A Muslim-owned kebab restaurant in the German city of Halle has been saved from bankruptcy by a fundraising campaign led by the Jewish community. The kebab restaurant was the site of a shooting by a neo-Nazi gunman after he failed to enter a synagogue on Yom Kippur in October 2019.

Germany’s union of Jewish students (JSUD) launched the campaign to save the Kiez-Döner restaurant, where trade has been badly hit by the COVID-19 pandemic. The campaign raised almost £30,000, far exceeding its original target. In addition, a local Jewish businessman donated cash to fund giveaways of free kebabs to help drum up business.

The restaurant was targeted by neo-Nazi gunman Stephan Balliet after he failed to get through the security doors of the synagogue and after he shot dead a woman passerby close to the synagogue. At the kebab restaurant he murdered a twenty-year-old customer.

Restaurant co-owner, Ismet Tekin, said: “It’s really amazing what they did. They did it out of solidarity, to show that we are together, that we can get through these times if we are united.”

A member of the Halle Jewish community pointed out that both the synagogue and the Muslim-owned restaurant were targeted by Balliet because they “did not reflect his idea of what should be in Germany.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The Guardian has removed a picture of two Chasidic men used to accompany an article about lockdown restrictions unrelated to the Jewish community, following a complaint from Campaign Against Antisemitism.

The original picture associated Jews with a delay in the lifting of lockdown rules, despite the fact that Jews were not mentioned in the article at all.

The article – entitled Covid lockdown a success but UK ‘not out of the woods’, says ONS [Office of National Statistics] head– was published online on Saturday and quoted statistician Ian Diamond who praised the UK lockdown restrictions whilst warning that they should not yet be lifted. He made no reference to Jews, nor did the article and no picture caption was provided to explain why the photograph was chosen.

Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to the Global Readers’ Editor of The Guardian Group on Monday to demand the picture’s removal as well as an apology. The newspaper, as well as its sister newspaper The Observer, have regularly published cartoons by Steve Bell with antisemitic undertones and have promoted conspiracy theories against Jews including that Israel was behind the killing of George Floyd.

Following the complaint from Campaign Against Antisemitism, the picture has been removed, with a non-apology at the foot of the article reading: This article was amended on 9 March 2021 to replace the picture with a more appropriate image.

A Guardian spokesperson told Campaign Against Antisemitism that the picture was chosen because it contained a poster related to Covid. The spokesperson said: “We considered the image had been chosen primarily because it depicted a Covid poster in a general street scene, not because it showed Charedi Jews or intended to associate them with the article other than as members of the public”, before stating that they had regarded the report as “largely positive”.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The Guardian published an image of two visibly Jewish men in an article about lockdown restrictions not yet being lifted. The image bore no relation to the report but its inclusion insinuated that Jews were somehow to blame for the UK being ‘not out of the woods’ with regard to the necessity for lockdown rules. After we complained to the newspaper, it removed the image and replaced it with a more appropriate image, but no apology has been issued. The Guardian owes the Jewish community an apology and an explanation for how its editors could possibly have arrived at the decision to use this unrelated and insensitive picture. Incidents like this do nothing to improve the newspaper’s horrendous reputation in the Jewish community.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

Shami Chakrabarti has been invited to speak at the prestigious St Paul’s School on the subject of “equality between people” on the occassion of International Women’s Day, despite her role whitewashing antisemitism within the Labour Party.

Following a complaint to us from an appalled alumnus, Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to the High Master of the boys’ school to ask why the disgraced peer has been invited to speak tomorrow, to insist that she is challenged on her role whitewashing anti-Jewish racism in the Labour Party, and to make welfare arrangements for Jewish students and anyone else affected by her address.

The alumnus told Campaign Against Antisemitism: “My old school St Paul’s has invited Chakrabarti to speak at an event to mark International Womens’ Day on Tuesday. I and several other Jewish alumni have objected to the High Master as we don’t feel that she is suitable to be given a platform at the school, given her contribution to the continuation of antisemitism which she could have snuffed out with the position and power she had. I also don’t believe she did very much to help Margaret Hodge, Ruth Smeeth, Luciana Berger and so many other women Labour Party members who were subjected to antisemitism after the publication of her joke of a report.

“The school’s response is that they haven’t asked her to talk about antisemitism or Labour so it’s fine that she still speaks regardless of the offence it has caused and will cause Jews. They quote freedom of speech, debate, open-mindedness etc. to justify not cancelling her engagement.”

The talk can be attended by anyone who registers.

Baroness Chakrabarti launched an inquiry into antisemitism within the Labour Party during Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership. The report was widely condemned as a whitewash. Baroness Chakrabarti was then awarded a peerage in 2016 by Mr Corbyn, despite his previous pledge not to nominate anyone for peerages.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Baroness Chakrabarti’s whitewash report into antisemitism in Labour set back the fight against racism in the Party by years, causing untold distress to the Jewish community. It is most regrettable that St Paul’s has chosen to honour her with this platform, and we have written to the High Master to this effect. If the event does go ahead, there must be opportunity for her shameful record to be challenged and appropriate arrangements must be put in place for Jewish and other pupils who do not wish to attend or who are adversely affected. We have also offered to provide a presentation on antisemitism to pupils, which can help illuminate the extent of the damage Baroness Chakrabarti did in the months prior to receiving her peerage.”

Four years after Baroness Chakrabarti’s shameful whitewash report, the Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Current leader Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

An online presentation in Italy for the new novel by the Italian journalist-turned-fiction-writer Gaia Servadio, was suspended after being interrupted by antisemitic and neo-nazi abuse.

The presentation for the book, entitled Giudei (“Jews”), was sponsored by the magazine Carta Vetrata. Commenting on the abuse, Ms Servadio said that similar events had occurred during “other online presentations, even in England,” where she lives. Ms Servadio, whose father was Jewish, was born in 1938 and experienced antisemitism in Padua, where she grew up.

Abuse in the Zoombombing included comments such as “Jews to the ovens” and “f***ing Jews” as well as other expletives and belching noises.

She has lived in London for more than 50 years and was the mother-in-law of Boris Johnson when her daughter, Allegra Mostyn-Owen, was the British Prime Minister’s first wife. The novel tells the story of a turbulent century through the lives of two Jewish families.  

Campaign Against Antisemitism has previously reported on the phenomenon of ‘Zoom bombing’ and has urged communal institutions to take precautions to safeguard against antisemitic disruption of online events.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A Progressive think-tank and Canadian Jewish organisations have expressed outrage at an invitation to Jeremy Corbyn to participate in an event organised by Canada’s New Democratic Party (NDP).

Now an independent MP following his suspension from the Parliamentary Labour Party, Mr Corbyn – under whose leadership the Party was found to have unlawfully victimised and harassed Jewish members by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) – has been invited to join “a conversation” with an NDP MP.

Rick Smith, the Director of the Broadbent Institute, a think tank with links to the NDP, criticised the invitation. After sharing the EHRC report, he declared: “This is not the sort of person that should headline a Progressive fundraiser or occupy the time of Canadian Progressive leaders.”

Describing Mr Corbyn as “toxic”, a Canadian Jewish leader said that it was “staggering” that, given the “catastrophic” and “consequential” issues currently facing Canada, this was where “some in the NDP want to spend the Party’s capital.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A knife attack on a Jewish school in the French city of Marseilles has been averted thanks to the intervention of school parents volunteering as security guards.

École Yavne (Yavne School) was locked down during the attack at 08:15 this morning, and nobody was injured, with police subsequently alerting all Jewish institutions across the southern city to increase security.

With his attack on the school foiled, the suspect reportedly targeted a kosher supermarket in the hope of stabbing Jewish victims, but he was again prevented by security.

Eventually the police arrived and apprehended the suspect.

The Chairman of the Jewish Agency warned that “the attack in Marseille today is a red flag that should alert us to the antisemitism that is happening below the radar, and is simply waiting to break free once the movement restrictions of the pandemic come to an end.”

We pay tribute to the volunteer security personnel who prevented these heinous attacks, and commend those in Britain and around the world who guard Jewish institutions and put themselves in harm’s way to protect others, sometimes making the ultimate sacrifice.

Marseilles has seen numerous violent antisemitic attacks in recent years, with the fatal stabbing of two women at a train station in 2017 and a machete attack on a Jewish man outside a synagogue in 2016.

It is also not the first attack on a Jewish school or kosher supermarket in the country. In 2012, a gunman murdered a teacher and three children at a Jewish school in Toulouse, while a Parisian kosher supermarket was attacked in 2015, leaving four people dead.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Organisers of an anti-vaccine demonstration in the French city of Avignon have been described as “brainless” for using the Nazi yellow star in their protest.

In the demonstration organised by a radical group of “southern citizens”, some 45 protestors marched through the centre of the historic city carrying banners showing yellow stars and comparing COVID-19 restrictions with Nazi persecution of Jews.

In an interview for a French-language website, one of the organisers conceded that France was “certainly not in a genocide” but that “these laws against liberty recall dark moments in our history.”

The Deputy (parliamentarian) for the region, Eric Ciotti, condemned the protestors as “brainless” and “outrageous”, while Fabienne Haloui, a local councillor, said that while protest was legitimate, the restriction of freedoms caused by the pandemic and lockdown can “in no way be compared to the persecution of Jews which ended in genocide.”

Sometimes it was “good to have a sense of proportion,” she added.

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

City University’s Students’ Union has called a referendum for later this month on a motion urging the University to reject the International Definition of Antisemitism, in what amounts to a shameful abandonment of Jewish students.

A similar motion was brought to a student members meeting in November 2020, where all students could vote, and it failed by an overwhelming margin, with 66% declining to support it.

Despite the failure of essentially the same motion to pass late last year, the trustees of the Students’ Union have taken the rare step of calling a university-wide referendum in a desperate effort to pass the resolution, which is controversially phrased as to call for the University to “reject” the Definition even before it has adopted it.

Over seventy other universities in Britain have adopted the Definition so far, for which the Government, Campaign Against Antisemitism, the Union of Jewish Students and all other mainstream Jewish organisations have called. City University has not yet adopted the Definition.

In deciding to call the referendum, it is understood that the Students’ Union appallingly failed to consult the Jewish Society.

In a statement, the Jewish Society observed that “once again, Jewish students were not consulted about this motion going ahead, and we are left frustrated that the Students’ Union believes it’s okay for the topic of antisemitism to be debated in a public forum. Having a referendum on such an issue reinforces the idea that Jewish student safety has to be fought for rather than a right. The Jewish community should be allowed to define for themselves what antisemitism is, same as with any other ethnic minority. All of this makes us feel that the Students’ Union is neglecting its Jewish students and failing in its responsibility to support all students.”

Even when concerns were raised by the Jewish Society, “the Students’ Union was adamant about the referendum going ahead.” According to the Jewish Society “the Students’ Union has made clear that when discussing anti-Jewish racism, they will not prioritise Jewish student voices.”

Further questions have also arisen about the rules of the campaign and what role, if any, that the Jewish Society will be permitted to play. Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is in contact with the Jewish Society and has also been approached directly by concerned Jewish students on campus, is monitoring developments and has offered ongoing support.

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “City University’s Students’ Union has brought shame on the University. This referendum, apparently called after the failure of a similar attempt and without consultation with the Jewish Society, represents an abandonment of Jewish students by their own union. The goal of the campaign – to encourage the University not to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism – is tantamount to reserving the right to be antisemitic. This referendum has no place on a distinguished campus. If it does proceed, City students are urged to show solidarity with their Jewish peers once more and reject this intimidatory motion.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

A cross-party group of over 100 MPs and peers have written to the University of Bristol accusing Prof. David Miller of “inciting hatred against Jewish students on your campus”.

Under the aegis of the All-Party Parliamentary Group Against Antisemitism, the letter calls on the University to act against Prof. Miller, whom it accuses of “hate speech” and of having brought the University “into disrepute”.

Prof. Miller, a Professor of Political Sociology, is a conspiracy theorist with a history of controversy relating to Jewish students, and the letter was prompted by his latest outburst, when he asserted that “Zionism is racism” and declared his objective “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world”.

In an online event, Prof. Miller complained of being criticised by the President of the Bristol University Jewish Society and accused the student group of being part of a worldwide Zionist conspiracy, adding that it is “fundamental to Zionism to encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”. Prof. Miller also observed that the Jewish Society and the Union of Jewish Students are Zionist, thereby implying that Jewish students (and the wider Jewish community) inherently “encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”.

He also portrayed the International Definition of Antisemitism as an attack on free speech and accused the Israeli Government of engaging in an “all-out attack” on the global Left as part of an “attempt by the Israelis to impose their will all over the world”.

In comments reminiscent of the darkest years of the United Nations, Prof. Miller insisted that “Zionism is racism” and asked how “we defeat the ideology of Zionism in practice”, “how is Zionism ended” and about the way “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world”.

This is not Prof. Miller’s first controversy in relation to Jews, antisemitism and Zionism. Last June, Campaign Against Antisemitism revealed that Prof. Miller was behind disgraced MP Chris Williamson’s Resistance Movement. The group aimed to give a home to the “politically homeless” politicians who had been expelled from the Labour Party for antisemitism, such as Jackie Walker, Tony Greenstein and Mark Wadsworth.

Prof. Miller has a history of spouting conspiracy theories about various Jewish community organisations and figures that has reportedly discomfited his Jewish students. In a presentation titled “Harms of the Powerful”, for example, Prof. Miller suggested that the “Zionist movement” is one of the “five pillars” of hatred of Muslims (redolent of the five pillars of Islam) and is bankrolled by “ultra Zionist funders”. He has also suggested that Jewish interfaith dialogue with Muslim groups represents an Israeli-backed “Trojan horse” initiative to “normalise Zionism in the Muslim community”.

Prof. Miller has previously accused the current leader of the Labour Party, Sir Keir Starmer, of taking “Zionist money”, and he has talked about what he referred to as the “witch hunt” against Labour members accused of antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to the University of Bristol.

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “David Miller is a conspiracy theorist who believes that Bristol’s Jewish Society and the entire nationwide Jewish student body ‘encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism’. His teachings have been going on for years with no action taken despite deep ongoing concerns for the safety of Jewish students at Bristol University.

“The University’s silence on this subject is now so loud and clear that more than 100 political figures have had to publicly move in on this. You do not need to be a member of the Jewish community to understand that this crank conspiracy theorist has no place in academia. We commend all those that have shown support for Jewish students today by calling for action to be taken.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities. Bristol University adopted the Definition in November 2019.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

The owner of an Amsterdam kosher restaurant said that he has “lost count” of the number of times his establishment has been vandalised following the latest incident, in which an antisemitic slogan was painted on his windows.

Daniel Bar-On, the owner of the HaCarmel restaurant in the Dutch capital, told local news outlets that he had “lost count” of the number of antisemitic attacks on his property.

“There are many restaurants owned by different nationalities along this street, but we are the only one subjected to these kinds of incidents,” explained Mr Bar-On.

His comments follow the recent desecration of a Jewish cemetery in Rotterdam, prompting the municipal authorities in the port city to provide more surveillance cameras and more police at Jewish institutions.

Rotterdam councillor Tanya Hoogwerf said in a media interview that “continuing hatred” towards the Jewish community in The Netherlands was “shocking”. Referring to a “series of incidents in our country”, Ms Hoogwerf added that, while politicians had been “falling over themselves to speak out” against antisemitism, “no effective measures have been taken.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

An educational resource site and the headteacher of a primary school have apologised after seven-year-olds were handed homework teaching them that the Jews killed Jesus.

Joanne Bell, the mother of a child who was handed the sheet, posted a picture of the antisemitic homework to Twitter. It showed a drawing with a depiction of Jesus standing in front of Roman leader Pontius, whilst a hook-nosed Jew is bending down to whisper to Pontius in a conspiratorial manner.

Alongside, the text reads: “The Jewish leaders wanted Jesus to be guilty…eventually they asked him if he was the son of God. Jesus replied ‘I am’. This was enough. They said this was an insult to God. Jesus was taken before Pontius Pilate, the Roman Governor. The Jewish people, who wanted Jesus to die, persuaded the people to set free a murderer called Barabbas. Pilate asked what he should do with Jesus, known as ‘king of the Jews’. ‘Crucify him!’ shouted the people.”

Ms Bell wrote: “Got to love Britain, doing my child’s RE [Religious Education] home-schooling today. Why not teach the Blood Libel, hey. What harm has it ever done to portray Jews as bloodthirsty and solely responsible for the death of the believed son of G-d, Jesus. I am in shock. This for seven-year olds.”

Topmarks – the education website responsible for creating and distributing the homework – blocked Joanne when she raised the issue, but it unblocked her a day later, with the head of the company tweeting an apology.

He wrote: “Hello Joanne. Sorry for the delay, I’ve been unwell post-vaccine. We are sorry for any offense to or misrepresentation of the Jewish community, it was not our intention, and we have removed the Bible story. Thank you for bringing it to our attention. I have unblocked you.”

Another user then asked why Ms Bell had been blocked in the first place, to which Mr Spolton replied: “It was an unnecessary mistake.” When Ms Bell questioned how the material ended up on the website in the first place, Mr Spolton replied: “I was young and naive. It was written circa twenty years ago based on books found in the local library, and the dated images were downloaded clip art. I literally hadn’t reviewed the story for decades and had pretty much forgotten about it. I’m glad you contacted me with your concerns and that I’ve been able to remove it quickly.”

Ms Bell, who has done a service by drawing attention to this material, updated followers as the homework was pulled from the primary school – which Ms Bell has not named – with an apology from the “horrified” headteacher.

A spokesperson from Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The notion that the Jews killed Jesus is an antisemitic trope which dates back millennia. It has been used as a supposed justification for the persecution of Jews in the Christian world for centuries and is often cited in abuse of Jews even today. It is sickening that this material was presented to young children as factual education. The apologies from Topmarks and the school in question are welcome, as is the withdrawal of the textbook, but educational material for children, particularly in sensitive fields, must be written and vetted by reliable experts. For Topmarks to be offering materials that, by its own admission, were created by someone so ‘naive’ as to present a blood libel as fact, and not to review those materials in decades is unacceptable.”

Graffiti reading “Zionist police state” has appeared in East London for the second time this week, this time in Tower Hamlets.

The vandalism on Chambord Street comes just after the police said that they were investigating graffiti with the same message in Hackney.

Police reported the graffiti to Tower Hamlets Council and it has since been removed. No arrests have yet been made, and it is unclear if the two incidents are related.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Jewish News

Leaflets comparing the COVID-19 vaccine to the Holocaust have reportedly been left on car windscreens in Bournemouth.

In an apparent criticism of the vaccine and lockdown rules, the leaflets read: “Millions believed in the Nazis. Do you believe in your Government?” The caption is accompanied by pictures of Bill Gates, Prime Minister Boris Johnson, and the controversial Jewish financier and political activist, George Soros, who is a frequent protagonist in antisemitic conspiracy theories.

The local resident who discovered the leaflets reportedly said: “To hijack the Holocaust and use the Nazis’ terrible crimes against humanity as an excuse to level criticism is repulsive to Jews and the general public at large.”

It is understood that police are investigating.

Comparisons of the lockdown rules to the Holocaust have become disturbingly commonplace in recent months.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Graffiti slurring Britain as a “Zionist police state” has been discovered on a wall in Hackney, East London, with a Jewish witness describing it as “shocking and insulting”.

Police are investigating but no arrests have yet been made.

A police spokesman said that the force is aware of the graffiti and has “contacted the council to get it removed as a matter of urgency”.

A witness said that he was “horrified at such a crude antisemitic trope being used”.

This is not the first time that this phrase has been sighted in the area.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Martin Sugarman

A university professor has been fired after posting antisemitic slurs on Twitter.

Thomas Brennan, a professor of physical science at Ferris State University in Michigan, was put on administrative leave in November after posting conspiracy theories about COVID-19, and for using racist, antisemitic and homophobic language on Twitter. The tweets included references to a “Jewish mafia” and a claim that COVID-19 was “another Jewish revolution” and a “stunt” to create a “new world order”.

Following an investigation by the University, Mr Brennan was reportedly sacked on 25th February.

Announcing the termination of his employment on Twitter, Mr Brennan added a link to his letter of defence, presented to the University administration. In it he says that he was “speaking out of despair” caused by a “personal crisis involving extremely painful migraines, EMF [electromagnetic] sensitivity and a series of break-ins” at his home.

While admitting that many of his posts were “horrible”, Mr Brennan said that he was exercising his rights to free speech.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Swastikas and a white power slogan have been discovered at a city-centre park in Vancouver.

Swastikas and the words “white power” were painted on trees in Riverview Park.

The vandalism was condemned by city officials and the Park Board who described it as “abhorrent” and said that they stood in solidarity with the Jewish community and all those “targeted by these messages” which were “intended to create shock, fear and division.”

Their statement continued: “They are offensive to all of us who stand for human rights and dignity and will not be excused or tolerated.”

Cleaning crews removed the graffiti.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Google

A white supremacist from New Jersey faces up to ten years in prison and a fine of at least $250,000 (£180,000) following his conviction for vandalising synagogues in an antisemitic rampage he called “Kristallnacht”.

In court, Richard Tobin, 19, pleaded guilty to conspiring to vandalise synagogues and to other acts of anti-Jewish and anti-Black racism. Mr Tobin allegedly conspired with members of The Base, a white supremacist hate group. Using online communications, he allegedly told its members in September 2019 to vandalise and destroy buildings and vehicles belonging to Jewish and Black Americans. He called the operation “Kristallnacht”, referencing the Nazi pogrom in 1938 when thousands of synagogues and businesses were destroyed, Jews were murdered Jews and their belongings torched in a prelude to the Holocaust.

Members of The Base allegedly vandalised synagogues in Wisconsin and Michigan, spray painting them with swastikas and other hate symbols. Mr Tobin’s co-conspirator, Yousef Omar Barasneh, also pleaded guilty to vandalising the Wisconsin synagogue.

Michael Driscoll, the FBI agent who brought the conspirators to justice, said: “Richard Tobin encouraged others to victimise innocent people, in furtherance of his abhorrent white supremacist beliefs.”

Mr Driscoll added: “While we all have the right to believe whatever we want, when those views lead to violence, that’s a different and dangerous story.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A Canadian university has been urged to condemn antisemitism publicly after one of its professors made a number of inflammatory statements, including the suggestion that Jewish money may be corrupting the institution.

In an online event organised by Ottawa’s Carleton University in early February, sociology Professor Nahla Abdo said: “Money works – I wish we had money. We could have donated a lot of money and buildings. Israeli… you know, you have tons of buildings, everywhere, actually named after donors. That is not a strategy that Palestinians can do. They are not there, in that world. So they can continue to be victims of that.” In the context of the discussion, the insinuation was that Jewish money may be corrupting the University and influencing its policies. Prof. Abdo walked back the statement later in the event.

Prof Abdo also accused Israel of using “genocidal tactics” against Arabs and “Arab Jews”.

The event was part of a discussion over the university’s adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

B’nai Brith Canada’s Chief Executive Michael Mostyn said that the University needed to “investigate Professor Abdo’s remarks, publicly condemn antisemitism” and look at its language on “diversity and inclusion” to ensure that it combats antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A far-right group is using an unregulated social media platform to create neo-Nazi channels dedicated to share vile messages, antisemitic conspiracy theories and images glorifying Hitler. An investigation by Scottish news site The Ferret found over 2,000 messages swapped by members of Patriotic Alternative on Telegram.

One message said: “I’m Ayran, then Scottish personally. It’s really easy in my eyes to dismiss British identity aka our culture being banned by the English? Now, the Jews were behind that. They were also behind many of the historic reasons many justify Scots being Brits. The Irish famine and subsequent population transfers was a Jewish thing too.”

Another stated: “White folk need to be having more kids. The enemy have done a good job of brainwashing our professionals in particular to put career over family. Those that get the snip young like that are essentially anti-whites in my book.”

One member posted images of himself holding what appears to be an automatic weapon alongside swastika flags and photos of Adolf Hitler and commented that: “Zyklon B was a delousing agent”, in an apparent denial of the gas chambers used to murder Jews during the Holocaust.

The Ferret further reported that the group is recruiting young members by offering camping trips and paint gun sessions.

Recently it was reported that the group, headed by ex-BNP member Mark Collett, published an “alternative” home-curriculum full of “hateful” speech described by one MP as “poison”. Mr Collett is reported to have dabbled in Holocaust denial, collaborated with the infamous American antisemite David Duke, and reportedly said in a Channel 4 documentary that he “admires Hitler”.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Patriotic Alternative is a fascist organisation that targets recruits, including youth, with racist indoctrination. With police warning that the far-right poses the fastest-growing terrorist threat to Britain, it is gravely concerning that this organisation is able to use Telegram to amplify its message. These messages, which include Holocaust denial, neo-Nazi imagery and antisemitic and racist tropes have only one aim of peddling hatred and must be must be met with zero-tolerance law enforcement. It never takes long for these far-right groups to pose a threat to the public, therefore we urge police to act swiftly.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Antisemitic graffiti found at student residences at a Texas university is being investigated by college police.

According to Gwendolyn Schuler, a spokesperson for St. Edward’s University in Austin, vandals left offensive antisemitic and xenophobic messages on student rooms at an on-campus residential building on 3rd February.

Ms Schuler said that authorities had no security footage of the vandalism because it occurred in an area where there are no CCTV cameras. She also said that the University had increased the number of police and resident-assistants in the days immediately following the vandalism and that the incident was being investigated by the college police department.

Jewish student Alysia Duemler, who is studying psychology and Spanish at St. Edward’s, said that she was alarmed to hear about the vandalism, particularly as it occurred a week after International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

“I would hope that people would learn the lessons of the Holocaust,” Ms Duemler said. “But apparently some people are not learning the lessons.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Canada’s Jewish community has expressed outrage after a vaccine conspiracy theorist created a t-shirt using the words “Covid Caust” inside a yellow Star of David.

Canadian television network CTV reported that the t-shirt had been created by Vancouver-based anti-vaccine activist Susan Standfield. In an Instagram video explaining the design, Ms Standfield stated, “We are the official yellow star class in Canada”, and said that her design was “an act of solidarity among all persecuted people.”

One senior Jewish figure in the Vancouver community said that it was “irrational” and “makes no sense” to compare a vaccine to save people’s lives with “the genocide of a people.”

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The Global Student Forum has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The umbrella organisation – which brings together the world’s major representative students’ federations from 118 countries – adopted the Definition after discussions with the World Union of Jewish Students and the European Union of Jewish Students.

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds the decision, which comes at a time of rising antisemitism and demonstrates the students’ solidarity with their Jewish peers across the world.

Britain was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism and Lord Pickles worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

The US Secretary of State is being urged to sack a mid-ranking State Department official who allegedly has a long history of posting antisemitism material online, including calling Jews a “brood of vipers” and “the founders of the original Anti-Christ religion.”

Foreign Service officer Fritz Berggren’s alleged history of anti-Jewish racism has been revealed by Politico, which claims that he has for several years posted in his own name and with his own picture on his website, bloodandfaith.com. In one post, it is claimed that he wrote, “Jesus Christ came to save the whole world from the Jews; the founders of the original anti-Christ religion,” and “They who are the seed of the Serpent, that brood of vipers.”

Mr Berggren’s posts allegedly also advocate a white supremacist ideology. They have included: “Europeans must reclaim their blood and faith”; “The revival of Christian nation-states is required for the advancement of Truth”; and “…the world cheers the elimination of White culture from whole regions of the earth” which “will not stop until White people stop it.”

American Jewish leaders have demanded action from the State Department.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has launched a petition calling on the BBC to apologise after airing a segment on its Politics Live show titled “Should Jews count as an ethnic minority?”, a question that the BBC would never presume to ask about any other British minority community.

The segment featured four panellists and a guest, Ben Cohen, the (Jewish) Editor of Pink News, who rightly observed on air that “the notion of this debate is ridiculous”.

Host Jo Coburn suggested that “many Jews have succeeded in reaching high political office and therefore don’t need to be seen as a group needing recognition in the same way as others”, but Mr Cohen observed that Jews “face antisemitism and racism very clearly” and referenced the Labour Party’s institutional antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has launched a petition calling on the BBC to apologise for the “ridiculous” and insensitive segment, and we have also submitted a complaint to the Corporation. The petition can be signed here.

Our Antisemitism Barometer 2020 showed that two thirds of British Jews view unfavourably the BBC’s coverage of matters of Jewish interest (including antisemitism). Given segments like these, this breathtaking finding is wholly reasonable.

The debate was stirred by the social media backlash against Labour’s Deputy Leader, Angela Rayner, who tweeted that Scottish Labour’s newly-elected leader is “the first ever ethnic minority leader of a political party anywhere in the UK”.

As Campaign Against Antisemitism pointed out, historically at least four party leaders have had Jewish roots, namely Benjamin Disraeli (Conservatives), Herbert Samuel (Liberals), Michael Howard (Conservatives) and Ed Miliband (Labour). There have been minority leaders in minor parties as well, for example the controversial Salma Yaqoob of the now-defunct Respect Party (she has since joined the Labour Party).

Despite the social media criticism — which, as many have observed, Ms Rayner never hesitates to issue herself — Ms Rayner has not clarified, deleted or apologised for her tweet.

It was recently reported that Labour had opened and promptly closed an antisemitism investigation into Ms Rayner based on a complaint from Campaign Against Antisemitism. The complaint relates to Ms Rayner’s promotion of a book entitled The Holocaust Industry, in which the author claims that the American Jewish establishment exploits the Holocaust for political and financial gain. Despite the reports, we maintain our expectation of a full and transparent investigation once the independent disciplinary system, mandated by the Equality and Human Rights Commission, is in place later this year, and that therefore our complaint remains open.

During the 2019 General Election, the Labour Party released an advertisement stating that every minority is “worthy of equality”, but the advertisement failed to reference the Jewish community at all in what appeared to many viewers, in view of Labour’s problem with Jews, to be a deliberate exclusion.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is outrageous that the BBC has aired a segment on whether Jews count as an ethnic minority. The show’s own guest rightly considered the debate to be ‘ridiculous’. It is a question that the Corporation would never presume to ask of any other minority community in Britain, and it is telling that it does so in relation to the Jews. These segments show why, according to our research, two thirds of British Jews view the BBC’s coverage of Jewish matters unfavourably.

“We have submitted a complaint to the BBC and launched a petition calling on the Corporation to apologise for airing this appalling segment.

“The pretext for the debate was a tweet by Labour’s Deputy Leader Angela Rayner that airbrushed Jewish party leaders from history, despite the fact that she herself was first elected an MP while her Party was led by a Jewish person. This sort of omission does nothing to restore Ms Rayner’s reputation, which has been sullied by accusations of antisemitism. In this connection, our complaint against her remains outstanding and we await the Party’s independent disciplinary process later this year before action should be taken.”

Kentucky’s General Assembly, the state legislature, has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Both the House and Senate unanimously passed resolutions adopting the Definition. The Governor is expected to back the resolutions, making the Bluegrass State the first in the United States to adopt the Definition.

Kentucky has seen a number of antisemitic incidents recently, including the distribution of antisemitic fliers and an assault at a menorah lighting.

Louisville Democrat Karen Berg said: “The desecration of Jewish cemeteries and congregations and community centres — it’s increasing and everybody knows it’s increasing. It’s part of the whole hate that we got to put away.”

The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

A speaker who is alleged to endorse antisemitic conspiracy theories and has apparently referred to “thieving Jews”, was dropped by a prestigious American political conference.

The online commentator known as Young Pharaoh had been due to speak at the annual Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC), which took place in Florida from February 25th to 28th and was addressed by former President Donald Trump.

Young Pharaoh is alleged to have called Judaism a “complete lie” and to have used the phrase “thieving Jews.” In his tweets he has allegedly said that “all the censorship and paedophilia on social media is being done by Israeli Jews” and that “YouTube, Twitter, Facebook and Instagram are all owned or controlled directly by them.”

He has allegedly also promoted conspiracy theories including QAnon, which incorporates antisemitic tropes.

However, following a report by media watchdog, Media Matters, revealing his past social media comments, CPAC tweeted that a speaker with “reprehensible views” which had “no home with our conference or our organisation” had been removed from the conference programme.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

An altar honouring the senior Nazi figure, Heinrich Himmler, was found when premises near Rome used by an Italian far-right movement were cleared by police.

The altar, dedicated to Himmler and Erich Priebke – an SS officer convicted of war crimes in Italy – was found together with other objects relating to Fascist and Nazi ideology during an eviction from a centre in Maccarese, near Rome.

The centre has reportedly been illegally occupied since 2008 by Fons Perennis, a far-right organisation with links to the neo-fascist, pro-Nazi movement CasaPound which was, in its early years, a political party named in honour of the author Ezra Pound.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A school official in a Boston suburb who referred to a Jewish official on television as a “kike” has announced his resignation.

Robert “Bob” Hoey Jr, a member of the school committee in Lowell, Massachusetts, was on a local talk show when he used the antisemitic slur while referring to a Jewish former official.

Two days later, a local news outlet reported that Mr Hoey had announced his resignation via Facebook Live.

On the video – which is no longer available – Mr Hoey reportedly said that he had “a big mouth” and “no control” over how he talked. He apologised to the official and said that “that word” should be condemned.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A guard at a Nazi concentration camp who has lived in the United States since 1959 has been deported to Germany.

German prosecutors, however, have dropped their case against him for lack of evidence.

Friedrich Karl Berger, 95, has admitted to working as a guard at the Neuengamme concentration camp near Hamburg, but he denies witnessing any killings or abuse of prisoners. During the deportation hearing, Mr Berger admitted that he had prevented prisoners from fleeing the camp.

In an interview with the Washington Post, Mr Berger claimed that he had been forced to work in the camp, had spent only a short time there and had not carried a weapon. He also said that “after 75 years” it was “ridiculous” to force him out of his home.

German police are to question him further about his wartime activities.

The US judge who last year ordered the deportation said that camp prisoners were held in “atrocious” conditions and often worked “to the point of exhaustion and death.” The Acting Attorney-General, Monty Wilkinson, said that Mr Berger’s deportation showed the administration’s commitment to ensuring that the United States was “not a safe haven for those who have participated in Nazi crimes.”

German prosecutors have continued to pursue former Nazi camp officials. In February, a 95-year-old woman who had worked as a secretary at the Stutthof camp and a 100-year-old man who was a guard at Sachsenhausen were charged with aiding and abetting mass murder.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: US Department of Justice

The host of a popular gameshow on Bulgarian National Television has apologised after allegedly denying the Holocaust and spouting anti-Jewish racism on air.

After asking contestants to name “the chess player with Jewish roots who nonetheless spoke out harshly against Jews,” Orlin Goranov went on to quote from an article on a white supremacist website. The author claimed to have interviewed the late chess master Bobby Fischer, who was also infamous for promoting antisemitism. Mr Goranov quoted the article claiming to quote Mr Fischer saying, “There were no gas chambers; that’s all baloney” and that Jews didn’t like to work, which was “one of the things the Jews didn’t like about Hitler’s concentration camps.”

On the following day, Bulgarian National Television’s director, Emil Koshlukov, apologised, saying that the quotations “contain hate speech and slander” and promised to “punish the employees” responsible for the incident.

A day later, Mr Goranov apologised on air, saying that his comments were not aimed at offending Jews “but at accurately quoting Fischer.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A war memorial has been daubed with swastikas and disturbing antisemitic hate messages.

The vile messages, which refer to the murder of Jews and gassing of soldiers, was found on the memorial in Rhyl, Wales.

The graffiti also continued the line, in German, that “the time has come for a Reich [empire]: we must exterminate the Jews.”

Richard Kendrick, Rhyl’s Poppy Appeal organiser for the Royal British Legion, said: “Someone has put graffiti on two of the stones and plaques. These stones are dedicated to the men and women from Rhyl who have given their lives for us over the past 125 years. I can’t understand who would do such an awful thing.”

Mr Kendrick went on to urge anyone with information to call police before adding: “Sad day when someone would do such an awful act.”

Councillor Brian Jones said: “It is a total disrespect to the people that fought for the freedom of the country.”

Image credit: Richard Kendrick

A historian in a Polish institute that researches World War II war crimes has resigned after alleged links to a far-right organisation emerged, along with pictures of him performing a Nazi-style salute.

Tomasz Greniuch, who was appointed in February as the head of the Wroclaw branch of the Institute of National Remembrance (IPN), resigned less than two weeks later amid outrage over his alleged links to the National Radical Camp, a far-right group, and after pictures appeared of him apparently performing a Nazi-style salute at rallies in the early 2000s.

The director of the Prime Minister’s Office, Michal Dworczyk, urged him to resign “for the sake of the institution and the image of Poland.”

Mr Greniuch’s appointment to such a sensitive role has caused controversy in Poland, where the governing Law and Justice Party has faced accusations of encouraging far-right sentiment, a charge that the Party denies.

Some politicians have called for the resignation of the head of the IPN, Jaroslaw Szarek, who went ahead with Mr Greniuch’s appointment despite concerns voiced by members of the Government and by the Polish President.

Mr Greniuch issued a public apology on Friday declaring: “I have never been a Nazi and I apologise for the irresponsible gesture I made a dozen years ago, which was a mistake.” He added. “The gesture was the result of youthful bravado,” and was not aimed at “glorifying totalitarianism”.

In a 2019 interview, he said that he had not cut himself off from his earlier views but had changed his behaviour and noted that “when you have your dream job, you try to be a professional.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A shopping plaza in Davie, just north of Miami, has been vandalised with antisemitic graffiti.

According to witnesses, a bank, a restaurant and other businesses were spray-painted with offensive messages.

The vandalism is being investigated by police and a $3,000 (£2,160) reward has been offered to  help find the perpetrator.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The Green Party is set to vote on two motions against adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism at its Spring Conference next month.

Motion D07 (an “organisational” motion), sponsored by former Deputy Leader Shahrar Ali and others, calls on the Party to “reaffirm its support for free speech on Israel and Palestine and for The Green Party to campaign against adoption of the [International] Definition of Antisemitism and in support of Boycott Divestment Sanctions (BDS) campaigns.”

The suggestion that the Definition stifles free speech is as persistent as it is unfounded in both fact and law. Meanwhile, research by Campaign Against Antisemitism has shown that the overwhelming majority of Jews feel intimidated by the tactics used to boycott Israel. It is also ironic that boycotting – particularly when it impacts academia and culture – is by definition an attempt to stifle free speech.

This is not Mr Ali’s first battle against the Definition. The Green Party failed to pass a resolution adopting the Definition in 2018 following calls to oppose it by Mr Ali.

Motion E07 (E motions are “unaccredited policy motions and enabling motions”) focuses on the BDS movement but also seeks to repudiate one of the examples under the Definition, namely that “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour)” is antisemitic.

The conference is due to be held online during the first week of March 2021.

Last year, Green Party co-Leader Sian Berry expressed her “frustration” that her Party had still not adopted the Definition. Speaking at a campaign briefing for the Jewish community, Ms Berry observed that motions to adopt the Definition had been placed before the Party’s conference twice but blamed the failure to adopt it on other priorities for the membership. She also noted that she sponsored another motion for the Party’s Spring conference of that year but that it was ruled “out of order”. The conference was in any event cancelled due to the pandemic.

Most other mainstream political parties in Britain have adopted the Definition, including the Conservative Party, Labour Party (after some controversy) and Liberal Democrats.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A far-right group that tries to recruit youth to its ideology has published an online “alternative” home school curriculum condemned as “poison” and “hateful”.

Patriotic Alternative claims that 10,000 people a month are accessing the curriculum. The group says: “With our help, your children can learn about their history and culture in a balanced and age-appropriate manner, free from the shackles and ideology of the National Curriculum.”

The group is led by the former head of the youth wing of the BNP, Mark Collett, who is reported to have dabbled in Holocaust denial, collaborated with the infamous American antisemite David Duke, and espoused antisemitic and racist views.

A report into Patriotic Alternative published last summer found that several members of the group engaged in Holocaust denial.

MPs and Ofstead officials have condemned the syllabus, with one MP saying: “We have seen far-right activity and racist attacks increase in the pandemic. Groups such as Patriotic Alternative use lockdown as an opportunity to peddle their hateful ideology.” Another described the curriculum as an attempt to “poison children’s education”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Notorious Holocaust-denier David Irving is reportedly charging £2,000 per person for a tour of concentration camps.

In an interview with The Jerusalem Post earlier this month, Mr Irving claimed that he was giving tours to thirteen people at camps and execution sites in Latvia and Poland. He advertises his tours with a title “The Real History Tour of the Wolf’s Lair”, and states underneath: “Don’t miss this lifetime adventure! Make up your own mind about the truth.” In his tours, Mr Irving’s groups visit Hitler’s headquarters, where Mr Irving apparently claims that the Nazi dictator was not aware of the Holocaust.

When asked if his denial tours might fuel antisemitism, an unapologetic Mr Irving replied to his interviewer: “The Jews should ask, Why us? It is not for me to ask that question. Maybe it’s how they have acted over the thousands of years. Maybe it is all our fault. Our Riga tour includes the NKVD [Soviet Interior Ministry] headquarters, and the Skirotawa train station, where Jews also played a role.”

When asked who his paying clients are, Mr Irving claimed that two were judges and three were lawyers, with the group including Russians, Britons, Americans and one from each of France, Sweden, New Zealand and Canada.

British-born Mr Irving was previously incarcerated for thirteen months in Austria for violating its Holocaust-denial laws. He is banned from Austria, Germany and Italy where Holocaust denial is illegal and he is also banned from Canada.

Mr Irving, who was discredited as a historian at a defamation trial in 2000, said during a far-right forum in 2017 that Auschwitz is “small beer” and now “like Disneyland”.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “David Irving is a disgraced historian whose views on the Holocaust are a deep insult to Jews worldwide and to the truth. That he reportedly seeks to profit from his notoriety and peddling of untruths is disturbing and unacceptable. Mr Irving has earned his reputation as a pariah, and should be treated as such by his would-be patrons and others who have the misfortune of encountering him.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

The leader of a Dutch Party that has two seats in the country’s Parliament, has provoked outrage by stating that the trials against Nazi leaders in Nuremberg after World War II were “illegitimate”.

Thierry Baudet, who leads the Forum for Democracy Party, was addressing a rally in the town of Gouda, ahead of the 17th March General Election, when he was asked about the notion of prosecuting the Mayor of Amsterdam for alleged police brutality. He said that he was “no supporter of retroactive punitive legal action” adding: “I consider the Nuremberg trials as illegitimate. You shouldn’t retroactively judge people.”

Political rivals and a Dutch antisemitism watchdog said that Mr Baudet’s remark was “shocking”.

The Nuremberg trials led to the conviction of prominent members of the leadership of Nazi Germany, who planned, carried out or participated in the Holocaust and other war crimes.

Mr Baudet recently resigned as Leader after the Party’s youth division became embroiled in a scandal over antisemitism, but he has since returned as Leader after an apparent split in the Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A group of academics at University College London (UCL) have reportedly written a letter expressing their support for the International Definition of Antisemitism, in the wake of a scandalous report and resolution by the University’s Academic Board calling on the University to “retract and replace” the Definition.

The nineteen signatories described the Definition as “an important safeguard” and condemned the resolution by the Academic Board as being based on a “deeply flawed report, presented as a balanced investigation, but which reads like a partisan piece of advocacy.” They further claimed that the authors of the report consulted only two Jewish students and ignored the widespread support that the Definition enjoys in the Jewish community.

UCL adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism in 2019 but earlier this month its Academic Board passed an advisory resolution calling on the University to “retract and replace” the Definition. The Students’ Union recently voted down a similar resolution. After the vote, one Jewish academic affiliated to the University resigned in disgust, calling UCL an “antisemitic cesspit”.

Following the Academic Board’s vote, Campaign Against Antisemitism announced that it was writing to the Provost of UCL.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Italian police have opened an investigation into racially-aggravated threatening behaviour after 93-year-old Holocaust survivor Liliana Segre was the target of antisemitic abuse on social media.

Ms Segre, who in 2018 was named Senator for Life by Italian President, Sergio Mattarella, was subjected to antisemitic hate after she was pictured receiving her COVID-19 vaccination on 18th February.

Abusive comments included: “…the a**hole … not even the Germans managed to kill her…and now she’s afraid of dying.” Another was: “And now let’s hope that the vaccine does its job…and she gets the f*** out of the way.”

In her first act after becoming a Senator for Life, she proposed the establishment of a parliamentary commission on racism, antisemitism and incitement to hatred and violence.

Italian police say that a formal investigation has been opened into racially-aggravated threatening behaviour following the online abuse.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A member of London Mayor Sadiq Khan’s “Commission for Diversity in the Public Realm” has stepped down from his position after allegedly making inflammatory remarks online.

Toyin Agbetu reportedly said in a blog post that there was an “immoral hierarchy of suffering”, whereby victims of the Holocaust have been “served well by Nazi hunters” compared to African victims of the slave trade.

He also apparently defended a lecturer who urged his students to read The Secret Relationship Between Blacks and Jews, a racist tome by the antisemitic hate preacher Louis Farrakhan. The book claims that the Jews played an essential role in the transatlantic slave trade, which is a baseless antisemitic trope. Mr Agbetu defended a book by the same academic, The Jewish Onslaught, which was apparently condemned as antisemitic even by the academic’s own faculty when it was published in 1994. In 2007, Mr Agbetu said of the academic that “his alleged ‘crime’ was being the author of a book that explored the role of Jews in the Maafa [black genocide].”

According to the Jewish News, Mr Agbetu signed a letter criticising the whitewash Chakrabarti Report into antisemitism in the Labour Party on the basis that it was unwittingly discriminatory as “racism against Jewish people is set apart from racism and prejudice against other people.”

Mr Agbetu reportedly further compared British people to Nazis at a commemoration of the abolition of the slave trade, where he said: “All of you sitting here are disrespecting my ancestors. In the history of the Maafa [black genocide], the British are the Nazis.”

Mr Agbetu was one of fifteen individuals appointed to the Commission, which aimed to review London landmarks and statues in the wake of the Black Lives Matter (BLM) protests in 2020.

He has apparently not apologised for his comments and wrote on Facebook: “This year the Mayoral candidate Shaun Bailey is now attempting a similar Afriphobic campaign. I can’t take the risk that all the gains we have made re BLM unravel so I have had to make a frustrating but strategic move. I voluntarily decided to step back from the post before being asked, to help reduce the attacks on the important work of the commission…They are looking for any means to destroy my reputation.”

It is understood that Mr Agbetu still serves on Hackney’s Review of Public Spaces.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “After we exposed pockets of controversy in the BLM movement, we would have hoped that the City Hall would have taken greater care in the selection of members for its Commission. Clearly, Toyin Agbetu has no place on any body designed to enhance diversity. He is right to resign, but there is nothing ‘strategic’ in avoiding apologising for his past inflammatory comments. Until Mr Agbetu makes amends, no institution should work with him.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

An antisemitic e-mail was sent to a French Jewish politician telling her that Muslims will “deal with” her and to “prepare for” the death camps.

Yaël Braun-Pivet, a member of the French National Assembly representing the ruling LREM party, revealed on Twitter the contents of an antisemitic e-mail sent to her private online account.

After telling her to prepare for the death camps, the e-mail stated: “This time, it’s the Muslims who will deal with you.”

It also said: “Jews can no longer come into some neighbourhoods. Within two generations it will be whole cities. Demography determines laws.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Swastikas and antisemitic Nazi slogans, including Sieg Heil, were carved into the door of a synagogue in the Swiss town of Biel.

The desecration, which is being investigated by police, was described as “a serious antisemitic incident” by the Swiss Federation of Jewish Communities (SIG/FCSI).  

Biel, also known as Bienne, is near the Swiss capital, Bern, and lies on the border between the French-speaking and German-speaking regions of the country.

In a statement, the SIG/FCSI said that it was “shocked,” and condemned “this act of violence in the strongest possible terms.” 

The SIG/FCSI and the local Jewish community are jointly filing a criminal complaint and expressed the hope that the perpetrator would be found quickly.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: SIG/FCSI

The controversial French comedian Dieudonné was instructed by the Paris Court of Appeals to pay a fine of €9,000 (over £7,700) for mocking the Holocaust in a video.

Dieudonné, whose real name is M’Bala M’Bala, is a French comedian and political activist who has been convicted for hate speech and advocating terrorism, among other offences, in France and Belgium.

Mr M’Bala M’Bala faces the fine or a ten-month prison sentence following the rejection of his appeal for a conviction for publishing a video and a song entitled “C’est Mon choaaa” (“That’s my Shoah”). The fine was originally imposed in November 2019, but he appealed against the sentence. He also denied singing it or writing it, claiming that it was written by a prison inmate during a song-writing workshop.

The court ruled that the lyrics referred “unquestionably, by innuendo,” to the Holocaust (Shoah) which was being “mocked.” The court said that the right to humour invoked by Dieudonné conflicted with “another right – that of human dignity.”

Mr M’Bala M’Bala, 54, has attacked the “Zionist lobby”, claiming it controls the world, and he has been convicted more than twenty times on charges that include defamation, hate speech and endorsing terrorism in Belgium and France. Last year, he was given a two-year jail sentence and fined for tax fraud and money-laundering.

In 2013, Mr M’Bala M’Bala was recorded during a performance suggesting that it was a pity that a Jewish journalist was not sent to the gas chambers. The then-French interior minister, Manuel Valls, declared that Mr M’Bala M’Bala was an “antisemite and a racist” and he would seek to ban all his events as public safety risks.

Last summer, as social media platforms claimed to be stepping up their fight against hate content, Mr M’Bala M’Bala was permanently banned from several major online platforms, including YouTube, Facebook, TikTok and Instagram, for his use of “dehumanising” terms in relation to Jews.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A Jewish schoolteacher from a town just outside Milan found antisemitic abuse scrawled over her car.

The teacher – who has lived in the municipality of Rosate for more than twenty years – found “Forza Hitler!” scrawled in permanent marker on the family car.

In a Facebook post, the Mayor of Rosate, Daniele del Ben, apologised to the teacher and her family on behalf of the whole city.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A football fan who admitted abusing a Jewish journalist online has walked free from court after the judge declared that “the law prohibits me from punishing you”, following a blunder by the investigating police force.

Sam Mole, a twenty-year-old from Kettering, had sent antisemitic and homophobic messages online to freelance Jewish journalist Dan Levene, including one wishing that Mr Levene would die and another lamenting that Mr Levene had not been killed in the Holocaust.

Further abusive messages had also been sent by Mr Mole from another account that Twitter suspended. Mr Mole, a fan of Chelsea Football Club, took issue with Mr Levene’s stance in opposition to racist chanting by some fans of the club.

Mr Mole admitted to police that he had sent the abusive tweets in October 2019, but on 18th February he was found not guilty at Leicester Magistrates Court on the technicality that he was on holiday in Australia at the time, and therefore outside the jurisdiction of the law.

The District Judge Nick Watson said that the messages “undoubtedly caused deep offence” and that it was “clear the sender’s intention was for the person receiving them to be distressed”. He added that “most would think sending them should be an offence, whether the sender is in this country or abroad”.

The judge went on to observe that there may be public policy grounds for this to be classed as a criminal offence subject to English law, but that it was not up to the court to dictate public policy. Accordingly, he concluded that it was “unpalatable” that Mr Mole had “escaped the consequences of his actions even though the impact of the offence was clearly felt” and he told the defendant: “You can regard yourself as fortunate the law prohibits me from punishing you for an offence most people would say for which you should be punished.”

Mr Mole was issued a three-year restraining order prohibiting him from directly or indirectly contacting Mr Levene and posting messages about him on social media or encouraging others to do so. He was told that if he broke this order, he could go to prison.

The court heard that that Mr Mole, a trainee teacher, expressed remorse for his actions.

The judge observed, however, that if the offence had been charged as harassment, the outcome would have been different. The reason a charge of harassment could not be issued was because the police took too long to interview Mr Mole, and by the time he was interviewed the time limit for that offence had elapsed. It is understood that two police forces – the victim’s home force and the defendant’s – took four months to decide between them who should log the crime, and consequently it was almost six months before Mr Mole was interviewed, leaving the Crown Prosecution Service with little option but to charge Mr Mole with the lesser offence.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has contacted Chelsea to urge the football club to exclude Mr Mole from attending matches and the club has confirmed that it is investigating.

Mr Levene said: “The court was clear that Sam Mole’s actions were criminal but for a technicality, and this shows how victims of online hate crimes are not best served by the laws supposed to protect them. But had two police forces not tried so hard to pass the buck, it is clear this man would have been found guilty of a greater charge. This man targeted me because I shone a light on the appalling racist behaviour of some Chelsea fans, and I look forward to seeing the results of the club’s investigation into his behaviour.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “This was an appalling blunder by the police. The result is that a defendant who broke the law and should have been punished has escaped justice. We will be raising this failure with the police forces in question and have contacted Chelsea to ask that the perpetrator be excluded from matches. It is no surprise that three in five British Jews believe that the authorities are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism, when the justice system can fail so spectacularly as it has here. In addition to highlighting this outrageous instance of police inaction, it also shows how Britain’s antiquated laws are unfit for dealing with online crime. The Online Harms Bill must be expedited through Parliament.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 showed that three in five British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

The disgraced peer, Baroness Tonge, is stepping down from the House of Lords today.

Her welcome departure follows an announcement earlier this month, in which she said: “I have always promised myself and my family that I would retire when I am 80 years old which is in mid- February. I informed the authorities some months ago. Indeed I think many of us should retire from the Chamber at my age—there are far too many people in the Lords. However, I shall continue to campaign for justice for the people of Palestine.”

The announcement came just days after yet another of her controversial interventions in the upper chamber, when she spoke at a recent debate on antisemitism on university campuses and blamed the rise in antisemitism on actions of the Israeli Government, again. Earlier in the debate, Baroness Tonge was skewered by Lord Polak as someone who has had “a career of repeating old, medieval tropes.”

Baroness Tonge was suspended from the Liberal Democrats before eventually resigning, has a long history of Jew-baiting, denouncing Campaign Against Antisemitism, suggesting that the antisemitic attack on a Pittsburgh synagogue might be Israel’s fault, blaming Israel for a rise in antisemitism, and sharing a cartoon comparing Israel’s policies to those of the Nazis, which is a breach of the International Definition.

In December 2019, Campaign Against Antisemitism joined 88 members of the House of Lords in condemning remarks on Facebook by Baroness Tonge following the general election, in which she commented: “The Chief Rabbi must be dancing in the street. The pro-Israel lobby won our General Election by lying about Jeremy Corbyn.”

In 2020, Lord Pickles called for reform in the House of Lords after Baroness Tonge called Israel America’s “puppet master” and received no sanction.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Good riddance. Baroness Tonge, the disgraced peer with a history of promoting antisemitic tropes, is stepping down from the House of Lords today. The Jewish community welcomes the departure of this hateful figure who should never have been elevated to the upper chamber of our nation. It is a stain on the Liberal Democrats that she was never expelled (she resigned) and on the House of Lords that she was never removed.”

An asylum seeker who wrote the foreword of a book urging the killing of Jews has been granted permission to live in the UK.

Egyptian-born Yasser Al-Siri faces the death penalty in his home country and was allegedly part of a conspiracy to murder a general as ordered by Osama Bin Laden.

It has been reported that 2,000 copies of books espousing “the killing of Jews” were found at addresses linked to Mr Al-Siri, but a 2015 Immigration Tribunal did not consider that this evidence was sufficient to overcome the apparent absence of evidence of his involvement in the conspiracy to murder the general.

The Home Office rejected his asylum case on security grounds again in 2018, claiming that Mr Al-Siri had “advocated the use of violent jihad” on social media, and the Government sought to keep him out of the UK. But the Court of Appeal ruled last week that Mr Al-Siri should be allowed to stay, on the grounds that the evidence of his “sympathy for extremist views” was insufficient.

Lord Justice Phillips stated at the conclusion of the case on 8th February: “The starting point is that an unappealed Tribunal decision is final and binding and must be accepted and implemented by the Home Secretary, unless there is a good basis for impugning that decision.”

The Home Office is reportedly “disappointed” with the result and considering its next steps.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is a travesty that our country should give the privilege of residence to a man who has reportedly urged the killing of Jews. Our research shows that the threat from Islamists is regarded as serious by 95% of British Jews, and with good reason. It is disappointing that the courts have shown insufficient concern for the wellbeing of British citizens in arriving at this decision.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 showed that over eight in ten British Jews consider the threat from Islamists to be very serious.

A French Jewish police officer found swastikas and “dirty Jew” scrawled on his locker at his police precinct.

The officer, who is part of an elite unit based south-west of Paris, discovered the antisemitic vandalism earlier this month.

The Jewish officer filed a police complaint and the incident is the subject of an internal probe. A French antisemitism watchdog (BNVCA) that was contacted by the officer said that the perpetrator was likely to be a fellow police officer.

The founder of BNVCA, Sammy Ghozlan, a former police commissioner, described the incident as “extremely serious” , as it undermined the Jewish community’s trust in the police who are entrusted, he said, with protecting citizens against antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Vivian Kubrick, the daughter of famed director Stanley Kubrick, is alleged to have posted far-right conspiracy theories online.

Ms Kubrick allegedly claimed that masks were “vectors for Globalist mind control,” using a far-right trope which often carries antisemitic connotations, and compared the distribution of a coronavirus vaccine to “Nazi sterilisation experiments on Jews”.

The Daily Beast, which reported the comments, further claimed that Ms Kubrick had claimed that the COVID-19 virus is “a hoax perpetrated on our civilisation by Globalists… in collaboration with the New World Order and major transnational corporations in an effort to destroy world economies and take control.”

The report claimed that she also argued that masks were “vectors for Globalist mind control,”, and that she has also defended the far-right Proud Boys and promoted the antisemitic QAnon conspiracy theory.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Swastikas have been scrawled on a building in Hollywood, Florida.

Located on Florida’s east coast between Miami and Fort Lauderdale, Hollywood is home to some 2,500 Orthodox Jews. The building on which the swastikas were drawn is understood to be a venue for Jewish lifecycle events and parties. 

The city’s police department was alerted.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: StopAntisemitism.Org

Spain’s Justice Minister, Enrique Lopez, has ordered prosecutors to open an investigation into possible antisemitic hate crimes following a rally in central Madrid on 13th February.

Several hundred supporters of the far-right, wearing fascist insignia and displaying flags from the Franco era, took part in the rally to honour Spanish soldiers who fought alongside the Nazis in World War II.

Video footage seen on Twitter showed speeches that contained antisemitic slurs and expressed support for Nazi ideology. It also showed supporters singing a fascist anthem and raising their hands in a Nazi salute.

The investigation follows complaints from human-rights groups.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The head of Argentina’s main Jewish umbrella body, which is involved in a judicial enquiry involving the country’s former president, is receiving police protection after he received a threatening letter.

Jorge Knoblovits, head of the Delegation of Argentine Israelite Associations (DAIA), received a letter at his office urging him to leave the country.

DAIA is party to a judicial complaint against the country’s former President and now Vice President, Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, that accuses her of colluding with Iran in impeding justice for the victims of the 1994 AMIA Jewish centre bombing, in which 85 people were killed and hundreds were injured.

Mr Knoblovits has previously received anonymous messages urging DAIA to remove itself from this judicial action, as well as threats over other issues such as Argentina declaring Hizballah a terrorist organisation. DAIA security advisors recommended requesting police assistance in response to this latest letter.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A Democratic congresswoman described as a “virulent antisemite” has been given a senior foreign-affairs role in “upholding and protecting” human rights.

Ilhan Omar, a Democratic congresswoman from Minnesota who was re-elected in November, has in the past accused Israel of “hypnotising” the world. She apologised for the remark, but subsequently alleged that American political leaders’ support for Israel is “all about the Benjamins” (a reference to $100 bills that feature the likeness of Benjamin Franklin) and, following criticism, doubled down by complaining that it seemed to be “okay to push for allegiance to a foreign country.”

Rep. Omar’s comments employ classic antisemitic tropes about Jewish influence, wealth, dual loyalty and conspiracy and she has persistently faced significant criticism. A former Republican White House speechwriter has now branded her a “virulent antisemite” and described her promotion to Vice-Chair of the House Foreign Affairs subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, and Global Human Rights as “absolutely appalling”.

In the past, Congressional Republicans took steps to ostracise Rep. Steve King after he made comments sympathetic to the far-right, and he subsequently lost a party primary in Iowa as a result and is no longer in Congress. Recently, another Republican congresswoman, Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia, has been heavily criticised and stripped of committee appointments after making antisemitic statements.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

An academic at University College London (UCL) has resigned over the Academic Board’s advisory resolution calling on the University to “retract and replace” the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Lars Fischer, a scholar of Hebrew and Jewish Studies and editor of an academic journal on Jewish history, has quit his role and slammed UCL as an “antisemitic cesspit”.

In a blog post dated 9th February, Dr Fischer wrote: “I have now become aware of the prominent role colleagues from Hebrew and Jewish Studies have played in spearheading the appalling assault on the [D]efinition currently being mounted at UCL.”

He went on to observe that “when I embarked on the academic study of antisemitism, it was still taken for granted that one did so in order to combat antisemitism. These days have long gone, and the academy is now full of academics who specialise in explaining why only some forms of antisemitism are harmful and others are not actually forms of antisemitism anyway. Whatever they may believe their subjective intentions to be, they are doing wonders for antisemitism promotion.”

UCL adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism in 2019 but last week its Academic Board passed an advisory resolution calling on the University to “retract and replace” the Definition. The Students’ Union recently voted down a similar resolution.

Following the Academic Board’s vote, Campaign Against Antisemitism announced that it was writing to the Provost of UCL.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

An academic with a history of promoting conspiracy theories has asserted that “Zionism is racism” and declared his objective “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world”.

In an online event, David Miller, a Professor of Political Sociology at the University of Bristol, complained of being criticised by the President of the Bristol University Jewish Society and accused the student group of being part of a worldwide Zionist conspiracy, adding that it is “fundamental to Zionism to encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”. Prof. Miller also observed that the Jewish Society and the Union of Jewish Students are Zionist, thereby implying that Jewish students (and the wider Jewish community) inherently “encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”.

He also portrayed the International Definition of Antisemitism as an attack on free speech and accused the Israeli Government of engaging in an “all-out attack” on the global Left as part of an “attempt by the Israelis to impose their will all over the world”.

In comments reminiscent of the darkest years of the United Nations, Prof. Miller insisted that “Zionism is racism” and asked how “we defeat the ideology of Zionism in practice”, “how is Zionism ended” and about the way “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world”.

This is not Prof. Miller’s first controversy in relation to Jews, antisemitism and Zionism. Last June, Campaign Against Antisemitism revealed that Prof. Miller was behind disgraced MP Chris Williamson’s Resistance Movement. The group aimed to give a home to the “politically homeless” politicians who had been expelled from the Labour Party for antisemitism, such as Jackie Walker, Tony Greenstein and Mark Wadsworth.

Prof. Miller has a history of spouting conspiracy theories about various Jewish community organisations and figures that has reportedly discomfited his Jewish students. In a presentation titled “Harms of the Powerful”, for example, Prof. Miller suggested that the “Zionist movement” is one of the “five pillars” of hatred of Muslims (redolent of the five pillars of Islam) and is bankrolled by “ultra Zionist funders”. He has also suggested that Jewish interfaith dialogue with Muslim groups represents an Israeli-backed “Trojan horse” initiative to “normalise Zionism in the Muslim community”.

Prof. Miller has previously accused the current leader of the Labour Party, Sir Keir Starmer, of taking “Zionist money”, and he has talked about what he referred to as the “witch hunt” against Labour members accused of antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism shall be writing to the University of Bristol.

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “David Miller has claimed that Bristol’s Jewish Society and the entire nationwide Jewish student body ‘encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism’. This is crystal clear incitement against Jewish students. The University of Bristol has a duty to protect them and must act without further delay. For years it has defended and protected Prof. Miller instead of its Jewish students. This crank conspiracy theorist has no place in academia, especially when he does such harm to the welfare of Jewish students.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities. Bristol University adopted the Definition in November 2019.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

UCL’s Academic Board has passed an advisory resolution calling on the University to “retract and replace” the International Definition of Antisemitism, which UCL adopted in 2019.

In December 2019, shortly after UCL adopted the Definition to send a message of solidarity with its Jewish students, the Academic Board established a “Working Group on Racism and Prejudice” to “examines the efficacy” of the Definition. The Working Group published a scandalous report in December 2020, observing that “incidents of antisemitism have persisted in our university” but nonetheless recommending a retraction of the Definition. It has also been alleged that evidence was taken from the President of UCL’s Jewish Society but was largely ignored in the report.

Last month, shortly after the report was published, UCL’s Students’ Union intended to hold a vote on the eve of Holocaust Memorial Day on whether to call for a retraction of the Definition. According to the Jewish Society, it was reportedly informed of the vote only 45 minutes in advance. Nevertheless, the Students’ Union was persuaded to delay the vote on calling for retraction. That vote took place last week and failed.

Today, the Academic Board held its own vote on whether to call for revocation of the Definition, and it has voted to call on the University to “retract and replace” the Definition with other (as yet unspecified) tools.

The University and College Union (UCU) branch President, Sean Wallis, said in a statement: “This is an important moment. Whilst there are many other positive concrete steps advised by the Working Group, it is very important that the Academic Board concluded that universities must be vigilant in defending academic freedom and free speech where political debates about Israel are involved. Today the Academic Board has resoundingly reinforced this position at UCL.”

In December 2020, the UCU branch of King’s College London also passed a motion calling on the University to revoke its adoption. Given UCU’s long history of controversy in relation to antisemitism, at the time Campaign Against Antisemitism said that UCU’s “reputation in the Jewish community is in the gutter”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism shall be writing to the Provost of UCL, calling on him to remain firm in his commitment to Jewish students.

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at CAA said: “UCU’s apparent effort to undermine the commitment of British universities to their Jewish students by calling for retraction of the International Definition of Antisemitism continues apace with this latest scandalous vote at UCL. When KCL passed a similar motion late last year, we said that UCU’s reputation in the Jewish community is in the gutter. Evidently, UCU is intent on remaining there. Fortunately, today’s vote is merely advisory, and we shall be writing to the Provost of UCL to ensure that wiser heads prevail.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

A Holocaust survivor has been left traumatised after she and her son, a Rabbi, were verbally abused, and the son was punched, by a woman in an unprovoked attack on a bus.

The assailant struck the son in the head whilst screaming: “I hate you Jews, it’s not your place, you took our money.”

She also threw the Rabbi’s hat to the floor in the assault, which took place at 14:48 on Tuesday, 9th February on a 76 London bus travelling from Stoke Newington to Stamford Hill.

Passengers pleaded with the bus driver to stop, as the incident took place as they were driving by a police station, but he allegedly refused.

Police are understood to be looking for a black woman, but a detailed description has not been circulated.

The abuse of the Holocaust survivor, aged 80, and the attack on her son who is a Rabbi in North London, comes in the same week that a disabled Jewish man was verbally abused on another bus with the driver failing to act then too.

Police are currently investigating the incident, which was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD4563 9/2/21.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “This is yet another unprovoked act of violence against members of the Jewish community going about their day. Our research has shown that almost half of British Jews conceal visible signs of their Judaism in public due to antisemitism, and fear of attacks such as this clearly feed into this sentiment. TfL must explain why the bus driver took no action, allowing the abuse to go on despite the violence and the protests of other passengers, and the assailant must quickly be identified and prosecuted to the full extent of the law.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Pork products and a pig effigy were used in antisemitic assaults against synagogues in two Swiss cities within a few days of one another, sparking concern among Jewish groups.

After a pack of bacon and a stuffed toy pig were left outside a synagogue in Lausanne, the CICAD, a leading Swiss Jewish communal organisation, posted on Twitter, saying: “Acts of this nature are an insult to any Jew and take on a highly symbolic dimension when they are committed in a synagogue. These are serious facts which must challenge our authorities and our fellow citizens.”

Four days later, a woman threw slices of pork at a Liberal synagogue in Geneva. CICAD said that criminal complaints would be filed.

The group also issued a statement explaining why the incident was “far from trivial”. It was reminiscent, the group said, of the ancient antisemitic Judensau (a folk art image of a Jews engaged in obscene contact with a female pig) used in anti-Jewish texts and art and in Nazi imagery and cartoons. Its use has been especially prevalent in German-speaking countries, the statement noted.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Rodrigo Sousa Castro, a leader of the 1974 Portuguese Revolution, has sparked public outrage after he shared an antisemitic social media post.

Mr Sousa Castro was a military general who helped lead the Carnation Revolution of 1974 in Lisbon, which ended the authoritarian Estate Novo regime. Mr Sousa Castro has since been hailed as a national hero and his contribution is celebrated annually on 25th April, known nationally as “Freedom Day”.

On 5th February, however, he posted a tweet that read: “The Jews dominate global finance so they have the vaccines they wanted. It’s a kind of historical revenge. And I won’t say more until the Zionist bulldogs jump.” The tweet employed a classic antisemitic trope.

Leaders of the Portuguese Jewish community issued a statement condemning the general’s remark as deeply antisemitic and prejudiced. The statement added that such overt hate speech must not be ignored because of Mr Sousa Castro’s high profile.

After removing his initial tweet, Mr Sousa Castro stated: “A post in which I speak of Zionism and its crimes in Palestine was deleted because of the support of the Nazi-Zionism legion. Our page is now sanitised”. Under the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The Labour Party has taken a regressive step by reportedly opening and promptly closing an investigation into Deputy Leader Angela Rayner over an antisemitism complaint submitted by Campaign Against Antisemitism. The complaint relates to Ms Rayner’s promotion of a book entitled The Holocaust Industry, in which the author claims that the American Jewish establishment exploits the Holocaust for political and financial gain.

We submitted our complaint against Ms Rayner and several other MPs on the day of the publication of the report into antisemitism in the Labour Party by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC). Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant in the EHRC’s investigation.

The complaints were accompanied by a specific demand that no investigation be launched until the Labour Party introduced a new, independent disciplinary system, as mandated by the EHRC. Late last year, the Party announced its action plan to address antisemitism, which revealed that the independent process could not be installed until after the Party’s annual conference in autumn later this year.

The Labour Party never acknowledged receipt of our complaint, let alone informed us that an investigation was opened. Nor has the Party disclosed to us that this investigation has now been closed. It is therefore unclear whether any investigation has been carried out at all, but if it has, it has not been independent, by Labour’s own admission.

As far as we are concerned, therefore, the complaint against Ms Rayner remains open, and we expect a full and transparent investigation once the independent disciplinary system is in place later this year.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “It is still business as usual for the Labour Party when it comes to antisemitism. It is hard to see how the handling of this complaint by Labour under Sir Keir Starmer has been any different to how it would have been handled under Jeremy Corbyn.

“Our complaint against Angela Rayner was never acknowledged by Labour. The Party also did not confirm that it was investigating, and now it has tried to drop the investigation without a word. The EHRC found Labour’s disciplinary processes unfit precisely because the Party tries to sneak through exonerations without due process. Our complaint demanded that any investigation be delayed until an independent process is installed, which Labour has publicly confirmed cannot happen until the autumn, therefore as far as we are concerned, our complaint remains open.

“The investigation of our complaint against Angela Rayner has been a sham and we will be re-introducing the complaint to the independent disciplinary panel when it is set up. British Jews should be under no illusion that despite Sir Keir’s promises, under his leadership the skulduggery apparently continues at Labour Headquarters.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has also lodged a complaint against Jeremy Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day of the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the EHRC to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

In 2019, Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics had surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A host on Norway’s state-owned broadcaster went on an antisemitic rant on live radio referring pejoratively to Israel as “God’s chosen people”.

In a segment on 3rd February in which morning-show host Shaun Henrik Matheson said that “We must never forget what a s***ty country Israel is”, he also said: “If some homemade rocket should land somewhere over the God’s chosen people, then terrible actions of revenge are committed where thousands of people are killed, often children.”

Mr Matheson’s hostility toward the Jewish state was such that he admitted that he “almost wished” the COVID-19 vaccine, which Israel is distributing more rapidly than any other country, had not worked.

As NRK’s Broadcasting Council prepared to meet, its Secretary, Erik Skarrud, revealed that 527 communications had been received regarding the programme, an overwhelming majority of which were critical and complaints. Very few were supportive, he said: “you can probably count those on one hand.”

Complaints against Mr Matheson have also been filed with the Norwegian police. “It is time to close down NRK,” said Norwegian parliamentarian, Per-Willy Amundsen of the Progress Party. Asserting that the broadcaster was a “front for the hatred of Jews,” Mr Amundsen urged that NRK be downsized and sold. Privatisation was “the best solution,” he said.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A synagogue in Spokane, Washington was vandalised with swastikas and antisemitic graffiti on 8th February.

Police are trying to identify the perpetrator of the vandalism at Temple Beth Shalom, who was allegedly caught on surveillance video.

The congregation’s Rabbi Tamar Malino told local news that a white power symbol was also painted on a window. She said that it was “horribly upsetting and frightening” to know that there was “that much hatred out there”. She added that she believed that this was more troubling than an incident five years ago, saying that this was “really different” from a small chalked image; this time the perpetrator used “big, bold red writing on the outside of the building.”

Mayor Nadine Woodward called it “a hate crime” and said that the symbols and writings were “disgusting” and “desecrate a place of worship.” The Mayor added: “This type of hate and divisiveness in our community will never be tolerated.”

Describing the incident as “reprehensible”, Police Chief Craig Meidl said: “There is no place for hate-mongering in our community.” He  said that police were committed to doing everything possible to arrest the perpetrator. “We will always stand with those who are the target of hate and bigotry,” he declared.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Spokane Police Department

Leading Catholic bishops in France have issued a declaration to combat what they call the “worrying resurgence of antisemitism in France.”

The declaration,  signed by the President of the Conference of Bishops of France, Monseigneur Éric de Moulins-Beaufort, and four senior bishops, was unveiled at a short ceremony on 8th February at which French Jewish leaders were present.

The text said that the brutal murders of four people last year at the hands of Islamist assailants had confronted the French people with basic questions of mutual respect and called for “special attention to be paid to the worrying resurgence of antisemitism in France.” 

The Bishops said that they “strongly reiterate how much the fight against antisemitism must be everybody’s business” and affirm their “willingness to work with all those engaged in this struggle.”

Calling for “spiritual resistance against antisemitism,” the declaration said that, while “faith in Jesus distinguishes and separates us,” it obliges us to recognise that “ healing from antisemitism and anti-Judaism” was essential “for a genuine fraternity.”

The Chief Rabbi of France, Haim Korsia, praised what he called a “prophetic initiative,” while Francis Kalifat, President of Jewish communal body CRIF, compared its significance to the 1997 apology made to the Jewish community by the Catholic Church in France for its failings during the Nazi occupation of France.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A kindergarten teacher in Charlotte, North Carolina was sacked after posting an abusive and antisemitic tweet that talked about “demonic” Jews.

The tweet, from Jarrin Wooten’s account, stated: “Hitler was trying to keep those demonic … Rothschilds and fractional reserve banks out of Germany and then we let those same ‘Jews’ come to America and teach us he was a terrorist…all I’ll say is look into it some more.”

After a Jewish watchdog group tied Mr Wooten to the Charlotte school, the regional superintendent began an investigation.

Mr Wooten initially claimed that his account had been hacked and said that, as someone who had “experienced racism,” he would not post such a tweet. Shortly after, the school board chair, Bryan Ives, issued a statement saying the claim was false and the teacher had been sacked. The tweet violated the school’s social media and discrimination policies, said Mr Ives adding that “hateful speech and discrimination against any person of any religion, race or colour,” would not be tolerated.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The Conservative Party has reportedly dropped a local council candidate after she referenced the “Aryan race” in a tweet to her local MP, who is Jewish.

Sharon Thomason was in a Twitter dialogue with Labour’s Charlotte Nichols MP, who commented in a tweet on a story about the Prime Minister and his partner expecting a baby, saying “Keep the Aryan race going…”.

Ms Nichols tweeted: “This far right troll is Sharon Thomason, who Warrington Conservatives have selected as their council candidate for Great Sankey North and Whittle Hall – if you wanted a feel for the calibre of candidates they’re selecting locally.”

There has apparently been no denial that the Twitter handle in question is operated by Ms Thomason.

The Conservatives have since reportedly confirmed that Ms Thomason will no longer represent the Party at the local elections in May, saying: “Warrington Conservatives condemns all forms of racism, including antisemitism, they have no place in our Party. We had already been made aware of the tweet before Ms Nichols published it and took action swiftly and immediately. We can confirm that the candidate in question will not be standing for the party at the local elections and is no longer a member.”

Further concerns have been raised as to why, given this tweet was apparently sent a year ago, Ms Thomason was nonetheless selected as a candidate.

Amanda Milling MP, co-Chair of the Conservative Party, said: “These comments are totally unacceptable. This was brought to my attention last week and the member was suspended. She is no longer a member and will not be standing for the party at the local elections.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We complained to the Conservative Party over its slow and opaque investigation into two Conservative MPs last year. The Party now appears to have learned lessons and has rapidly opened investigations into the conduct of councillors and candidates in Warrington and Hertsmere. We look forward to an efficient and transparent investigation.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A teenager from Cornwall who recently became the UK’s youngest terror offender has controversially been spared a custodial sentence.

Now sixteen, the neo-Nazi teenager, who cannot be named for legal reasons, admitted two counts of dissemination of terrorist documents and ten of possession of terrorist material, after he downloaded his first bombmaking manual at thirteen, and joined the far-right Fascist Forge. In 2018 and 2019, he expressed antisemitic, racist and anti-gay views online, reportedly talking about “gassing” Jewish people and hanging gay people. He is also believed to have been in contact with the founder of the proscribed neo-Nazi terror group Feuerkrieg Division.

His home was searched and police found a Nazi flag, a racist slogan on the garden shed and manuals on his computer and phone about making weapons.

He is also understood to have recruited other young people to the cause.

Nevertheless, he has only received a two-year youth rehabilitation order, after Judge Mark Dennis QC told the Old Bailey that a custodial sentence would “undo” the progress made since the teenager was arrested in July 2019. The judge added that the teenager has “significant vulnerabilities”.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “While rehabilitation of young offenders is a priority, so are justice and deterrence. This convicted terrorist has recruited other youth to a violent far-right cause and must be held accountable for the impact on society and on the future lives of those he has influenced, and it is difficult to see how a non-custodial sentence achieves this. A weak sentence also sends precisely the wrong signal to other would-be terrorists, broadcasting the message that recruitment of minors to violent terrorism carries no real cost.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has previously reported on far-right efforts to recruit young people.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Gavin Williamson, the Education Secretary, has written to the Office for Students on the matter of adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The Office for Students is the regulator and competition authority for the higher education sector in England.

In his letter, which covered numerous topics relating to universities and campus life, Mr Williamson called for the Office for Students to undertake “a scoping exercise to identify providers which are reluctant to adopt the definition”.

Recently, Campaign Against Antisemitism launched a dynamic project monitoring adoption of the Definition by universities in real time, and shall be providing the latest figures to the Office for Students. The project also includes those universities that have yet to adopt the Definition or have expressly declined to do so, as well as summaries of select antisemitic incidents on university campuses.

Mr Williamson also called for consideration of “mandatory reporting of antisemitic incident numbers by [higher education] providers”. This antisemitism audit would be designed to “ensure a robust evidence base” to assist regulation of this area by the Office for Students.

Finally, Mr Williamson also noted that, where antisemitic incidents do take place at a university, subject to the response of the institution it may be appropriate to consider applying “sanctions, including monetary penalties”.

In full, Mr Williamson wrote: “Following my letter to the sector on October 2020 on antisemitism and adoption of the International [D]efinition of Antisemitism across the [Higher Education] sector, we have positive progress, with at least 31 additional institutions adopting the definition. I would like the OfS [Office for Students] to undertake a scoping exercise to identify providers which are reluctant to adopt the definition and consider introducing mandatory reporting of antisemitic incident numbers by providers. This would ensure a robust evidence base, which the OfS could then use to effectively regulate this area. If antisemitic incidents do occur at a provider, the OfS should consider if it is relevant in a particular whether the provider has adopted the definition when considering what sanctions, including monetary penalties, would be appropriate to apply.”

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Gavin Williamson is right to continue to urge adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities, and we shall be providing our research to the Office for Students to provide it with the latest figures. We are also heartened by Mr Williamson’s insistence that universities must report and take action against antisemitic incidents, and that failure to do so may attract financial penalties. Jewish life on campus must be protected from anti-Jewish hatred on campus, be it from academics or students.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Jewish students are facing an antisemitic backlash online after opposing an event with the controversial filmmaker Ken Loach, who has a history of antisemitism-denial and inflammatory comments.

The event was being hosted by Prof. Judith Buchanan, the Master of St Peter’s College, of which Mr Loach is an alumnus.

Oxford students have largely sided with their Jewish peers, with St Peter’s JCR (junior student body) voting to issue a statement condemning the event. Dialogue between Jewish students and Prof. Buchanan reportedly failed to reach an understanding.

However, Jewish students have reported to Campaign Against Antisemitism that they are also facing an antisemitic backlash over the incident, particularly online, where they have been called “rich Jewish students” and (pejoratively) “Zionists” and “f***ing Zionists”; gratuitous connections have been made to Gaza; the Talmud has been described as “satanist”, with calls to burn it; there are numerous references to Israel being a racist state, in a deliberate breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism; and portrayals have been promoted of the Oxford Jewish Society as a “lying racist organisation”. Some individual Jewish students have also been targeted.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is providing backing to the Oxford Jewish Society and has made legal assistance available.

A roster of ‘usual suspects’ in the creative industry have backed Mr Loach, with the controversial musician Roger Waters describing the effort to raise concerns over the event “McCarthyite”.

Mr Loach’s voice has been among the loudest of those who attempt to dismiss Labour’s antisemitism crisis as non-existent and a right-wing smear campaign. He claimed that Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn was subjected to a “torrent of abuse” that was “off the scale” and that regardless of what he did, the “campaign” of antisemitism accusations was “going to run and run”. He described the BBC’s Panorama investigation into Labour antisemitism as “disgusting because it raised the horror of racism against Jews in the most atrocious propagandistic way, with crude journalism…and it bought the propaganda from people who were intent on destroying Corbyn.”

He was also reportedly behind a motion passed by Bath Labour Party branding the Panorama programme a “dishonest hatchet job with potentially undemocratic consequences” and asserting that it “disgraced the name of Panorama and exposed the bias endemic within the BBC.” John Ware, the programme’s reporter, is apparently considering legal action against Mr Loach for his comments.

In 2017, Mr Loach caused outrage when, during an interview with the BBC, he refused to denounce Holocaust denial. The International Definition of Antisemitism states that “denying the fact, scope, mechanisms (e.g. gas chambers) or intentionality of the genocide of the Jewish people at the hands of National Socialist Germany and its supporters and accomplices during World War II (the Holocaust)” is a manifestation of antisemitism. Although Mr Loach later sought to clarify his remarks, he has continued to make inflammatory and provocative statements about Labour’s antisemitism scandal.

While speaking at a meeting of the Kingswood Constituency Labour Party, Mr Loach advocated the removal from the Party of those Labour MPs, some of whom are Jewish, who have taken a principled stand against antisemitism. Shortly after that incident, the Labour Party announced that it would no longer use Mr Loach as a producer of their election broadcasts.

A spokesperson for St Peter’s College told the Oxford Student: “Ken Loach, an alumnus of St Peter’s College, has been invited by the College and The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities to speak about two of his films. These films form part of a distinguished filmmaking career. This is the latest in a run of occasions on which Ken Loach has been invited to speak in College, all of which have previously been very well received by students. The event will be respected as advertised and we look forward to a good conversation about the films on this occasion.

The continued: “Significant concerns about the event have been brought clearly to the attention of College and College is committed to creating further opportunities for these concerns to be properly respected and discussed within College.  St Peter’s stands vigorously against all forms of discrimination and always seeks to support students who are discriminated against. In the context of the current conversation, College affirms without reservation its very strong opposition to antisemitism. It recognises the appalling atrocities that antisemitism has wrought and can bring.  While not believing that no-platforming is the way to pursue goals of a free and open academic community, it is committed to supporting students who find such decisions painful and to finding ways to address these questions within College as part of a broader, ongoing conversation.”

The Oxford Jewish Society has released an updated statement to its members: “I am sure many of you have followed the events of the past few days relating to the talk that was hosted by St Peter’s College Master, Professor Judith Buchanan, this evening. There was no mention of antisemitism in the talk itself. Professor Buchanan provided a brief explanation as to why the event was not cancelled before introducing Ken Loach. She did not directly address the allegations of antisemitism levelled at Ken Loach. Shortly after the event, multiple public figures signed a statement published on ‘Artists for Palestine UK’, entitled: ‘Artists stand with Ken Loach and against McCarthyism’. Following that, [the musician and controversial activist] Roger Waters…shared our statement directly on Facebook, and then on Twitter. Accompanying his post is a trope-ridden caption that reads: ‘Don’t let the Israeli Lobby rewrite our dictionaries with this McCarthyite, racist, claptrap. We know what antisemitism is, and being anti-Israeli apartheid ain’t any part of it.’

“As a result of this, the statement has garnered huge publicity, and with that, antisemitic comments have been posted on the JSoc Facebook and Twitter pages, as it was a public post. Waters’s own post has amassed a large number of likes, shares and retweets…I am deeply sorry that this has caused so many students such upset and anger. We were left with little choice by the leadership at St Peter’s in publishing a statement. And we will continue to do everything we can to protect students from antisemitic speakers, and from antisemitism itself.”

The Jewish Society has offered assistance to members.

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Despite his history of incessant antisemitism-denial and over the objections of Jewish students, the controversial filmmaker Ken Loach was invited to one of Britain’s most prestigious universities. Now, Jewish students are facing an extreme antisemitic backlash merely for raising concerns, and we are making available legal assistance and support. We are particularly grateful to the Oxford student body for their solidarity with their Jewish peers. It is perverse that someone who spouts hate and belittles the lived experience of Jews is given a platform while those who courageously call him out find themselves targeted by hate.”

The University of Oxford has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

A man has subjected a Jewish couple – including a disabled man – to ten minutes of verbal abuse on a London bus.

The offender screamed “You f***ing damn p**** this is our country, I will batter the f*** out of you” and various other obscenities at the couple. He was also apparently infuriated that the disabled person allegedly took longer to board the bus; witnesses denied that this was even the case.

The incident took place at 12:45 on 8th February on a 253 bus at Manor House, London N4, heading towards Hackney Central, and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol. The assailant alighted at 

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD4968 05/01/2020.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “This is a despicable and unprovoked attack against elderly members of the Jewish community, one of whom was disabled. TfL must explain why the bus driver took no action, allowing the abuse to escalate so appallingly. At a time when 44% of British Jews are telling us that they are afraid to show any sign of their religion in public, Police must act swiftly to ensure that this antisemitic criminal is brought to justice before he reoffends.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 showed that three in five British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

The BBC World Service has been accused of failing to ensure its foreign-language content meets BBC editorial guidelines after a presenter on the BBC World Service failed to challenge an antisemitic conspiracy theory advanced on air by a Somali politician.

The BBC Somali Service is part of the London-based BBC World Service. In an edition of a programme called Dooda Jimcaha broadcast on 18th December on the Somali Service, the Somali MP Mohamed Omer Dalha claimed that there was a conspiracy against Somalia by “Jews running these affairs both in the West and the East.”

According to the translation of the segment for CAMERA UK by Dr Moshe Terdiman, Founder and Research Director on Islam and Muslims in Africa, the assertion was not challenged by the presenter.

A CAMERA spokesperson said that such antisemitic statements “should have no place in BBC content,” adding that this case once again “raises questions concerning the ability of the BBC World Service to oversee the foreign-language content put out in its name and ensure that it meets BBC editorial guidelines.”   

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Switzerland’s Jewish community is taking legal action over a new edition of  “The Protocols of the Elders of Zion,” published by the far-right Swiss Nationalist Party (PNOS).

“The Protocols” were an antisemitic hoax fabricated more than a century ago in Czarist Russia and are a source of many of the most virulent antisemitic tropes. PNOS has provided a new foreword which states: “Whether real or fake, we don’t need to worry, because we are mainly concerned with the content.”  

The Swiss Federation of Jewish communities (SIG-FCSI) filed a complaint with the public prosecutor’s office in Bern after the publication was flagged in the PNOS magazine Harus.

In a statement, SIG-FCSI noted that “especially” during the COVID-19 pandemic “conspiracy myths” had gained popularity, including those that were antisemitic. “The publication of ‘The Protocols’ encourages such conspiracy myths and promotes Jew-hatred,.” the statement declared, adding that the new foreword clearly showed that these were the goals of the PNOS.

The PNOS is active mainly in the German-speaking cantons but is not represented in any of Switzerland’s parliaments. It was classified as an “extremist” group in 2001. Its leader, Thomas Steiger, has reportedly used his Facebook page to spread antisemitic propaganda, on one occasion telling a journalist that “Jews should be sterilised.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

An independent committee inquiry has cleared Prof. Paul Cliteur, from the Law Faculty of the University of Leiden, and his associates of accusations of antisemitism.

The recent investigation was initiated after a Dutch right-wing political party, Forum for Democracy, in which Mr Cliteur held a prominent position, disbanded. Last November, the Party’s leader, Thierry Baudet, faced significant backlash following the exposure of extremist and hateful statements in the youth section of the organisation.

Mr Cliteur maintained his membership and stated that he was “in solidarity with Baudet and his ideological line”.

A publication followed in which twenty-seven former doctoral students of Mr Cliteur claimed that the professor had failed to take action against antisemitic statements made directly by Mr Baudet. Mr Baudet has received criticism for several inflammatory and offensive remarks, including the comment, “You are everywhere”, directed towards a Jewish individual.

A group of professors from Mr Cliteur’s faculty subsequently shared an open letter that claimed that antisemitism, xenophobia and anti-democratic attitudes are normalised and common in the Forum of Democracy, and shared by its members.

Following a two-month investigation, the Committee of Inquiry concluded that “the position of the [van Cliteur] Department”, and that of the Faculty of Law and the University of Leiden, had been “wrongly affected” by the allegations.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A Florida police department is to investigate an incident in which a former civilian employee engaged in a furious antisemitic rant, telling an elderly man: “Move your f***ing car, you stupid Jew.”

A video of Leslie Socolov, 64, a retired police stenographer with the Miami-Dade Police Department (MDPD), went viral after being posted on Twitter by an online antisemitism watchdog. Wearing her uniform jacket on which “Miami-Dade Homicide” was clearly visible, Ms Socolov was filmed in a restaurant car park in Boca Raton, screaming at the 78-year-old man.

Ms Socolov was seen running to the SUV and telling the driver: “Move your f***ing car, you stupid Jew!” Slurring her words and appearing unsteady on her feet, she continued: “You f***ing piece of s***. Just because you’re Jewish and a Democrat doesn’t give you the right to stay there. Move it!”

Prior to her rant, Ms Socolov had allegedly rammed the SUV with her Prius. The SUV driver called emergency services. Ms Socolov was arrested by the Palm Beach County Sheriff’s office.

Denying that she was antisemitic and claiming that she was Jewish, Ms Socolov said, “I’m not antisemitic, I’m getting persecuted,” adding: “Look at these Democrats getting away with bulls***.”

In a statement, MDPD condemned its former employee of 20 years and said that it was investigating. It described the “hateful speech” as “appalling”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The disgraced peer, Baroness Tonge, has reportedly announced her intention to step down from the House of Lords.

She reportedly told the Jewish News: “I have always promised myself and my family that I would retire when I am 80 years old which is in mid- February. I informed the authorities some months ago. Indeed I think many of us should retire from the Chamber at my age—there are far too many people in the Lords. However, I shall continue to campaign for justice for the people of Palestine.”

The announcement comes just days after yet another of her controversial interventions in the upper chamber, when she spoke at a recent debate on antisemitism on university campuses and blamed the rise in antisemitism on actions of the Israeli Government, again.

Earlier in the debate, Baroness Tonge was skewered by Lord Polak as someone who has had “a career of repeating old, medieval tropes.”

Baroness Tonge was suspended from the Liberal Democrats before eventually resigning, has a long history of Jew-baiting, denouncing Campaign Against Antisemitism, suggesting that the antisemitic attack on a Pittsburgh synagogue might be Israel’s fault, blaming Israel for a rise in antisemitism, and sharing a cartoon comparing Israel’s policies to those of the Nazis, which is a breach of the International Definition.

In December 2019, Campaign Against Antisemitism joined 88 members of the House of Lords in condemning remarks on Facebook by Baroness Tonge following the general election, in which she commented: “The Chief Rabbi must be dancing in the street. The pro-Israel lobby won our General Election by lying about Jeremy Corbyn.”

In 2020, Lord Pickles called for reform in the House of Lords after Baroness Tonge called Israel America’s “puppet master” and received no sanction.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is shameful that Baroness Tonge has been permitted to remain in the legislature for so long and is now retiring of her own accord. She should have been stripped of her position and honours long ago. Every day she sat in the House of Lords was a stain on our democracy.”

A newspaper review hailing a Jewish cookbook has sparked a slew of antisemitic slurs online.

After Jewish journalist Jay Rayner wrote a piece for The Observer, in which he commended Claudia Roden’s Book of Jewish Food for its revival of traditional Jewish recipes in homes and restaurants, the article was posted on The Guardian’s Facebook page (The Guardian is The Observer’s sister newspaper).

Users responded with comments such as, “No ty I do not eat stolen food from the original owners, Palestinian [sic]” and “Would you have bought a German recipe book during WWII slaughter of hundreds of thousands of innocent people? Even though the author may have been living somewhere else, Britain perhaps?”

“Holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the State of Israel” and “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” are both examples of antisemitism under the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The Guardian has since deleted the comments from its Facebook page and issued an apology.

A spokesperson for the newspaper reportedly said: “We take online abuse and hate speech incidents very seriously and were horrified to see these disgusting and offensive remarks posted underneath a Guardian article on Facebook. Such comments are unacceptable in any circumstances. We removed the Facebook post as soon as the antisemitic comments were brought to our attention overnight. We have since reposted the article and will act as necessary if further such comments occur.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Latin America’s largest online retailer, Mercado Libre, is removing from sale antisemitic merchandise, including books such as Mein Kampf and The Protocols of the Elders of Zion.

In February the Buenos Aires-based retailer revealed that it had signed an agreement with the Latin American branch of the World Jewish Congress (WJC) to fight antisemitism. As part of a joint strategy, both organisations will work to identify other publications that incite racial hatred, as well removing from sale items such as Nazi memorabilia.

Operating throughout Latin America, Mercado Libre is more popular in the region than e-commerce giant Amazon. The agreement with the WJC affects its operations in all of its markets.

Jacobo Cohen Imach, a Mercado Libre Senior Vice President, said that the agreement was “another step towards the eradication of racial hatred and antisemitism.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The Metropolitan Police has disclosed that it arrested a 73-year-old man in Southwark yesterday on suspicion of malicious communications and public nuisance.

Campaign Against Antisemitism and others have reported recently that Piers Corbyn, the brother of the former Labour leader, conceived and has been distributing grotesque flyers comparing lockdown rules to Auschwitz. Referencing a headline in the Evening Standard that the new COVID-19 vaccines are a “safe path to freedom”, the leaflets show the slogan atop the infamous gates to Auschwitz.

Mr Corbyn has distributed the leaflets in heavily-Jewish Barnet and now in Southwark, which has prompted his arrest.

Responding to his arrest, Mr Corbyn absurdly argued that he could not be antisemitic because he had been married to a Jewish woman and once employed a Jewish person who was a “superb worker” in a comment attributed to him in the JC. Mr Corbyn reportedly protested: “The idea we’re antisemitic in any way is completely absurd. I was married for 22 years to a Jewess and obviously her mother’s forebears fled the Baltic states just before the war because of Hitler or the Nazis in general. I’ve worked with Jewish leading world scientists over the last 30 years. I’ve also employed Jewish people in my business Weather Action, one of whom was a superb worker.”

Mr Corbyn, the brother of the former Labour leader, is a vehement opponent of pandemic lockdowns and has spoken at numerous rallies against lockdown rules, including appearing alongside the antisemitic hate preacher David Icke. Recently, the former BNP leader, Nick Griffin, also compared the lockdown to Auschwitz.

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Mr Corbyn has a history of controversy in relation to antisemitic conspiracy theories. He has previously retweeted @whiteknight0011, a notorious neo-Nazi who declared that “They will force Trump in to war What do you think happened to Hitler? Bilderberg CIA IMF Banker Gangsters They are the problem” along with four images. The @whiteknight0011 account has since been suspended. One image showed Lord Jacob Rothschild, the Jewish banker and philanthropist, against the background of a Nazi flag, claiming that he controls the world. A second showed Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu as a puppeteer controlling ISIS through Israeli intelligence agency Mossad, orchestrating the war in Syria and Paris attacks as Lord Rothschild and the Queen look on approvingly. A third image showed the faces of supposed Jewish conspirators who run the world to society’s detriment, proclaiming: “Know your enemy”. The last image showed a family photo of the Royal Family, claiming that they are in cahoots with these Jewish conspirators in committing “the worst genocides, invasions and theft in all history.”

Mr Corbyn has also claimed that “Zionists” were conspiring against his brother: when Jewish then-MP Louise Ellman complained of antisemitic attacks against her, Piers accused her of using it as a cover for political attack, tweeting: “ABSURD! JC+ All #Corbyns are committed #AntiNazi. #Zionists can’t cope with anyone supporting rights for #Palestine”.

A spokesperson for the Metropolitan Police Service said: “A 73-year-old man was arrested in Southwark on Wednesday, 3 February on suspicion of malicious communications and public nuisance. A 37-year-old man was arrested earlier the same day in Bow, east London, on suspicion of a public order offence. Both men were taken to a south London police station. They have since been bailed to return on a date in early March. The leaflet contained material that appeared to compare the Covid-19 vaccination programme with the Holocaust.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “These grotesque flyers comparing the lockdown to the Auschwitz death camp are just the latest stunt in Piers Corbyn’s long history of Jew-baiting, which apparently runs in the family. Lately, he even shared a platform with the modern date antisemitic hate preacher David Icke. It is time that Corbyn faces the legal consequences of his trolling of Jews.”

A fire is believed to have been deliberately started at a Jewish centre in a small Massachusetts town near Boston.

Authorities are investigating a blaze in the early hours of the morning in a “dumpster” at Chabad of Sharon, Mass. The centre incorporates a synagogue, a school and other learning and recreational facilities.

There is not yet proof of arson but police are reportedly investigating the fire as suspicious.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

An American congresswoman who has promoted an antisemitic conspiracy theory faces expulsion from her committee posts.

Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, a Republican congresswoman from Georgia who was elected in November, is assigned to two Congressional committees by the House Republican Leader. But Democrats have introduced a resolution to strip Rep. Greene of her committee roles over a series of social media posts in which she has espoused a number of conspiracy theories.

In one Facebook post, for example, she suggested that the 2018 California wildfires had been started for financial gain by the Rothschilds in collusion with the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) using a space laser to clear areas for a high-speed rail project. “Forests don’t just catch fire, you know,” she wrote, adding that there were “too many coincidences to ignore.”

In other posts she has promoted the antisemitic conspiracy theory called the “Great Replacement,” which alleges that “Zionist supremacists” are secretly masterminding Muslim immigration to Europe to make white Europeans a minority.

Ms Greene has advanced the QAnon conspiracy theory, which includes antisemitic tropes, and wrote in one post that the Rothschild family and the controversial Jewish financier George Soros were involved in a plot against President Trump.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Belgian Prime Minister Alexander De Croo’s private residence was defaced with several swastikas in the early hours of 31st January.

According to local press, seven large swastikas were found sprayed across a mailbox and the front of the house. The vandalism was discovered the following morning and reported to local law enforcement, who have thus far been unable to identify those responsible.

A demonstration of the far-right political action group Vlaanderen Ons Land, Flanders Our Country, was held the same weekend in Brakel. Police are trying to establish if there is a connection between the demonstration and the vandalism. The protest comprised fifteen participants, however there was reportedly a large federal police presence.

Through his spokesperson, Prime Minister De Croo condemned the damage to his private property and the failed attempt to intimidate his family through fascist and antisemitic symbolism.

According to the Prosecutor’s Office East Flanders, an investigation into the incident is ongoing.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has submitted evidence to Parliament’s Joint Committee on Human Rights to counter claims that adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism, especially by universities, stifles freedom of expression.

The Joint Committee on Human Rights comprises members drawn from both the House of Commons and the House of Lords and examines matters relating to human rights. One of its current inquiries is into freedom of expression.

The campaign to encourage universities to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism has encountered opposition on the basis that adoption somehow stifles freedom of expression, but this argument does not have merit, and the evidence that we have submitted lays out in detail why this is the case. “The claim that adoption of the Definition conflicts with the duty on universities to protect free speech is a familiar and flawed argument, notwithstanding its persistence,” our letter says.

The letter proceeds to analyse the difference between speech that is ‘merely’ insulting or offensive, and speech that is antisemitic, and the implications for whether those types of speech are protected under Article 10 of the European Charter of Human Rights.

We also cite the legal opinion, produced for us in 2017 by Lord Wolfson of Tredegar QC and Jeremy Brier, which argued that “this Definition should be used by public bodies on the basis that it will ensure that the identification of antisemitism is clear, fair and accurate” and emphasised that “Criticism of Israel, even in robust terms, cannot be regarded as antisemitic per se and such criticism is not captured by the Definition.”

The full letter to the Joint Committee can be accessed below.

A lecturer on international relations at a prestigious Moscow university denied that Nazi gas chambers were used to kill people and said that six million dead Jews was “a fiction”.

Prof. Vladimir Matveyev is expected to face a charge of Holocaust denial, which is illegal in Russia.

Speaking online to teachers from the St. Petersburg region on Holocaust Remembrance Day, Prof. Matveyev, a lecturer at the Russian Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA), said: “No gas chambers were found to kill people in concentration camps,” and claimed that the “gas was used by the Germans for disinfection.” He also stated: “Six million dead Jews are a fiction.”

In a statement issued on the same day, the state-owned RANEPA said that it “cannot accept” the lies told by Prof. Matveyev and said that he was not representing the University when he made the remarks but was participating “outside his professional duties.”

St. Petersburg Rabbi Menachem Mendel Pevzner, of the Federation of Jewish Communities, said that his office was pressing charges against Prof. Matveyev for hate speech and Holocaust denial, which are illegal in Russia.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

An Algerian news outlet has attacked a Moroccan-born Chelsea FC footballer over his participation in a Holocaust Memorial tribute.

The Algerian channel, Ennahar TV, showed a photo of Moroccan player Hakim Ziyech with his teammates at Chelsea’s tribute to Holocaust victims, and described his participation as “a scandal.”

The photo of Mr Ziyech and two teammates holding a banner declaring “We Remember,” and the logo of Chelsea FC and of the World Jewish Congress (WJC), was initially shared by Israel’s official Arabic Twitter account on 28th January.

The Algerian media report is part of an Islamist narrative criticising Morocco for its recent rapprochement with Israel.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Facebook is now promoting new resources on Holocaust education in an apparent effort to compensate for years of allowing Holocaust deniers to run amok on its platform.

In a statement, the technology company said: “We will begin to connect people with authoritative information about the Holocaust. Anyone who searches on Facebook for terms associated with either the Holocaust or Holocaust denial will see a message from Facebook encouraging them to connect with credible information about the Holocaust off Facebook.

“We’re taking these steps given the well-documented rise in antisemitism globally and the alarming level of ignorance about the Holocaust, especially among young people. We want to help our community learn about the events that led to the Holocaust and the genocide of one-third of the Jewish people.”

The announcement comes after a report argued last year that Facebook’s algorithm “actively promoted” Holocaust denial content, and following revelations about white supremacist activity on the platform.

Last year, Facebook banned Holocaust denial on its platform and moved against promotion of the antisemitic QAnon conspiracy theory.

Campaign Against Antisemitism joined a global coalition of 140 groups to write to Facebook last year urging it to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism

.Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

A teenager from Cornwall is the UK’s youngest terror offender, after he admitted twelve terrorism offenses.

It is understood that he downloaded his first bombmaking manual at thirteen, and joined the far-right Fascist Forge. Now sixteen, the neo-Nazi teenager, who cannot be named for legal reasons, admitted two counts of dissemination of terrorist documents and ten of possession of terrorist material.

In 2018 and 2019, he expressed antisemitic, racist and anti-gay views online, reportedly talking about “gassing” Jewish people and hanging gay people. He is also believed to have been in contact with the founder of the proscribed neo-Nazi terror group Feuerkrieg Division.

His home was searched and police found a Nazi flag, a racist slogan on the garden shed and manuals on his computer and phone about making weapons.

The prosecutor observed that “The age is the alarming factor and his conduct betrays a maturity beyond his chronological age.”

Sentencing at the Old Bailey is expected on 8th February.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “There has been a notable rise in far-right activity among the young, with older activists deliberately targeting youth with specially-designed videos and other material. Social media companies are too often failing to act against the threat, which, as this latest conviction shows, is very real. The number of prosecutions of young offenders shows that the criminal justice system is taking the matter seriously, but further preventative action is necessary to stop the deplorable brainwashing of young people with far-right hate.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has previously reported on far-right efforts to recruit young people.Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

The Conservative Party has reportedly confirmed that it has issued a warning to one of its MPs after he appeared on The Richie Allen Show.

Sir Desmond Swayne was on the internet radio program to discuss coronavirus and the lockdown.

The Richie Allen Show has featured antisemites such as Alison Chabloz and Gilad Atzmon, conspiracy theorist Kevin Barrett, who believes Israel was behind 9/11, and Holocaust deniers including Nicholas Kollerstrom. The host, who is considered a protégé of the antisemitic hate preacher and conspiracy theorist David Icke, has himself apparently questioned the number of Jews that were murdered in the Holocaust, telling Mr Kollerstrom that “there’s a big lie there somewhere, I don’t believe the numbers are anywhere near as great as they’re saying, you know…I’m with you with respect to the numbers and the way that it’s been exploited ever since.”

Sir Desmond also revealed on his website that he has also donated money to a campaign to support Piers Corbyn, the conspiracy theorist and anti-lockdown activist with a history of antisemitic comments who has also been connected to a grossly offensive pamphlet comparing the lockdown to Auschwitz. Sir Desmond also apparently suggested that he had been “tempted” to join an anti-lockdown protest in London led by Mr Corbyn and Mr Icke.

In a statement, the Conservative Party reportedly told the JC: “Desmond has apologised and been warned about his appearance with those who share views not fit for public life and his appearance on a radio station where these views are promoted.”

Sir Desmond tweeted on Thursday: “I have never expressed antisemitic sentiment and if I’d ever given comfort to antisemites I’d be mortified. I do wonder what I’m going to be accused of next.”

Following complaints from Campaign Against Antisemitism and others, he has since added: “I was not aware of the history of this show and had I known my appearance on it would have offended the Jewish community, I would not have appeared on it. I apologise for any offence given.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

New Zealand’s Governor-General acknowledged the “shameful” treatment by New Zealand of Jewish refugees fleeing Europe in the 1930s. Speaking in Auckland at a commemorative event for International Holocaust Remembrance Day, Governor-General Dame Patsy Reddy said that New Zealand did too little to help European Jews.

“The cards were stacked against them,” said Dame Patsy, who is also a Patron of the New Zealand Holocaust Centre. Pointing out that Government ministers, professional groups and trade unions “openly expressed reluctance to provide a haven for more Jewish refugees”, she said that that reluctance was “a stain on our history.”

As European Jews fled the continent between 1936 and 1938, the New Zealand Government rejected at least 70 percent of more than 1700 formal applications.

Dame Patsy said that the country “also actively discouraged” thousands more from applying. Only about 1200 Jewish refugees were eventually allowed into New Zealand. Dame Patsy said that those who did come were also often met with hostility and were thwarted in their efforts to bring family members to New Zealand.

“We should all acknowledge and learn from our own country’s shameful history with Jewish refugees,” she declared.

The theme of this year’s Holocaust Remembrance Day was the contribution made by those refugees and their families and included comment from former Prime Minister John Key, whose mother was a Jewish refugee.

Dame Patsy’s comments come as antisemitism in New Zealand is increasing, prompting the country’s Race Relations Commissioner, Meng Foon, to to warn against the growing use of longstanding antisemitic tropes “using the language of the Third Reich.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The chair of Labour in Newham in London is reportedly to be investigated over alleged antisemitism, just days after his deputy was suspended over alleged antisemitic social media activity.

Cllr Mushtaq Mughal, who chairs the Labour Group, is reportedly being investigated over social media posts. He reportedly posted on social media a video from the fringe and controversial Neturei Karta group with the caption: “Israel is govern by Zyonist not by Jews revealed by Jewish Rabbi [sic]”.

In another post he wrote: “Real Islam & real Judaism together can bring peace in the world. Israel is not Jewish state & it’s acts against God, Said jewel in USA [sic]”. The posts go back to 2016 and 2014.

The launch of the investigation comes shortly after the Deputy Chair of Labour in Newham was suspended over social media posts, including the same antisemitic post as that shared by Naz Shah MP several years ago. Cllr Nazir Ahmed shared a post in December 2017 with an image situating Israel in the middle of the United States and calling for the relocation of Israel to America. This was the same post for which Ms Shah apologised and was suspended from the Labour Party in 2016. Cllr Ahmed described the image as an “easy solution for Israel Palestine conflict!”

In another Facebook post, from 2014, Cllr Ahmed shared a video that asked whether “Israel have USA in the pocket [sic]”.

A Labour spokesperson said at the time that the “Party takes all complaints of antisemitism extremely seriously and they are fully investigated in line with our rules and procedures, and any appropriate disciplinary action is taken.”

Inexplicably, Cllr Mughal has apparently not been suspended, raising questions about the enduring consistency of Labour’s disciplinary processes.

Meanwhile, Newham’s only Jewish councillor has reportedly condemned the handling of antisemitism allegations by the borough’s Labour mayor.

Newham London Borough Council has not properly adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism, after a Labour councillor deliberately amended the accompanying examples, which are integral to the Definition.

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently lodged a complaint against Mr Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A Rome High School was Zoombombed with antisemitic slurs during the screening of a film to mark International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

Students and teachers of the Istituto Tecnico Federico Caffé were on Zoom during the screening of the film made at the technical high school, entitled “The Wandering Jew in 20th-century Art.”

The Zoom meeting was interrupted by comments on the “chat” function, including, “Viva Hitler,” “I will kill all you bastards” and “Open the ovens”.

Staff believe that the meeting may have been “bombed” because a link was sent to neo-fascist groups.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has warned about the phenomenon of Zoombombing over the past year, as video gatherings have become more common during the period of pandemic lockdowns.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

170 celebrities from the Jewish and black communities have come together to form an alliance against antisemitism and anti-black racism in the entertainment industry.

The “unity statement” includes other household names, as well as leading producers and other figures, such as Jason Alexander, Nick Cannon (who was recently embroiled in controversy over antisemitism before publicly making amends), Jeremy Piven, Antoine Fuqua, Ethiopia Habtemariam, Neil Blair, Ozwald Boateng and the late Larry King.

The statement reads: “We acknowledge that the Black and Jewish communities have a shared history of subjugation and persecution. We recognise that the Black community in America has faced a history of racism that continues to this day, while the Jewish community is currently encountering record levels of antisemitism, which affects both group’s sense of fear, vulnerability, and self-worth. As members of the entertainment community, we stand against all forms of hate, and pledge to work to bring our two communities together in solidarity, to support one another in our struggles, and to better understand each other’s plight and narratives.

“The Jewish community must continue to speak out against racial injustice and work to effect change, while the Black community must continue to speak out against all forms of antisemitism. In the spirit of Martin Luther King Jr., Rabbi Abraham Heschel, and the many Blacks and Jews who stood together in the fight for civil rights, we come together to support each other in the struggle against hatred and bigotry. In the words of the late John Lewis, ‘We are one people, one family, the human family, and what affects one of us affects us all.’”

Last year, hundreds of musicians and other music industry figures signed a letter condemning antisemitism and racism in the wake of the grime artist Wiley’s antisemitic tirade.

An Orthodox Jewish boy and his father were violently attacked in Antwerp on Wednesday night.

The incident, in which the alleged assailant grabbed the 13-year-old Orthodox boy by the throat and then attacked the boy’s father, was blamed on antisemitism that has resurfaced in the Belgian city and was possibly fuelled by comments from Antwerp Mayor Bart De Wever in relation to COVID19 compliance and the Orthodox community.

Two days earlier, Mayor De Wever had commented on the poor response to a mail-shot inviting 6,500 residents of Antwerp’s Jewish quarter to test for the virus. In criticising the low response he asserted that the community risked a “wave of antisemitism” as a result.

His critics claim that the comments, in which he referenced “Jewish schools” and the “Jewish quarter”, singled out Jews for criticism and helped to fuel antisemitism in Belgium.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is recruiting an in-house General Counsel to bolster our capacity to pursue private prosecutions and other legal strategies, as our Antisemitism Barometer research showed that the Jewish community’s confidence in the justice system has hit a new low.

More than half (52%) of British Jews think that the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) does not do enough to protect them, and 44% say that they do not think that antisemitic hate crime against them would be prosecuted even if there was enough evidence, with the same percentage now saying that they hide signs of their Judaism when in public.

This perception of the criminal justice system is hardly surprising given that, according to our analysis of Home Office statistics, Jews are almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group, with an average of over three hate crimes directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales. This is not even the full story, as hate crimes against Jews are also still widely believed to be under-reported, and also do not reflect the extent of antisemitic material and abuse on social media.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is particularly concerned about antisemitism on campus and online going unpunished.

By recruiting a General Counsel, Campaign Against Antisemitism will be able to leverage its existing network of pro-bono lawyers, many of whom are amongst the most renowned lawyers in the country, to bring many more lawsuits.

Over the past six years, our litigation has broken new ground and established critical precedents in the fight against antisemitism.

Our successes have included a private prosecution leading to the landmark ruling that Holocaust denial is illegal in England and Wales when used as a means to hound Jews; taking the CPS to court and forcing them to prosecute an antisemite they originally claimed had committed no crime but then was not only convicted but sent to prison; and multiple libel successes, including two High Court rulings against Jews engaged in antisemitism.

Two of the most recent developments have included our first overseas case against the grime artist Wiley over his antisemitic tirade on social media, because justice should not stop at the UK’s borders; and our success in convincing the Professional Standards Authority to appeal to the High Court over a disgraceful ruling that would have let the leader of the “Al Quds Day” march in London off with a warning over his comments.

Some of our litigation has made national headlines, with the notable recent example of our referral of the Labour Party to the Equality and Human Rights Commission, leading to an investigation of antisemitism in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, providing hundreds of pages of legal argument and evidence. This investigation — which many previously argued was inconceivable — resulted in a devastating report that demonstrated that Labour had broken the law.

These cases — and other innovative legal strategies that we are currently using but have not yet made public — represent just a sample of the ground-breaking litigation and other legal work that we have undertaken in recent years with the help of some of the country’s leading experts, often acting pro bono.

A new general counsel will enable Campaign Against Antisemitism to expand all of this work — in criminal, regulatory, administrative, defamation and equality law — and hold antisemites to account and force the authorities to fulfil their duty to protect British Jews.

More information on the position is available at antisemitism.org/jobs/general-counsel/.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism (CAA), said: “Having spent six years winning cases and proving that litigation is one of the most effective ways to hold antisemites to account and force the authorities to fulfil their duty to protect the Jewish community, we are excited to be recruiting a General Counsel. Having an in-house counsel will enable us to greatly expand our ability to bring lawsuits in defence of British Jews.

“British Jews’ confidence in the justice system is unacceptably low, while Jews are victims of an average of over three hate crimes every single day in England and Wales. CAA is at the forefront of the fight against antisemitism, using innovative legal techniques and establishing ground-breaking precedents. A new General Counsel will supercharge these efforts, enabling us to provide a first-of-its-kind antisemitism prosecution service to ensure that victims of anti-Jewish racism finally get the justice that they deserve. We will always do whatever it takes to defend the Jewish community.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has published a new resource showing antisemitic incidents at universities and whether each institution has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism, with detailed information for each campus.

The resource for the first time makes public years of monitoring by Campaign Against Antisemitism through our volunteers and hundreds of requests we have filed under freedom of information laws.

We have long campaigned for the widespread adoption of the Definition, which was adopted by the Government in 2016 following efforts by Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Pickles and others. Since then, we have asked universities to adopt it too, and apply it in any disciplinary proceedings. As antisemitism rises on campuses around the country, successive Secretaries of State for Education have demanded that universities waste no more time in adopting the Definition.

This public resource shows the state of play following the expiry of the Education Secretary’s ultimatum to universities to adopt the Definition, naming those that have heeded the call to protect Jewish students and shaming those that have not.

So far, 76 institutions of higher education have adopted the Definition, based on their replies to our requests under freedom of information laws, with 101 yet to do so. This information is kept updated by our researchers in real time.

Those that have adopted the Definition include the universities of Birmingham, Bristol, Cambridge, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Imperial College, Leeds, Liverpool, LSE, Manchester, Manchester Metropolitan, Nottingham, Oxford and UCL.

SOAS — the School of Oriental and African Studies — whose long history of controversy in its relations with the Jewish community, earning its nickname as the School of Antisemitism, has declined to adopt the Definition, as can be seen from the details we have put together on its dedicated web page.

In addition, each page provides a summary of recent antisemitic incidents that have been reported to us. This information is indicative only, as it is widely believed that many (possibly most) antisemitic incidents are not reported at all, and we invite students, faculty or other victims or witnesses of antisemitism on campus or in academic trade unions to contact us with the details of any incidents that are not listed. We also offer assistance and free legal representation to victims who wish to pursue the matter.

The project can be viewed at antisemitism.org/universities/.

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We are delighted to offer a resource to students, faculty, politicians and the general public providing a dynamic and accessible record of antisemitism at British universities.

“The resource includes real-time coverage of adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism, and the results so far are promising, with almost half of British universities having adopted the Definition. However, Education Secretary Gavin Williamson urged institutions of higher education to adopt the Definition by the end of 2020 or face consequences. This resource names those universities that have heeded the call to protect their Jewish students and shames those that have failed so far to do so. We are making real progress, but there is much more to do.

“Years in the making, this project complements the vital work being done by Jewish Societies and campus activists across the country as well as the Union of Jewish Students, CST and other communal groups in our shared campaign for widespread adoption of the Definition.

“The other, critical component of the resource is a summary of recently reported incidents on each campus, which we hope will encourage more students and faculty to come forward and disclose antisemitic incidents, which are chronically underreported. Our monitoring helps to protect Jews on campus, and we offer free legal representation to any victims of antisemitism at university or in an academic trade union. University should be the time of Jewish students’ lives. Through our monitoring, we will remain vigilant against antisemitism on campus and when Jewish students need protection we will do whatever it takes to defend their rights.

“We invite victims to contact us confidentially via our website at antisemitism.org/contact. ”

The campaign for universities to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism is one that has been championed by a large number of student activists determined that their universities should defend their Jewish students and academics, politicians who are disgusted by antisemitism in higher education, and organisations including the Union of Jewish Students, the Office of the Government’s Independent Adviser on Antisemitism, CST, the Jewish Leadership Council, and others, in addition to Campaign Against Antisemitism.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Labour’s Shadow Communities Secretary has called on all local authorities controlled by his Party, as well as all universities, to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Steve Reed made the announcement in a debate in the House of Commons, saying: “With the support of Keir Starmer, I have asked every Labour council to adopt the [International] Definition of Antisemitism with all the examples. We’ve backed the Secretary of State’s request for Universities to do the same.”

The announcement comes after repeated calls by the Communities Secretary Robert Jenrick and the Education Secretary Gavin Williamson for local authorities and universities to adopt the Definition.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by local authorities and universities.

The Football Association, often known by its abbreviation FA, has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

FA chief executive officer Mark Bullingham said in a statement: “Tackling all forms of discrimination and promoting equality has long been a priority for the FA as we strive for a game that is a truly safe and inclusive environment for all. Adopting this working definition is an important step and it will provide clarity across football on what language or actions may be considered antisemitic. We will continue to work closely with the relevant authorities and everyone within football to reaffirm the message that antisemitic behaviour is completely unacceptable.”

Recently, the Premier League and nineteen of its member clubs adopted the Definition (Sheffield United declined to do so), as did Championship clubs Watford and Brentford.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities, public bodies and other institutions. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

It has been revealed that Sir Desmond Swayne, has appeared on The Richie Allen Show.

The Conservative MP was on the internet radio program to discuss coronavirus and the lockdown.

The Richie Allen Show has featured antisemites such as Alison Chabloz and Gilad Atzmon, conspiracy theorist Kevin Barrett, who believes Israel was behind 9/11, and Holocaust deniers including Nicholas Kollerstrom. The host has himself apparently questioned the number of Jews that were murdered in the Holocaust, telling Mr Kollerstrom that “there’s a big lie there somewhere, I don’t believe the numbers are anywhere near as great as they’re saying, you know…I’m with you with respect to the numbers and the way that it’s been exploited ever since.”

Mr Allen is considered to be a protege of Mr Icke. Mr Icke preaches to large audiences that the world is run by an evil group mostly consisting of prominent Jews whom he calls “Rothschild Zionists”. He tells his disciples that these “Rothschild Zionists” are in fact inhuman “reptilians” conspiring to cheat all of humanity, with governments, media and banks in their grasp.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is appalling that Sir Desmond Swayne appeared on The Richie Allen Show, which is a magnet for antisemites and conspiracy theorists and is hosted by a protégé of the modern-day antisemitic hate preacher David Icke who has also questioned the number of Jews who were murdered in the Holocaust. MPs must set an example in the platforms to which they lend their prestige, and ignorance is no excuse. No MP should be cavorting with the far-right, and the Conservative Party must immediately investigate.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Brentford Football Club has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Kevin Coleman, the Championship club’s Head of Equality, Diversity and Inclusion said: “Through the adoption of this definition, we aim to increase the understanding of antisemitism within our supporters, staff, and the wider football family. This will be an addition to all of our work to engage more meaningfully with all of our local faith communities, whether in terms of positive and proactive engagement or dealing with unacceptable language and behaviour.”

The Bees join fellow Championship club Watford and nineteen Premiership clubs and the Premier League who have all adopted the Definition. The twentieth Premiership club, Sheffield United, declined to do so.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities, public bodies and other institutions. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

During an online commemoration event for International Holocaust Remembrance Day, five German companies issued a joint declaration against antisemitism and racism in the country.

Borussia Dortmund, Daimler, Deutsche Bahn, Deutsche Bank and Volkswagon, together with Freundeskreis Yad Vashem, shared their decision to take ownership of their historical responsibility for such hatred in the hopes of advocating for freedom, democracy, diversity and peaceful coexistence. According to the collective, the declaration reflects a commitment to the culture of remembrance and the limitation of far-right and other extremist ideologies.

The five companies expressed great concern at the increasing rates of hatred, and condemned the “fatal development” of rising antisemitic violence.

The declaration has emerged following a decision by all five companies to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism. The participating companies expressed a united front in combating antisemitism, in the hope that other organisations and corporations will follow suit.

The commemoration took place as a digital event, with speakers including the current Chair of the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance and the President of the Central Council of Jews in Germany. Nearly two hundred guests from across civil society, the Government and employees of all the participating companies were invited to attend.

A representative for Freundeskreis Yad Vashem e.V. praised the companies for their joint stance against antisemitism and discrimination, and stated that it is an “important and clear sign both for Germany and the whole world”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Deutsche Bahn

According to Israel’s Ministry of Diaspora Affairs’ annual antisemitism report, anti-Jewish racism is expected to increase significantly around the world as a direct result of conspiracy theories against Jews and the State of Israel connected to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The report maintained that the most prominent forum for the expression of antisemitism in 2020 shifted from the physical realm to a hostile online environment.

The previous year saw a sharp rise in the dissemination of antisemitism online, including an alleged Iranian campaign to compare the Jewish state to a viral pandemic by launching “#COVID48”, in a reference to the year in which the Jewish state was established. The recent report stated that there was also an increase in antisemitism in the United States caused by the pandemic, various conspiracy theories and the presidential election.

The 140-page document noted, however, that there was a reduction in the number of antisemitic posts on mainstream social media sites, as a result of new measures taken by social media companies to regulate potential hate speech. Data from the Ministry’s monitoring systems highlighted that there was a 50% decrease in antisemitic content on Twitter, for example, between 2018 and 2020. Antisemitic users have apparently migrated to alternative platforms with less regulation and stringent terms of use to spread antisemitic propaganda, hate and conspiracy theories.

The Diaspora Affairs Minister has stated, as a result of recent findings, that “if antisemitism is a global phenomenon, then the war against it must also be global”, and that an “uncompromising struggle” should therefore be adopted to defeat “this plague”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

According to the Romanian Foreign Minister, Bogdan Aurescu, antisemitism and incidences of discrimination have intensified online throughout the coronavirus pandemic.

The head of Romanian diplomacy spoke at an event organised on the 80th anniversary of the Bucharest pogrom against Jews in 1941.

Mr Aurescu stated that the Romanian Government will soon complete and finalise the development of a national strategy against rising antisemitism, radicalisation, xenophobia and hate speech, with a plan that can be implemented to halt the growing phenomenon in the country. He assured that increasingly accurate data will help prepare law enforcement forces to tackle hatred, and school curricula and university courses will be harnessed to enable young people to recognise manifestations of such.

Mr Aurescu maintained that Romania is also actively involved in the development of the European Union’s first antisemitism strategy, which it hopes will be launched for public debate in the near future.

According to the head of the ministry, these strategies are intended to prevent the recurrence of tragedies such as the Bucharest pogrom during WWII, which saw at least 120 Jews murdered, hundreds injured and 1,100 homes, shops and synagogues looted and damaged. He stated that this was not an isolated incident, with the ensuing Pogrom of Iasi and the deportation of Jews to the Transnistria region.

The Government hopes that it can close “one of the darkest and most painful chapters in the history of Romania”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.