazi terrorist group. 

Mr Scothern, who was apparently a practicing Muslim and activist with the extremist anti-fascist group, Antifa, before joining National Action, had been given a sentence of eighteen months in a Young Offenders’ Institution.

He was convicted and sentenced with ‘Miss Hitler’ and other defendants in a case covered by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

As Mr Scothern was aged fifteen and sixteen during his membership of National Action in 2016-17 but nineteen when he was sentenced, his lawyers argued that he would have to serve two-thirds of his sentence before becoming eligible for parole whereas if he were sentenced for the same offence at the age that he committed it, he would have received a youth detention and training order lasting nine months before release under supervision. Accordingly, his eighteen-month sentence – double the sentence that his lawyers said that he ought to have received were he sentenced sooner – “was not only wrong in principle but was also unlawful”.

The Court of Appeal agreed with this reasoning, although the Court dismissed other arguments that factors mitigating the offence were not adequately taken into account at the sentencing. Aside from the particular point of law in the successful argument, “there could have been no criticism of the sentence imposed upon the appellant”.

The judgment, handed down last Friday, quashes the original eighteen-month sentence and replaces it with nine months’ detention in a Young Offenders’ Institution.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years, continues to urge the Jewish community to remain vigilant and welcomes the seriousness with which the authorities are treating the danger.

Image credit: West Midlands Police

According to recent reports, the Labour Party has lost tens of thousands of members since Sir Keir Starmer became leader, with the exodus apparently accelerating since the suspension of Jeremy Corbyn.

This is the first time since Mr Corbyn’s election as Leader that the Party’s membership has fallen below half a million, which was itself a staggering achievement for a British political party in the current era.

There was a great deal of concern over entryism during Mr Corbyn’s two leadership primary campaigns and, more generally, over the possibility that many of these new members were tolerant of or held far-left antisemitic views. These concerns appeared to be borne out over the course of Mr Corbyn’s tenure as Leader, and Campaign Against Antisemitism’s 2019 Antisemitism Barometer showed, based on analysis of polling conducted by YouGov, that people holding four or more antisemitic views were particularly attracted to Mr Corbyn.

Since Mr Corbyn’s resignation as Leader and the increasingly heated confrontation between different factions in the Labour Party, it has become evident that some of these pro-Corbyn members – some of whom were returning to Labour after decades outside of the Party and others who had joined the Party for the first time – were becoming disillusioned. Campaign Against Antisemitism has long been concerned about where some of these Labour members might go next.

Joe Glasman, Head of Political and Government Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We continue to urge other parties – especially, for obvious reasons, on the political Left – to be vigilant that anyone espousing antisemitic tropes not be made welcome in their parties. Antisemitism has no place in any political party, and the EHRC has rightly addressed the conclusions of its report into Labour to all political parties. It would be a tragedy for Britain if anti-Jewish racism were not only to persist in Labour but to reappear on such a scale in any other Party.”

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A man with a history of antisemitic harassment has been jailed over a video inciting terrorism.

Shehroz Iqbal, 29, has been charged on multiple occasions over antisemitic incidents with no custodial sentence, leading to strong protest from Campaign Against Antisemitism. He also reportedly had a history of posting antisemitic messages – including a poster saying “Jewish scum” – and harassing synagogue members in Gants Hill, and he apparently sent the synagogue a threatening e-mail after it posted a picture of him on its website.

However, Mr Iqbal, who is from Ilford in East London, has now been given a sentence of eight-and-a-half years in prison over a video he posted in a WatsApp group of over twenty like-minded users called From Dark To Light on 11 March. The video was claimed to have incited a terror attack on London’s Royal Festival Hall with the words “Attack, attack”. He has previously shared propaganda on social media portraying Islamic State terrorist fighters. The sentence also includes time for drugs-related charges.

The Old Bailey heard during the trial that the posts had been discovered on his mobile phone after he was pulled over in that month for drug possession.

The prosecutor described him as “volatile and prone to act on his extremism”, and Judge Philip Katz QC said: “You have a long history of unpleasant, antisemitic threats and harassment.”

Plaid Cymru has seen two former leaders at odds over antisemitism, with one appearing to endorse conspiratorial denials of antisemitism in the Labour Party and another calling for no tolerance of anti-Jewish racism.

Leanne Wood, who served as leader of the Welsh Nationalist Party until 2018, appeared to endorse tweets by a controversial American journalist that read: “I’ve never seen a more flagrant, repellent and cynical exploitation of antisemitism in my life than its disgusting use to smear [Jeremy] Corbyn because of a lack of alternatives for how to defeat him. Nothing has trivialized this cause more than what British Blairites have done.”

A further tweet in the thread said: “Jeremy Corbyn is a better human being by a multiple of about 1,000 than all of the Oxbridge cretins in politics and media who have united to cynically smear him with accusations they know in their rotted souls are false.”

This is not the first time that Ms Wood has waded into the Labour antisemitism scandal, coming to the apparent defence of Rebecca Long-Bailey, who was sacked from Labour’s Shadow Cabinet earlier this year after she promoted an article containing an antisemitic conspiracy theory.

Plaid Cymru, after a recent antisemitism scandal, has announced that it is holding a review into antisemitism in its Party, to which Campaign Against Antisemitism shall be making submissions. The review will be led by the Party’s Westminster leader, Liz Saville Roberts MP.

Commenting on the review, Lord Wigley, who led Plaid Cymru in the 1980s and 1990s, said: “I cannot comment in detail, but it’s absolutely clear that Plaid Cymru cannot tolerate antisemitism or any other form or racism. Liz Saville Roberts is a first-class MP and I have no doubt she will come to the right conclusions.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “It is evident from our research, media reports, and contact from ordinary Plaid Cymru members and members of the public that there are divisions within the Party as to how to address antisemitism. On one side are culprits, enablers and defenders, and on the other are those fighting to eradicate it. We hope the Party’s review into antisemitism, to which we shall be making submissions, will aid the right side of that internal conflict.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Lord Desai has resigned from the Labour Party over its antisemitism crisis, and in particular over Jeremy Corbyn’s rapid and controversial readmission following the former Leader’s suspension.

In a letter to The Times Lord Desai, an economist who was made a peer in 1991, wrote: “Sir, You are right to be worried about the likelihood of success of the policies of the leader of the Labour Party to fight antisemitism. I agree with you that this makes the persistence of antisemitism more likely than not. I have submitted my resignation from the Labour Party after 49 years of membership.”

Mr Corbyn was suspended for downplaying antisemitism in the wake of the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s (EHRC) damning report into anti-Jewish racism in the Labour Party last month, but was readmitted less than three weeks later, using a fast-track disciplinary process that the EHRC had declared unfit for purpose. Sir Keir Starmer has, however, not restored the whip to Mr Corbyn, from which he will be suspended for three months.

Lord Desai also said of this series of events: “It was a very peculiar decision to allow him back without any apology. He has been refused the party whip in the House of Commons for a few months, but that is a very lame response to a very big crisis,” adding: “I have been very uncomfortable and slightly ashamed that the party has been injected with this sort of racism. Jewish MPs were abused openly, and female members were trolled. It is out and out racism.”

Lord Desai’s resignation is the first over antisemitism under Sir Keir’s leadership, and is reminiscent of the MPs and peers who resigned from the Party over antisemitism when Mr Corbyn was Leader.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Lord Desai’s principled resignation from the Labour Party over antisemitism is the first such departure since Sir Keir Starmer became leader. It is a courageous decision reminiscent of those MPs and peers who quit the Party under Jeremy Corbyn in disgust. Lord Desai’s decision comes after Labour conned the Jewish community by suspending Mr Corbyn and then readmitting him under a specially-fast tracked hearing using a disciplinary process that the EHRC had ruled was unfit for purpose. Lord Desai saw what the entire Jewish community saw: a déjà vu return to the revolving door approach to antisemitism instead of the just and fair due process that Sir Keir promised and the EHRC demanded.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently lodged a complaint against Mr Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

There has been a dramatic rise in the number of teenagers and children referred to the Government’s counter-terrorism programme over their alleged far-right links, according to Home Office figures.

682 children were referred over such alleged links in 2017-18, rising from 131 in 2014-15. Moreover, the 2017-18 figure includes 24 children under the age of ten. The data was obtained via a Freedom of Information request by Sky News.

Looking at the figures across all age ranges, it is believed that this is the first time since the data began to be recorded that there was an equal balance in cases linked to the far-right and those connected to Islamist radicalism.

There is concern that youth are being drawn to the far-right by content designed to appeal to a younger demographic, a development previously reported by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others.

Two youths have been sentenced over far-right terror charges in just the past few weeks, one of whom was an A-star student. Last year, another young person was jailed for life over a neo-Nazi terror plot.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to urge the Jewish community to remain vigilant and welcomes the seriousness with which the police are treating the danger posed by the far-right.

Image credit: Hope Not Hate

A teacher of mathematics at Niles West High School in Skokie, Illinois, saw her e-mail account hacked to send messages described by school leaders as being of a “lewd, racist, antisemitic and homophobic” nature to thousands of students across the district on 11th November.

School administrators declined to comment on the abrasive content contained, however students have described the e-mails as ranging from swastikas and fascist propaganda to pornographic and indecent images.

A Jewish Niles West senior expressed shock at the overtly antisemitic content and stated that: “It’s hard not to feel targeted when you are part of the minority that those e-mails were about.” She added that it was inconceivable that the e-mails could have originated with the teacher, and there is no suggestion that the e-mails were the product of anything other than a hack.

Local leaders have denounced the torrent of “patently offensive” e-mails, and reportedly reassured the public that Student Services teams would work directly to support students affected by the incident in the days following.

Skokie police and Dist. 219 staff are working together to investigate the incident and identify the perpetrator. A representative has said that student access to district e-mail accounts has been temporarily suspended and instructions have been given for greater online security, including the changing of all passwords.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Users of social media have reacted to a visit by Sir Keir Starmer to a synagogue earlier this week with grotesque antisemitism.

The Labour leader was participating in a Jewish charity event in his constituency, and users of social media responding to pictures of the event accused him of “bending to the Jewish lobby”, being a “slave to Israel”, being financed by people opposed to “helping palestine [sic]”, accepting donations in return for “[promises] to support Zionism” and “doing his pay masters bidding [sic]”.

Others asked him (using inflammatory language) whether he called for similar kindness from the local Jewish community to be “extended to [those] being oppressed, tortured and murdered by the Zionist apartheid state of Israel”, while other racist accusations were made against the Jewish community using antisemitic tropes, including claiming that the Jews have “wealth”, “power” and “influence”, as well as references to the “Rothschilds” who “funded the majority of conflicts”.

Antisemitic online abuse targeting Sir Keir and the Jewish community has been commonplace in pro-Corbyn Facebook groups over the past year, as previously documented by Campaign Against Antisemitism. Labour has even asked Facebook in the past to remove such groups.

Meanwhile, Dame Margaret Hodge, a prominent Jewish Labour MP, has shared some of the reactions she has received to calling for action against antisemitism in the Party, including: “I hope she dies soon. Dumb bitch. Member of a rich and powerful Jewish dynasty. Mossad agent. Liar. Rat. Old c***. Snake. Nazi. Traitor. Zionist stooge. Evil personified. Cancer. Zionist hag. Pig. Infiltrator. Racist witch. Controlled and funded by Israel. Palestinian child murderer.”

“This abuse,” she stated, “is not normal. This is why zero tolerance matters. This is why people have to take responsibility for their actions.”

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Graffiti with the antisemitic phrase “Jewish Lies Matter” was discovered in at least two locations in Brighton this week, and subsequently removed by concerned residents.

Activist Fiona Sharpe, who lives in Brighton, said on Twitter: “The clearly political nature of this graffiti is very concerning. It was sprayed on a wall just down the road from one synagogue and within five minutes’ walk from two others.”

Sussex Police is investigating the racist vandalism, with a spokesperson reportedly saying: “I understand the distress and concern that this incident will cause, this matter is being dealt with as a hate crime and I want to offer reassurance and say that we take criminality of this nature very seriously. We are doing everything we can to progress this investigation. We continue to closely monitor Hate incidents, it remains a priority for us to identify and hold those responsible to account. I would ask the public to remain vigilant please report any incidents of hate crime to us without delay.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Sussex Friends of Israel

In response to our petition calling for the Government to bring forward its Online Harms Bill, we have received confirmation that there will be a debate in Parliament today on “regulation and prevention of online harms”.

The subject of the debate was determined not by the Government, however, but by the Backbench Business Committee.

Specifically, the debate is on a motion that proposes “that the House recognises the need to take urgent action to reduce and prevent online harms and urges the Government to bring forward the Online Harms Bill as soon as possible”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism launched a petition in August, in the aftermath of the Wiley episode, calling for new legislation urgently to introduce a requirement for technology companies to remove racist incitement within set timeframes, a duty of care for social networks with personal liability for executives, and tighter requirements to provide evidence to police under warrant.

The petition can be signed here: https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/333146/

More and more evidence is emerging that Labour’s disciplinary process remains a politicised shambles almost a month after the Equality and Human Rights Commission slammed it in a damning report and demanded that the Party introduce an independent system.

Item: Campaign Against Antisemitism submitted a complaint against Kate Linnegar, Labour’s Parliamentary candidate for North Swindon in the 2019 General Election, but was told by the Party that “this person is not a member of the Labour Party.” Given that Ms Linnegar still features prominently on the North Swindon Constituency Labour Party’s website, there appears to be some confusion as to whether she is a member or not.

Naturally, this raises questions about the coherence of the Party’s processes. But a couple of years ago, Labour Against Antisemitism alleged that Labour might be letting some subjects of antisemitism complaints off the hook by claiming that the Party could not find evidence that they were members of the Party and therefore could not take the complaints forward. The conclusion appears to be that either the Party’s membership system is still a shambles or its operation remains politicised.

Item: Gurinder Singh Josan, a member of Labour’s ruling National Executive Committee (NEC), was reported to have been on the panel that readmitted Jeremy Corbyn following his recent suspension, and that the panel’s decision was unanimous. However, Mr Josan has now cast doubt on the smoothness of the process and the matter of unanimity, complaining of the dissemination of “false information”. He has also stated that he has “written to the General Secretary informing him I shall forthwith not be volunteering to be part of any further disputes panels until concerns I have raised are fully addressed.” Further, he has called for the Party to “expedite an independent complaints process”. Evidently, the factionalism that dominated the complaints procedures during Mr Corbyn’s tenure as leader of the Party has not remotely disappeared.

Indeed, a snap poll by YouGov has showed that, while half of Britons agreed that Sir Keir Starmer was right not to restore the whip to Mr Corbyn (with only a fifth disagreeing), Labour voters were split 38% in favour to 32% opposed. The Labour Party is as divided as ever on whether and how to address antisemitism.

Item: Although Sir Keir’s election seemed to herald an end to the factionalism and politicisation that has prevailed in Labour for the past several years in relation to antisemitism, there are now reports that Mr Corbyn’s non-apology, his expedited NEC hearing and readmission to the Labour Party were part of a deal cooked up between Sir Keir’s office and far-left union allies of Mr Corbyn. It has even been suggested that Sir Keir was prepared to restore the whip to Mr Corbyn and only balked under pressure from some of his MPs.

At best, Mr Corbyn’s suspension and rapid readmission is a shambles that demonstrates that incompetence, factionalism and politicisation remain the hallmarks of Labour’s disciplinary process, even a month after the EHRC called for an independent process, over half a year since Sir Keir became leader, and almost a year since he promised to introduce an independent process. At worst, with this series of inconclusive developments, Sir Keir has tried to con the Jewish community.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has submitted two major complaints against Mr Corbyn and further complaints against other sitting Labour MPs, which must be investigated by the Party under an independent disciplinary process.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A Chicago suburb is the latest American town to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Forest Park, Illinois, adopted the Definition at a village council meeting on 9th November. The meeting, held online over Zoom, was addressed by senior Jewish figures.

The resolution means that the Definition will be available as an “educational resource” to assist police and local government in determining whether a crime or incident was antisemitic.

Pointing out that there had been a rise in antisemitism over recent years, and that some cities and counties in Florida had already adopted the resolution, the Jewish speakers explained that they were trying to get as much “awareness of it as possible” in Illinois and wanted to show how Forest Park could “take a leading role in addressing” the disturbing trend of increasing antisemitism.

At the meeting, the Mayor, Rory Hoskins, explained that recent protests in the Illinois state capital involving antisemitic imagery had motivated him to have the Definition adopted, adding that a spate of graffiti around town in September that had included swastikas would now be investigated as hate crimes rather than merely property damage.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Tom Metzger, a leading white supremacist, died from Parkinson’s disease on 4th November in Hemet, California, according to a spokesperson for the Riverside County Department for Public Health.

In the 1970s, Mr Metzger attained the level of State Leader for the Ku Klux Klan in California, and subsequently left to form the White Aryan Resistance (WAR) group.

Mr Metzger pioneered the use of radio and television to spread racist and antisemitic propaganda, with his own public-access cable television show, appearances on popular talk shows and a telephone hotline. He also published a newspaper and managed an electronic bulletin board through which skinheads could communicate and share hateful content.

In 1990, an Oregon jury ordered Mr Metzger to pay $5 million in punitive damages after skinheads he reportedly incited to violence pleaded guilty to criminal charges in the racially motivated murder of the 27-year-old Ethiopian, Mulugeta Seraw.

Though in recent years his influence diminished, he reportedly stated that he remained active with the WAR hotline and the publishing of several white supremacist leaflets.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A leader and administrator of the far-right group, Proud Boys, is reportedly attempting to rebrand the organisation as unashamedly white supremacist and antisemitic.

The group originally described itself as a “Western chauvinist” fraternal organisation, and has previously insisted that its preference for an established “Western civilisation” was not fundamentally racist or antisemitic in nature.

However, the founder of the “tactical defence arm” of the Proud Boys, known for their engagement in street violence, Kyle Chapman, claimed in a recent message on the encrypted app Telegram that he has staged a “coup” against the current leader of the group, who is himself a member of an ethnic minority.

Mr Chapman wrote: “We will confront the Zionist criminals who wish to destroy our civilisation,” while also expressing an active desire for white supremacy in the country. He also quipped that he renamed the group the “Proud Goys” in a reference to the Jewish term for non-Jews that has been appropriated by neo-Nazis to represent their antisemitic beliefs.

The founder of the Proud Boys, Gavin McInnes, also has an extensive history of alleged antisemitism, despite ostensibly decrying hatred and racism. He has shared several video recordings of himself giving the Nazi salute and repeatedly shouting “Heil Hitler”. In March 2017, he allegedly posted a video on Rebel Media titled “Ten Things I Hate about Jews” that was later renamed after media backlash.

Other members and channels of the group on Telegram have rejected Mr Chapman’s desired changes, and it is unclear whether Mr Chapman has indeed obtained total control of the controversial group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The editor of a controversial Toronto free-sheet is basing a legal appeal against a conviction for racial hatred in part on his lawyer’s refusal to defend Holocaust denial.

James Sears, the editor of free publication Your Ward News, and its publisher, LeRoy St. Germaine, are appealing against their 2019 convictions for wilfully promoting hatred against Jews and women. Speaking at his appeal last week, Mr Sears argued that his lawyer, Dean Embry, was incompetent because he had failed to call witnesses to defend his Holocaust beliefs, for “fear of appearing antisemitic or of angering the judge.”

At his trial, Mr Sears stated that he did not believe gas chambers were used in the killing of six million Jews and claimed he had a “right to file a truth defence on historical facts.”

When finding the two men guilty last year, the Ontario Judge said that the case against them was overwhelming and noted that they “promoted hate to a vast audience in an era where online exposure to this material inexorably leads to extremism.” Mr Sears was given the maximum one-year jail sentence and granted bail pending appeal. St. Germaine was given 12 months’ strict house arrest. The judge said that he would have given longer sentences if the statutes allowed.

Mr Sears, 57, who likened himself to “an actor who portrays a lawyer on TV,” is handling his own appeal.

Testifying, Mr Sears said that at his trial he had repeatedly urged his lawyer to call witnesses in an effort to undermine the testimony of the prosecution’s experts on antisemitism and misogyny, but his lawyer had refused.

Mr Embry said that, while he considered Mr Sears’ views about the Holocaust to be indefensible, he believed that they “had a shot at raising a doubt about whether the accused had been promoting hate.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Four demonstrators who took part in an anti-fascist demonstration in Milan in 2018 have been indicted for racial hatred as a result of abuse and threats allegedly aimed at Jewish demonstrators.

The four were indicted for racial or religious hatred offenses allegedly against members of the Jewish Brigade during April 2018 demonstrations to mark the anniversary of Italy’s Liberation in WWII.

A YouTube video of the demonstration shows police keeping noisy demonstrators apart, with far-left protesters on one side of a barrier and Jews on the other. It became more unpleasant when bottles were thrown at Jewish demonstrators and gestures of throat-slitting and machine-guns fire was directed at Jews.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has reacted to Sir Keir Starmer’s statement that he is withholding the whip from Jeremy Corbyn, who was yesterday readmitted to the Labour Party by the same processes that the Equality and Human Rights Commission had declared unfit for purpose.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We have been conned. We did not go to the lengths of asking the EHRC to investigate the Labour Party only to return to the days of opaque, arbitrary decisions by panels that are unfit for purpose.

“Withholding the whip from Jeremy Corbyn is offering the Jewish community crumbs. The EHRC ruled that Labour’s disciplinary processes were unfit but Sir Keir allowed Mr Corbyn to be tried under them. Not only that, but Mr Corbyn should never have been suspended merely for his response to the EHRC’s damning report, but for the responsibility he bears for the Labour Party being found guilty of committing unlawful acts of antisemitism by the EHRC.

“Sir Keir needs to get a grip of his Party and ensure that Mr Corbyn is held to account for what he did to Britain’s Jews. Who is in charge of the Labour Party? Today, we have submitted a second complaint against Mr Corbyn, calling for him to be held to account not by a sham panel but by an independent disciplinary process, as required by the EHRC. Sir Keir must suspend him pending that process, and, if our complaint is upheld, Mr Corbyn must be expelled.”

Earlier today, Campaign Against Antisemitism lodged a further complaint against Mr Corbyn, alleging that he bears personal responsibility for the Party’s institutional antisemitism and must be held to account. We previously submitted a complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs which the Labour Party has yet to acknowledge, let alone investigate, and now we have submitted a further complaint against Mr Corbyn.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Today, Campaign Against Antisemitism has filed a further complaint against the former Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn, over his personal responsibility for the Party being found guilty of unlawful acts of antisemitism, for which he must be held to account.

Mr Corbyn was suspended over remarks he made in reaction to the damning report issued by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC), but less than three weeks later he was yesterday readmitted to the Party by the same processes that the EHRC had declared unfit for purpose. Alarmingly, the decision was made by a panel of Labour’s National Executive Committee, its ruling body, on which allies of Sir Keir Starmer have a majority.

We previously submitted a complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs which the Labour Party has yet to acknowledge, let alone investigate, and today’s complaint against Mr Corbyn is additional to that earlier complaint.

In the letter, which had extensive input from expert legal counsel, Chief Executive Gideon Falter and Head of Political and Government Investigations Joe Glasman wrote: “Given the seriousness of the conduct complained of, Campaign Against Antisemitism requests that Mr Corbyn be suspended pending the outcome of an investigation of the complaint under the independent disciplinary and complaints machinery that the EHRC requires must be established. That process is likely to require independent determination of when conduct is ‘prejudicial, or…grossly detrimental to the Party.’ Campaign Against Antisemitism requests that in the event the complaint is upheld, the appropriate sanction should be expulsion from the Labour Party.”

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We have been conned. We did not go to the lengths of asking the EHRC to investigate the Labour Party only to return to the days of opaque, arbitrary decisions by panels that are unfit for purpose.

“Withholding the whip from Jeremy Corbyn is offering the Jewish community crumbs. The EHRC ruled that Labour’s disciplinary processes were unfit but Sir Keir allowed Mr Corbyn to be tried under them. Not only that, but Mr Corbyn should never have been suspended merely for his response to the EHRC’s damning report, but for the responsibility he bears for the Labour Party being found guilty of committing unlawful acts of antisemitism by the EHRC.

“Sir Keir needs to get a grip of his Party and ensure that Mr Corbyn is held to account for what he did to Britain’s Jews. Who is in charge of the Labour Party? Today, we have submitted a second complaint against Mr Corbyn, calling for him to be held to account not by a sham panel but by an independent disciplinary process, as required by the EHRC. Sir Keir must suspend him pending that process, and, if our complaint is upheld, Mr Corbyn must be expelled.”

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

In a shambolic development, Jeremy Corbyn has been readmitted to the Labour Party following a decision by a panel of Labour’s ruling National Executive Committee (NEC).

Labour’s former leader was recently suspended from the Party after making inflammatory remarks about the report into Labour antisemitism by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) and the submission of a complaint against him, cataloguing his long history of antisemitism, by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Earlier today, Mr Corbyn issued a statement trying to clarify his recent remarks about the EHRC, doubtless in anticipation of this hearing by the NEC panel.

That panel, a majority of which, reportedly, were pro-Corbyn activists, has now lifted Mr Corbyn’s suspension and readmitted him to the Party. The panel was selected by the NEC, on which allies of Sir Keir Starmer have a majority.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The shambolic suspension and readmission of Jeremy Corbyn appears to have been nothing more than a media stunt to blunt the blow of the EHRC’s report last month, which forensically analysed the hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument we submitted as complainant. That report condemned Mr Corbyn and his allies for presiding over the institutionalisation of antisemitism in the Labour Party.

“By readmitting Mr Corbyn, the Labour Party has once again excused antisemitism and proved itself unwilling to address it. Mr Corbyn’s suspension should have remained in place until all of our complaints against him were investigated, but no investigation has been undertaken. Once again, we see the impact of Labour’s failure to implement an independent disciplinary process as demanded by the EHRC and Sir Keir Starmer’s leadership pledges that have now gone unfulfilled for almost a year.

“The Jewish community has been conned. Mr Corbyn must be resuspended immediately pending investigation of our complaint against him under the new independent process mandated by the EHRC. Britain is watching.”

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Jeremy Corbyn, Labour’s former leader who was recently suspended from the Party, has issued a statement “clarifying” his inflammatory remarks about the report into Labour antisemitism by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC). However, he has not addressed his own long history of antisemitism, which was recorded in a complaint made by Campaign Against Antisemitism shortly before he was suspended.

Mr Corbyn was suspended two weeks ago after Campaign Against Antisemitism submitted a detailed disciplinary complaint against him and other sitting MPs, and just hours after the publication of the EHRC’s report after he appeared to downplay the extent of antisemitism in the Party. At the time, he said: “One antisemite is one too many, but the scale of the problem was also dramatically overstated for political reasons by our opponents inside and outside the party, as well as by much of the media. That combination hurt Jewish people and must never be repeated.” This was not the first time that Mr Corbyn (or his allies) had tried to undermine confidence in the EHRC’s report.

Now, Mr Corbyn has issued a new statement, in which he said: “We must never tolerate antisemitism or belittle concerns about it. And that was not my intention in anything I said this week. I regret the pain this issue has caused the Jewish community and would wish to do nothing that would exacerbate or prolong it. To be clear, concerns about antisemitism are neither ‘exaggerated’ nor ‘overstated’. The point I wished to make was that the vast majority of Labour Party members were and remain committed anti-racists deeply opposed to antisemitism. I fully support Keir Starmer’s decision to accept all the EHRC recommendations in full and, in accordance with my own lifelong convictions, will do what I can to help the Party move on, united against antisemitism which has been responsible for so many of history’s greatest crimes against humanity.”

He went on to thank “the many thousands of Labour party members, trade unionists, and supporters in Britain and around the world, who have offered their solidarity.” Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring the solidarity that Mr Corbyn has received, and there are reports now of optimism on Labour’s far-left that Mr Corbyn will be reinstated.

However, in his statement, Mr Corbyn only referred to his remarks about the EHRC, which represented only one of some eighteen incidents of antisemitic discourse in which Mr Corbyn has been involved. The Labour Party must undertake a full investigation of all of these incidents before Mr Corbyn’s suspension can possibly be lifted.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Mr Corbyn’s statement today seeks to recast his comments gaslighting the Jewish community when the EHRC’s report into Labour antisemitism was released. This is a desperate attempt to have his suspension lifted and reveals that he still believes that suspensions are something that happen on the whim of the Leader as it did during his tenure, and not as a result of any due process. If the Labour Party wants to build on the positive step of suspending Mr Corbyn, it must investigate the entirety of our complaint against him under the independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has mandated, and do so within six months. Reinstating Mr Corbyn now would only show that Labour is not serious about tackling antisemitism, or is incapable of doing so.”

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Alton Brown, the host of the Food Network’s “Iron Chef America” and creator of “Good Eats”, issued an apology last week following a “flippant” remark he posted on Twitter about the uniforms worn by prisoners at the Auschwitz extermination camp during the Holocaust.

The post, originally shared on 10th November, read: “Do you think the camp uniforms will be striped, like the ones at Auschwitz or will plaid be in vogue?” Mr Brown claimed that the remark was a comment on the current political climate. In response to an individual comment, he also tweeted, “I have no gold fillings”, a reference to the fillings often stolen by the Nazis from the bodies of murdered Jews.

A few minutes after the post was tweeted from his account, another user of the networking site responded with criticism and Mr Brown replied: “F*** you”.

With 4.5million Twitter followers, numerous followers expressed shock at the television host’s gross insensitivity, describing his remarks as “hurtful” and “disgusting”. Several Jewish organisations called for the removal of the celebrity chef from the Food Network too demonstrate zero tolerance for antisemitic language.

In a public statement, Mr Brown maintained that the allusion to the victims of the Holocaust was not for a “humorous effect” and it was a “very poor use of judgement and in poor taste”. The tweet has subsequently been removed from the platform.

The Food Network, and the culinary entertainment industry more broadly, has not yet taken any further action or spoken out.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The American Jewish actor Joshua Malina levelled criticism at Hollywood last week for continuing to employ Mel Gibson following past antisemitic comments.

The actor is set to star in the upcoming film “Dangerous” and has recently been cast in the action-thriller “Leo From Toledo”. Retweeting a tweet from Variety that outlined Mr Gibson’s recent work, Mr Malina wrote: “Antisemite Continues To Get Work.”

Mel Gibson has a long history of offensive comments and causing controversy . He first came under public scrutiny from Christian and Jewish activist groups and organisations in 2004 for his movie “The Passion of Christ”, and, in 2006, he was arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol and told the police officer that “the Jews are responsible for all the wars in the world” and asked if the police officer was himself a Jew in what became a widely publicised incident.

He subsequently issued a public apology for the antisemitic remark and claimed that “[He is] not an antisemite. [He is] not a bigot.”

Fellow American Jewish actress Winona Ryder has also previously accused Mr Gibson as describing her as an “oven dodger” in the 1990s, in a direct reference to the crematoria at Nazi concentration camps. The actor strongly denies making the comment, reportedly calling the actress “a liar”.

Mr Gibson nevertheless enjoyed wide critical acclaim following the premiere of his film “Hackshaw Ridge” in 2016 and has maintained a high level of support from others in the industry. Others have continued to protest his continued high profile in Hollywood.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A cardiologist based in Victoria, Australia has issued a public apology after making antisemitic comments in a private e-mail.

Dr Arthur Nasis intended to respond to his sister, a property manager, regarding a negotiation over a rent reduction with her tenants during the coronavirus pandemic. The e-mail was inadvertently sent to the tenants, Paul and Susannah Swiatlo, as the property agent mistakenly forwarded the chain of e-mails to the tenants. It concluded with the statement: “Tell him to pack his Jew bags and f*** off”.

Ms Swiatlo, whose father had lost family members during the Holocaust, expressed shock and hurt at the casual use of such antisemitic language, and said that the incident has subsequently “sparked fear of the prevalence of antisemitism” in the community. She contact the Anti-Defamation Commission (ADC), and raised the matter with Monash Health and Monash University, however the tenant was told that the remark represented a private matter.

Following a discussion with the Australasian Jewish Medical Federation and condemnation from the Victorian Health Minister, Dr Nasis issued a statement in which he expressed regret and said that he “[looks] forward to maintaining a positive relationship with [his] Jewish medical colleagues and the wider Jewish community.”

The Executive Director for Monash Health has stated that the public health service has commissioned an urgent investigation into the matter to be undertaken by external experts, to ensure racism is not tolerated in or outside of the workplace.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A series of lectures by a professor at Sofia University in Bulgaria have been roundly condemned for being “filled with racist, xenophobic and antisemitic content.”

Professor Mihail Mirchev recently uploaded a series of online lectures on Youtube that show him, among other inflammatory remarks, stating in response to his own question as to whether it is possible for Bulgaria to become a “Jewish state”, that it is indeed possible “if they [the Jews], less than one per cent, own the state and the capital, the media and the arts”.

The series of controversial lectures is titled “Social Work with Ethnic Groups”, and it has been taught for three years by the professor.

Numerous organisations and academics have written to the University’s administration calling for his dismissal.

Prof. Mirchev reportedly maintains that he will not resign and refuses to alter any of his teaching materials or online content, describing the allegations as “very exaggerated.”

Hours after students shared the letter on social media, an online petition was organised calling for Prof. Mirchev’s removal.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The suspension of Jeremy Corbyn following the publication of the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s report into Labour antisemitism and the submission of a complaint against Mr Corbyn and other MPs by Campaign Against Antisemitism appears to have spurred a confrontation within the Party between several Constituency Labour Parties (CLPs) and the Labour Party headquarters.

Among the CLPs to express support for or solidarity with Mr Corbyn are BatterseaBristol North WestBristol WestBlyth ValleyCamarthen East and DinefwrCardiff NorthCarlisleHastings and RyeIslington North (Mr Corbyn’s CLP), Leeds EastLiverpool WaltonNewton AbbottPendlePutney, and South Thanet.

Various other local branches of the Party have also passed motions of solidarity or expressed support for the suspended former leader.

The motions and expressions of support came only a few days after the Party’s General-Secretary, David Evans, warned CLPs not to discuss disciplinary cases. A few months ago he also warned them to avoid discussion of sensitive issues relating to antisemitism.

Apparently as a result of these motions and other inflammatory tweets, the Chair and co-Secretary of Bristol West and other members of that CLP have been suspended from Labour.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

It has been reported that a co-founder of a neo-Nazi terrorist group has set up an online business selling inflammatory t-shirts.

Ben Raymond co-founded National Action as a student with Alex Davies in 2013 but, according to The Independent, distanced himself from the group after it was proscribed by the British Government following repeated calls by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others. He has never been prosecuted for his involvement, while others have been convicted and imprisoned. It is believed that he went on to produce designs for other splinter groups since the ban on National Action, for which he also worked on designs.

It is understood that Mr Raymond operates an online shop specialising in t-shirts and posters with neo-Nazi designs, including swastikas, swords, guns and other Nazi symbols and occult Nazi tropes. The online retailer is called Blackguard.

Apparently, when asked if Blackguard’s Twitter account was operated by Mr Raymond, he replied “yes” from his personal handle. Mr Raymond apparently did not respond to requests for comment from The Independent.

According to one academic specialist, the website is “smuggling symbols and images through in a way that you might get away with…It’s striking but it’s not necessarily immediately obvious what you’re looking at,” unless you are a white supremacist familiar with the motifs.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

A new report on hate crimes released today by the Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI) has shown that 60.2% of hate crimes against a religious minority in the United States are “motivated by offenders’ anti-Jewish bias”.

Not only does this figure represent a significant majority of the 1,715 victims of anti-religious hate crimes that were reported in 2019, but given that Jews represent only around 2% of the entire population of the United States, the discrepancy is extraordinary and startling.

In light of these figures, not to mention the numerous high-profile and many lower-profile antisemitic incidents in recent years, it is vital that federal and state authorities take antisemitism seriously.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist us with this project.

A man has been arrested and charged with racially aggravated assault and assaulting a police officer after he yelled antisemitic abuse at a Jewish victim and then attacked a local neighbourhood patrol volunteer and a policeman.

The suspect is alleged to have shouted “F*** Jews, you vote for Trump, go to Hitler – he should kill you!”

A volunteer with Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol, then intervened, as did a police officer, and they were both allegedly set upon by the suspect.

The attack took place on Craven Park Road in Stamford Hill on 13th November.

The suspect has been remanded in custody and will appear at Highbury Magistrates Court today. Shomrim volunteers are supporting the victim.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD2818 13/11/2020.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “This sort of antisemitic abuse is far too common, particularly in Stamford Hill, and this is also hardly the first time that violence has been involved. We applaud Shomrim and the police for their persistent vigilance and wish full recoveries to all of the victims. The suspect, if convicted, must face the full force of the law, otherwise these attacks will only get worse.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Shomrim

Yet another figure at Islamic Relief Worldwide has resigned over alleged antisemitism in the third such incident in just six months.

It has now emerged that Tayeb Abdoun, a former interim-CEO at the charity who has worked there for 25 years, resigned on 14th October after being confronted over a picture he reportedly posted on Facebook of a knife with a thumbs up and wrote: “Lay the bodies of the Jews on the top of the mountains, so that no dog in Palestine must suffer hunger.” Other controversial posts were also uncovered, and Mr Abdoun resigned after the Swiss newspaper Tages-Anzeiger confronted him.

In a statement, Islamic Relief Worldwide reportedly said: “We continue to work as an organisation to root out anyone that does not meet our core values as a respectful, faith-sensitive, non-discriminatory and principled charity.”

Back in August, the entire board of Islamic Relief Worldwide resigned after a new trustee-director was discovered to have a history of antisemitic posts on social media. He had been appointed to replace another trustee who had previously resigned after his history of antisemitic social media posts was uncovered.

This is therefore the third such incident to rock Britain’s largest Muslim charity in just six months, making our representations to the Charity Commission all the more urgent.

Following the second incident, Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to the Charity Commission. In our letter to the Charity Commission, we wrote: “The episode has shown that IRW’s processes are defective. Given the size of the charity and the severity of the breach, we are writing to invite you to open a statutory investigation into how IRW has been operating and whether the racist views and negligence of some of its trustees have impacted its activities. We believe that the Commission must intervene to chart a new course for IRW, rebuild the public’s trust in its work. This matter has caused considerable concern amongst members of the Jewish community who have sought our support and it is important that the Commission is seen by them to be investigating this matter thoroughly and taking action where it is needed.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “This third incident of alleged antisemitism at Islamic World Relief in just six months, which follows the resignation of the entire trustee board, reinforces the impression that Islamic Relief Worldwide’s processes are defective and makes all the more urgent our call for a statutory investigation by the Charity Commission into how the charity has been operating and whether the racist views and negligence of several of its trustees have impacted its activities. The Commission must chart a new course for the organisation in order to rebuild the public’s trust in the charity’s work.”

It is understood that an independent commission will review the charity’s processes for vetting trustees and directors and its code of conduct, while the organisation’s leadership will receive antisemitism training. The commission will be chaired by the former Attorney-General, Dominic Grieve.

Tony Greenstein has been ordered by the High Court to pay £67,886 to Campaign Against Antisemitism after his attempt to sue us for calling him a “notorious antisemite” humiliatingly backfired.

Several days ago the High Court struck out Mr Greenstein’s libel claims against us, ruling that it was permissible for us to call him a “notorious antisemite” in articles on our website.

Mrs Justice Tipples denied Mr Greenstein leave to appeal, although Mr Greenstein is still able to petition the Court of Appeal directly.

Campaign Against Antisemitism was represented by Adam Speker QC, instructed by solicitors Keith Mathieson and Alex Wilson of RPC, and advised pro bono by solicitor Dr Mark Lewis who is an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

A memorial in a German town to the victims of Kristallnacht has been vandalised just days after the anniversary of the Nazi pogrom.

Flowers that had been laid at a memorial in Leer, Lower Saxony, to commemorate victims of Kristallnacht at the site of a synagogue that was burned down on the night of Nazi violence on  9th November 1938, were damaged.

The security authorities in Lower Saxony have launched an investigation into the vandalism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

There were 257 antisemitic incidents in Austria in the first six months of 2020, according to Austria’s Jewish representative body.

According to new statistics released this week by the Vienna-based Israelitische Kultusgemeinde Wien (IKG), 257 antisemitic incidents were recorded between January and June 2020, or an average of 43 antisemitic attacks each month.  These included three physical assaults, 26 instances of destruction of property and 131 episodes of verbal abuse or harassment. Perpetrators came from far-right and far-left groups, or were Islamists, according to the IKG.

Austrian politicians expressed concern over the IKG report. Chancellery Minister Karoline Edtstadler stated that the numbers were “a call to action.”

Ms Edtstadler added: “43 antisemitic incidents per month is 43 too many.”

IKG officials noted that the statistics only recorded the reported incidents and that the true picture was likely to be more alarming. They also urged the Austrian police to ensure that antisemitism was registered as a motive. In a radio interview, one official said: “People who are attacked because of their religious beliefs… should feel that they are being taken seriously and protected by all state authorities.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A Greek daily newspaper, whose publisher was last week found guilty of defamation and whose newspaper was accused by the court of contributing to hate against Jews, has published an antisemitic slur on its front-page, allegedly comparing the Greek-Jewish head of the Pfizer pharmaceutical company with the infamous Nazi Josef Mengele and referring to the vaccine that Pfizer has reportedly produced as “poison.”

The Makeleio newspaper published its front page article under the headline “Jewish veterinarian will stick the needle in us!” in connection with the role of the Pfizer CEO, Dr Albert Bourla, a Greek Jew, in the development of a vaccine for COVID-19.

The Central Board of Jewish Communities in Greece (KIS) issued a statement condemning the newspaper and claiming that it regularly publishes “incendiary antisemitic articles.”

It claimed that the article, which was illustrated with a photo of Josef Mengele, was “yet another antisemitic story” and a clear incitement to violence against the Jews.”

The newspaper was also condemned by George Kalantzis, the General Secretary for Religious Affairs, who said that the article and others in the same newspaper “cultivate consciously the most vile antisemitism.”

It brought to mind, said Mr Kalantzis, the medieval period when Jews were blamed for every disaster, illness or defeat. “At that time the road to Auschwitz begun,” he declared.

He added that it was “a great honour and a source of pride” that a Greek “regardless of which God he might believe in” has significantly contributed to “finding a solution for this unprecedented health crisis” in a period when the health of billions of people, as well as the global economy, depended on the existence of a vaccine.

Just days ago, an Athens court found Stefanos Chios, the publisher of Makeleio, guilty of defamation in connection with an article in 2017. Mr Chios was fined £1,660 for a 2017 article defaming a former President of the Jewish Community of Athens.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Neo-Nazi graffiti was found in a park in Woodstock, including a swastika, the number 88 (denoting HH, for ‘Heil Hitler’) and other symbols.

The graffiti in the Oxfordshire park was reported to the police as criminal damage and a hate crime.

Town Councillor Sharone Parnes is understood to have urged the town council to issue a “strongly worded” notice expressing “disgust” at the graffiti and calling for the perpetrators to turn themselves in, but is appalled by the council’s apparent reticence to do so before further consultation.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has contacted the Mayor for comment.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Cllr Sharone Parnes

The controversial councillor, Jo Bird, is understood to be under investigation by the Labour Party for the third time in recent years after reportedly suggesting that antisemitism is being privileged over other forms of racism.

Last week, Cllr Bird reportedly told a meeting of the far-left faction ‘Don’t Leave, Organise’: “As a Jew, I worry about racism against Jewish people. I also worry about privileging the racism faced by Jewish communities in this country as more worthy of resources than other forms of discrimination such as against black people, Palestinians, Muslims and refugees. Abuses of power are measured in detentions, deportations and deaths. Privileging one group over another group is divisive. It’s bad for the many, as well as bad for the Jews.”

Cllr Bird represents the Bromborough Ward on Wirral Council and has a long history of controversy relating to Jews, including renaming ‘due process’ in the Labour Party as “Jew process”, for which she was suspended; supporting the expelled Labour activist and friend of Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, Marc Wadsworth, who was thrown out of the Party after a confrontation with Jewish then-MP Ruth Smeeth; and worrying about the “privileging of racism against Jews, over and above — as more worthy of resources than other forms of racism.”

Elected to Wirral Council in August 2018, Cllr Bird is a member of Jewish Voice for Labour, the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, and she has described Labour’s institutional antisemitism as based on mere “accusations, witch-huntery and allegations without evidence”. She recently failed in her bid for election to Labour’s ruling National Executive Committee.

Cllr Bird rejoined the Labour Party in 2015, when Jeremy Corbyn was running for the Party’s leadership, and last year she had previously been tipped to become a candidate to replace Dame Louise Ellman, a Jewish MP who quit Labour prior to the election due to antisemitism.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Several Nassau Country, NY elected officials, various organisations and the local Jewish community have made calls for the immediate removal of an Oceanside Sanitation Commissioner for alleged antisemitic social media posts.

On the morning of 10th November, elected officials and activists convened in front of the sanitation office with a bipartisan group of Nassau County legislators and organisations to publicly condemn the actions of Ryan Hemsley.

The Sanitation Commissioner is believed to have shared more than thirty offensive posts, dating back several years, that featured swastikas and Nazi imagery as well as the denigration of Holocaust victims.

The series of Facebook posts were anonymously sent in a letter and mass e-mail to the other four board members and the media in October. One politician said: “It’s just hate, hate, hate”. However Mr Hemsley has maintained that many of the posts were not created by him and none of the memes were directed towards any specific group.

Mr Hensley has refused to resign after he was elected commissioner for a two-year term that commenced in September this year. In a recent post on his Facebook page, however, he stated that he would donate his pay checks to the Long Island Coalition Against Bullying, and promised to donate his $7,500 annual salary for the remainder of his two-year term.

The Nassau County District Attorney’s Office is currently reviewing Mr Hensley’s position. The Sanitation Board’s attorney has requested that all offensive posts be identified, having been deleted from the social media platform, and has asked the Attorney General for potential legal routes. Elected officials may be removed by the District Attorney under state law or if a local resident petitions a court with material that shows misconduct while in office.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A swastika was found graffitied with red paint on a hall of residence popular with Jewish students at the University of Leeds.

The word “Nazi” was also painted beside the swastika on a wall in the Charles Morris Hall building.

The University confirmed that the graffiti, found over the weekend, has been removed.

A spokesperson for West Yorkshire Police reportedly said: “This is being treated as a hate crime and will be investigated accordingly. Officers are working with the university to identify suspects and anyone with information can contact police on 101, or by using the options on the West Yorkshire Police website. The crime reference is 13200552418.”

It is understood that the University suspects that this represented a “one-off indiscriminate act of vandalism by intruders” and that it was “unaware of any direct threats made to anyone living in the halls of residence”. Security patrols have apparently been increased at halls.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Concerns have been raised following the announcement that former Labour MP Ruth George has been selected as a candidate for the Party in upcoming local council elections, despite a complaint against her having recently been submitted by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

The complaint was submitted on the day that the report into Labour antisemitism by the Equality and Human Rights Commission was published, and details of the incidents relating to Ms George can be found here.

Despite the complaint being outstanding and Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer’s pledge to tear out antisemitism “by its roots” from the Party, Ms George has served as a County Councillor for Whaley Bridge and Blackbrook for the last nine months (she lost her seat in Parliament in the 2019 General Election) and has now been selected for as a candidate for the County Council election in May.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The continued service of Ruth George as a Labour councillor and now her selection as a candidate for the coming elections, while our complaint against her relating to antisemitism remains outstanding, is difficult to square with Sir Keir Starmer’s pledge to tear out antisemitism ‘by its roots’. That complaint, along with the other complaints we have submitted against sitting and former MPs and other officeholders, must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process and concluded within six months.”

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Josh Reaume, a part-time driver in the Xfinity and Truck series this season, has been suspended for a recent controversial post on one of his social media channels following a violation of NASCAR’s anti-discrimination behavioural policy.

The driver reportedly posted an image of a slice of toast, with a spread in the shape of a swastika, on his Snapchat account on 5th November. The photograph was then captured by an unidentified source and submitted to NASCAR for review.

In a recent public statement, the NASCAR driver said: “On Thursday I posted a picture of my evening snack and it was taken out of context. It was never meant to offend anybody and I’m sorry if it did.” He expressed that he is proud to have grown up in an ethnically diverse family and argues that his team has the most diverse set of drivers in the history of stock car racing. Mr Reaume hopes to participate in Daytona International Speedway following the apology.

NASCAR officials have confirmed that the indefinite suspension and behavioural penalty will remain in place.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The Finnish government’s decision to scrap a measure that would have banned brit milah (religious circumcision) has been welcomed by Finnish and British campaigners.

A bill aimed at banning female genital mutilation originally contained language relating to non-medical circumcision, which could have led to a ban on religious circumcision for boys. Following representations from the Central Council of Finnish Jewish Communities and intervention by the Anglo-Jewish advocacy groups, as well as diplomats and politicians, lawmakers in Finland changed the language in the draft legislation.

The bill, which was passed on Friday, was drafted after some 50,000 Finns signed a petition calling for a specific law against female genital mutilation.

The issue of circumcision of boys will be re-examined and “clarified” in future, it is understood, but for now a ban “has been averted”, according to one campaigner.

There have been various attempts to ban religious circumcision of boys across Europe. Anti-immigration parties often join forces with more liberal groups who view the custom as, among other things, “a violation of children’s rights.” Jews and Muslims campaign against this push.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Neo-Nazi and white supremacist propaganda has been discovered by local residents in San Antonio, Texas.

Individual posters and plastic wallets that contained antisemitic and racist leaflets were left outside homes in multiple neighbourhoods in the city’s Northside district. A mobile phone number was also included in an alleged attempt to recruit more members to the cause of those behind the leaflets.

Residents shared photos and video recordings of the concerning materials created by an organisation known as the 14First Foundation, a self-proclaimed white supremacist group operating in the area.

The group’s Vice President has openly admitted that he drove across the city in his truck to distribute the hateful flyers. Despite the widespread use of swastikas and Nazi imagery in the material, he maintained that he does not identify as an antisemite or affiliate himself with the Nazis.

For the previous six months, his organisation has been hoping to recruit people from the most affluent neighbourhoods with mostly white American residents, he said.

The local community has expressed fears and disgust over rising hatred in the city, and the seemingly widespread distribution of divisive and offensive content.

The FBI, when asked for comment, reportedly said that if information “comes to light of a potential federal violation” in local investigations, the FBI will be prepared to undertake its own investigation. Hollywood Park Police and the San Antonia Police Department, however, have stated that no crime was committed and thus charges cannot be filed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Following an hour-long presentation from Holocaust survivor Man Eisen, Orillia’s City Council unanimously approved the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism on 9th October.

The recent move comes as part of a broader motion that referenced the city’s hope to be a “welcoming, caring, inclusive and accessible community” in its 2018-2020 strategic plan to combat racism in Orillia.

The city’s Mayor invited Mr Eisen to make the presentation to the City Council in order to approach the “disgusting issue of racism”. The virtual presentation explored his experiences of the Holocaust, including the murder of several family members in Auschwitz.

He said while he remains grateful to the country that has acted as a “safe haven”, it is vital that Canadians remain vigilant in the fight against antisemitism. Along with the wider Jewish community, Mr Eisen expressed shock “to see such poison coming out” and suggested that the city’s endorsement of the Definition is an encouraging sign that the rising rates of antisemitism are being effectively tackled.

Many councillors reportedly found the content distressing, and thus decided significant action had to be undertaken to reflect an appropriate condemnation of such hatred.

Canada announced an intention to adopt the Definition in 2019, and the country’s province of Ontario recently recognised the Definition following a series of hateful and discriminatory incidents across the region.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A number of headstones have been vandalised at a Jewish cemetery in Ukraine.

The vandalism in Malyn, a town located some 60 miles north-west of the capital Kiev, follows similar desecrations last month at Jewish cemeteries in neighbouring Moldova and Hungary.

According to a Facebook post by a local fundraiser for cemetery renovations in Malyn, the vandalism was discovered last week. It is understood that police currently have no leads in their attempt to identify the culprits.

One of the headstones smashed was a new marble memorial for a Jewish couple who both died more than 50 years ago. Portraits of the couple and a Star of David were also smashed. The perpetrators climbed into fenced burial plots to smash headstones as well.

In 2012, the Council of Europe placed responsibility for the care of Jewish cemeteries on national governments. The non-binding resolution followed a report that pointed out that Jewish cemeteries were more vulnerable than other similar sites. In addition to vandalism – often motivated by antisemitism – the report noted instances of cemeteries in Eastern Europe that had been turned into “public gardens, leisure parks, army grounds and storage sites.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

An A-star student said to have fallen down “the rabbit hole of the internet” to become a neo-Nazi has been sentenced after pleading guilty to fourteen terror charges and two charges of possessing indecent images of children.

Harry Vaughan, who is eighteen, was given a two-year prison sentence suspended for two years. He was also ordered to attend a rehabilitation programme.

Mr Justice Sweeney, handing down the sentence at the Old Bailey, said: “You are a dangerous offender.”

Mr Vaughan is said to have begun taking an interest in Satanic neo-Nazism at the age of fourteen, unbeknownst to his parents, who were bewildered when he was arrested some years later.

He had “every advantage that could have been afforded to him,” according to his barrister, having been educated at a prestigious grammar school and received four A-star grades in summer exams.

In 2018, he applied to join the System Resistance Network, a white supremacist successor to National Action, which the Government proscribed as a terrorist organisation in 2016 following a long campaign by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others. He wrote at the time that “there is nothing I wouldn’t do to further the cause”.

He was arrested at home on 19th June last year in a counter-terrorism operation against a far-right online forum called Fascist Forge. His laptop was seized, revealing documents relating to antisemitism, Satanism and neo-Nazism, as well as as far-right terrorist book, bomb-making manuals and materials from the Sonnenkrieg Division, a neo-Nazi organisation that was proscribed by the Government this year.

Police also discovered videos of child abuse, leading to the charges of possession of indecent images of children.

The Head of the Metropolitan Police’s Counter Terrorism Command reportedly said that the case “illustrates it is possible for any young person to be susceptible to radicalisation,” adding: “Harry Vaughan is an intelligent young man who was predicted A-star grades and aspiring to study computing at university. Yet, online, he was an enthusiastic participant of right-wing terrorist forums.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Image credit: Metropolitan Police

The Welsh nationalist party, Plaid Cymru, has announced that it is holding a review into antisemitism in its Party.

The announcement follows the publication of the damning report into antisemitism in the Labour Party by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC). Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant in the EHRC’s investigation, having made the formal referral that prompted the launch of the unprecedented full statutory investigation. 

Plaid Cymru’s internal review will reportedly be led by Liz Saville Roberts MP, the leader of the Party’s small contingent at Westminster, and it aims to ensure that there is “zero tolerance” of antisemitism in the Party.

However, the announcement comes shortly after the Party showed that it has no intention of actually tackling antisemitism after deciding not to take action against repeat offender and prospective Welsh Assembly candidate Sahar Al-Faifi.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has details of other concerns relating to antisemitism in Plaid Cymru, and intends to submit representations to the review.

Plaid Cymru leader Adam Price reportedly told BBC Wales: “I think this is a watershed moment, and I think no part of society is immune from it. The Welsh Labour Party is not immune from it, Plaid Cymru is not immune from it…It’s absolutely certain that we are seeing a rising tide of antisemitism, it’s endemic.” He added: “I can’t involve myself for the very good reasons set out in the EHRC report in individual disciplinary cases, but it is my responsibility to ensure our culture, our structures, our processes, do actually fulfil a zero-tolerance approach to antisemitism and any other form of religious prejudice.” He also disclosed that Plaid Cymru election candidates are to undergo training on combating antisemitism.

Joe Glasman, Head of Political and Government Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We welcome Plaid Cymru’s announcement of a review into antisemitism in its ranks, in the wake of the EHRC’s damning report into anti-Jewish racism in the Labour Party, instigated after we referred Labour to the EHRC. Plaid Cymru has welcomed our offer of representations, including incidents involving Party members, and we shall make these submissions shortly.

“Plaid Cymru is making the right decision to try to get ahead of this problem, but it will have to show that it is serious. Its recent decision not to take action against repeat offender Sahar Al-Faifi certainly shows that it has work to do to win the confidence of anyone who opposes racism.”

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

After years of pressure from Campaign Against Antisemitism, the conspiracy theorist and antisemitic hate preacher David Icke has finally been banned from Twitter.

Twitter’s decision follows similar moves by YouTube and Facebook several months ago. Mr Icke had some 382,000 followers on Twitter.

These decisions by the leading social media companies to remove Mr Icke from their platforms come after years of promoting the antisemitic commentator, much of whose website traffic is directed from social media. Despite extensive dossiers having been provided to the tech giants by Campaign Against Antisemitism in the past detailing Mr Icke’s racist claims about Jews, it has taken this long to ban him – and in each case it was not even related to antisemitism.

Instead, Mr Icke’s YouTube channel and Facebook page – and now his Twitter handle – were removed because of his misinformation campaign regarding the COVID-19 pandemic (although as part of this campaign he has also claimed that Israel was using the COVID-19 crisis to “test its technology”).

Mr Icke uses social media, his books and his stage performances to incite hatred. His preaching is so absurd that since the 1990s he has been dismissed as a crank, but because he is dismissed, there has been no major opposition to him and he has built up a following of thousands upon thousands of disciples whom he has persuaded to adamantly believe that the world is in the grip of a conspiracy run by the “Rothschild Zionists”. His repertoire includes conspiracy myths and tropes classified as antisemitic according to the International Definition of Antisemitism. Campaign Against Antisemitism has successfully persuaded some venues to pull out of hosting his events. Last month, Ofcom sanctioned the television channel London Live for airing an interview with Mr Icke on COVID-19.

Campaign Against Antisemitism will continue to press social media companies and other outlets to bar Mr Icke and other antisemites from their forums.

A teenager from Rugby linked to neo-Nazi groups has been jailed for terror offences.

Paul Dunleavy, who is seventeen, was given a sentence of five years and six months in jail after being found guilty of preparing acts of terrorism at Birmingham Crown Court.

The judge ruled that Mr Dunleavy can be named, and reportedly described his terrorist efforts as “inept”, adding: “Your autism impacts on your maturity and understanding.”

Mr Dunleavy had pleaded not guilty, but it was alleged that he had joined the neo-Nazi Feuerkrieg Division group, which the Home Office plans to proscribe.

The court had been told that he had to pass a test to prove his hatred of Jews and that he had “graphic” video footage of a terrorist attack on his telephone and had searched the internet for information about guns, including how to convert a gun that fires blanks into a live weapon.

He had also apparently praised the terrorist who carried out the mass shooting last year in Christchurch, New Zealand, describing such perpetrators as “saints”.

Jurors had been told that he had adopted the “twisted ideology” of Nazis and white supremacists and had participated in far-right chat groups online, where he shared the information about firearms that he had learned.

In one of the messages, the defendant said that he was an administrator of a group called ‘League of Nationalists’, and also said: “Whatever happens I’m going to have a local unit. I’m working on the propaganda and the weapons. I need men.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Image credit: West Midlands Police

Ofcom has fined the Islam Channel £20,000 for broadcasting a programme that included “antisemitic hate speech”.

Last year, Ofcom determined that the Islam Channel broadcasted “very harmful and highly offensive antisemitic content” in its programme, The Rightly Guided Khalifas.

According to its website, the Islam Channel broadcasts from London and describes itself as providing “alt news, current affairs and entertainment programming from an Islamic perspective,” and it broadcasts to over 136 countries worldwide.

The Rightly Guided Khalifas, a religious education series on the history of the Koran and the measures used to preserve its original wording, claimed that Israel printed hundreds of thousands of deliberately distorted copies of the Koran in 1961 for distribution in Africa and Asia, an assertion based on government propaganda from the period.

The Arabic narration also quoted a “telegraph” from the last century accusing Israel of being “formed on the basis of tyranny and aggression…[and it] continues to live in this tyrannical frame of mind…[and] seeks the destruction of our belief and religion” by distorting the Koran. “In this way, it continues to practice what their forefathers [i.e. the Jews] had done before.”

The English translation on-screen also accused Israel of “poisonous acts”, while the English subtitles added that “the occupying state of Israel (the jews)…is still living in this world with the same evil mind…by doing so the new jews tried to do the same thing their ancestors did when they displaced words from (their) right places [sic].”

The Islam Channel said that The Rightly Guided Khalifas series was produced by an overseas third party rather than in-house, and that it did not endorse its content, despite having broadcast it, noting also that the English translations were produced in the Middle East and claiming that terms such as “Israel”, “Israelis” and “Jews” are used interchangeably there, while insisting it did not endorse this conflation.

Ofcom had regard to the International Definition of Antisemitism, noting in particular the following examples of antisemitism:

  • accusing Jews as a people of being responsible for real or imagined wrongdoing committed by a single Jewish person or group, or even for acts committed by non-Jews;
  • holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the state of Israel; and
  • making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy or of Jews controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions.

Ofcom determined that the material constituted hate speech on the bases that that it conflated Israel and the Jewish people (for both Arabic and English language viewers); held contemporary Jews collectively responsible for allegations (based on a single interpretation) stretching from the establishment of Islam to the 1960s; and ascribed a perpetually negative characteristic to Jewish people (namely corrupting holy books and seeking the destruction of Islam).

Ofcom decided that the broadcast “had the potential to promote, encourage and incite such intolerance among viewers” and that it “represents serious breaches of the [Ofcom Broadcasting] Code”.

The Islam Channel, which is reportedly funded by Saudi Arabia, has been found on multiple occasions in the past to have broadcast programmes featuring political bias and advocacy of marital rape and violence, and has been accused of promoting a radical cleric.

The University of Cambridge has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The adoption of the Definition was reportedly agreed at a meeting of the University’s General Board on 4th November.

Last month, the University appeared to be resisting adopting the Definition, despite reiterated calls by the Education Secretary, Gavin Williamson, for universities to do so. However, in a welcome move, the University now appears to have reversed itself.

The University’s Jewish Society has applauded the decision, and has stated that it is asking for clarifications on implementation. It has also called for the Students’ Union to adopt the Definition as well.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities and public bodies. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Eric Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

In a grotesque social media post, the Secretary of the Scottish Palestine Solidarity Campaign, Mick Napier, has called the late former Chief Rabbi Jonathan Sacks “utter racist swine”.

Lord Sacks died over the weekend, prompting mourning in the Jewish community and tributes from around the world.

The researcher David Collier observed that Mr Napier wrote on Facebook: “Utter racist swine, and moral guide for BBC Radio 4 listeners, Rabbi Jonathan Sacks has died. He extended a ‘personal invitation’ to Jews to join him and his racist successor [Chief Rabbi Ephraim] Mirvis on the March of the Flags on Jerusalem Day, ‘dancing with our brave IDF soldiers’ in the settler enclave in [sic]”. Mr Napier repeated the insult on Twitter.

The post was ‘liked’ several times, including by the antisemite and expelled Labour member, Jackie Walker. Comments on the post included “Good riddance!” and “May he rot”.

Mr Napier is an activist who was convicted of aggravated trespass and of failing to follow police orders to leave a Jewish-owned cosmetics store in Glasgow following a prosecution supported by Jewish Human Rights Watch.

Last week, a founding member of the Palestine Solidarity Campaign and expelled Labour member, Tony Greenstein, lost his case against Campaign Against Antisemitism for calling him a “notorious antisemite”.

A court in Greece has found a newspaper publisher of guilty of defamation in connection with an editorial column that used antisemitic tropes.

The Athens court imposed a fine of £1,660 on Stefanos Chios, the publisher of the Makeleio newspaper, for a 2017 article about Minos Moissis, a former President of the Jewish Community of Athens.

The court stated that, in addition to defaming Moissis personally, the paper “contributed deliberately” to the production of “a rhetoric of hate against Greek Jewry.” .

Greece’s central Board of Jewish Communities announced the findings in a statement on Tuesday.

Moissis filed a lawsuit against Mr Chios three years ago.

The 2017 article read:  “A crude Jew who runs a loan-shark firm has bought the debts of poor Greeks. The President of the Jewish Community who pretends to be our friend, is stealing our money through the back door.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The High Court has today ruled that it was permissible for Campaign Against Antisemitism to call Tony Greenstein a “notorious antisemite” in a humiliating case of legal action backfiring, as he loses a defamation case that he himself brought against us after we called him just that.

An expelled member of the Labour Party and founder of Palestine Solidarity Campaign, Mr Greenstein has long sought to have Campaign Against Antisemitism struck off the register of charities, and last year he brought a case against Campaign Against Antisemitism alleging that we had libelled him when we said that he was antisemitic.

We applied to strike out Mr Greenstein’s case because it had no hope of success at a full hearing and should not proceed.

Today, the court agreed to dismiss the entirety of his libel claim, leaving only other minor aspects of the case to be determined at a later hearing.

In a 21-page judgement, Mrs Justice Tipples referred to the International Definition of Antisemitism in the case, noting that “on any objective assessment, an honest person could form the view that these tweets, in which the claimant has referred to ‘Jewish Nazis’, used the word ‘Zios’ (which he knows is antisemitic…) and, having done so, referred to collaboration with the Nazis, were antisemitic statements he made.”

Mrs Justice Tipples also ruled that “The claimant’s tweet compares the people of Israel to the Nazis and, on any objective assessment, an honest person could have held the opinion that that was an antisemitic statement from the claimant.” She added: “The claimant has no real prospect of succeeding on this issue [of libel].”

A significant part of Mr Greenstein’s argument was that Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Chief Executive, Gideon Falter, had been malicious in describing Mr Greenstein as an antisemite and that he did not honestly believe that he was one, but Mrs Justice Tipples dismissed those arguments, finding that “this plea of malice is insufficient and should be struck out.”

As we have previously shown, Mr Greenstein has defended Ken Livingstone’s Nazi apologism, compared Zionists to Nazis on several occasions and regularly characterises the creation of Israel as “racist.” He has thus repeatedly breached the International Definition of Antisemitism in multiple respects.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “For years, Tony Greenstein has sought to discredit the International Definition of Antisemitism and have Campaign Against Antisemitism struck off the register of charities. We have repeatedly called him a ‘notorious antisemite’ and today the High Court ruled that we were perfectly entitled to do so. This is a humiliating defeat for Mr Greenstein who will now have to explain to those who paid his legal expenses through crowdfunding that he wasted their money on such a hopeless claim. All that remains of his action is a minor data protection and privacy claim which we now look forward to dismantling at a future hearing, should he even progress that far.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism was represented by Adam Speker QC, instructed by solicitors Keith Mathieson and Alex Wilson of RPC, and advised pro bono by solicitor Dr Mark Lewis who is an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

A pharmacist, Nazim Ali, who leads the annual “Al Quds Day” march through London, has been found to have brought the pharmaceutical profession into disrepute following a two-week hearing that culminated today arising from a complaint by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

However, the General Pharmaceutical Council’s (GPhC) fitness to practice tribunal let Mr Ali off with a warning after ruling that his remarks were grossly offensive and that his fitness to practise was impaired, but that his statements were not antisemitic.

Remarkably the GPhC did not present expert testimony from academics or Campaign Against Antisemitism on what constitutes Jew-hatred.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s complaint related to Mr Ali’s actions in 2017, when he led the pro-Hizballah “Al Quds Day” parade for the controversial London-based organisation calling itself the Islamic Human Rights Commission, just four days after the Grenfell Tower tragedy in which over 70 people were burned alive.

Heading the parade, surrounded by the flags of Hizballah, the genocidal antisemitic terrorist organisation, Mr Ali shouted over a public address system: “Some of the biggest corporations who are supporting the Conservative Party are Zionists. They are responsible for the murder of the people in Grenfell, in those towers in Grenfell. The Zionist supporters of the Tory Party. Free, Free, Palestine…It is the Zionists who give money to the Tory Party to kill people in high-rise blocks. Free, Free, Palestine. From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free.”

At another point he told marchers: “Careful of those Rabbis who belong to the Board of Deputies, who have got blood on their hands, who agree with the killing of British soldiers. Do not allow them in your centres.”

The events were filmed by members of Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Demonstration and Event Monitoring Unit.

Mr Ali is the Managing Partner of Chelsea Pharmacy Medical Clinic. Campaign Against Antisemitism submitted a complaint to the GPhC, which confirmed that the matter “calls into question the pharmacy professional’s fitness to practise as a pharmacist.”

During Mr Ali’s hearing, his defence emphasised his grovelling apology, in which he acknowledged that his comments were grossly offensive and that they could be perceived as being antisemitic. Mr Ali claimed that he had not made the apology sooner because he had apparently been advised not to do so while legal proceedings were underway, even through those proceedings ended in early 2019 and the apology appeared to have only been issued a short time before the GPhC hearing.

Mr Ali’s defence also made much of his warm relationship with the extremist fringe Jewish group, Neturei Karta, as evidence that he would not have knowingly said something antisemitic, even though Neturei Karta condemns most Jews and has actively supported antisemites.

Mr Ali’s counsel spent the better part of two days arguing that the hearing was a breach of Mr Ali’s right to a private life and right to freedom of expression under Articles 8 and 10 of the Human Rights Act 1998, however the tribunal took a day to consider these arguments and rejected them.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Since 2017, we have fought to ensure that Nazim Ali faces the consequences of his actions. As a pharmacist, he is bound by professional rules, and we are pleased that due to our complaint his regulator has now agreed that he brought his profession into disrepute. However it is disappointing that the regulator showed so little understanding of the issues at the hearing and only requested that the tribunal issue Mr Ali with a warning, which it did. After more than three years, at least we have succeeded in ensuring that Mr Ali’s record has been publicly marked and his disgrace made official.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism previously sought a criminal prosecution of Mr Ali. When the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) refused to prosecute him, we launched a private prosecution which the CPS disgracefully used its statutory powers to take over and discontinue, protecting Mr Ali from prosecution.

The Guardian newspaper has been criticised for publishing a cartoon employing antisemitic and insensitive motifs.

The cartoon features Labour Leader Sir Keir Starmer presenting the head of former Leader Jeremy Corbyn on a platter in a pose deliberately reminiscent of the Caravaggio painting “Salome with the Head of Saint John the Baptist”, a depiction of the New Testament event of King Herod having Jesus’ mentor, John the Baptist, beheaded at the request of his Jewish stepdaughter Salome.

The drawing, dubbed “After Caravaggio”, was intended to represent the suspension of Mr Corbyn by Sir Keir. However, the implication of the cartoon that Sir Keir has done the bidding of the Jews by suspending and martyring a saintly Mr Corbyn is a deliberate provocation. Mr Corbyn is an antisemite whose Party engaged in unlawful harassment and discrimination against Jews, and the notion that Sir Keir is under the thumb of the Jewish community is an antisemitic conspiracy that has become popular in pro-Corbyn social media groups and on the far-left.

The depiction of Mr Corbyn beheaded was also criticised in view of recent events in France.

The cartoon was drawn by Steve Bell, who has a history of drawing offensive and contentious cartoons, some of which The Guardian has reportedly refused to publish in the past. Mr Bell has reportedly denied using antisemitic tropes in his cartoon when accused in the past.

A spokesperson for The Guardian spokesperson reportedly told the JC: “The Steve Bell cartoon published today portrays his observation on the recent events in the Labour Party.” The Readers’ Editor is reportedly reviewing complaints that the newspaper has received.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Within minutes of our submission of a complaint against former Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn and fifteen other sitting Labour MPs in relation to antisemitism, Sir Keir Starmer has suspended Mr Corbyn, pending an investigation.

Our letter to Sir Keir, which followed the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s unprecedented finding that the Labour Party committed unlawful acts of harassment and discrimination against Jewish people, urged him to take action.

The letter read: “That your Party became institutionally racist against Jews, causing more than two in five British Jews to consider leaving the country and necessitating the investigation that has now concluded, is an indelible stain on Labour and on those within your Party who stood by and let antisemitism take hold. The individuals responsible must at last be held to account.”

The letter submitted complaints against Mr Corbyn, Diane Abbott, Apsana Begum, Richard Burgon, Barry Gardiner, Afzal Khan, Rebecca Long-Bailey, Zarah Sultana and others.

The complaint against Mr Corbyn included his statement in reaction to the EHRC’s report, in which he said:“Anyone claiming there is no antisemitism in the Labour Party is wrong. Of course there is, as there is throughout society, and sometimes it is voiced by people who think of themselves as on the left. Jewish members of our party and the wider community were right to expect us to deal with it, and I regret that it took longer to deliver that change than it should. One antisemite is one too many, but the scale of the problem was also dramatically overstated for political reasons by our opponents inside and outside the party, as well as by much of the media. That combination hurt Jewish people and must never be repeated.”

Within minutes of our letter and complaints being publicised, Mr Corbyn was suspended by the Labour Party, pending an investigation.

Joe Glasman, Head of Political and Government Investigations, said: “Shortly after submitting our complaint to Sir Keir regarding Jeremy Corbyn’s statement this morning and his past deeds, we have received confirmation that Mr Corbyn has been suspended from the Labour Party and had the whip withdrawn. This is a hugely significant turning point and an indicator of real change and accountability at last.

“We referred Labour to the EHRC precisely because it was not taking out complaints against Mr Corbyn seriously. Four years since our first complaint, Labour has finally begun to take action. Mr Corbyn is part of the problem, and at last our complaints against him and other sitting Labour MPs who seemed untouchable, are now being acted upon.”

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “The Equality and Human Rights Commission’s report is a groundbreaking document. It is the first ever finding by the EHRC of unlawful acts. It heavily criticises the Labour Party’s former leadership. It makes clear recommendations to ensure that there is zero tolerance of antisemitism in the Party in the future. It provides a robust framework for ensuring that the Party complies.

“The EHRC’s report utterly vindicates Britain’s Jews who were accused of lying and exaggerating, acting as agents of another country and using their religion to ‘smear’ the Labour Party. In an unprecedented finding, it concludes that those who made such accusations broke the law and were responsible for illegal discrimination and harassment.

“The debate is over. Under Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership, the Labour Party became institutionally antisemitic. It drove almost half of British Jews to consider leaving the country. For five miserable years, every effort to compel Labour to reform failed. We were left with no choice but to refer the Party to the EHRC, which launched an investigation with us as complainant. The EHRC’s findings and recommendations today – that Labour’s leadership and culture created an unlawful environment that discriminated against Jews – closely align with the hundreds of pages of evidence and argument that we submitted to the EHRC over many months.

“Frankly, this report would not be much different had we written it. It is the dispensing of British justice that British Jews have sorely awaited, but has been denied for too long.

“Jeremy Corbyn and those around him who took part in or enabled the gaslighting, harassment and victimisation of Britain’s Jewish minority are shamed for all time. Those who defended and stood by them are shown to have made possible the closest flirtation that mainstream British politics has had with antisemitism in modern history.

“Sir Keir Starmer now has a long list of reforms to make, including establishing an independent disciplinary process so that those who put Britain’s Jews in fear for their future in this country can at last be held to account for their deeds. To that end, we have submitted complaints against Jeremy Corbyn, Diane Abbott and fourteen other sitting MPs and have given Labour six months to conduct transparent investigations and finally deliver justice for the Jewish community.

“We are immensely grateful to everyone who fought alongside us for this day to come. Too many of them have suffered greatly for their principles. They are the best of this country.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism first approached the EHRC at the time of the Labour Party Conference in Brighton in 2017. The conference was so rife with antisemitism that Brighton and Hove City Council’s then Labour leader, Warren Morgan, told his own Party that he would not permit use of Council premises for the conference again. Mr Morgan later resigned from the Labour Party over its failure to address antisemitism. Following Campaign Against Antisemitism’s contact with the EHRC, the Chief Executive of the EHRC issued a statement demanding that the Labour Party prove “that it is not a racist party”.Campaign Against Antisemitism made a number of disciplinary complaints to the Labour Party between 2016 and 2018 about Jeremy Corbyn, including about his defence of the antisemitic Tower Hamlets mural in 2012, his Holocaust Memorial Day event in 2010, and his Press TV interview in 2012 (Press TV is an Iranian state broadcaster which Ofcom banned from broadcasting in Britain).

The Labour Party repeatedly refused to open an investigation into our complaints against Mr Corbyn, and consequently on 31st July 2018, Campaign Against Antisemitism formally referred the Labour Party to the EHRC over its institutional antisemitism.

Subsequently, the Jewish Labour Movement and Labour Against Antisemitism Ltd made further submissions, which supported our referral. 

At the EHRC’s request, Campaign Against Antisemitism submitted detailed legal arguments in November 2018. We continued to provide additional legal arguments to the EHRC in relation to subsequent developments, resulting in the EHRC’s announcement on 7th March 2019 that it was starting pre-enforcement proceedings against the Labour Party.

Pre-enforcement Proceedings

Prior to the EHRC opening a statutory investigation, it entered into a pre-enforcement period of engagement with the Labour Party, allowing it to propose a plan of action and make representations to the EHRC giving reasons why enforcement should not commence, and offering to take action voluntarily, under the EHRC’s supervision.

During the pre-enforcement period, the Labour Party had an opportunity to make representations to the EHRC seeking to agree a plan of action that would remove the need for a statutory investigation by offering to implement certain measures against antisemitism, with the EHRC able to monitor compliance.

The Labour Party failed to satisfy the EHRC that it could be trusted to address the antisemitism issue itself.

Investigation (enforcement) process

Campaign Against Antisemitism asked the EHRC to open a statutory investigation under section 20 of the Equality Act 2006 into antisemitic discrimination and victimisation in the Labour Party.

On 28th May 2019 the EHRC announced a full statutory investigation, which enabled it to use its enforcement powers.

A summary of the terms of reference of the investigation can be found here.

Most significantly, the EHRC suspected that the Labour Party “may have itself, and/or through its employees and/or agents, committed unlawful acts in relation to its members and/or applicants for membership and/or associates.” Therefore “the investigation will consider whether the Party carried out such unlawful acts.”

The purpose of the EHRC’s investigation has been to consider whether the Labour Party carried out unlawful acts.

Once the statutory investigation was launched, the EHRC was able to use its powers to compel the Labour Party to reveal details of its handling of antisemitism in recent years, including internal communications such as text messages and e-mails. It is also within the EHRC’s power to seek court injunctions against the Labour Party to prevent further antisemitic discrimination and victimisation, and it can impose an action plan on the Party and enforce compliance with the plan.

The only previous statutory investigation ever conducted by the EHRC was an investigation into unlawful harassment, discrimination and victimisation within the Metropolitan Police Service.

The only other political party to have been subject to action by the EHRC was the British National Party, but that was not a statutory investigation.

The launch of a full statutory investigation by the EHRC into the Labour Party was an unprecedented development, resulting from the EHRC’s acknowledgement that the legal arguments made by Campaign Against Antisemitism were sufficiently compelling to merit investigating whether the Labour Party committed unlawful acts.

Content of our legal submissions

Campaign Against Antisemitism submitted hundreds of pages of legal submissions to the EHRC between 2018 and 2020 with the assistance of specialist human rights counsel Adam Wagner of Doughty Street Chambers and Derek Spitz of One Essex Court Chambers.

The hundreds of pages of Campaign Against Antisemitism’s submissions provided substantial details of incidents for investigation, including incidents directly involving Mr Corbyn.

In summary, Campaign Against Antisemitism made legal arguments that:

  • An unacceptable number of antisemitic incidents of unlawful discrimination, harassment and victimisation had occurred in Labour in recent years, at all levels of the Party.
  • Under Mr Corbyn’s leadership, Labour’s disciplinary mechanisms for dealing with antisemitism were significantly weakened, and the machinery of the Party was used to victimise those who stand up against antisemitism. 
  • A culture of denial and victimisation developed in some sections of Labour in relation to antisemitism. For example, antisemitism allegations have often been described as “smears”.
  • The result of the toxic culture which surrounds the issue of antisemitism in Labour was that people who suffer discrimination were subjected to victimisation when they raised complaints or that they were reluctant to bring complaints in the first place.
  • Antisemitism in Labour should be judged according to the International Definition of Antisemitism, which Labour itself adopted in 2018 (under pressure) after its adoption by the Government and other major political parties.
  • Labour failed to put in place a fair and effective complaints and disciplinary process to deal with antisemitism.
  • There was substantial evidence that the problem of antisemitism in Labour became institutional.
  • Labour appeared incapable of resolving this issue of antisemitism itself.
  • There was sufficient evidence to warrant a section 20 statutory investigation by the EHRC into whether systemic unlawful acts occurred in the handling of complaints of antisemitism in relation to Labour officials, members and other representatives.

Labour’s reaction to the investigation

The announcement of the investigation following the referral by Campaign Against Antisemitism was, to date, the single most significant development in the fight against antisemitism in the Labour Party, a point acknowledged by both supporters and opponents of the investigation.

Campaign Against Antisemitism continued to receive strong backing from the mainstream Jewish community and was vilified by far-left factions within and without the Labour Party.

Some senior figures in the Labour Party, such as then-Shadow Foreign Secretary Emily Thornberry, then-Deputy Leader Tom Watson and Lord Falconer, welcomed the EHRC’s investigation (while admitting that it was shameful for the Labour Party to find itself subjected to such a probe). During the Labour leadership contest, the candidates, including Sir Keir Starmer, pledged to implement the EHRC’s recommendations.

However, some elements within the Labour Party tried to undermine the EHRC’s standing, and cast doubt on its independence and thus on its eventual findings, including the Labour leadership under Mr Corbyn and his allies within the Party, who saw the investigation as a threat.

During the 2019 General Election, Labour’s Race and Faith Manifesto pledged to “Enhance the powers and functions of the Equality and Human Rights Commission, making it truly independent, to ensure it can support people to effectively challenge any discrimination they may face.” The implication was that the EHRC was not an independent body but rather an arm of the Conservative Government and therefore that its investigation and subsequent report could not be trusted. At the time, Campaign Against Antisemitism called Labour’s pledge to reform the independent body conducting an investigation into the Party “sinister in the extreme”.

Similarly, in his first interview (given to a fringe blog) since stepping down as Leader of the Labour Party, Mr Corbyn said that the EHRC was made “part of the government machine” by the Conservative Party.

Other far-left Labour activists have claimed that the EHRC itself is racist, specifically against BAME people, or at least that it has prioritised addressing antisemitism over other forms of racism, and that this prioritisation is racist.

With the removal of Mr Corbyn as Leader, his allies turned their ire on the Labour Party as well, accusing it of institutional racism against BAME people rather than Jews. As proof, they cited a leaked internal report titled ‘The work of the Labour Party’s Governance and Legal Unit in relation to antisemitism, 2014 – 2019’, which conceded the scale of the antisemitism problem in Labour but purported to show that some staffers – particularly those allegedly antagonistic to Mr Corbyn’s leadership – had deliberately frustrated the Party’s efforts to address the antisemitism crisis and had made racist or misogynistic remarks toward BAME and women MPs. At the time, Campaign Against Antisemitism described the report as a “desperate last-ditch attempt to deflect and discredit allegations of antisemitism” and a “disgrace”.

The report is subject to an investigation by the Labour Party and its leak has reportedly led to libel and data protection complaints, not to mention threatsagainst Jewish complainants mentioned in the report. It was apparently intended that the report would be submitted to the EHRC, but it is understood that the Labour Party under Sir Keir’s leadership declined to do so.

Some far-left figures within Labour have tried to make the claim that the Party is indeed institutionally racist, but against BAME people rather than Jews.

When the first signs of this argument arose, Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is offensive to Jews and BAME people to suggest that tackling prejudice against either community is somehow at the cost of discrimination against the other, and it is an appalling sign of the lengths to which this far-left faction will go to try to exonerate itself from its own central role in Labour’s antisemitism scandal.”

Not just Jeremy Corbyn

Although Campaign Against Antisemitism’s referral of Labour to the EHRC was triggered by the Party’s failure to address our complaints regarding Mr Corbyn, those failures were cultural and institutional.

A culture of denial that antisemitism could exist on the ‘anti-racist’ far-left of the Party was institutionally cemented by the whitewash 2016 Chakrabarti Report. The Chakrabarti Report effectively served to protect the reputation of the Party, and therefore, in an affront to natural justice, recommended that Labour’s disciplinary procedures be kept secret. The result was a process that was not independent, transparent, fair, efficient or accountable.

Consequently, Campaign Against Antisemitism has not submitted further complaints to the Labour Party about MPs, councillors, officeholders and other members because the disciplinary process is not fit for purpose, a deficiency exacerbated by the former Shadow Attorney General’s Report. Sir Keir has since promised to introduce an independent disciplinary process but has not yet done so, and has ignored our calls for him to set out a timeline. Once the Labour Party introduces an independent disciplinary process, as Sir Keir has promised, Labour will have a backlog of complaints to address.

The Canadian premier has condemned the desecration of the country’s National War Memorial after an antisemitic hate symbol was carved into it on 16th October.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau described the “antisemitic desecration” of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in the Canadian capital, Ottawa, as “completely unacceptable”.

In a statement on Twitter he said: “I strongly condemn this hateful act.” He urged anyone with information to contact police.

The Hate Crimes Unit of the Ottawa Police is looking for the man suspected of carving the antisemitic symbol. The suspect is believed to have rode a bicycle to the city-centre National War Memorial – site of Canada’s annual, national Remembrance Day ceremony – and scratched hate graffiti onto the tomb before riding away.

Canada’s Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan said that the “hateful” desecration of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier “with an antisemitic symbol” was “despicable,” declaring: “The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier represents the gallantry and the sacrifices of all those who fought for our freedom. Its desecration with an antisemitic symbol is despicable.”

Ottawa Police have issued a description of the suspect. A police spokesperson said that the graffiti was removed within 24 hours. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism has now expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Ottawa Police Service

In what is seen as a game-changing move, Bahrain and the United States have signed a memorandum of understanding on combating antisemitism, including anti-Zionist antisemitism.

At the signing on 22nd October, Bahrain became the first nation in the Arab world to acknowledge the International Definition of Antisemitism.

At a ceremony on Thursday, which came less than a week after Israel and Bahrain signed a series of bilateral agreements normalising relations, the document was signed by the US State Department’s antisemitism monitor, Elan Carr, and Shaikh Khalid bin Khalifa Al Khalifa, the head of Bahrain’s King Hamad Global Centre for Peaceful Coexistence.

While the signing falls short of a legislative adoption of the Definition, it is, nevertheless, seen as ground-breaking. Under the Definition, claiming that Israel “is a racist endeavour” or that Jews or Israel exaggerated the Holocaust is antisemitic.

Under the terms of the document, both sides vowed to promote and share the best practices for “combating all forms of antisemitism, including anti-Zionism and the delegitimization of the State of Israel.” In a tweet following the signing, Mr Carr said: “Thank you Bahrain!” adding that, together, the US and Bahrain would “create programmes to teach the region’s children the value of peaceful coexistence.”

 “We all know that hatred is the enemy of peace,” Shaikh bin Khalifa said at the event.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has now expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A man imprisoned for antisemitic incitement has apologised for his actions after being required to learn about the Holocaust during his jail term.

Michael Graves, 21, of Anchorage, Alaska, was jailed last year for posting hate messages calling for violence against Jews and Muslims and for illegally owning a machine gun and silencers. As part of his eighteen-month prison sentence, he was required to take classes and read books about the Holocaust and other forms of race-hate and was then required to write essays about what he learned.

At a hearing on Wednesday, Mr Graves apologised for his comments and acknowledged that he was part of a group that expressed vile views.

Prosecutors said that Mr Graves had the means “and the mentality” to commit a violent act. The classes were described as a creative way to “stop potential mass shooters” who spew hate-speech.

“I’m sorry for what I said. I do not believe in prejudice or violence of any kind,” he declared.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has now expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The Head of the BBC World Service has personally apologised after the Corporation gave sympathetic coverage to an antisemitic mass murderer.

Jamie Angus, the Director of BBC World Service, described the sympathetic treatment of Ahlam Al-Tamimi, the terrorist mastermind of the 2001 Sbarro Pizza Restaurant attack in Jerusalem, a “lapse in our editorial standards”.

Ms Al-Tamimi is a Jordanian national who was convicted for the terrorist attack, which killed fifteen people, half of whom were children. She was also behind a previous failed terrorist attack. She has repeatedly expressed pride at her actions and never remorse; she was even disappointed that the death toll was not higher. Although she was given several life sentences, she was released as part of a prisoner deal.

However, she recently appealed to the King of Jordan on a live radio broadcast but was cut off. BBC Arabic then rushed to give her a platform for her appeal to be reunited with her husband, who is also a convicted murderer and was released in the prisoner exchange. BBc Arabic provided no context for her notoriety.

Late last week, Mr Angus said that the segment “did not follow the correct BBC procedures by failing to refer the matter to the BBC’s Editorial Policy team or to senior editors in BBC News Arabic. Had they done so, the segment would not have been authorised for broadcast.”

He added that “Al-Tamimi has been convicted of serious crimes” and it was “therefore not a suitable subject” to broadcast.

He insisted that appropriate lessons were being learned.

Jewish students at Lancaster University have pledged that they “will not stop” campaigning until their university adopts the International Definition of Antisemitism.

After the Education Secretary, Gavin Williamson, reiterated his call on universities to adopt the Definition, Lancaster University reportedly said: “Our University is committed to building a diverse, inclusive environment where people are able to reach their potential free from prejudice. Antisemitism, racism or hate speech of any form will not be tolerated. With the appointment of a new Vice Chancellor in May 2020, the university’s policies to support equality and diversity are under review as part of a wider Strategy update. A more formal consideration of the [International D]efinition of Antisemitism may take place as part of this. At this stage, no specific timetable relating to any consideration to adopt the [D]efinition has been set, however the matter will be discussed by University management in due course.”

However, the University’ Jewish Society has protested the University’s inaction, with its President saying “We would like it to be implemented. We have never said you can’t have valid criticisms or anything like that. Not adopting this Definition is in itself antisemitic. There is no disadvantage in adopting this Definition.”

The Jewish Society’s Campaigns Officer said: “It is shameful that people in 2020 can’t accept a definition that protects against hate…We love Lancaster, it’s an amazing place, we are heavily involved in campus life and the community. The work we are trying to do is relating to us improving the prospects of Lancaster students because the university can do better and we want them to do better.”

The President added: “We will not stop working until this Definition is adopted.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities and public bodies. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Eric Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

A new report has exposed antisemitism in the overwhelming majority of anti-vaccination networks.

The twenty-page report, titled “From antivaxxers to antisemitism: Conspiracy theory in the Covid-19 pandemic” and produced for the Government, urges action against a “resurgence of antisemitism” within the anti-vaccination movement, which it predicts is likely to play a role if and when a vaccination for COVID-19 becomes available.

“Exposing the level of antisemitism amongst the anti-vaxxer movement now is therefore of the utmost importance,” the report warned.

The report, produced by Lord Mann, the Government’s Independent Adviser on Antisemitism, and Dr Lewis Arthurton, a molecular cell biology expert, reviewed 27 leading anti-vaccination networks on Facebook and Twitter and observed antisemitic content in 79% of them.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has previously reported on antisemitism among protests against pandemic lockdown measures, and has monitored the intersection of antisemitism and COVID-19 conspiracy theories over the past several months. Various reports, including by Campaign Against Antisemitism, have shown how the far-right and others have exploited the pandemic to target the Jewish community.

Expectations of an acrimonious debate came to nothing as Hastings Borough Council adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism almost unanimously.

With the exception of Cllr Leah Levane, who abstained, it is understood that all councillors present at the 21st October virtual Council meeting agreed to the adoption. Cllr Levane is a co-Chair of Jewish Voice for Labour, an antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation.

The motion was proposed and promoted by Cllr Dany Louise, who bravely resigned from the Labour Party in 2019, saying at the time that “sensible people have long ago abandoned the Hastings and Rye branch of the Labour Party” and that she had been “driven out” because Labour had become a “welcoming environment for antisemites”. Later in the year, she revealed the dismissive reactions of erstwhile colleagues when she rightly raised the issue of antisemitism, including that “Jews should complain quietly”, references to “the Jewish question” and that she herself might have a “right-wing motivation”.

Cllr Louise now sits as an Independent, and Campaign Against Antisemitism praises her and others for pushing adoption of the Definition, and welcomes Hastings Borough Council’s decision.

Cllr Louise gave an impassioned speech at the meeting, saying: “In the last few years, antisemitism has entered the national public discourse in a truly frightening and morally repugnant way. Where once it was the preserve of the far right, it has now become commonplace on the left as well. Shockingly, there has been widespread denial of this fact, with far too many people somehow casting it as yet another Jewish conspiracy theory. The denial itself has become another form of antisemitism, enthusiastically entertained by many who would otherwise call themselves part of the Community of the Good.”

She also rightly noted that the eleven examples “are indivisible from the Definition”, and that any “modified version” of the Definition is “no longer the…Definition”.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We are delighted that Hastings Borough Council has joined other local authorities in adopting the International Definition of Antisemitism, something for which we and others have long campaigned ever since we secured the adoption of the Definition by the British Government in 2016. We are particularly grateful to Cllr Dany Louise, formerly of the Labour Party but who quit over antisemitism and now sits as an Independent, for bringing and promoting the motion to adopt the Definition so passionately.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently published its first Audit of Local Authorities, documenting the campaign for widespread adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by local authorities.

The former Mayor of Luton, who is currently Labour’s candidate for Bedfordshire Police and Crime Commissioner, has been suspended by the Party over alleged antisemitism.

Tahir Khan, who served as Mayor of Luton in 2016-17, will no longer be able to represent Labour in the 2021 election for the senior police job, and a new selection process is reportedly underway.

Although the basis of the suspension is unclear, Mr Khan is believed to have posted Rothschild conspiracy theories on social media in the past and to have claimed that the BBC is a “Zionist channel”.

A Labour spokesman reportedly said: “The Labour Party takes all complaints of antisemitism extremely seriously and they are fully investigated in line with our rules and procedures, and any appropriate disciplinary action is taken.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We are pleased that this case is being investigated by Labour, but the Party must make its processes transparent so that the Jewish community and the public can see whether and what action has been taken. The Party’s failed disciplinary processes are why we referred Labour to the EHRC in the first place, and it must now urgently introduce an independent disciplinary process in order to restore confidence in the Party’s procedures.”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Several major music streaming platforms have reportedly removed antisemitic and racist music, following an investigation.

The BBC found that sections of speeches by Adolf Hitler, references to white power and celebrations of the Holocaust featured in songs on the platforms, with Spotify, Apple, Deezer and YouTube apparently having now removed them.

One song on Spotify, for example, contained the lyrics: “Aryan child, listen to what is said/ So rise your hand and learn to love your land/ For the white revolution needs your uncorrupted hand.”

According to the BBC, Spotify said that the songs violated its hate content policy, while YouTube reportedly said that there was no place for hate on its platform. Apple Music has apparently hidden the majority of the songs while it investigates, and Deezer is investigating.

Following an antisemitic rampage by the grime artist Wiley over the summer, more than 700 musicians and members of the music industry signed a letter decrying racism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

Albania has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The country’s Parliament adopted the Definition last Thursday ahead of the upcoming Balkans Forum Against Antisemitism conference, which the Parliament is organising in conjunction with Jewish groups.

Albania thereby becomes the first Muslim-majority to adopt the Definition.

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds this decision at a time of rising antisemitism in Europe.

“It is good news that we, the Albanians and the peoples of the Western Balkans, a region that has suffered more than any other part of the world, the consequences of ethno-centrist and religious-centrist views and attitudes, join this emancipatory action of contemporary civilization: the fight against antisemitism,” said Gramoz Ruci, the Speaker of Albania’s parliament.

“All nations that throughout history have protected Jews from extermination and support them today against stigma have a right to be proud,” he said, adding: “But we Albanians have more reasons to be proud, because Albania is the only country in Europe where all Jews were taken under protection and rescued during World War II. Our homeland, Albania, in difficult times has served as a substitute soil for Jews.”

Britain was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism and Lord Pickles worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street. Serbia joins a growing list of national governments and public bodies to use the Definition.

An attempt by ten police officers to prevent disciplinary proceedings against them in connection with antisemitic and racist Whatsapp messages has cost Police Scotland nearly £200,000, it has been reported.

Whatsapp messages described as being “sexist and degrading, racist, antisemitic, homophobic, mocking of disability and included a flagrant disregard for police procedures by posting crime scene photos of current investigations,” were discovered in the course of an investigation into alleged sexual misconduct on the part of another officer, who was later cleared.

After the messages were discovered in 2016, Police Scotland’s Professional Standards department sought to discipline the officers implicated in the messages in November 2017. However, the Scottish Police Federation tried to block the disciplinary proceedings on behalf of the officers on the basis that they were entitled to privacy under Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights, and a common law right to privacy. Last month, however, three appeal judges upheld an earlier ruling that rejected those arguments, claiming that the duty to uphold professional standards on the police force overrode the right to privacy and that it was proportionate for Police Scotland to use the messages.

Following the ruling, The Ferret submitted a Freedom of Information request to Police Scotland, which revealed that its legal bill to date is £189,366.04 (including VAT).

Police Scotland reportedly noted in its reply that “subject to the outcome of any further proceedings, Police Scotland intends to seek an award of expenses in its favour as a result of being successful both in the outer and inner houses of the court of session.”

A spokesperson for Police Scotland reportedly said: “Because of their position, our officers are held to higher standards than ordinary members of the public and this is consistently made clear from the first day of training. The inner house judgment underlined that these high standards also apply to the virtual space. The vast majority of our officers conduct themselves in line with our values of fairness, integrity and respect. Where inappropriate conduct is brought to our attention it will be considered by our professional standards department. All probationary officers still involved in this long running court action have been placed on restricted duties pending further proceedings.”

A spokesperson for the Scottish Police Federation reportedly said: “The SPF does not comment on any individual legal cases.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We welcome this judgement, so that the messages in question can be properly investigated and the public can be confident that everyone will receive equal treatment without discrimination by the police in Scotland.”

Police in Ontario are appealing for witnesses after antisemitic graffiti appeared in Richmond Hill.

Located in the Greater Toronto Area, Richmond Hill is one of the York’s largest towns. The graffiti, which includes swastikas and blames Jews for 9/11, appeared on 13th October.

Shortly after 13:00 on that day, police were called to a neighbourhood park after antisemitic and other racist graffiti was reported. When officers arrived, they also found that a bench had been vandalised.

Investigators, including from the York Regional Police Hate Crime Unit, are asking witnesses or anyone with information or video footage to come forward.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist us with this project.

Image credit: Bnai Brith Canada

Members of Brooklyn’s Hasidic community has protested a decision by the New York Police Department to to treat what they deem to be an antisemitic hate crime merely as an attempted robbery.

Police are investigating an attack on a Hasidic Jewish man in Williamsburg at 22:40 on Thursday, 15th October as an attempted robbery.

Surveillance video footage shows two individuals approaching the victim, chasing him, beating him and trying to steal his bag. The victim’s face was injured but he managed to hold on to his belongings. The suspects – two men in their twenties, according to police – fled the scene empty-handed.

Former NY State Assemblyman Dov Hikind, a vocal communal activist, reportedly described the attack as a hate crime, while two eye-witnesses who spoke to CBS News claimed that the attack was sparked by antisemitic hatred.

One of the eye-witnesses, however, conceded that robbery might have been an “additional” motive as the area was “not the best.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist us with this project.

A “dangerous” Islamist, who is alleged to have played a prominent role in organising protests against the Paris high school teacher who was beheaded last week, has been taken into police custody.

Abdelhakim Sefrioui, 61, is alleged to have helped to organise protests against Samuel Paty, the teacher from the school in a north-western suburb of Paris who was decapitated after showing his students images of the prophet Muhammad during a discussion on freedom of speech.

Further raids on the homes of suspected Islamists by French police were reported on Monday as the French Government announced an investigation into 51 Muslim organisations. One of them, the Cheikh Yassine Collective, which is named after a former leader of the genocidal antisemitic terrorist group, Hamas, was dissolved by the French Cabinet today. The Government said that the Cheikh Yassine Collective was ‘implicated’ in Mr Paty’s murder.

Eye-witnesses said that Abdoullakh Anzonov, the eighteen-year-old refugee from Chechnya shouted “Allahu akbar” (“God is great”) as he slaughtered Mr Paty, 47. Mr Anzonov was later shot dead by police.

In the days leading up to his murder, Mr Paty had been the target of protests from some Muslim parents in connection with his display of the images. One parent had sought the backing of Mr Sefrioui, a Moroccan-born Islamist described by a prominent French Muslim leader as “dangerous.”

On the day before the murder, after filming an interview with a female Muslim pupil, Mr Sefrioui had a meeting with members of the school management and issued a statement asserting that Muslim children “had been attacked and humiliated in front of their classmates.” He demanded the immediate suspension of Mr Paty, whom he referred to as “this thug.”

In an interview with the news outlet Marianne, Bernard Godard, an expert on Islam and former adviser to France’s Interior Ministry, said that Mr Sefrioui had been well-known to French intelligence for nearly twenty years. In 2011, Hassen Chalghoumi, an Imam in the Parisian suburb of Drancy, was placed under police protection after Mr Sefrioui denounced him as a “pawn of the Zionists.”

Also speaking to Marianne, Imam Chalghoumi said Mr Sefrioui was “dangerous because he seduces the youth.”

Mr Sefrioui’s activism has repeatedly involved antisemitism. In 2006, for example, he campaigned on behalf of the comedian, presidential candidate and convicted antisemite Dieudonné M’Bala M’Bala, who was recently banned from several social media platforms for Holocaust denial and antisemitism.

Mr Sefrioui is a member of the Council of French Imams and claims to speak in its name. However, Daw Meskine, Secretary-General of the organisation, vigorously disputed his right to do so in interviews with French media over the weekend. When asked about the harassment of Mr Paty, Mr Meskine said: “Sefrioui does not have the right to speak on our behalf. It was a personal initiative.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist us with this project.

An antisemitic note was discovered hanging on a municipal bulletin board at the Schio city council in Italy.

The sign, with several grammatical and spelling errors, read: “The Jewish senator [Liliana Segre] who asks herself where G-d was he was – where you put him, the Jew has a short memory, unlike G-d.”

The intended victim of the hateful rhetoric was Liliana Segre, an Auschwitz survivor who received honorary citizenship in the city of Trieste and several other cities across Italy in 2019 to show solidarity with her in her fight against antisemitism. In January 2018, Ms Segre was made an Italian senator by President Sergio Mattarella.

Senator Segre has been a target for online abuse, including death threats, since she first called for the establishment of a Parliamentary committee to combat racism and online hate speech in the country. She said at the time: “I appealed to the conscience of everyone and thought that a commission against hatred as a principle would be accepted by all.” Senator Segre has reported receiving in excess of 200 hate messages a day.

With such an influx of potential threats to her life, it was agreed that Senator Segre would receive police protection, and she is now accompanied in public by two paramilitary carabinieri officers.

The recent antisemitic sign on the council building in Schio has been condemned by city councilman Carlo Cunegato, who published an image of the note, and stated that acts of antisemitism in 2020 “stink of gross regression” which he hopes is simply “the madness” of an individual. He also pointed to the possibility that this is not an isolated incident. On 27th January a letter was found in Torrebelvicino, supposedly signed by the SS, that said: “Let us remember to reopen the ovens: Jews, Roma, sinti, fags, negri, communists. Free entry”.

The Major of Schio, Walter Orsi, outlined his disappointment at the note in a public statement, and reassured the community that the persons responsible would be found and held accountable. The sheet was promptly removed and investigations into the incident are ongoing.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Twitter has confirmed that it will ban and remove posts that endorse Holocaust denial, following Mark Zuckerberg’s announcement last week that Facebook will now enforce a similar policy on its platforms.

A spokesperson for Twitter reportedly said that posts and accounts that “deny or distort” or circulate disinformation on events, including the Holocaust, would be banned under Twitter’s hateful conduct policy. This has also been extended to include the glorification of historical acts of violence, persecution and genocides.

Mr Zuckerberg announced on 12th October that his platform’s revised hate speech policy would prohibit such offensive content and instead direct users to “authoritative sources to get accurate information.” The recent move followed a decision to ban the antisemitic conspiracist movement QAnon, which saw thousands of associated Twitter accounts removed over the last few months as well.

Twitter has assured users that the company will continue to work with a number of partners to tackle antisemitism and hateful conduct across the platform, including NGOs, the Jewish community, governments and several civil society partners.

In a public statement, a spokesperson reportedly said: “We strongly condemn antisemitism, and hateful conduct has absolutely no place on our service. Our Hateful Conduct Policy prohibits a wide range of behaviour, including making references to violent events or types of violence where protected categories were the primary victims, or attempts to deny or diminish such events.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The Argentine Football Association (AFA), which governs all Argentinian club activity, adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism on 8th October in a move to combat discrimination in the sport. The two-time World Cup winner Argentina is the first national football association to have adopted the Definition.

In the previous day the University of Buenos Aires, with more than 300,000 students, also adopted the Definition.

In recent years, the country’s football culture has come under criticism for several antisemitic controversies. In 2018, fans of the Atlanta team, a Buenos Aires club that is home to a large Jewish neighbourhood and has featured many Jewish players, were targets for chants that stated, “killing the Jews to make soap”, a reference to the claim that the Nazis made soap out of the dead bodies of Jewish victims.

At a football game this year a rival Argentine player, Arnaldo González, made antisemitic gestures towards the rival Atlanta team. While leaving the field, the player placed his hand on his head to imitate a kippah and gestured to his genitals as fans jeered. The AFA decided to adopt the Definition as a direct response to rising antisemitism, particularly amongst spectators, in the sport.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed the widespread adoption of the Definition internationally. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Eric Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street. Since then, numerous other national governments –including Argentina’s – and institutions have followed suit.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist us with this project.

A fourteen-year-old in San Diego, California, has been charged with a hate crime after allegedly punching a rabbi in the face and knocking him to the ground.

The teenager, who cannot be named because of his age, allegedly assaulted Rabbi Yonatan Halevy, 31, while the rabbi was walking with his father on Shabbat two weeks ago.

Rabbi Halevy told police that the teenager hit him so hard that he was knocked to the ground.

The teenager has been charged with hate-crime and battery.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Leaders of the United Hebrew Temple in Benton, Illinois are asking the public to provide any information on a recent spate of vandalism against the synagogue.

The synagogue remained closed due to COVID-19 prevention measures, however upon reopening approximately a month ago leaders discovered a vast amount of damage to the property. Local authorities were consequently notified and an investigation was launched to identify the suspect or suspects responsible.

On 9th October further vandalism was found with ten antique stain-glass windows broken, prayerbooks and skullcaps thrown across the floor, and damage to the building’s kitchen. The windows were purposefully made for the synagogue on its construction in 1957 and are irreplaceable.

This is the third act of vandalism in less than a month. Another incident saw two of the windows broken and more than a week earlier there was a further break-in, including the theft of electronic equipment, reported to Benton Police.

The Vice President of United Hebrew Temple said that the local community simply wants to worship “in peace and safety” without fear of potential antisemitism. She added that the organisation is currently exploring ways to protect and preserve the remaining windows, and supporters of the United Hebrew Temple raised nearly $6,000 in under a week to repair the damage to the building.

Benton Police are continuing investigations into the vandalism, however they have released no further information.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Google

Sky HISTORY has reportedly axed its programme, The Chop: Britain’s Top Woodworker, after Campaign Against Antisemitism and others protested the inclusion of a contestant who appeared to have neo-Nazi symbols tattooed on his face.

The contestant, Darren, was introduced by Sky HISTORY in a video on Twitter with the caption: “Meet the Woodman, the Bloke-With-All-The-Tattoos or Darren as we like to call him. #TheChop”, and he was due to feature on the show hosted by comedian Lee Mack.

The contestant is covered in tattoos, including on his face, where one tattoo reads “88”, a popular number in neo-Nazi numerology that denotes the phrase “Heil Hitler”, since ‘H’ is the eighth letter of the alphabet. Other tattooed numbers include 23/16, denoted White Supremacy, 18 for Adolf Hitler, and 1488, another white supremacist figure.

Sky HISTORY tried to defend one tattoo on the basis that 1988 was the year his father died, but this was disputed by a journalist on social media.

Now, the channel has reportedly cancelled the show, which was due to commence on Thursday.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Sky HISTORY made a terrible mistake by including in ‘The Chop’ an individual adorned with what appear to be neo-Nazi tattoos without providing serious evidence to show that the tattoos mean something other than how they appear. These tattoos would be plainly visible to viewers on the show, including younger viewers, which is unacceptable. Sky HISTORY is right to cancel the show until it can satisfy viewers that they and their families will not be subjected to neo-Nazi propaganda.”