Since the Labour Party’s defeat in the 2019 General Election under the leadership of the antisemite Jeremy Corbyn, some of his most ardent supporters have sought to find a scapegoat. An idea has developed – similar to the historic “stab-in-the-back” myth – that it was the Jewish community and its supposedly false allegations of antisemitism that fatally undermined the Labour Party’s electoral ambitions. This idea has become known as “#ItWasAScam”.

The theory behind this idea is that allegations of antisemitism in Labour were a fraud, and represented an effort to smear Mr Corbyn, his supporters and the Labour Party under his leadership.

The notion that claims of antisemitism are disingenuous is the foundation of the “Livingstone Formulation”. Named after the controversial former Mayor of London, Ken Livingstone, the Livingstone Formulation is used to describe how allegations of antisemitism are dismissed as insincere and malevolent. Often, such allegations are portrayed as baseless attempts to silence criticism of Israel. In its report on antisemitism in the Labour Party, the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) found that suggestions of this nature were part of the unlawful victimisation of Jewish people in the Party.

Although #ItWasAScam has not been the only attempt to undermine the finding that the Labour Party had become institutionally racist against Jewish people, it has proved the most popular and enduring. It has trended repeatedly on X/Twitter in the years since 2019, and has often been referred to whenever the Labour Party has attempted to address antisemitism on the far-left of the Party.

As with most political myths, #ItWasAScam thrives on vagueness, capturing a feeling of injustice on the part of Mr Corbyn’s most blindly loyal supporters but rarely being elucidated with actual facts and argumentation. The principal exception to this trend is a document authored by the writer and activist Simon Maginn, who is believed to have coined and popularised the #ItWasAScam hashtag.

Given the popularity of this myth, and the distress that it has caused Jewish victims of Labour antisemitism, users of social media and the wider Jewish community, Mr Maginn’s (since deleted) document – originally posted on 11th April 2021 and later, in 2023, accompanied by a graphic tweet and series of videos – merits authoritative refutation. The document is titled “Top Ten Labour Antisemitism Smears”.

Before examining the ten items, it must be borne in mind that these are only ten instances in the scandal of Labour antisemitism, which was an unprecedented development in British politics that proceeded for several years in the national spotlight and which is still in the process of remediation. Some of these ten instances, selected by Mr Maginn, received considerable media attention when they arose; others did not. Why these ten have been chosen, as opposed to the countless other allegations of antisemitism in the Party, interviews with leading Labour officials or other instances that might have been included in the document, is not known. The failure even to address the fact that these are only a sample of such instances itself exposes the document to charges of strawmanning, in which Mr Maginn has addressed only those instances that were convenient for his purposes, rather than those that were not. Even so, his analysis of each of the ten chosen instances is deficient or inaccurate and invariably misleading.

Let’s see how.

10: Chris Williamson.

Claim: Mr Williamson, then an MP, said Labour had been ‘too apologetic for antisemitism’.

BBC’s Nick Robinson tweeted it. It’s still up today.

In fact, what Mr Williamson said was this:

“The party that has done more to stand up to racism is now being demonised as a racist, bigoted party. I have got to say, I think our party’s response has been partly responsible for that because in my opinion…we’ve backed off far too much, we have given too much ground, we’ve been too apologetic…We’ve done more to address the scourge of antisemitism than any other party.”

Oddly, the last part of Mr Williamson’s statement, where he talks about ‘addressing the scourge of antisemitism’, doesn’t get quoted. This is called ‘clipping’ — extracting words from a longer speech in order to misrepresent it.

Transcript here: https://www.jewishvoiceforlabour.org.uk/article/in-defence-of-chris-williamson/

Verdict: False

Analysis

Chris Williamson is a disgraced one-term Labour MP who was suspended from the Party before eventually resigning his membership and running as an Independent in the 2019 General Election. He received so few votes that, extraordinarily for an incumbent MP, he lost his deposit. Research by Campaign Against Antisemitism shows that Mr Williamson has been involved in numerous antisemitic incidents, and since his ejection from frontline politics, Mr Williamson can be found presenting a programme on the Iranian state propaganda channel, Press TV. He has also become the Deputy Leader of George Galloway’s Workers Party of Britain.

Mr Williamson’s comments quoted here were made at an event in Sheffield organised by the pro-Corbyn pressure group, Momentum, in February 2019.

With regard to the substance of the comments, Labour’s history as an avowedly anti-racist party was no defence of its descent into institutional racism under Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership. Indeed, that very history made this development so distressing for those Jews and opponents of racism who had made the Labour Party their political home. Mr Williamson nevertheless contended that, in response to this scandal of antisemitism, the Party had been too defensive. In twisted logic, he argued that Labour had done more to address the scourge of antisemitism, seemingly without acknowledging that it was also by far the most antisemitic party, an assessment confirmed by both the Home Affairs Committee in 2016 and the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) in 2020. Both the Home Affairs Committee and the EHRC found that the Labour Party had in fact not been too apologetic for antisemitism but, on the contrary, had failed to identify and deal with antisemitism within the Party appropriately, despite numerous recommendations to improve its procedures.

In any event, this is all background to Mr Maginn’s obscure focus on a tweet by the BBC presenter Nick Robinson. Whether or not one tweet by one journalist half a year after they were made accurately represented the thrust of Mr Williamson’s remarks is immaterial. Mr Williamson’s remarks are available to watch, they were reported across the national media at the time that they were made, and they rapidly led to his suspension from the Labour Party.

Verdict: Not “false”.

9: Jackie Walker.

Claim: Ms Walker said ‘Jews controlled the slave trade’. Again, the BBC’s old reliable Nick Robinson said exactly this in a now-deleted tweet.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/contact/ecu/tweet-by-nick-robinson-26-february-2019

In fact, what Ms Walker said was this: “Oh yes — and I hope you feel the same towards the African holocaust? My ancestors were involved in both — on all sides as I’m sure you know, millions more Africans were killed in the African holocaust and their oppression continues today on a global scale in a way it doesn’t for Jews… and many Jews (my ancestors too) were the chief financiers of the sugar and slave trade which is of course why there were so many early synagogues in the Caribbean. So who are victims and what does it mean? We are victims and perpetrators to some extent through choice. And having been a victim does not give you a right to be a perpetrator”.

BBC finally retracted Mr Robinson’s accusation, describing it as ‘insufficiently accurate’, and Mr Robinson was required to delete his tweet, though in so doing, regrettably, made the further smear against Mr Williamson above.

He’s prolific.

Verdict: False

Analysis

Jackie Walker is a former Vice-Chair of Momentum whose case exemplified the institutionalisation of antisemitism in the Labour Party. She was initially suspended by Labour for repeating the Louis Farrakhan-inspired hoax that Jews were the “chief financiers of the slave trade”. That suspension was lifted in secrecy and without public explanation, with that mysterious exoneration being swiftly celebrated with a public embrace from the Party’s leader, Jeremy Corbyn. She went on to be suspended a second time for comments misrepresenting the inclusivity of Holocaust Memorial Day and for challenging the need for security at Jewish schools. After being suspended for over two and a half years, she was finally expelled in early 2019. 

She has persistently claimed that complaints of antisemitism are part of a plot to destabilise Mr Corbyn’s leadership and has rejected the International Definition of Antisemitism. While contentiously claiming to be Jewish herself, she nevertheless alleged that Jews claim privileges at the expense of black people, at one point reportedly referring to Jewish Labour MP Dame Margaret Hodge as “someone from the white millionaire elite” whom she accused of “black Jew baiting”.

She created a bizarre “Lynching” show, in which she claimed to be the victim of a “witch-hunt”, and toured it around the country – to applause, incidentally, from Chris Williamson. Meanwhile, leaders of the Party such as John McDonnell MP, then the Shadow Chancellor, have defended her. She was Chair of the antisemitism-denial group, Labour Against the Witchhunt, which was eventually proscribed by the Party.

Mr Maginn has again chosen to focus on a tweet by Nick Robinson, perhaps because the BBC’s admission that the tweet lacked sufficient context might mislead a reader of his document into thinking that portrayals of Ms Walker as an antisemite are without foundation. But the BBC’s assessment of Mr Robinson’s tweet does not in any way detract from Ms Walker’s record.

Ms Walker’s leading position in grassroots Labour groups, the Party’s reversal of her suspension and failure to expel her for several years, and her enduring popularity and influence among the far-left grassroots of the Party and even among some MPs on the far-left wing of the Party, all underscore her exemplification of Labour’s antisemitism scandal.

Verdict: Not “false”.

8: Irony.

Claim: Jeremy Corbyn said ‘Jews [or sometimes Zionists] don’t understand English irony.’

In fact what he said was this.

‘…the other evening we had a meeting in Parliament in which Manuel [the Palestinian Ambassador Manuel Hassassian] made an incredibly powerful and passionate and effective speech about the history of Palestine, the rights of the Palestinian people. This was dutifully recorded by the, thankfully silent, Zionists who were in the audience on that occasion [my emphasis]; and then came up and berated him afterwards for what he had said.

They clearly have two problems. One is they don’t want to study history and, secondly, having lived in this country for a very long time, probably all their lives, they don’t understand English irony either. Manuel does understand English irony and uses it very very effectively. So I think they needed two lessons which we can perhaps help them with.’

You will note the (habitually) careful language: ‘the Zionists who were in the audience on that occasion.’ Unless you were one of the named self-identifying Zionist protesters who had disrupted the meeting in question, Mr Corbyn’s remarks about irony obviously do not apply to you. Indeed, one of the protesters, Richard Millett, is currently suing Mr Corbyn for libel — his entire case is that he is identifiable as one of the people Corbyn called ‘disruptive’ at the meeting. So unless you’re him, this isn’t about you. Or ‘Jews’. Or ‘Zionists’.

Transcript here: https://labourbriefing.org/blog/2018/8/29/full-texxt-of-that-speech-by-jeremy-on-zionists-and-a-sense-of-irony

Verdict: False.

Analysis

As research by Campaign Against Antisemitism has shown,Jeremy Corbyn has a long record of antisemitic incidents and associations with those who promote antisemitic conspiracy theories or intend harm to Jewish people. This background was increasingly known to the wider public when the historic comments quoted by Mr Maginn surfaced in the summer of 2018, which was also a time when the Labour Party was resisting adopting the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Mr Corbyn originally made the quoted remarks in a speech to a conference at the House of Commons in 2013, while he was still a backbench MP. Mr Maginn’s claim is that Mr Corbyn’s reference to “Zionists” was specific to certain individuals in the audience and was not a wider reference to British Jews more generally. The reason that it may plausibly be construed as having this wider meaning is because the term “Zionists” is often used as a dog whistle by antisemites to refer to Jews. Indeed, even Mr Corbyn recognises this, saying in his defence when these remarks came to light in 2018 that “I am now more careful with how I might use the term ‘Zionist’ because a once self-identifying political term has been increasingly hijacked by antisemites as code for Jews.”

Mr Maginn claims that it is clear that Mr Corbyn was referring to specific audience members because one of them went on to sue Mr Corbyn for libel, which would indicate that that claimant must have been identifiable as the person to whom Mr Corbyn was referring. Mr Maginn is incorrect; that claimant was suing Mr Corbyn for libel in relation to comments that Mr Corbyn made on The Andrew Marr Show in September 2018, not based on Mr Corbyn’s remarks in 2013.

Mr Corbyn’s remarks were widely viewed in the Jewish community as referring to British Jews in general, accusing them of not being fully British because they did not understand English language and humour. The remarks were therefore reasonably interpreted as being scandalously racist and antisemitic. But this is equally true if the remarks were directed simply at people who identify as Zionists, and even if the comments were directed solely at the specific audience members. This is because the comments are “othering” and represent a xenophobic manner of addressing people. The comments imply that, despite living in the UK all of their lives, the people in question (be they Jews, “Zionists” or the specific audience members) were still somehow not fully English. The implication was that this foreignness was connected to their Zionist views or identity, which also happens to be an identity shared by the overwhelming majority of Jewish people. Given that centuries of antisemitic persecution have been built on the premise that Jewish people are different from the rest of the population and have different or dual loyalties, with their principal allegiance being to the Jewish people – or the Jewish state – rather than their countries of citizenship, it is understandable that Jewish people are very sensitive to any suggestion that they are not fully English.

If there was any ambiguity in the remarks, as Mr Maginn suggests, in view of Mr Corbyn’s long history of antisemitic incidents and associations the presumption was against him. Indeed, after making the remarks quoted here, Mr Corbyn was immediately followed onstage by the disgraced Rev. Dr Stephen Sizer, whom Mr Corbyn has defended despite Rev. Dr Sizer’s infamy for having promoted antisemitic conspiracy theories. Rev. Dr Sizer was eventually handed a twelve-year ban by the Church of England after having been found to have “engaged in antisemitic activity” by a tribunal of the Church of England.

Mr Corbyn’s failure even to apologise for the possibility of an interpretation contrary to whatever it was that he claimed to have meant in these 2013 remarks was further evidence that he had little sympathy for those who maintained that they had been victimised by his statement.

Following this incident, the former Chief Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks made his first intervention on Labour’s antisemitism crisis. Lord Sacks said that the comments were “the most offensive statement made by a senior British politician since Enoch Powell’s 1968 ‘Rivers of Blood’ speech. It was divisive, hateful and like Powell’s speech it undermines the existence of an entire group of British citizens by depicting them as essentially alien.” He described Mr Corbyn as “an antisemite”.

Verdict: Not “false”.

7: The Wreath.

Claim: Jeremy Corbyn laid a wreath at the cemetery in Tunisia where the 1972 Munich Olympics terrorists were buried.

In fact, the wreath was laid at the Palestinian cemetery in Tunisia, which has a memorial to the victims of the universally condemned 1985 Israeli bombing of the PLO headquarters, many of whom were civilians.

The Munich terrorists are buried in another country, Libya.

Corbyn was in the wrong country.

Operation Wooden Leg – Wikipedia

Operation “Wooden Leg” ( Hebrew: מבצע רגל עץ‎, Mivtza Regel Etz) was an attack by Israel on the Palestine Liberation…


en.wikipedia.org

Verdict: False.

Analysis

On 10th August 2018, the Daily Mail published photographs taken from the Facebook page of the Palestinian Authority’s diplomatic mission to Tunisia, which showed Jeremy Corbyn laying a wreath at the Hamman Chott Cemetery in Tunis in 2014.

The Daily Mail alleged that one of the pictures showed Mr Corbyn with a memorial wreath in his hand standing feet “from the graves of terror leaders linked to the Munich Massacre”. The article went on to say: “The picture was among a number taken during a service to honour Palestinian ‘martyrs’. Buried in the cemetery in Tunisia are members of Black September, the terror group which massacred eleven Israeli athletes at the 1972 Olympics.”

The article proceeded to report that “sources close to Mr Corbyn insisted he was at the service in 2014 to commemorate 47 Palestinians killed in an Israeli air strike on a Tunisian Palestine Liberation Organisation (PLO) base in 1985. But on a visit to the cemetery this week, the Daily Mail discovered that the monument to the air strike victims is 15 yards from where Mr Corbyn is pictured – and in a different part of the complex. Instead he was in front of a plaque that lies beside the graves of Black September members.

“The plaque honours three dead men: Salah Khalaf, who founded Black September; his key aide Fakhri al-Omari; and Hayel Abdel-Hamid, PLO Chief of Security. Adjacent to their graves is that of [Atef] Bseiso [PLO Head of Intelligence]. All were assassinated either by the Israeli secret service Mossad or rival Palestinian factions.”

In an article for the Morning Star newspaper a few days after his visit to Tunis, Mr Corbyn wrote about his trip, recounting how “wreaths were laid at the graves of those who died [in the 1985 Israeli airstrike] and on the graves of others killed by Mossad agents in Paris in 1991.”

When the Daily Mail story broke, Mr Corbyn reiterated what he had written in the Morning Star several years prior: “A wreath was indeed laid by some of those who attended the conference to those that were killed in Paris in 1992. I was present when it was laid. I don’t think I was actually involved in it. I was there because I wanted to see a fitting memorial to everyone who has died in every terrorist incident everywhere because we have to end it.”

A few hours later, Mr Corbyn’s office unequivocally denied that Mr Corbyn had laid a wreath at the graves of those linked to the Munich Massacre.

However, the reference to Paris indicated that Mr Corbyn was indeed involved in a commemoration at the cemetery for Atef Bseiso, who was killed outside a Paris hotel in 1992, either by a rival faction or by Israeli security services.

Mr Maginn is correct to insist that Mr Corbyn was not present at the graves of the Munich terrorists, but that was not the Daily Mail’s claim; the newspaper reported that he was at a commemoration for “terror leaders linked to the Munich Massacre”. Given that Atef Bseiso was PLO Head of Intelligence and generally believed to have been behind the Munich terror attack, the newspaper’s contention appears reasonable, as did the conclusions drawn by its readership and the Jewish community.

In the days following the Daily Mail’s report, the Labour Party made a formal complaint to the Independent Press Standards Organisation (IPSO) against the Daily Mail, The Times, The Sun, The Daily Telegraph, the Daily Express and the Metro, apparently for misrepresenting the event that Mr Corbyn had attended. But the Labour Party eventually withdrew its complaint, blaming leaked communications that it claimed had compromised IPSO’s investigation.

Mr Corbyn was also referred to the Parliamentary Commissioner for Standards over a potential failure to declare the trip to Tunisia, especially given that guests were alleged to have stayed at a five-star hotel. E-mails from the time were leaked, suggesting that Mr Corbyn had sought to keep the costs below the reporting threshold so that he would not have to refer to the trip in Parliamentary debates. Mr Corbyn’s office eventually estimated that the trip had cost £4 less than the £660 threshold, and hence did not need to be reported.

Verdict: Not “false”.

6: Baddiel’s Leaflet

Claim: There was a leaflet at a Labour Party Conference about the Holocaust that didn’t mention Jews.

TV celebrity David Baddiel claimed in a TV promo for his book ‘Jews Don’t Count’ that he had been informed by ‘someone on the NEC’ [Labour National Executive Committee] that there had been a leaflet circulated at a Labour Conference about the Holocaust that didn’t mention Jews.

What he seems to be referring to in garbled form here is a petition by the SWP (Socialist Workers Party) in 2008 at a far-right rally in Derbyshire, which, by some unaccountable error, lists the other victims of the Holocaust but omits ‘six million Jews’. It has never been repeated, and SWP have never denied or minimised the Holocaust in any way. Ironically, the petition was specifically about remembering the victims of the Holocaust, in the face of far-right Holocaust denial.

Nothing to do with the Labour Party. Nothing to do with a Labour Conference. Nothing whatsoever to do with Jeremy Corbyn.

Mr Baddiel has never, to my knowledge, been challenged on his claim, nor has he been required to show any evidence that what he claims happened ever happened at all.

Has the SWP Discovered a “Jew-Free” Holocaust?

He makes the claim here, at 55.00

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o_3g4UGVcNQ&t=1s

Verdict: False.*

* A previous version of this said Baddiel had said it was a ‘Labour Party leaflet’. This has been challenged, and I have been unable to verify that he did in fact use those words, so I have deleted them. The substance of his claim remains unchanged: that it was a leaflet ‘circulated at a Labour Party Conference’. No evidence of this has ever been produced, or even asked for.

Analysis

This item is drawn from a Zoom interview of the comedian and author David Baddiel, in conversation with the Jewish former Labour MP Ruth Smeeth organised by the Antisemitism Policy Trust, on 5th March 2021.

This is the full transcript of the segment:

David Baddiel (DB): “When someone says “antisemitism” [in scare quotes], I presume that’s a Labour person, who is someone who thinks it’s all smears, and it never existed or whatever. I mean one of the things that is really annoying about that is, I notice, what they tend to do, those people, is they’ll say it was all smears and, you know, it was all weaponised by the Tories or whatever, and then they’ll say ‘and it diminishes the struggle against real antisemitism’. And I always wanna say, at what point, by the way, would you recognise real antisemitism? Cause there’s all this stuff that Jews are saying that they’re unhappy with, but you’re dismissing all that as ‘smears’. So I’d like to know what you thik  antisemitism, is it just genocide? Is that the only thing that counts? You know, because it’s a really extraordinary thing. They always bring it up: it’s like, the ‘real’, what’s real antisemitism. And I always thing, who’s defining that?”

Ruth Smeeth [RS]: “Yeh they think Nazis. They mean the far-right and Nazis.”

DB: “They just mean that. Yeh okay.”

RS: “I think one of the most shocking testimonies that went through, there was far-right material that was distributed at a Labour Party event, and it had been, it was a BNP leaflet, as fact. Like, a really old school proper Nazi, Jews-run-the-world stuff. And, I mean, how the Labour Party dealt with it was appalling. They asked the Jewish person who’d seen it why she’d be offended by it as part of the evidence testimony. But it just showed the circle that we’d gone on, that certain members of the Labour Party thought it was appropriate, that there was valid messaging in a far-right leaflet.”

DB: “Yeh. That is appalling. A guy called Joel Braunold, who’s on twitter, who’s a Labour Party person, or he was, told me that he was at an NEC meeting a few years ago, and this wasn’t a right-wing thing, that there had been an information or educational leaflet going around conference or whatever about the Holocaust, and it mentioned all the groups –

RS: “Yeh”

DB: – that were targeted by the Holocaust, and it included gays, and Roma, and disabled people and communists and trade unionists, and it didn’t mention Jews, right?”

RS: “It was a trade union leaflet.”

DB: “Huh?”

RS: “It was a trade union leaflet.”

DB: “Yeh. And what is incredible about that is, I am prepared to accept that the people doing that are not just straightforward antisemites. That they think they’re doing something worthwhile. Because I think they think ‘well I think it’s important to draw attention to the other people who were killed.’ Obviously it is. But not if you miss out the primary target. Then you’re doing something that’s really weird, and vile, and whatever.”

For Mr Maginn to believe that a comment made in passing in 2021 – a year after Jeremy Corbyn stepped down as leader of the Labour Party – by one commentator towards the close of an hour-long interview on Zoom that has been viewed (at time of writing) by fewer than 1,000 people and was not covered by the media, is somehow a significant milestone in the story of Labour’s antisemitism scandal is nonsensical. It is a good example of strawmanning.

Mr Baddiel does not suggest that the leaflet in question circulated during Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership of the Party; in fact, the personalities whom he references suggest an earlier time frame. Even Mr Maginn is not able to identify the incident to which Mr Baddiel is referring. But even if Mr Baddiel had been mistaken, this item is so inconsequential that no significance could possibly be attributed to it.

What is clear is that the trend of omitting or minimising the targeting of Jews in the Holocaust is not an isolated occurrence but distressingly commonplace, including on the far-left, where, for example, calls to dilute or cancel Holocaust Memorial Day recur annually. Indeed in 2011, Jeremy Corbyn himself proposed a motion in Parliament to rename Holocaust Memorial Day. During the years of his leadership of the Party, there have been plenty of concerning spectacles at Labour conferences. At Labour’s 2017 Party conference, for example, a packed fringe event heard from American-Israeli activist Miko Peled that people should be free to ask “Holocaust, yes or no” because “there should be no limits on the discussion”, for which he was cheered.

Why Mr Maginn chose not to address an episode such as that, which took place during the Corbyn era and actually contributed to Labour’s antisemitism scandal, as opposed to a wholly unimportant comment made in passing years later at the end of a long Zoom conversation that received minimal public attention, is telling.

Verdict: Who cares?

5: The IHRA definition.

Claim: Corbyn’s Labour Party was antisemitic because of its initial reluctance to adopt the IHRA Working Definition of Antisemitism and all its examples.

The new head of the EHRC, Baroness Falkner, recently said the definition is ’extremely poorly worded and probably unactionable in law’ while it ‘directly conflicts with the duty to protect free speech’

https://jewishnews.timesofisrael.com/new-chair-of-equalities-watchdog-is-against-call-for-unis-to-adopt-ihra

The Labour party have been forced to publish details of a ‘secret code’ in operation, which was an attempt to make the IHRA definition legally actionable. Corbyn was condemned for this code, which Starmer has been forced to admit he is still using.

https://skwawkbox.org/2021/04/09/court-ordered-release-shows-labour-still-using-corbyns-incendiary-code-of-conduct-despite-howls-of-outrage-against-corbyn-silence-now

Verdict: False.

Analysis

The International Definition of Antisemitism, also known as the IHRA Definition, is the globally-recognised definition of anti-Jewish racism. It was the product of years of international collaboration and careful composition. It has support from Jewish communities around the world, and has been adopted by the British Government and numerous national governments and public bodies worldwide. It is opposed only by a minute fringe of Jews and by activists, many of whom routinely breach the Definition or support those who do.

In the summer of 2018, the Labour Party became embroiled in a scandal relating to whether it would adopt the Definition in full. Under Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership, the Party resisted for several months before eventually relenting and adopting the Definition.

During this controversy, in July 2018, it was revealed that the Party had adopted a “code of conduct” relating to antisemitism that took a pick-and-choose approach to anti-Jewish racism. Effectively, the Labour Party was saying that it knew better than the Jewish community how to define antisemitism.

Specifically, the code of conduct excluded four of the eleven examples of antisemitism incorporated in the Definition; namely, accusing Jews of dual loyalty, denying the Jews’ right to self-determination, comparing Israel to Nazis, and applying double standards to Israel.

These self-evidently racist positions seem obviously omitted for one reason: the Labour Party was trying to protect its then-dominant far-left contingent, including its leader, from being held to account for past comments and activity that might breach these aspects of the Definition. After all, the best way to prevent someone being exposed as an antisemite is to change the definition of antisemitism. Whether or not such a policy is antisemitic in itself – and Mr Maginn has not provided any citations for those saying that it was – it is certainly an attempt to provide institutional protection to racists.

Verdict: Not “false”.

4: The EHRC report.

Claim: The EHRC found the Labour party ‘institutionally antisemitic’.

The EHRC report, entitled ‘Investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party’, is 130 pages long. A search of the document itself (Ctrl F) using the words ‘institutionally antisemitic’ turns up only one result, on page 127. This section is annex 7, ‘How we carried out the investigation’, and it cites a report by Professor Alan Johnson (BICOM), ‘Institutionally Antisemitic: Contemporary Left Antisemitism and the Crisis in the British Labour Party’ (March 2019). It is used as a reference for the EHRC report, and is not part of the content.

The claim is not made anywhere in the EHRC report itself. It simply doesn’t say it. Read it.

https://www.equalityhumanrights.com/en/publication-download/investigation-antisemitism-labour-party

Verdict: False

[This section has been edited for clarity. Thanks to Dangerous Globe for their input.]

Analysis

After the Labour Party repeatedly refused to investigate our complaints against Jeremy Corbyn relating to antisemitism, we referred the Party to the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) in 2018. The EHRC is an independent commission that was set up by the previous Labour Government.

At the EHRC’s request, Campaign Against Antisemitism submitted detailed legal arguments. We continued to provide additional legal arguments to the EHRC in relation to subsequent developments. Thereafter, the Jewish Labour Movement and Labour Against Antisemitism Ltd made further submissions, which supported our referral.

In 2019, the EHRC announced that it was starting pre-enforcement proceedings against the Labour Party. After the Party failed to satisfy the EHRC that it could be trusted to address the antisemitism issue itself, Campaign Against Antisemitism asked the EHRC to open a statutory investigation under section 20 of the Equality Act 2006 into antisemitic discrimination and victimisation in the Labour Party. The Equality Act was legislation that had been introduced by the previous Labour Government.

On 28th May 2019, the EHRC announced a full statutory investigation, which enabled it to use its enforcement powers.

The only previous statutory investigation ever conducted by the EHRC was an investigation into unlawful harassment, discrimination and victimisation within the Metropolitan Police Service. The only other political party to have been subject to action by the EHRC was the British National Party, but that was not a statutory investigation.

The launch of a full statutory investigation by the EHRC into the Labour Party was an unprecedented development, resulting from the EHRC’s acknowledgement that the legal arguments made by Campaign Against Antisemitism were sufficiently compelling to merit investigating whether the Labour Party had committed unlawful acts.

In October 2020, the EHRC published its report into Labour antisemitism.

The EHRC did not set out to make a finding of “institutional antisemitism”, nor could it have done so, as this is not a legal category or designation. Instead, the EHRC’s objective was “to determine whether the Labour Party committed a breach of the Equality Act 2010, related to Jewish ethnicity or Judaism, against its members, associates or guests, through the actions of its employees or agents.”

The EHRC found that the Labour Party had breached the Equality Act 2010, and in its report “concluded that there were unlawful acts of harassment and discrimination [against Jewish people] for which the Labour Party is responsible.” In other words, Labour’s racist treatment of Jewish people had become so serious that it had broken the law.

The EHRC found, for the first time ever in relation to a political party, that the Labour Party was in breach of the Equality Act 2010 due to serious failings in the Party’s disciplinary procedures, including political interference in antisemitism complaints, failure to provide adequate training to those handling antisemitism complaints, serious errors within the complaints system, inappropriate applications of sanctions, unclear policy for antisemitism on social media and an overall failure of Party leadership in relation to antisemitism.

The 1999 Stephen Lawrence Inquiry’s report, commonly known as the Macpherson Report, defined institutional racism as “the collective failure of an organisation to provide an appropriate and professional service to people because of their colour, culture or ethnic origin”.

In view of the fact that the EHRC found that Labour, as an institution, was so racist that it had broken the law, it is reasonable to describe the Party as having become institutionally antisemitic. Although it was not within the EHRC’s terms of reference to make such a finding in those terms, institutional antisemitism is in essence what its report was describing.

Verdict: Strawman.

3: The Friends.

Claim: Corbyn referred to representatives of Hamas and Hezbollah as ‘our friends’.

This is so. What is missing here is context. Corbyn habitually refers to anyone at a meeting as ‘friends’. It is a boilerplate diplomatic courtesy attempting to establish a positive atmosphere to a hopefully productive meeting. It does not mean he agrees with everything every one of them has ever said and done, because that isn’t how meetings work. If it were, he would, logically, also have to agree with everything said and done by the opposing side, as well as holding all the positions of everyone he’s ever met, and I think a moment’s consideration shows this idea to be obviously absurd.

Corbyn has explicitly condemned Hamas in parliament, for instance: https://edm.parliament.uk/early-day-motion/37443

Verdict: True but grossly misleading because of context-stripping.

Analysis

The groups referred to here are Hamas and Hizballah. Both are antisemitic, Islamist genocidal terrorist organisations sworn to the destruction of the Jewish state, and which have persistently targeted Jewish people in Israel and around the world, murdering them in their hundreds.

In a meeting in Parliament in 2009, Jeremy Corbyn made the following remarks: “I want to first of all say thank you to everyone for being here tonight, and to say that tomorrow evening it will be my pleasure and my honour to host an event in Parliament where our friends from Hizballah will be speaking. I also invited our friends from Hamas to come and speak as well. Unfortunately, the Israelis would not allow them to travel here, so it’s going to be only friends from Hizballah. So far as I’m concerned, that is absolutely the right function of using Parliamentary facilities to invite people from other parts of the world…[applause] so that we can promote that peace, that understanding, and that dialogue. And the idea that an organisation that is dedicated towards the good of the Palestinian people and bringing about long-term peace and social justice and political justice in the whole region should be labelled as a terrorist organisation by the British Government is really a big big historical mistake, and I would invite the Government to reconsider its position on this matter and start talking directly to Hamas and Hizballah.”

That is the fuller context, which Mr Maginn claims has been “stripped” by Mr Corbyn’s critics.

To interpret these quoted remarks as emanating from someone with a neutral position in relation to Hamas and Hizballah, and who was only using “diplomatic” language to be inclusive – language that, incidentally, was not extended to “the Israelis” – is laughable. Mr Corbyn described these murderous, racist, terror groups as organisations that are “dedicated towards…bringing about long-term peace and social justice and political justice”. This is a politician who clearly sounded sympathetic to the aims of these organisations.

Worse still, at the time that Mr Corbyn made his remarks, the British Government (then a Labour Government) had only proscribed what it considered to be the “military wings” of Hamas and Hizballah, and not their so-called “political wings”. Mr Corbyn’s wider point was therefore a criticism of the British Government’s oppositional stance toward the expressly violent elements of these organisations. This is a politician who clearly sounded sympathetic not only to the aims of these organisations, but also to their methods.

In 2015, during the Labour leadership primary, Mr Corbyn was pressed on these past remarks. He explained: “I’m saying that people I talk to, I use it in a collective way, saying our friends are prepared to talk. Does it mean I agree with Hamas and what it does? No. Does it mean I agree with Hizballah and what they do? No. What it means is that I think to bring about a peace process, you have to talk to people with whom you may profoundly disagree.”

In 2016, when asked by the Home Affairs Committee about the “friends” description, Mr Corbyn said: “It was inclusive language I used which with hindsight I would rather not have used. I regret using those words, of course.”

This was not the only occasion in which Mr Corbyn used “inclusive” language to describe Islamist terrorists. Another was in 2012, when, on a programme on the Iranian propaganda channel Press TV, Mr Corbyn described hundreds of Hamas terrorists as “brothers”. Among Mr Corbyn’s “brothers” was Abdul Aziz Umar, who had been given seven life sentences after he helped in the preparation of a suicide vest which was detonated at a restaurant in Jerusalem in 2003. Seven civilians were murdered.

Verdict: Not “false”.

2: Ruth Smeeth/Marc Wadsworth

Claim: Marc Wadsworth used an antisemitic trope to Jewish MP Ruth Smeeth.

At the launch of the Chakrabarti report on antisemitism in April 2016, black rights activist Marc Wadsworth was reported as saying to (then Labour MP) Ruth Smeeth, who is Jewish, ‘Look who’s working hand in hand with the media’.

  1. Marc Wadsworth had no knowledge Ms Smeeth is Jewish, nor any reason to know it. He merely recognised her as a Labour MP, and saw Ms Smeeth and a Daily Telegraph journalist passing a document between them. There is nothing in his words to suggest antisemitism.
  1. There simply is no antisemitic trope of ‘working hand in hand with the media’. Of course Jewish people work in and with the media, why shouldn’t they? The trope is control and ownership of the media. So this accusation requires the manufacturing of an entirely new antisemitic trope, and one which is patently ridiculous.

Video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bHv3D7g4RH4

Verdict: False

Analysis

In 2016, with mounting pressure over antisemitism and two internal Labour Party investigations already quashed by the leadership, Jeremy Corbyn appointed the human rights barrister Shami Chakrabarti to lead yet another inquiry, this time not only into anti-Jewish racism, which was the trigger for the investigation, but, controversially, into the broader category of “antisemitism and other forms of racism, including Islamophobia”. Although the inquiry was billed as being independent, on the same day as her appointment, Ms Chakrabarti joined the Labour Party, and explained in her “independent” report that “my inquiry would be conducted, and any recommendations made, in the Party’s best interests.”

In April 2016, the ostensibly independent report was presented by not only Ms Chakrabarti but also, inexplicably, by Mr Corbyn. The presentation took place at a press conference. Present were numerous journalists; MPs, including Ruth Smeeth; and Labour activists, including Marc Wadsworth, to help fill the room. The activists cheered Mr Corbyn and booed the journalists in what became a small political rally instead of the sober introspection that the event had called for.

In his opening remarks launching a report about antisemitism, Mr Corbyn compared Israel to ISIS by saying “our Jewish friends are no more responsible for the actions of Israel or the Netanyahu government than our Muslim friends are for those of various self-styled Islamic states or organisations.”

Mr Wadsworth, a longtime associate of Mr Corbyn’s who had reportedly been handing out leaflets against “traitors” earlier on, used the event’s question-and-answer segment to accuse Ms Smeeth – a female Labour MP and one of the Party’s best-known Jewish MPs, who is active in its Jewish affiliate and more widely on Jewish affairs – sitting just a few seats away from him, of working “hand in hand” with The Daily Telegraph, which he dubbed the “Torygraph”. Those in the room interpreted his remarks as suggesting that she, a Jew, was treacherously working with Labour’s rivals to undermine Mr Corbyn’s leadership. In the context of the event, the further insinuation was that the concerns about antisemitism that this event was ostensibly meant to address were part of that effort to sabotage Mr Corbyn. Mr Wadsworth was briefly drowned out by cries of “how dare you!”

He then went on to complain that there were too few “African, Caribbean, and Asian people” in the room, implying that the Labour Party’s more immediate problem was not with Jews but with other minorities. One journalist, sitting near Ms Smeeth, commented under his breath: “antisemitism at the launch of an antisemitism report.” Ms Smeeth fled the room in tears. Mr Corbyn, standing at a podium that read “Standing Up Not Standing By”, stood by as Ms Smeeth left the room, and proceeded to answer Mr Wadsworth’s question.

When the event was over, Mr Wadsworth and Mr Corbyn had a good laugh together, with Mr Corbyn telling him that he had sent Mr Wadsworth a text message, and Mr Wadsworth boasting that he had “outed” Ms Smeeth, “bloody talking to the Torygraph!”

Shortly thereafter, Ms Chakrabarti was awarded a peerage, despite Mr Corbyn’s previous pledge not to appoint members to the House of Lords, and she was then appointed to his cabinet.

Mr Wadsworth claimed that he did not know that Ms Smeeth is Jewish. In 2018, he was expelled from the Labour Party in connection with this incident.

Ms Smeeth wrote after the event: “It is beyond belief that someone could come to the launch of a report on antisemitism in the Labour Party and espouse such vile conspiracy theories about Jewish people, which were ironically highlighted as such in Ms Chakrabarti’s report, while the leader of my own party stood by and did absolutely nothing. People like this have no place in our party or our movement and must be opposed.”

In the months following the event, Ms Smeeth experienced some 25,000 incidents of abuse, much of it racial. One of her abusers had authored a 1,000-word document describing how he would murder her. She assumed that it was a far-right individual. It turned out that he was a supporter of Mr Corbyn’s.

Verdict: Not “false”.

1: The Mural.

Image by Donahue Rogers

Claim: Corbyn approved of an antisemitic mural, which shows ‘big-nosed Jewish bankers’ exploiting the masses.

Everyone’s favourite.

  1. They’re not ‘Jewish bankers’. Five are bankers, only two of whom are Jewish, and the sixth is a bizarre figure from the world of Edwardian English occultism, Aleister Crowley, also not Jewish (he invented his own religion, Thelema). It is quite obviously not a statement about ‘Jews’, as the artist himself has explained, since only two of the ‘big-nosed’ figures are Jewish. The accusation simply makes no sense.
  2. Neither did Corbyn ‘approve’ of it. He saw a thumbnail of a facebook post about it, and asked why it had been removed. When it was explained to him that some people maintained it was antisemitic, he apologised.

That’s literally the whole thing.

Verdict: False.

Analysis

The mural in question was titled Freedom for Humanity and was created by the American artist Kalen Ockerman, known as Mear One. It was a temporary mural painted on a wall on Hanbury Street in Tower Hamlets in London in 2012. The mural, pictured in full below, depicts older, white-appearing men in suits seated alongside one another playing a Monopoly-like board game resting on the backs of dark-skinned, bald, naked men. Behind the players is the Eye of Providence and scenes of chimneys billowing smoke and images of protest. The players are supposedly dictating the “New World Order”, and the mural plays on notions of freemasonry, the Illuminati and other conspiracy theories, many of which are often bound up with anti-capitalist and anti-establishment antisemitism on both the far-left and the far-right.

The players are claimed to represent actual figures, two of whom are Jewish. The two Jewish figures, Lord Rothschild and Paul Warburg, have exaggerated noses, a classic antisemitic motif. The other figures have alternative exaggerated features.

At the time that the mural was displayed, it provoked negative reactions from local politicians, who sought to have it removed. The Mayor of Tower Hamlets, for example, said: “The images of the bankers perpetuate antisemitic propaganda about conspiratorial Jewish domination of financial and political institutions.”

The artist defended the mural, saying: “I came to paint a mural that depicted the elite banker cartel known as the Rothschilds, Rockefellers, Morgans, the ruling class elite few, the Wizards of Oz. They would be playing a board game of monopoly on the backs of the working class. The symbol of the Freemason Pyramid rises behind this group and behind that is a polluted world of coal burning and nuclear reactors. I was creating this piece to inspire critical thought and spark conversation. A group of conservatives do not like my mural and are playing a race card with me. My mural is about class and privilege. The banker group is made up of Jewish and white Anglos. For some reason they are saying I am antisemitic. This I am most definitely not…What I am against is class.”

He is also reported to have said that “some of the older white Jewish folk in the local community had an issue with me portraying their beloved #Rothschild or #Warburg etc as the demons they are.”

The artist posted on Facebook that there were calls to remove the mural. Jeremy Corbyn commented on the post, which featured a full picture of the mural, asking: “Why? You are in good company. Rockerfeller [sic] destroyed Diego Viera’s mural because it includes a picture of Lenin.”

In 2018, the mural controversy resurfaced, including Mr Corbyn’s comment. The Jewish then-Labour MP, Luciana Berger, asked his office to explain his historic comment. Mr Corbyn’s office issued a statement: “In 2012, Jeremy was responding to concerns about the removal of public art on grounds of freedom of speech. However, the mural was offensive, used antisemitic imagery, which has no place in our society, and it is right that it was removed.”

This statement is a non-sequitur. Did Mr Corbyn accept at the time that the mural was antisemitic, but believed that it should remain on the grounds of freedom of speech? Or did he not accept that it was antisemitic at the time, but now, as leader, recognised that it was expedient to admit that it was?

Alternatively, perhaps Mr Corbyn never noticed that it was antisemitic. This was the charitable interpretation that many drew, acknowledging that it also meant that he was not able to recognise antisemitic tropes when they appeared on the far-left. This blindness could, at best, be said to characterise Mr Corbyn’s entire approach to Labour’s antisemitism scandal. At worst, in view of his long record of utterances and activity, he is himself an antisemite.

Regarding the mural, Mr Maginn claims that it was not antisemitic, except for where it was. He also claims that Jeremy Corbyn could not have been expected to have seen the mural properly, but that when it was later explained to him, Mr Corbyn agreed that it was right to remove the mural – because it was antisemitic. Yet Mr Maginn still claims, pace Mr Corbyn, that the mural was not in fact antisemitic. In other words, even incidents that Mr Corbyn is prepared to accept are antisemitic, Mr Maginn is not.

Verdict: Not “false”.

#ItWasAScam is a scam

After over seven years of action by Campaign Against Antisemitism, the former barrister Ian Millard has been handed a shockingly lenient sentence at Southampton Magistrates’ Court.

In November last year, Mr Millard was convicted of five offences contrary to section 127(1)(a) Communications Act 2003 in relation to the posting of grossly offensive material relating to his assertions regarding the Jewish race on his blog.

However, Mr Millard was only prosecuted following seven years of work by Campaign Against Antisemitism, due to a reluctance to prosecute on the part of the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS).

The charges related to five blog entries dated between May 2021 and April 2022, which Mr Millard had posted on his website.

In one post on 10th May 2021, Mr Millard wrote: “Where Jews exist in any but very small numbers, non-Jews will always be exploited, and can never be free. That is as true in Europe (and including the UK) as it is in the Middle East.”

On 15th May 2021, Mr Millard wrote: “I lived on and off in the USA, mostly in the early 1990s though I did also spend time there in 1999, 2001 and 2002. Many Americans are fine people, but the mass media there is almost, not quite, 100% owned and operated by Jews. TV, radio, film, newspapers, magazines, book publishing. Americans have little choice but to see the world largely through the Jewish, Zionist, and Israeli lens. Fact. They are also brainwashed from childhood with ‘holocaust’ propaganda and fake history.”

In another, dated 20th November 2021, Mr Millard posted an image of an arm — which had a Star of David emblazoned on the sleeve — holding a hammer above a computer with the words “free speech” on it. Above the image, text read: “Wherever Jews have power, non-Jews eventually become victims or slaves. Look at history. The ridiculous thing is that, in the UK, many of those who oppose Jewish supremacism in Israel or occupied Palestine, effectively support the Jewish lobby in Europe, eg in the UK itself; they pay lip-service to the ‘holocaust farrago’, in particular, and applaud the Zionist efforts to destroy free speech.” 

Defending himself in court, Mr Millard admitted to ownership and editorial control of the blog, but did not admit to posting the offending posts. He did, however, state that he agreed with all the sentiments expressed in the posts.

During the course of his time on the stand, Mr Millard attempted to portray himself as the victim of a Jewish plot to crush free speech, telling the court that the CPS had been able to highlight only five blog posts out of more than 1,600 that he had published. A cursory glance at his blog reveals that it is strewn throughout with antisemitic conspiracy theories and imagery glorifying Adolf Hitler and the Nazi regime.

He went on to brag about how he had visitors to his blog from all over the world.

When confronted with the opinions expressed in his posts, he maintained that they were “perfectly acceptable”.

Attempting to defend his Holocaust-denial, he said: “There’s history and there are views of history and people are entitled to adopt whichever view they want.”

He further professed that there were “a great number of hoaxes” around the Holocaust, going on to lament: “It’s the only history that’s acceptable and I disagree with that.”

Mr Millard told the court that “Jewish control of media is pervasive.”

He also made the claim that British politics is controlled by Zionists, citing as evidence of this the fact that the Star of David — the flag of Israel — had been projected onto 10 Downing Street as a display of solidarity with the Israeli public following the 7th October Hamas terror attacks.

Parroting the far-right antisemitic Great Replacement conspiracy theory, he asserted during his cross-examination that “They [Jews] are trying to get more immigrants into the country and the truth is coming out.”

While insisting that he could not recall if he had written any of the posts, owing to the fact that he allegedly blogs daily, he also said: “It’s not about whether I’m right or wrong. It’s about freedom of expression.”

He maintained that he had never set out with an intent to offend and that while some of the posts were “shocking”, they were not against the law and in fact merely satirical. 

Despite the alarming number of inflammatory comments made by Mr Millard during proceedings, and the CPS referring in its own online post-sentencing report to Mr Millard’s “continuous barrage of offensive material”, it failed to challenge his asserted mitigation that, out of approximately 1,800 blog posts, the CPS could find only five that were grossly offensive.

At neither the trial nor the sentencing hearing did the CPS tell the court that Mr Millard’s blog is in fact awash with Nazi imagery, adoring photos of Hitler, the fetishisation of Aryan supremacy and extracts from Nazi texts, such as the SS doctrine.

During sentencing, Mr Millard was only given a nine-month community order and a costs order of £734, despite the severity of his offences.

Despite being told that, since his conviction, Mr Millard had continued to post material similar to that which had led to his prosecution,the court also denied a criminal behaviour order, which was requested by the CPS in order to tackle this persistent offending behaviour.

The police have confirmed that they are assessing new evidence supplied by Campaign Against Antisemitism, in relation to alleged further offending by Mr Millard in the period between his conviction and sentencing.

Campaign Against Antisemitism (CAA) commissioned King’s College London to survey British adults’ attitudes towards Jews, using YouGov.

The polling has revealed worrying levels of anti-Jewish prejudice among the British public, with particularly frightening rates among young people aged between 18 and 24.

Coming on the eve of Holocaust Memorial Day, the polling raises serious questions about whether lessons about the antisemitism that motivated the Nazis have really been learned by British young adults.

  • A quarter of British people over 64 believe that Israel treats the Palestinians like the Nazis treated the Jews. Among 18-24 year olds, it is over a third.
  • Almost one fifth of the British public believes that Israel can get away with anything because its supporters control the media. Among 18-24 year olds, it is more than a quarter.
  • Compared to the general population (one in twenty), double the proportion of 18-24s (almost one in ten) do not believe that Jewish people are just as loyal to Britain as other British people.
  • Compared to the general population, more than double the proportion of 18-24 year olds are not as open to having Jewish friends as they are to having friends from other sections of British society.
  • While almost one fifth of the British public believes that Israel and its supporters are a bad influence on our democracy, that rises to over one quarter of 18-24 year olds.
  • 7% of Britons do not believe that Israel is right to defend itself against those who want to destroy it. That figure doubles to 14% of 18-24 year olds.
  • 14% of British people are not comfortable spending time with people who openly support Israel. Among 18-24 year olds, that figure rises to 21% – more than one fifth of the young population.
  • More than one in ten young Britons do not believe that Israel has a right to exist as a homeland for the Jewish people.
  • More than one in ten 18-24 year olds believe that Jewish people talk about the Holocaust just to further their political agenda.

Other findings from the survey:

  • More than one in ten British people believe that Jewish people chase money more than other people do.
  • Only three quarters of British people believe that Jewish people can be trusted just as much as other British people in business.
  • More than one in ten Britons believe that, compared to other groups, Jewish people have too much power in the media.

The YouGov survey was designed and analysed by experts at KCL on behalf of CAA.

Total sample size was 2,084 adults. Fieldwork was undertaken between 8th-11th December 2023 by YouGov plc. The survey was carried out online. The figures have been weighted and are representative of all GB adults (aged 18+).

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The rhetoric that we are seeing online, on television and on our streets is radicalising the British public, but it is the rates of antisemitism that we have discovered among 18-24 year olds that are most frightening. This is generation hate.

“On the eve of Holocaust Memorial Day, our country needs an urgent rethink about how we teach about antisemitism. If young people cannot see the relationship between the genocidal antisemitism of the Nazis and the genocidal antisemitism of Hamas, and, worse still, refuse to talk about how our attitudes towards Israel and its supporters are influenced by antisemitic prejudice, then we are clearly not talking about antisemitism properly.

“Our education is failing the next generation, and our society is suffering as a result. It is British Jews who are paying the price.”

Full results

Jewish people can be trusted just as much as other British people in business.

  • Strongly agree 42
  • Agree 33
  • Neither agree nor disagree 21
  • Disagree 3
  • Strongly disagree 2
  • TOTAL AGREE 75
  • TOTAL DISAGREE 5

Only three quarters of British people believe that Jewish people can be trusted just as much as other British people in business.

Jewish people are just as loyal to Britain as other British people.    

  • Strongly agree 34
  • Agree 32
  • Neither agree nor disagree 29
  • Disagree 3
  • Strongly disagree 2
  • TOTAL AGREE 66
  • TOTAL DISAGREE 5 (rises to 9% among young people, i.e. 18-24)

Compared to the general population (one in twenty), double the proportion of 18-24s (almost one in ten) do not believe that Jewish people are just as loyal to Britain as other British people.

I am just as open to having Jewish friends as I am to having friends from other sections of British society.    

  • Strongly agree 56
  • Agree 28
  • Neither agree nor disagree 13
  • Disagree 1
  • Strongly disagree 1
  • TOTAL AGREE 84
  • TOTAL DISAGREE 2 (rises to 5% among young people)

Compared to the general population (2%), more than double the proportion of 18-24 year olds (5%) are not as open to having Jewish friends as they are to having friends from other sections of British society.

Compared to other groups, Jewish people have too much power in the media.

  • Strongly agree 4
  • Agree 8
  • Neither agree nor disagree 42
  • Disagree 24
  • Strongly disagree 22
  • TOTAL AGREE 12 (rises to 16% among young people)
  • TOTAL DISAGREE 46

More than one in ten Britons believe that, compared to other groups, Jewish people have too much power in the media.

Jewish people talk about the Holocaust just to further their political agenda.

  • Strongly agree 2
  • Agree 6
  • Neither agree nor disagree 30
  • Disagree 29
  • Strongly disagree 33
  • TOTAL AGREE 8 (rises to 11% among young people)
  • TOTAL DISAGREE 62

More than one in ten 18-24 year olds believe that Jewish people talk about the Holocaust just to further their political agenda.

Jewish people chase money more than other people do.    

  • Strongly agree 3
  • Agree 8
  • Neither agree nor disagree 43
  • Disagree 21
  • Strongly disagree 25
  • TOTAL AGREE 11
  • TOTAL DISAGREE 46

More than one in ten British people believe that Jewish people chase money more than other people do.

I am comfortable spending time with people who openly support Israel    

  • Strongly agree 14
  • Agree 24
  • Neither agree nor disagree 48
  • Disagree 9
  • Strongly disagree 5
  • TOTAL AGREE 38
  • TOTAL DISAGREE 14 (rises to 21% among young people)

14% of British people are not comfortable spending time with people who openly support Israel. Among 18-24 year olds, that figure rises to 21% – more than one fifth of the young population.

Israel has a right to exist as a homeland for the Jewish people    

  • Strongly agree 21
  • Agree 35
  • Neither agree nor disagree 37
  • Disagree 4
  • Strongly disagree 3
  • TOTAL AGREE 56
  • TOTAL DISAGREE 7 (rises to 11% among young people)

More than one in ten young Britons do not believe that Israel has a right to exist as a homeland for the Jewish people.

Israel is right to defend itself against those who want to destroy it    

  • Strongly agree 20
  • Agree 38
  • Neither agree nor disagree     34
  • Disagree 4
  • Strongly disagree 3
  • TOTAL AGREE 58
  • TOTAL DISAGREE 7 (rises to 14% among young people)

Seven percent of Britons, and fourteen percent of young Britons, do not believe that Israel is right to defend itself against those who want to destroy it.

Israel and its supporters are a bad influence on our democracy    

  • Strongly agree 7
  • Agree 10
  • Neither agree nor disagree 51
  • Disagree 21
  • Strongly disagree 12
  • TOTAL AGREE 17 (rises to 28% among young people)
  • TOTAL DISAGREE 33

Over one quarter of young people believe that Israel and its supporters are a bad influence on our democracy, compared to almost one fifth of the wider British public.

Israel can get away with anything because its supporters control the media    

  • Strongly agree 6
  • Agree 12
  • Neither agree nor disagree 45
  • Disagree 23
  • Strongly disagree 15
  • TOTAL AGREE 18 (rises to 26% among young people)
  • TOTAL DISAGREE 38

Almost one fifth of the British public believes that Israel can get away with anything because its supporters control the media. Among young people, it is more than a quarter.

Israel treats the Palestinians like the Nazis treated the Jews    

  • Strongly agree 12
  • Agree 18
  • Neither agree nor disagree 43
  • Disagree 15
  • Strongly disagree 12
  • TOTAL AGREE 30 (rises to 34% of young people)
  • TOTAL DISAGREE 27

A quarter of British people over 64 believe that Israel treats the Palestinians like the Nazis treated the Jews. Among 18-24 year olds, it is over a third.

Background and Methodology

The twelve statements – which include six relating to Judeophobic antisemitism and six relating to anti-Zionist antisemitism – together comprise the Generalised Antisemitism Scale.

The Generalised Antisemitism Scale was devised by Dr Daniel Allington of King’s College London, Dr David Hirsh of Goldsmiths, and Dr Louise Katz (then) of the University of Derby. The research behind the Generalised Antisemitism Scale has been peer reviewed.

In particular, in developing the Generalised Antisemitism Scale, they were guided by the International Definition of Antisemitism, which Campaign Against Antisemitism, together with other Jewish communal institutions from around the world, has long campaigned to be widely adopted. Further background on the Generalised Antisemitism Scale can be found here.

Our survey of British adults were conducted by YouGov Plc. The surveys were administered online to members of YouGov’s panel of over 1,000,000 British adults who have agreed to take part in surveys. E-mails were sent to adult panellists who fulfilled the requirements of the sample, inviting them to take part in the surveys, and providing a link to the survey. YouGov normally achieves a response rate of between 35% and 50% to surveys however this does vary depending on the subject matter, complexity and length of the questionnaire.

Total sample size was 2,084 adults. Fieldwork was undertaken between 8th-11th December 2023 by YouGov plc. The survey was carried out online. The figures have been weighted and are representative of all GB adults (aged 18+).

YouGov ensured that there were no duplicate responses and that all respondents were adults living in Great Britain.

The responding sample was weighted according to age and gender, social grade, political attention level, education, and region, in addition to past voting behaviour, to provide a representative reporting sample. The profile is derived from the Census as well as the mid-year population estimates and Annual Population Survey published by the Office for National Statistics.

This week we approach Holocaust Memorial Day, which marks the Allied liberation of Auschwitz and commemorates the six million Jewish men, women and children murdered by the Nazis and their collaborators. But how should we remember the Holocaust – the event for which the term “genocide” was coined?

From graffiti in Glasgow to a library in Tower Hamlets, we are all seeing comparisons of Israel to Nazis everywhere, in a clear breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism. At yesterday’s weekly anti-Israel protest, leaflets were distributed in London purporting to explain the “Zionist Holocaust, backed by the West, aping Hitler.” Across the channel in the Hague, the Jewish state is being accused of implementing a genocide.

The brutality of the antisemitic genocidal terror group Hamas has quickly been forgotten, and reminders of its barbarism – such as pictures of baby Kfir, who this past week turned one year old in Hamas’s clutches – are torn from walls.

Evidently, the enemies of the Jewish people view the Holocaust and its legacy very differently from the rest of us. This week will be an opportunity to ask ourselves why we continue to remember the Holocaust, and what lessons it is supposed to teach.

If you are organising or attending a Holocaust Memorial Day event, make sure that the right lessons are being taught. If they are not, please let us know.

Manchester marches against antisemitism

Weekly anti-Israel rallies featuring antisemitic rhetoric and genocidal chanting have made our urban centres no-go zones for Jews. It is intolerable.

Today, Campaign Against Antisemitism was proud to join Jews and allies in Manchester to march against antisemitism!

“Filthy animals and Zionist control”

Our Demonstration and Event Monitoring Unit, together with our communications team, went out to a recent anti-Israel rally and asked protesters why they were demonstrating.

​Their repugnant responses were so voluminous that we couldn’t fit them all into one video. Here is Part One:

You can also watch Part Two and Part Three.

Are the police doing enough?

Sir Mark Rowley, the Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis, appeared on LBC to defend policing of the weekly anti-Israel protests. Challenged by a caller, he claimed: “We’re determined to do everything we can do within the law to create the frameworks around protest to make sure that we balance the rights of protesters with not having the centre of London as a place where people such as yourself are afraid to come into.”

Given that our polling shows that 90% of British Jews say that they would avoid travelling to a city centre if a major anti-Israel demonstration was taking place there, we question Sir Mark’s satisfaction that the right “balance” has been struck.

Pressed on whether his officers are being robust enough with demonstrators who hold antisemitic signs and presented with the claim that, when protestors shout the genocidal chant “From the River to the Sea”, his officers just stand and watch, he insisted: “That’s not true.”

​You can judge for yourself here.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been at the forefront of holding the Met to account, and we will continue to do so in the weeks to come.

Proscription of Hizb ut-Tahrir

While the Met Police may not be listening, the Government showed that it is. This week, Home Secretary James Cleverly announced that the Islamist group Hizb ut-Tahrir is to be proscribed under the Terrorism Act 2000.

When we discovered that Hizb ut-Tahrir had appeared to praise the Hamas attack of 7th October, we wrote to the Met to prevent the group from holding its demonstrations on the streets of London. The Met took no action and the rallies went ahead, in which there were calls for the armies of Muhammed to wage Jihad. Still, the Met refused to take action, making excuses to defend this rhetoric instead.

We therefore wrote to the Home Secretary calling for the controversial Islamist group to be proscribed.

​We commend the Home Secretary for this significant announcement. for which we have called over the past few weeks and with which, according to our polling, 90% of British Jews agree.

It is absolutely the right step, and shows that the Government is listening. The Met should take note.

This week, as we approach Holocaust Memorial Day, we must ensure that the right lessons are being learned. We owe it to the past, and we owe it to the present and the future.

A camp for former British soldiers has been revealed to be a hotbed of antisemitic conspiracy theories. 

PTSD Camp Bath, a camp for “ex-forces with PTSD [post-traumatic stress disorder]”, has allegedly hosted several antisemitic conspiracy theorists as well as far-right individuals, according to an investigation by the JC.

The camp is located in a rural area and offers therapy sessions with horses as well as classes on woodland skills.

According to the investigation, the centre is run by Dion Drayford and Jo Drayford. Mr Drayford has reportedly appeared on podcasts with members of Patriotic Alternative (PA). According to his wife, Mr Drayford previously worked as a bodyguard in Iraq for American clients and, before that, served as a paratrooper for around twenty years. 

His wife, Jo, is also known to have been a guest on a podcast with the alleged former East of England organiser for PA, Chris Mitchell. 

PA is a UK-based group headed by the former leader of the youth wing of the BNP, Mark Collett. Mr Collett is reported to have dabbled in Holocaust denial, is regularly heard as a guest on the radio show of the former Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard, David Duke, and has described the Holocaust as “an instrument of white guilt”.

PA is known for its efforts to recruit youth to its white nationalist ideology. Previously, the far-right group published an online “alternative” homeschool curriculum condemned as “poison” and “hateful” and attempted to recruit children as young as twelve through live-streaming events on YouTube, according to The Times.

In 2017, Mr Drayford reportedly shared content that claimed to uncover a “Jewish organ-trafficking centre”. In the content, it was alleged that Jews harvest organs from Syrian refugees. 

Currently, the centre is understood to be organising a fundraiser for Alfred Guenigault. Mr Guenigault is a 98-year-old veteran who fought in the Second World War and whose landlord evicted him from his home. The fundraiser is claimed to be organised by Darren Edmundson, the self-proclaimed “Pembrokeshire Patriot” who was involved in protests against asylum seekers arriving in the UK. It is understood that the logos of both PTSD Camp Bath and Patriotic Alternative appear on the fundraising videos.

John Lawrence, the founder and leader of the National Housing Party, is known to have made a livestream in which he encouraged people to donate to Mr Guenigault. 

According to its website, the National Housing Party is a “nationalist party with realistic policies which will benefit both the indigenous population and UK citizens”. According to the Party, “the politically correct society we now live in is a vicious anti-white and anti-Christian one.”

Mr Lawrence has reportedly said: “I’ve met many veterans alongside Dion [Mr Drayson] at the camp.”

Earlier this year, a message on Telegram was reportedly sent from the National Housing Party which read: “Every major contributor to the dogma of Cultural Marxism was Jewish. The Frankfurt School from where it originated was a nest of Jews. Its goal was simple destroy white Christian civilisation and replace it with a multicultural madhouse under Jewish hegemony [sic].” 

The Party has also allegedly said that “there is not an anti-Jewish agenda… there is a vicious anti-white agenda” and that the “mainly Jewish” Soviet authorities were responsible for the deaths of Christian Ukrainians by starvation. 

Nigel Marcham and Alan Leggett, who are nicknamed “Little Veteran” and “Active Patriot” respectively, are understood to be attendees at the camp. Both Mr Marcham and Mr Leggett were previously banned from the docks at Dover after a judge concluded that they were “abusing” migrants. 

In 2020, Mr Marcham allegedly led a protest against boat crossings over the Channel. The protest, which was attended by white nationalists, led to the port being closed. 

A spokesperson for the Government said: “There is no place in our country for antisemitism in any form – it is abhorrent and will not be tolerated. The UK has some of the strongest legislation in the world, but we recognise there is more work to be done and will continue to push for prosecution where religious or racially motivated criminal activity occurs. We also continue to work closely with Jewish communities and the police to tackle hate crime.”

Simon Fell, the MP for Barrow and Furness who sits on the Home Affairs Select Committee, said: “Given the links to Patriotic Alternative, this is deeply concerning. The police and the Home Office must scrutinise this camp very carefully to ensure it is not a front for more insidious activity.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism closely monitors the far-right, which remains a dangerous threat to the Jewish community and other minority groups.

A GB News presenter took to Twitter yesterday where she shared a conspiracy theory about COVID-19 and Ashkenazi Jews.

Beverley Turner, the mid-morning co-host of the To The Point programme, wrote on her Twitter: “Sas cov 2 virus causes less harm to certain ethnicities – east Asians, and Ashkenazi Jews (Fauci anyone?) than to European, S Asian & African… Just let that sink in.”

She continued: “This is looking increasingly like a bio weapon to destroy the west.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Stating that COVID-19 poses less of a risk to Ashkenazi Jews would be stupid enough, but simultaneously suggesting that the virus is a ‘bio weapon to destroy the west’ implies that Jews collaborated in creating the pandemic and feeds a classic trope that Jews spread disease to harm others and not themselves. It is astonishing that someone who tweeted such dangerous nonsense could be a host on GB News.”

Last week, presidential hopeful Robert F Kennedy Jr made similar comments at a dinner in New York when he said: “COVID-19 is targeted to attack Caucasians and black people. The people who are most immune are Ashkenazi Jews and Chinese…We don’t know whether it was deliberately targeted at that or not but there are papers out there that show the racial or ethnic differential of impact for that.”

The comments were roundly condemned, including by members of his family. Mr Kennedy has since refuted all accusations of antisemitism.

Last year, Mr Kennedy was forced to apologise after he invoked Anne Frank’s name in comparing COVID-19 mandates to laws in Nazi Germany. During his speech at an anti-vaccination rally in Washington, he remarked: “Even in Hitler’s Germany, you could cross the Alps to Switzerland. You could hide in an attic like Anne Frank did.”

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Hope Sussex Community is reportedly due to host the antisemitic hate preacher and conspiracy theorist, David Icke, at an upcoming festival. 

According to its website, the group is “a community that loves, learns and grows together”. 

In the website’s section for “Education & Empowerment”, it reads: “State schools are unfit for purpose, they are increasingly pushing an agenda that is harmful and eroding to our society, while being falsely presented as ‘social progress’.”

It is understood that Hope Sussex Community is currently under investigation by Ofsted as a suspected unregulated illegal school. Earlier this year, the group denied allegations of teaching conspiracy theories. A spokesperson for the group said: “We teach [students] to think critically at all times and to question everything, to investigate themselves and not to believe the often harmful state propaganda peddled on our TV screens.”

Two of the organisation’s founders, Sadie Single and Matthew Single, are reported to be former members of the British National Party who were expelled in 2019 after they leaked personal details of the Party’s membership online.  

The organisation is currently advertising its festival, the “Freedom Music Festival”, for which Mr Icke is a “special guest”. 

Mr Icke uses social media, his books and his stage performances to incite hatred. His preaching is so absurd that since the 1990s he has been dismissed as a crank, but because he is dismissed, there has been no major opposition to him and he has built up a following of thousands upon thousands of disciples whom he has persuaded to adamantly believe that the world is in the grip of a conspiracy run by the “Rothschild Zionists”. His repertoire includes conspiracy myths and tropes classified as antisemitic according to the International Definition of Antisemitism, adopted by the British Government. Campaign Against Antisemitism has successfully persuaded some venues to pull out of hosting his events.

After years of pressure from Campaign Against Antisemitism, Mr Icke was banned from most social media platforms.

Sainsbury’s has issued an apology after two of its branches were found to have stocked copies of a conspiracy newspaper that has previously come to the defence of Holocaust-deniers.

The Light is an independently-distributed newspaper that was founded in 2020. It has regularly promoted conspiracy theories relating to COVID-19 and vaccines, and has made comparisons between lockdown and vaccine regulations to those of Nazi Germany.

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

The newspaper has also, on at least two occasions, targeted Campaign Against Antisemitism in relation to successful prosecutions against antisemites.

In 2021, it defended the Hitler-loving radio host Graham Hart, who was sentenced to prison after pleading guilty to eight counts of inciting racial hatred after action by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

An investigation by Campaign Against Antisemitism revealed that Mr Hart repeatedly claimed that Jews are “filth”; questioned whether six million Jews were really murdered in the Holocaust; praised Adolf Hitler as “the greatest man of the twentieth century”; said that “is isn’t just the white people who hate the Jews…it’s everyone hates the Jews. Everyone”; claimed that the Jews “run everything”, are “evil” and are “not of this world”; and argued that the Jews have “got to go down, they’ve just got to go down”.

The Light wrote of the sentencing: “While his opinions may seem radical, surely he is entitled to them? How does it harm anybody else for him to have a different view of history?”

Last year, the newspaper expressed support for Tahra Ahmed, a prominent Grenfell Tower volunteer aid worker who, after being reported to the police by Campaign Against Antisemitism, CST and others, was sentenced to eleven months in prison after being found guilty of publishing written material in order to stir up racial hatred.

On the Holocaust, Ms Ahmed said: “I’m not a Holocaust denier…unfortunately, six million Jews is a number that has been perpetuated and the actual number has been revised down by experts.” She affirmed using the term “Holohoax”, arguing that “it [the figures] was manipulated and exaggerated at the time” and that, regarding the actual number of deaths in the Holocaust, “The Jewish council [sic] says 3.5 million…the Red Cross says 283,000.” She also baselessly asserted that “Hitler had an agreement with Rothschild to put Jews in concentration camps so Rothschild could transfer Jews to Palestine” and approvingly quoted a known Holocaust denier. She was also pressed on why she described the expulsion of the Jews from England in the Middle Ages as a “final solution to the Jewish problem.”

Her trial was described by the newspaper “a political stitchup.”

Additionally, according to the BBC, The Light published an article by blogger Lasha Darkmoon, in which she argued that individuals should be able to question the Holocaust.

The Light’s website also lists one of its “proud sponsors” as the antisemitic hate preacher and conspiracy theorist David Icke, who has been banned from entering several European countries.

It has also been reported that The Light has endorsed content by the far-right organisation Patriotic Alternative, a UK-based group headed by the former leader of the youth wing of the BNP, Mark Collett. Mr Collett is reported to have dabbled in Holocaust denial, is regularly heard as a guest on the radio show of the former Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard, David Duke, and has described the Holocaust as “an instrument of white guilt”. Last month, one of its members who said that Adolf Hitler did “nothing wrong” was jailed.

A spokesperson for Sainsbury’s said that the newspaper was left in its Warlingham and Newhaven branches without its knowing, stating: “We do not stock this newspaper and it is removed from any stores where it’s left. We apologise for any upset caused”.

Image credit: Google

The BBC has apologised in response to a multitude of complaints – including from Campaign Against Antisemitism – after a presenter made the baseless accusation that “Israeli forces are happy to kill children.”

The outrageous and unfounded claim came during an interview on BBC News yesterday with the former Prime Minister of Israel, Naftali Bennett, about Israel’s military operation in Jenin, which has now concluded.

When speaking on the topic of the targets of the operation, Anjana Gadgil, the presenter who conducted the interview, stated: “The Israeli forces are happy to kill children.” 

Mr Bennett robustly rejected the baseless assertion, including by noting that the seventeen-year-olds were armed combatants.

The notion that the military of the state of Israel – the Jewish state – is “happy” to kill minors draws on the symbolism of the blood libel.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Using the symbols and images associated with classic antisemitism (e.g. claims of Jews killing Jesus or blood libel) to characterise Israel or Israelis” is an example of antisemitism.

The original antisemitic blood libel dates to 1144, when Jews in England were falsely accused of the murder of a boy known as William of Norwich.

Incidents of blood libel grew in the Middle Ages, with Jews accused of murdering Christian children in order to use their blood in Passover rituals. In 1290, it was a pretext for the confiscation of all Jewish property and the complete expulsion of Jews from England. They were not permitted to return until centuries later. The blood libel has been a case of much persecution and murder of Jews ever since, including up to the present day.

In the modern era, updated versions of the blood libel continue to pervade antisemitic discourse.  Contemporary manifestations include the accusation that Jews or the Jewish state steal human organs, drink or utilise the blood of non-Jews, or willfully and readily murder non-Jewish – particularly Arab – children.

In response to a multitude of complaints, the BBC summarised the position: “We received comments and complaints concerning an interview with the former Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett about recent events in the West Bank and Israel. The complaints raised relate to specific interview questions about the deaths of young people in the Jenin refugee camp.”

In its response, the BBC said: “Across the BBC’s platforms – including the BBC News channel – these events have been covered in an impartial and robust way. The United Nations raised the issue of the impact of the operation in Jenin on children and young people. While this was a legitimate subject to examine in the interview, we apologise that the language used in this line of questioning was not phrased well and was inappropriate.”

Ms Gadgil has also deleted her Twitter account.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If you are concerned about reportage in the media, please contact us at [email protected]

Plans are being drawn up for the establishment of a Jewish heritage centre in Norwich, a city that played an infamous role in the history of antisemitism.

Fundraising is underway for the new centre, with a view to locating it at the site of Jurnet’s House, described as the oldest known Jewish dwelling in England. The oldest dwelling in the city, it was home to the prominent Jewish Jurnet family in the early thirteenth century. All that remains of the original structure is the crypt on King Street; the entire building closed in 2020 due to damp.

The crypt is all that remains of the original Jurnet’s House on King Street and the entire building closed in 2020 because of damp and mould.

The announcement comes after the then-Lord Mayor of Norwich apologised earlier this year for the first known instance of the antisemitic blood libel, which took place in the city, as well as a subsequent massacre of Jews in 1190.

The original antisemitic blood libel dates to 1144 when Jews were falsely accused of the murder of a boy known as William of Norwich.

Following this, accusations of blood libel grew in the Middle Ages, eventually evolving to the point of claiming that Jews murdered Christian children in order to use their blood in Passover rituals. In 1290, it was the pretext for the confiscation of all Jewish property and the complete expulsion of Jews from England. They were not permitted to return until 1655. Blood libel has been responsible for the persecution and killing of Jews ever since.

In the modern era, blood libel continues to be a major aspect of antisemitism. It has extended its reach to accuse Jews of many different forms of harm that can be carried out against other people. Manifestations of blood libel include the accusations that Jews steal human organs, Jews harm the children of non-Jews, or Jews drink or utilise the blood of non-Jews.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Using the symbols and images associated with classic antisemitism (e.g. claims of Jews killing Jesus or blood libel) to characterise Israel or Israelis” is an example of antisemitism.

A painting on wood – known as a rood screen – in Holy Trinity Church in nearby Loddon in Norfolk depicts the crucifixion of the twelve-year-old boy William of Norwich.

In 1190, many of Norwich’s Jews were murdered, with survivors taking refuge at the city’s castle. The remains of seventeen victims were discovered down an old well during the construction of a shopping centre two decades ago, while DNA testing last year established a strong genetic link to Ashkenazi Jews and dated the deaths to around the time of the massacre.

A century after the original blood libel in Norwich, in the 1230s a local Jew was accused of abducting and circumcising a Christian boy, leading to violence and the torching of Jewish homes.

Image credit: Norwich City Council

A report by a non-profit has revealed numerous disturbing antisemitic comments being espoused in the Palestinian Authority media.

According to Palestinian Media Watch, researcher Muhammad Al-Yahya is said to have stated on Talk of the Hour, an official Palestinian Authority television channel, that “Jews are arrogant by nature” and “Jewish thinking is based on racist ideology.”

Jordan Muhammad Al-Burin, a journalist repeatedly invited to speak on the channel, reportedly opined that the Holocaust was “truly fabricated” and that “the Zionists cooperated with Hitler to advance their state.”

Palestinian Media Watch has previously exposed abundant expressions of antisemitic tropes in official PA media outlets, such as the claim that “Jews control American institutions” and that Israel is “reenacting the Nazi Holocaust.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism worldwide.

Image credit: Palestinian Media Watch

The Duke of Sussex has conducted an “intimate conversation” with an inflammatory trauma expert who has previously compared Hamas terrorists to Warsaw Ghetto fighters and denied antisemitism in the Labour Party.

Yesterday, Harry held a conversation with Gabor Mate, who wrote in 2014: “The Palestinians use tunnels? So did my heroes, the poorly armed fighters of the Warsaw Ghetto.”

This was not an isolated occurrence. On a 2019 far-left podcast, for example, he spoke to his son Aaron Mate, who has also courted controversy in the past, about “the misuse of antisemitism”, defending the antisemitic former leader of the Labour Party, Jeremy Corbyn, saying: “You also point out just how manipulative it is to call Corbyn an antisemite…So, Corbyn goes to this rally where this Jewish person speaks, and Corbyn’s accused of being an antisemite because he’s present when a Jew criticises or points out similarities between the ghettoisation of Gaza and the ghettoisation of Jews.”

Similar views were expressed in a 2021 episode of the podcast in which Mr Mate participated, alongside his son, activist Max Blumenthal, and the controversial activist and musician Roger Waters.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

The elder Mr Mate, a Holocaust survivor born in Budapest in the period of the deportation of Hungarian Jewry in 1944, has also spoken positively of Mr Waters.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Giving such a prominent platform to someone who has compared Hamas operatives to the victims of the Holocaust and who has gone out of his way to deny antisemitism in Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour Party is a deeply troubling move from Harry. The Duke of Sussex should carefully consider how he uses his privileged position.”

A man arrested after allegedly “keeping British girls in cellar for nine months” is reported to be a Holocaust-denier and conspiracist.

Tom Landon, 54, is understood to have been reported to social services by neighbours who heard children’s voices emanating from the British man’s home in Obritz in northern Austria near the German border. It is claimed that whenever anyone approached the house, the children’s voices became silent.

Inspectors found Mr Landon and his 40-year-old British partner at the home, and five young children between seven months and five years of age.

News reports allege that Mr Landon has ties to the German Reichsburger movement, which recently sought to conduct a coup on the German state, which was foiled by authorities.

According to the Deputy Mayor of Obritz, “He’s not from here and has only been Obritz for a short time. Before that, he apparently lived in England. I think he worked in the IT sector.”

He added that Mr Landon could speak English and German, and that the children did not appear to have been mistreated and had been seen walking around the town a fortnight earlier.

Image credit: Twitter

A new poll has found that almost one in four Dutch people born after 1980 believe that the Holocaust is “a myth” or that the number of Jewish people murdered by the Nazis is “greatly exaggerated”.

29 percent of Dutch people believed that two million or fewer Jews were killed, with 37 percent of millennials and Generation Z affirming that view. A majority of respondents also did not know that six million Jews were murdered in the Holocaust.

Twelve percent of those polled said that the crimes of Nazi Germany were untrue or exaggerated, rising to 23% among young Dutch.

Almost a third of Dutch millennials also do not know that Anne Frank died in a concentration camp, despite her renowned diary documenting her life in hiding in The Netherlands.

The survey, conducted by the US-based Claims Conference, polled 2,000 Dutch people last December. Similar surveys were previously conducted in the United States, Britain, France, Austria and Canada, but the results for the Dutch polling was more troubling than the other surveys

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism in The Netherlands and throughout Europe.

An Iranian television network has broadcasted an inflammatory Catholic bishop claiming that Jews “control the world.”

Bishop Richard Wiliamson, who has previously claimed that only 200,000 Jews died during the Holocaust, reportedly claimed on the Iranian Channel 4 that Jews “control peoples’ minds” and “the world,” among numerous other comments targeting Jewish people. 

Bishop Williamson, who was convicted of Holocaust-denial in Germany, has also said that he believes that “there were no gas chambers.”

Throughout the broadcast, Bishop Williamson appeared to reference a number of conspiracy theories relating to Jews, including the belief that Jewish people control the media. He then continued to refer to the Holocaust as a “myth” and claimed that it was “historical truth” that only 100,000 Jews died during the Holocaust. 

On the same broadcast, he also reportedly characterised Jewish people as “masterly twisters of minds” who created freemasonry to “carry Jewish corruption into Christian society”. 

Judeo-Masonism is a conspiratorial belief that Jews secretly collaborate with freemasons to undermine the teachings of the Catholic Church and control the world.

Bishop Williamson was previously excommunicated from the Catholic Church, and, following a brief readmission, excommunicated again.

The antisemitic hate preacher and conspiracy theorist David Icke has been banned from entering several European countries.

The two-year ban came prior to a planned demonstration in Amsterdam, which was scheduled to have taken place this Sunday, after Dutch immigration authorities told Mr Icke that “there are concrete indications that your arrival in the Netherlands poses a threat to public order.”

Following his ban, the rally was reportedly cancelled by the organisers.

Mr Icke’s ban reportedly includes 25 other countries due to it also applying to the EU’s visa-free Schengen area.

Last month, the organisers of the demonstration were called upon by Amsterdam’s mayor, police and prosecutor’s office to disinvite Mr Icke due to his “antisemitic and hurtful statements”.

In a video response uploaded to his website, Mr Icke said that he was “demonised” by “ultra-Zionist organisations”.

Mr Icke uses social media, his books and his stage performances to incite hatred. His preaching is so absurd that since the 1990s he has been dismissed as a crank, but because he is dismissed, there has been no major opposition to him and he has built up a following of thousands upon thousands of disciples whom he has persuaded to adamantly believe that the world is in the grip of a conspiracy run by the “Rothschild Zionists”. His repertoire includes conspiracy myths and tropes classified as antisemitic according to the International Definition of Antisemitism, adopted by the British Government. Campaign Against Antisemitism has successfully persuaded some venues to pull out of hosting his events.

After years of pressure from Campaign Against Antisemitism, Mr Icke was banned from most social media platforms.

The Brooklyn Nets player, Kyrie Irving, has come under fire for promoting an allegedly antisemitic film.

Last week, the Nets’ star guard posted a link to the film “Hebrews to Negroes: Wake Up Black America” on Twitter. The film supposedly “uncovers the true identity of the Children of Israel.”

The notion that Black Americans are the true Jews is an increasingly popular conspiracy theory and was also recently promoted by Kanye West. It features too in the ideology of the Black Israelite Hebrews, an extremist Black supremacist group that has also harassed and intimidated Jews on the streets of the UK and the London Underground and is thought to have been connected to the New Jersey kosher grocery store shooting in 2019.

Nets’ owner Joe Tsai said: “I’m disappointed that Kyrie appears to support a film based on a book full of antisemitic disinformation. I want to sit down and make sure he understands this is hurtful to all of us, and as a man of faith, it is wrong to promote hate based on race, ethnicity or religion.”

Mr Irving said on Twitter: “I am an OMNIST and I meant no disrespect to anyone’s religious beliefs…the Antisemitic label that is being pushed on me is not justified and does not reflect the reality or truth I live in everyday. I embrace and want to learn from all walks of life and religions.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the United States.

A senior local authority officer has been exposed as operating incendiary far-right anonymous social media channels.

Leon Mayer, who works as a systems development officer at Swindon Borough Council, is reported to have secretly run Twitter and YouTube accounts that published inflammatory rock songs with racist references to Jews.

Mr Mayer has also reportedly been photographed on hikes organised by the far-right group Patriotic Alternative.

According to watchdog Red Flare, Mr Mayer operates the @NatKumquat handle on Twitter and the Kumquat Nat account on YouTube, a platform that he has reportedly referred to as “Judentube”.

Both accounts have apparently shared antisemitic and far-right content, including songs called Swindon Is Dead, Dresden and Kalergi Express, a reference to the antisemitic “Kalergi Plan” conspiracy theory, which alleges that Jews are “taking over the world” by encouraging immigration, as well as marriage and sexual relationships between members of different races.

When YouTube took down the video of a song called Dissident Detected (Shut It Down!), Mr Mayer complained on his Twitter account: “(The song) gets taken down by Judentube for possible ‘Hate Speech’. They write themselves.” 

Another song, You Called?, proclaimed, “It hasn’t ended, you know that. Walk into the light, Victory will soon be hailed,” and was posted with a video showing a photograph of Hitler as a baby.

The Twitter account also reportedly featured defences of Hitler and disparaging references to Jews and other minorities.

It also commented “Pure Gold” in reference to an antisemitic YouTube post by “Mordecai Sheckelberg”, an account that reportedly mocks the Holocaust.

The JC uncovered these and further inflammatory social media posts.

Confronted by the JC outside his home in Swindon, Mr Mayer reportedly denied being Kumquat Nat, but conceded: “I’ve used an alias similar.” It is understood that both accounts were deleted within hours.

He denied being a member of Patriotic Alternative but said: “I know of them.” Asked by the JC if he had been on any hikes organised by Patriotic Alternative, Mr Mayer replied: “I went on one once, to see what it’s about.” When asked if he was a member of the far-right group, he said: “I’m not a member. I’d have thought you’d have to be paying money or something.” He was asked if he was sympathetic with their policies and replied: “I agree with some of it, yeah. I agree with some of lots of parties. I agree with not becoming a minority within the country.”

Asked by the JC where he stood on Jews, he reportedly replied: “Not really a problem. With the ones who are at the top of things, they’re a problem, like in banking and such things, which is common knowledge.” Pressed on whether he is anti-Jewish, he reportedly said: “No, I’ve said this before, only these oligarchs within certain systems, like the media, which you can’t deny, and other such things that they’re the majority within. The rich ones, but that’s what they do. You could say the same about the Catholics.” 

Swindon Borough Council, which has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism, said that Mr Mayer was being suspended pending an internal investigation into the allegations.

Image credit: JC

New research shows that over a third of British young people in the 18-24 age bracket agree that Jews have an “unhealthy control over the world’s banking system”.

The findings come from polling conducted by the anti-racism charity, Hope Not Hate. The organisation investigated attitudes across British society, and the results reportedly show that 34 percent of those questioned between the ages of eighteen and 24 believe the statement about Jews and banking to be “probably” or “definitely” true.

This number falls to 28 percent among people in the 25-34 demographic, and is as low as twelve percent among those over 75 years of age.

The authors of the survey describe these findings as “shocking” and said that they indicate “a higher degree of openness to conspiracies in those under 35…it is clear that while socially liberal beliefs are more common amongst the majority, there is a large cohort of young people who hold more reactionary views, and a smaller minority who hold even more extreme beliefs”.

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “These are frightening statistics. Even a fraction of these figures would serve to highlight just how widespread antisemitic conspiracy theories have become. The numbers here are downright terrifying. It is particularly alarming that these tropes are so popular among the younger population, which raises serious questions about the quality of formal education in this area and the critical role that social media plays in propagating these racist ideas. It means that the fight against antisemitism is only going to have to intensify and more must be done to prevent the indoctrination of children into antisemitic conspiracy online.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism closely monitors the far-right, which remains a dangerous threat to the Jewish community and other minority groups.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Flyers claiming that “challenging Jewish privilege” is “social justice” were distributed to homes in Brighton and Hove recently.

The flyers utilise classic antisemitic tropes of power and control in asking why Jewish people “get special privilege when it comes to top universities?”

It goes on to state: “Challenging White Privilege and Jewish Privilege is not antisemitic. It is not defamatory. It does not insult anyone. It is social justice.”

The flyers also depict the yellow star containing the word German ‘Jude’, meaning ‘Jew’, that was forced upon Jewish people during the Holocaust and advertises the online domain of the Goyim Defense League (GDL).

The GDL is a hate group whose membership reportedly contains several neo-Nazis and is understood to be led by Jon Minadeo II, who created t-shirts carrying antisemitic slogans such as the Holocaust was “a hoax”. The GDL is responsible for stunts such as hanging a banner from a bridge in Austin, Texas that read “Vax the Jews” and driving around Los Angeles dressed as Nazis.

The group is divided into regional branches and regularly distributes antisemitic flyers across the United States. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism closely monitors the far-right, which remains a dangerous threat to the Jewish community and other minority groups.

The Catholic Church in Spain has announced an investigation into claims made in an Israeli newspaper that some towns and villages in the country still observe rituals relating to the antisemitic “blood libel”.

The blood libel is a racist claim that Jews use the blood of Christian children in religious rituals, and has been part of Christian – and, in the modern era, also Islamic – antisemitism for centuries. It was also used to justify the expulsion of the Jews from Spain in 1492.

According to the Haaretz newspaper, parishes in Toledo, Zaragoza and elsewhere continue to practice rituals, backed by the local churches and councils, based on the blood libel.

In Toledo, for example, the Santo Niño de La Guardia myth, which dates back to 1480, imagines that a child from the village was abducted and murdered by Jews, even though no child was reported missing at the time. Still, every September villagers carry an effigy of a child to the church where it is blessed by the clergy over the course of a five-day festival, with the child venerated as a saint.

Meanwhile, in the basilica of Zaragoza there is a chapel dedicated to a child allegedly abducted and tortured by local Jews, with a special service held on 13th October every year.

Jacob Daniel Benzaquén, the President of Spain’s Jewish communities, said: “The case of the Niño de La Guardia is especially serious because year after year the civil authorities continue to support this celebration. It’s very sad that these events continue to this day and are celebrated with such enthusiasm and a shame that the ecclesiastical authorities haven’t put an end to them, despite our requests.”

The El Confidencial news site reported that sources close to the Archbishop of Madrid have said that the church was revising “cults and rituals involving saints such as the Niño de La Guardia that refer to the legend that Jews killed Christian children in order to celebrate Passover.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout Europe.

An Emirati Princess has accused Jews of leveraging the Holocaust for sympathy.

Princess Hend bint Faisal Al-Qasimi recently tweeted: “6,636,235 Jews were killed in WW2, killed in Europe. At least 12.5M Muslims died in wars in past 25 years. You never hear a Muslim writing books, movies, starts a law that if you don’t sympathise with our plight you are less of a human. We forgive & move on.”

The Princess, a royal from the Al-Qasimi family that rules Sharjah, the third-largest city in the United Arab Emirates, has over half a million followers on Twitter.

She has also tweeted that “the media that is controlled by you know you”, and elsewhere: “We’ve all cried at what the Nazis have done to the Jews in Germany. Yet, it’s funny how the very same Jewish Zionists don’t cry at the EXACT SAME thing that they are doing to the Palestinians. Take their homes if they don’t leave, terrorize them & bomb it. The dead don’t speak.”

In yet another tweet, she asked “Are Zionists making Jews look like the new Nazis?”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis.”

The Princess serves as the editor of a lifestyle magazine and became prominent campaigning against anti-Muslim hatred online.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism worldwide.

Khaled Hassan, an Egyptian political risk and intelligence analyst whose research looks at antisemitism, Islamism and conspiracy theories, appeared on the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism where he recounted his story of how he went from living in Egypt and harbouring antisemitic views to living in the United Kingdom and not only disavowing those views, but converting to Judaism. 

When Mr Hassan was asked what his impression of Jewish people was during his time in Egypt, he said: “This is actually one of the most difficult questions to answer. Not necessarily because I don’t know how to describe it but because I want to explain to someone born in Europe or the [United States] how it actually works. 

“I think the best way to put it is, imagine you find out that your neighbour did something so hideous and horrible that the whole community just hates them. The whole community wants to avoid them because obviously, any association with them would actually also put you under scrutiny and people would question you, question your convictions. Sadly, this is how Jews are viewed in [much of] the Middle East, in Egypt and the Arab-speaking world.” 

He continued: “[Jews are viewed as] this group of people who are fundamentally evil, who are fundamentally horrible, in a way, and that’s why nobody is even willing to consider Hebrew literature, everyone’s terrified of touching even one simple book. So that is really the perception that we’ve had, it’s one of suspicion, of fear, and obviously thinking that they are inherently evil. And education does reinforce it.”

Explaining how he unlearned these views, the political risk and intelligence analyst said: “I was very different from an early stage because I loved tourism, I loved seeing people from different places, I loved America. Unlike a lot of Egyptians, I loved the idea of American rights.”

Mr Hassan explained how the term ‘radicalisation’ is often misinterpreted as being inherently negative.

“It’s not always something bad,” Mr Hassan said. “A radical is just somebody who believes in views that are uncommon where they are, within their own environment. And it always begins with this sense of grievance, you always feel that something is wrong, and you need to right this wrong, and this is when you start to find answers to questions that you have. So this is precisely what happened to me when I was a teenager.

“In radicalisation, we call something a ‘cognitive opening’. It’s this willingness to actually listen, this willingness to actually hear information. For me, it all started when I started examining where I want to study. As a teenager, I just wanted to study somewhere where I could actually view these ideas, and that was always the U.S., so I would say this was really the changing point for me.

“And one of the key turning points for me was definitely my involvement in peace talks between Jordanians, Palestinians, Egyptians and Israelis, because I was very fortunate to be involved in some of these discussions on a grassroots level.”

On his conversion to Judaism, Mr Hassan said: “So that’s my journey; I started questioning all of these beliefs around me when I was a teenager and decided that I’m not going to inherit any beliefs, I will just find the beliefs that suit me. And it really took years. I examined different faiths and eventually made the decision that Judaism is right for me.”

Throughout the interview, Mr Hassan touched upon a variety of other issues including the Colleyville synagogue hostage attack, the ‘Free Palestine’ convoy in North London in May 2021 and COVID-19 conspiracy theories.

The podcast with Mr Hassan can be listened to here, or watched here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox.

Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, television personality Robert Rinder, writer Eve Barlow, Grammy-Award-winning singer-songwriter Autumn Rowe, and actor Eddie Marsan.

Concerns have been raised about a controversial Hungarian media figure invited to the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Budapest on 20th May.

Hungarian journalist Zsolt Bayer has a history of making inflammatory remarks. 

The journalist, whose political views have variously been described as “ultra-conservative” and “far-right”, is reported to have said that the Hungarian Academy of Science had been infiltrated by Jews.

Mr Bayer is also reported to have written in a 2008 column about the “limitless hunger of the Jewish financiers in Brooklyn and Wall Street yuppies, which plunged the American and as a consequence the global monetary world into depression.”

A 2011 article for the conservative, pro-government Hungarian daily newspaper Magyar Hírlap contains several inflammatory remarks relating to Guardian journalist Nick Cohen and other Jewish figures with typically Jewish surnames.

Nick Cohen’s article criticised the rightward turn in Hungarian politics. Mr Cohen wrote that he would not call the conservative government headed by Viktor Orbán “fascist” or “neo-fascist”, but that “a foul stench wafts from the ‘new society’ Orbán’s patriots are building on the Danube. You can catch a smell of it in [the ruling party] Fidesz’s propaganda” which, Mr Cohen argues, involves forming a political pact with Jobbik, a political party that was at the time explicitly far-right and which blamed Jews, Roma people and homosexuals for Hungary’s social problems.

In response, Mr Bayer is reported to have written an article in Hungarian calling Mr Cohen “stinking excrement”. Mr Bayer’s article goes on to use more subtle pejorative references. Mr Bayer juxtaposes the typically Jewish surname Cohen with the names Cohn-Bendit and Schiff.

The former is believed to refer to former MEP and radical student leader, Daniel Cohn-Bendit. Mr Cohn-Bendit is a vocal supporter of the European Union, and has criticised Mr Orbán in the European Parliament for adopting laws that allegedly restrict the freedom of the press. Mr Cohn-Bendit says that this has resulted in Mr Orbán’s allies harbouring a “hatred” for him.

The name “Schiff” refers to Sir András Schiff, a Hungarian-born classical pianist and conductor who is an outspoken critic of Mr Orbán. Mr Schiff has questioned whether Hungary was worthy of taking on the Presidency of the Council of the European Union due to its Government’s policies, said that he would refuse to perform or even visit Hungary due to antisemitism, and said that “antisemitic baiting has become socially acceptable in Hungary” under Fidesz and Mr Orbán’s rule.

Both Mr Cohn-Bendit and Mr Schiff are Jewish. Then Mr Bayer writes that “There is nothing new under the sun. Unfortunately they were not all buried up to their necks in the forest of Orgovány.”

Orgovány was the site of a series of massacres committed by the leaders of the Hungarian White Terror. This was a period of repressive violence between 1919-21 carried out by opponents of Hungary’s short-lived Soviet Republic and its Red Terror. Far-right Hungarian figures often associate the 1919 Hungarian Soviet Republic with Jewish influence, which fits into a conspiracy theory about “Judeo-Bolshevism”, which holds Jews responsible for communism. As many as 1,000 people were killed in the White Terror, many of them Jewish. Mr Bayer’s appeared to imply that he is unhappy that these Jewish journalists were not also killed during this period.

On another occasion, Mr Bayer referred to US Secretary of State Antony Blinken, who has a Hungarian-Jewish background, as a “ROOTLESS Hungarian”, echoing a typical trope about Jews that questions whether Jews have sufficient allegiance or loyalty to their countries of residence.

Though Mr Bayer rarely uses the word “Jew” or “Jewish” directly, it is believed that readers in Hungary are aware of what Mr Bayer may be implying when he refers to these events and who he may mean when he claims that the interests of white European Christians are under attack.

In 1988, Mr Bayer co-founded the Fidesz political party together with Mr Orbán. At the time, the Party was a centre-left and liberal activist movement formed in opposition to the ruling Marxist-Leninist Hungarian Socialist Workers’ Party, which had held power since the failed democratic revolution in 1956. Fidesz took a national-conservative turn during the 1990s.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

While America mourns for the ten people killed and three injured, eleven of whom were Black, reportedly at the hands of self-described “ethno-nationalist eco-fascist national socialist” Payton Gendron on 14th May, many have turned their attention to the shooter’s 180-page-long manifesto.

The document details the alleged Buffalo supermarket killer’s interest in what is known as the “Great Replacement Theory”. This antisemitic far-right conspiracy theory claims that Jews are the secret masterminds behind a planned “invasion” of non-white immigrants into western countries with the aim of making white people a minority to further an insidious, but largely unclear, agenda.

The theory’s origins are said to date back to early-20th century France, but it was formalised and popularised more recently, by the writer Renaud Camus in his 2011 essay “Le Grand Remplacement” (“The Great Replacement”).

Over time, the theory was adopted by white supremacists who professed hatred for Jews and other non-whites, with one prominent example including those behind the August 2017 “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.

The theory has also influenced terrorist murderers like neo-Nazi terrorist Anders Breivik, Pittsburgh Tree of Life Synagogue shooter Robert Bowers, and Christchurch mosque shooter Brenton Tarrant, from whose manifesto the alleged Buffalo shooter’s writings are reported to have borrowed heavily.

One Twitter user stated that Mr Gendron’s manifesto included a “scientific”-style chart distinguishing between different types of supposedly Jewish faces based on animals and mythical creatures, including hawks, trolls, goblins, demons, “nightmare” creatures and rats. It is illustrated with famous faces, including former Labour Party MP Luciana Berger, actor Ron Perlman, billionaire financier and activist George Soros, and philosopher Max Horkheimer, whose writings often feature in far-right conspiracy theories about “cultural Marxism”.

The gunman apparently explained that, although the primary problem in the United States is supposed Jewish influence, he chose to attack immigrants and Black people to stop them from having any more impact on the country.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Pulitzer prize-winning author Alice Walker, who has previously garnered media attention for her inflammatory comments and support for conspiracy theories, is set to speak at San Diego Community College for the investiture ceremony for its new chancellor.

Ms Walker won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1983 for her novel The Colour Purple. She is, however, also known to have made inflammatory comments about Jews, one example of which can be seen in her poem “To Study the Talmud”. Excerpts from Ms Walker’s poem reads:

“Are Goyim (us) meant to be slaves of Jews, and not only
“That, but to enjoy it?
“Are three year old (and a day) girls eligible for marriage and intercourse?
“Are young boys fair game for rape?
“Must even the best of the Goyim (us, again) be killed?”

While also receiving little scrutiny from the press about her views due to the forthcoming publication of her journals, Ms Walker has been asked to speak at the investiture of San Diego Community College’s new chancellor, Carlos O. Cortez.

Ms Walker has also voiced her support for the antisemitic hate preacher David Icke, citing with approval his books Human Race Get off Your Knees: The Lion Sleeps No More, which states that the world is secretly run by shape-shifting reptilian humanoids and “Rothschild Zionists”, and And the Truth Shall Set You Free, which promotes the antisemitic conspiracy theories contained in The Protocols of the Elders of Zion and questions whether the Holocaust happened.

The author reportedly described Mr Icke’s work as “a curious person’s dream come true” and denied that there was anything antisemitic or anti-Jewish about its content.

Mr Icke uses social media, his books and his stage performances to incite hatred. His preaching is so absurd that since the 1990s he has been dismissed as a crank, but because he is dismissed, there has been no major opposition to him and he has built up a following of thousands upon thousands of disciples whom he has persuaded to adamantly believe that the world is in the grip of a conspiracy run by the “Rothschild Zionists”. His repertoire includes conspiracy myths and tropes classified as antisemitic according to the International Definition of Antisemitism, adopted by the British Government. Campaign Against Antisemitism has successfully persuaded some venues to pull out of hosting his events.

After years of pressure from Campaign Against Antisemitism, Mr Icke was banned from most social media platforms.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A Labour Party councillor is alleged to have posted a horrific article arguing “The Germans were completely justified in persecuting and expelling the Jews…just as we would be today.”

Belgica Guaña is alleged to have posted the article, titled “The Holocaust Hoax and the Jewish Promotion of Perversity”, on Facebook in 2016, two years before she became a councillor in Newham in London, where she is running for re-election this week.

The article says that “The so-called ‘Holocaust’ is propaganda in an ongoing war between the Jews and those with the courage to stand up to them – a war that began with the National Socialists coming to power in Germany in the 1930s and continues to this very day. The Jews do not have the means or the numbers to defeat Europeans with the force of arms so they have to rely mainly on infiltration, subversion, and economic and psychological warfare, with the Holocaust hoax being the best example of the latter. 

“The Germans were completely justified in persecuting and expelling the Jews (which is all that was actually happening), just as we would be today. Hitler and the National Socialists freed Germany from the death grip of the Jews and gave it back to the German people.”

The essay also argues that Jews use pornography to control western societies by way of the “Holocaust hoax”, and pushes the “white genocide” conspiracy theory, as well as claiming that teenage diarist Anne Frank, murdered by the Nazis at Bergen-Belsen, was a “bisexual degenerate” whose popular diary is an “obvious fraud…laced with pornographic and sexually subversive messages”.

In May 2016, Cllr Guaña reportedly shared a post that said that “The Nazi holocaust [sic] was a crime against humanity, and the Israeli Genocide against Palestinians can not be ignored or denied,” and in December 2017, Cllr Guaña is said to have shared a video of the United Nations General Assembly, writing: “If you can have a minute of silence for the 6 million Jews who died in the Holocaust. So how much time should I ask for the more than 50 years of invasion and oppression of the Palestinian people?” Both posts are further breaches of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The allegation that Cllr Guaña posted the article was made in the JC, based on research by Labour Against Antisemitism.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The article allegedly shared by this councillor is a not only an abhorrent collection of antisemitic tropes, from Holocaust denial and paedophilia to comparisons of Israel with the Nazis and support for the far-right ‘Great Replacement Theory’, but it may also imply support for Jewish genocide. In view of just how horrific this post is, we are examining legal options.

“The Labour Party must urgently investigate both the veracity of the allegation and how Belgica Guaña was allowed to become and remain a councillor in spite of the post, and why she was endorsed by the Party in her bid for reelection.”

Cllr Guaña is not the only Labour candidate in the coming elections to be embroiled in controversy.

Cllr Lee Garvey, an independent candidate representing Pallister and Berwick Hills in Middlesbrough, had applied to become a member of the Labour Party, but was rejected after concerns were raised about material that he had allegedly shared online. Cllr Garvey allegedly compared Israel’s policies to the Holocaust and referenced antisemitic conspiracy theories surrounding the Rothschild family.

In a 2015 Facebook post referencing then-Conservative Prime Minister David Cameron, Cllr Garvey reportedly wrote: “Just saw an interview with [Channel 4 News presenter John] snow and CaMORON where he says, we need to stop the Demonisation of Jews…Lets look at how I see it…Israel is doing to the Palestinians what they themselves suffered at the hands of the Nazi’s [sic].”

On another occasion, Cllr Garvey allegedly complained about the number of Jewish characters on television, saying: “Watch any US sitcom or show, you will find the vast majority have at least one Jewish character if not a Jewish family. Why is this when they make up JUST 2.2% of the population?? And if like me you fear the TV is just a Propaganda, it certainly makes you think [sic].”

In another alleged 2015 Facebook post, Cllr Garvey is claimed to have referenced classic antisemitic conspiracy theories about the Rothschild family, writing: “I also take the sleeping enhancer from those drug companies I despise, use money to purchase items given to us by the Rothschild family who I regard as less than poo and I also maek most of my living in churches and we all know how I feel about them…”

Another Labour candidate, Anne Pissaridou, representing North Portslade in Brighton, has been suspended by the Party for a second time after new revelations about her social media output. She is accused of posting messages on social media downplaying antisemitism allegations in the Labour Party and reportedly appeared to condone an online attack on a Jewish party member.

A third figure caught up in controversy is former Labour MP Martin Linton. Mr Linton served as the MP for Battersea between 1997 and 2010, but is now running as a council candidate in Wandsworth’s Lavender ward. He has allegedly made a number of inflammatory statements in the past.

In 2010, while Mr Linton was Chair of Labour Friends of Palestine, he reportedly claimed that the “Israel lobby” played a malign role in marginal constituencies. During a meeting held at the House of Commons by the Palestine Solidarity Campaign and Friends of al-Aqsa, Mr Linton is reported to have said that “There are long tentacles of Israel in this country who are funding election campaigns and putting money into the British political system for their own ends…When you make decisions about how you vote and how you advise constituents to vote, you must make them aware of the attempt by Israelis and by pro-Israelis to influence the election.”

In an appearance on the Islam Channel, Mr Linton said that the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group Hamas should not be called “terrorists”. That is, Mr Linton explained “the wrong word to use when you are talking about someone who is fighting a military occupation”. Mr Linton’s preferred term is “Gazan militants”, because, while the actions of individuals may be described as terroristic, the same apparently cannot be said for groups and governments.

In 2010, Mr Linton appeared on the Iranian-backed news outlet PressTV to, it has been claimed, defend Hamas terrorists in Israeli prisons. On another occasion, he appeared on PressTV to defend Raed Salah, a prolific antisemite who claims that Israel planned 9/11.

Murad Qureshi, the candidate for the ward of Little Venice in west London, is also embroiled in controversy. Mr Qureshi is alleged to have made comments about the “powerful pro-Israel lobby” in the United States, and retweeted a Twitter post which read “You can get away with offending anyone so lomng as they’re not Jewish”. In a 2013 blog post, Mr Qureshi also reportedly questioned the “legal basis” for the trial of the leading Nazi Adolf Eichmann. Mr Qureshi allegedly wrote that “I am not sure the Eichmann trial can be held up as a model of due processes [sic].” From 2016 to 2021, Mr Qureshi was Chair of Stop the War Coalition, and has been photographed alongside Hamas politicians including leader Ismail Haniyeh.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The Liberal Democrats appear to have reintegrated a member once suspended for reportedly sharing antisemitic material online.

In 2019, local Liberal Democrat candidate Abjol Miah was suspended during a council by-election in the Shadwell ward of Tower Hamlets after he reportedly shared antisemitic content, including a video produced by David Duke, five years earlier.

Mr Duke is a former Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard, and runs a daily radio show that promotes the antisemitic “Zionist Occupied Government” conspiracy theory inspired by the infamous antisemitic conspiracy theory The Protocols of the Elders of Zion and Henry Ford’s notorious collection of antisemitic articles, The International Jew. The video reportedly shared by Mr Miah was titled “CNN Goldman Sachs and the Zio Matrix”.

“Zio”, short for “Zionist”, is an epithet invented and disseminated by Mr Duke, used to disparage anything that he deems to have come from a Jewish source, whether or not the individuals in question are actually Jewish themselves.

Mr Miah also allegedly shared other examples of antisemitic conspiratorial material. They include a picture of the globe with a Star of David on it featuring the words “Zionist globalism”, a picture that collected a series of logos of major newspapers and media companies with an Israeli flag in the background and the headline “Zionist dominated media”, and an illustration of a figure with a withered face, its mouth gagged with an Israeli flag, and words that appear to say “Zio globalist tyranny!” above it.

Mr Miah is understood to have campaigned for London Mayor, Sadiq Khan, in 2016, before having his Liberal Democrat membership “revoked, pending an investigation” following his alleged online activity. However, he is now understood to have been reintegrated into the Party as part of the campaign for Rabina Khan to become Mayor of Tower Hamlets

Ms Khan is a former member of George Galloway’s Respect Party who also campaigned for Sadiq Khan in 2016 before switching allegiance to the Liberal Democrats.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Dr Efraim Zuroff, the Chief Nazi Hunter at the Simon Wiesenthal Center, appeared on the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism where he said that he believes anti-vaccination protesters who wear yellow Stars of David are trivialising the Holocaust.

Much of the rhetoric that has emerged from anti-vaccination conspiracy theorists has compared lockdowns to the Holocaust. These crude and inflammatory comparisons have included protesters donning yellow stars bearing the word “Unvaccinated”, a comparison that has been made across the world, including in the United Kingdom, Canada, Ukraine and elsewhere.  

Such symbolism is reminiscent of the kind of insignia Jews in Germany and occupied Europe were forced to wear by the Nazis. Those wearing such items in 2021 do so in order to compare the persecution of the Jewish people with protective measures sanctioned by governments and other administrative bodies in order to deal with the pandemic. Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

“It’s Holocaust trivialisation,” Dr Zuroff said. “In other words, to, in a sense, turn the Holocaust into a far more trivial event than it was in fact.”

He continued: “It’s very ironic but in a certain sense, I have to say that there’s a small silver lining here which goes to prove the success of the people who have devoted their lives to promoting Holocaust education, Holocaust research, Holocaust commemoration. In other words, the Holocaust has become the ultimate tragedy, and that’s why everyone who has a cause wants to connect that cause or to claim that it’s similar to the Holocaust…related to the Holocaust, because that’s the most effective tool.”

However, Dr Zuroff went on to lament the negative effect that wearing the yellow star has on the Holocaust. 

“It’s a horrible thing because it basically turns the Holocaust into something much, much more minor than it actually was.”

Throughout the interview, Dr Zuroff touched upon a wide variety of topics which included highlights from his storied career, the details of ongoing trials of alleged Nazi war criminals, and explained the difference between Holocaust denial and distortion.

The podcast with Dr Zuroff can be listened to here, or watched here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox. Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, The Sunday Telegraph columnist Zoe Strimpel and actor Eddie Marsan.

Two Austrian men who publicised myths about coronavirus vaccinations by wearing Stars of David have reportedly been convicted of violating the Alpine republic’s strict anti-Nazi laws.

The two men, who have both refused to be vaccinated, had worn yellow felt stars bearing the word “Ungeimpft” (unvaccinated) at anti-vaccination demonstrations held in Vienna.

A court in Vienna heard that the defendants, known as “Mr K”, 50, and “Mr B”, 34, pled not guilty to infringing upon Austria’s 1947 Verbotsgesetz (Prohibition Act), which not only banned Nazi paramilitary organisations, but made it illegal to publish or broadcast denials or minimisation of the Holocaust. Austria’s Jewish community has recently argued that these laws should be extended to ban the utilisation of Holocaust-related imagery and slogans in order to push anti-vaccination conspiracy theories.

Much of the rhetoric that has emerged from anti-vaccination conspiracy theorists has compared lockdowns to the Holocaust. These crude and inflammatory comparisons have included protesters donning yellow stars bearing the word “Unvaccinated”, a comparison that has been made across the world, including in the United Kingdom, Canada, Ukraine and elsewhere.  

Such symbolism is reminiscent of the kind of insignia that Jews in Germany and occupied Europe were forced to wear by the Nazis. Those wearing such items in 2021 do so in order to compare the persecution of the Jewish people with protective measures sanctioned by the German federal government in order to deal with the pandemic. Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

The judge handed both men fifteen-month suspended sentences and three years’ probation.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Antisemitic conspiracy theories are believed to have been a contributing factor as to why a man murdered his own family last year.

German police said that the man, who lived in the State of Brandenburg and, before killing himself, reportedly shot his wife and children aged four, eight and ten on 7th December, feared that his children would be taken away from him owing to a forged coronavirus document.

According to Germany’s Interior Ministry, investigators uncovered messages sent by the man that indicated he was fearful that Germany’s vaccine mandates were part of a plan to “to halve the world population and establish a new world order under Jewish leadership.”

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Tahra Ahmed, a prominent Grenfell Tower volunteer aid worker who was reported to the police by Campaign Against Antisemitism has been sentenced to 11 months in prison after being found guilty of publishing written material in order to stir up racial hatred.

Ms Ahmed, 51, was exposed in The Times as having claimed that the victims of the Grenfell Tower fire were “burnt alive in a Jewish sacrifice.” After the tragic fire that left 71 dead, Ms Ahmed said that she had been coordinating the work of volunteers, coaching them and running workshops with the aim of empowering them. She reportedly discussed her beliefs with some of the people she has helped.

Ms Ahmed, who described herself during her testimony as “very very bright”, was found guilty of two counts of incitement to racial hatred, following the trial instigated after Campaign Against Antisemitism, CST and others reported the matter to the police.

Sentencing Ms Ahmed today, His Honour Judge Mark Dennis QC said that “stirring up racial hatred is an abhorrent act”. Noting that she had received a good education, he said: “I have no doubt you knew full well what you were doing and it’s likely affect,” adding that he had “no reason to conclude you have any remorse.”

He also read from character statements from Ms Ahmed’s family, noting that it was “unfortunate” that one of them had claimed: “There seems to be a special rule for the Jewish people…one rule for them, another rule for us. Is that fair?” A defence plea for Ms Ahmed to receive a light sentence on account of her care duties for her 74-year old diabetic mother was brushed aside as the judge observed that Ms Ahmed is not her mother’s primary carer and in fact visits about once or twice a week.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “For years we have pursued justice against Tahra Ahmed and today we are vindicated by this strong sentence, which sends a very clear message to those who seek to stir up anti-Jewish racism through conspiracy theories.

“Ms Ahmed sought to twist the Grenfell Tower tragedy to fit her venomous world view in which it seems that any evil can be attributed to Jews. She used people’s suffering and anger in the aftermath of the Grenfell tragedy and tried to wield it as a weapon against Jews before an audience of tens of thousands on social media. We are pleased that she will now go to prison for her wicked fabrications.

“As we have seen, her hatred has not only enabled her to abuse the Grenfell tragedy, but also to accuse Jews of being responsible for 9/11 and of supposedly exaggerating the Holocaust. As the prosecution observed, she used her position as an aid volunteer in the aftermath of Grenfell to ‘bait the mob’ against Jewish people, making her conduct particularly repulsive.”

In her social media posts, Ms Ahmed had written: “Watch the live footage of people trapped in the inferno with flames behind them. They were burnt alive in a Jewish sacrifice. Grenfell is owned by a private Jewish property developer just like the twin towers. I wonder how much Goldman [Goldman Sachs, a bank often targeted by antisemites] is standing to make in the world’s most expensive real estate location [Kensington].”

She has also described the Holocaust as the “holohoax” and posted on Facebook that “Hitler and the Germans were the victims of the Jewish conspiracy to destroy Germany.” She is also a proponent of the antisemitic conspiracy theory that the 9/11 terror attacks were faked by Jews. In one Facebook comment found by Campaign Against Antisemitism after The Times published its article, she wrote: “All the leadership of ISIS is directly recruited by CIA and the leadership are all Arab Jews, trained by Mossad.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism also uncovered posts by Ms Ahmed claiming that “Jews have always been the ones behind ritual torture, crucifixion and murder of children,” a comment redolent of the blood libel. Other posts described the antisemite Gilad Atzmon as her “good friend” and complained about the “hold of Jewish power over our so-called free and democratic society”, claimed that “Zioborg overlords are engineering a civil war”, and referenced a supposed “Zioborg Banking cartel”, among other inflammatory comments. She has also promoted the far-right, antisemitic “Kalergi Plan” conspiracy theory, which claimed that there is a plot to mix white Europeans with other races through immigration.

Following The Times’ exposé and the further research by Campaign Against Antisemitism, we reported Ms Ahmed to the police and called for her to be prosecuted. The five-day trial, held at the Old Bailey after Westminster Magistrates’ Court declined jurisdiction, ended today with a guilty verdict from a jury.

Ms Ahmed, who denied two counts of stirring up racial hatred by publishing written material, was described by prosecutor Hugh French as having “published two posts that were virulently antisemitic and crossed the line as to what is acceptable in a liberal society.”

During the trial, the prosecution read a statement by Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Chief Executive, Gideon Falter.

Giving evidence, Ms Ahmed said that she campaigns against the arms trade, with her lawyer describing her work as being part of the “social justice movement.”

She claimed to have a problem with “Zionist Jews, not all Jews,” and that when she talks about “Zionist Jews” or “Talmudic Jews” or “Satantic Jews” people know whom she is referring to, conceding that there were times when she wrote something and failed to make a distinction between the particular Jews whom she was talking about and Jews in general. She claimed that she detests publicity and that The Times, by publishing her posts, is guilty of inciting racial hatred, rather than her.

As her evidence turned to Grenfell, she explained that in 2014 she began working as a life coach, confirming, however, that she had no training in this field. She set out to provide support for the volunteers who were supporting the victims. When asked about her description of the Grenfell fire as a “Jewish sacrifice”, she answered that “the Talmud talks about sacrificing children, Satanic ritual abuse, a lot of it coming from the Jewish circles…the Ba’al Jews, Talmudic Jews, Zionist Jews they’re a small number of the Jewish community but they are criminals.” Asked whether the fire was started deliberately, she claimed that many people believe so. Pressed on whether the Jews were to blame, she said that at the time she did think that, “just like they bombed Gaza every couple of years.”

Asked by her lawyer whether she accepts that the post was insulting, she agreed, but she denied that it amounted to racial hatred, saying: “Absolutely not, no way. No racial hatred except to the criminals. I’ll be bold to the criminals and I’m entitled to be.” The prosecution noted, however, that with passions running high in the immediate aftermath of the fire, people would be looking for someone to blame, and Ms Ahmed’s posts were an attempt to “bait the mob”, which she denied.

When Ms Ahmed was asked about her claim that “Jews are always the ones behind ritual murder, especially young boys, to atone and be let back in Palestine,” she insisted that “there are millions of Jewish people who are anti-Zionist and many are Facebook friends, so if any of them were offended they would have pointed it out,” adding that “If it [the comment] stirred up racial hatred, it would have happened by now.”

Regarding her posts about the disgraced Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein, Ms Ahmed told the court about “Satanic ritual abuse practiced by secret societies in order to control people…horrific torture of children, raping them, et cetera…Weinstein, the Hollywood mogul, my suggestion was he was not involved in SRA [Satanic Ritual Abuse] or the upper echelons of the cult and was therefore dispensible.”

The defence asked Ms Ahmed who the “Satanic ruling Jews” are, to which she responded that they are “the bankers, owners of media and corporations, they manipulate and control a lot of evil in the world and I want it to end and so I expose who they are. Unfortunately, sometimes I don’t qualify by saying ‘Satanic’ and some racists would comment and I’d delete the comment or tell them off. People would share racist or inflammatory memes and I’d delete them, even though I’m passionate about freedom of speech. My intention is to educate them.” When pressed by the prosecution on whether she could provide any examples of her calling out racism or removing posts as she claimed to have done, she could not.

On the Holocaust, Ms Ahmed told the court, “I’m not a Holocaust denier…unfortunately, six million Jews is a number that has been perpetuated and the actual number has been revised down by experts.” She affirmed using the term “Holohoax”, arguing that “it [the figures] was manipulated and exaggerated at the time” and that, regarding the actual number of deaths in the Holocaust, “The Jewish council [sic] says 3.5 million…the Red Cross says 283,000.” She also baselessly asserted that “Hitler had an agreement with Rothschild to put Jews in concentration camps so Rothschild could transfer Jews to Palestine” and approvingly quoted a known Holocaust denier. She was also pressed on why she described the expulsion of the Jews from England in the Middle Ages as a “final solution to the Jewish problem.”

The judge asked Ms Ahmed about 9/11: “It’s a yes or no question. Do you believe Jews were responsible for 9/11?” Ms Ahmed replied that “It’s not fair to answer that without context,” also variously describing the terrorist attack as a “false flag” operation and a “Mossad” operation. She further claimed that “Before US Presidents are elected, they show their allegiance to Israel to pay homage to say ‘we’re here to serve you’.”

During her testimony, Ms Ahmed also invoked far-right conspiracy theories, for example asserting that “Kabbalistic Jews don’t want Europe to remain white. Personally, I’m multicultural and love diversity. This plan is to bring other people into the land to deliberately destroy cultures,” a claim akin to the replacement theory antisemitic conspiracy theory popular with white nationalists. Her testimony also featured further comments about “Rothschild” control of the banking system; “ZioNazis”; “real Ashkenazis” and “Satanic Ashkenazis”; the “Bilderberg group” (which often features in conspiracy theories); “powerful people behind world governments”; a “cabal” akin to the “deep state” and “the most powerful ones at the top are Jewish”; the Khazar myth, which holds that contemporary Jews are actually a converted Central Asian people with no claim to the Land of Israel, and other conspiracy theories, including about the CIA and the COVID-19 “scamdemic”.

The prosecution accused Ms Ahmed of “using the witness box as a pulpit for your views” and of knowingly and deliberately “whipping up the mob with her social media posts.”

In her defence, over the course of her extended and rambling testimony Ms Ahmed insisted that “I’m not racist or antisemitic but passionate which sometimes looks like anger. They don’t care I write about Muslim terrorist organisations, I’m not accused of being islamophobic or anti-white or anti-British.” She described the trial as a “witchhunt” and claimed that, during case management and her plea hearing last year, she was “unlawfully arrested, incarcerated and tortured for six days” and suffered from “post-traumatic stress disorder” as a result, inhibiting her from mounting a strong defence. At more than one point, she was rebuked by the judge for misleading the jury about the case management process.

Ms Ahmed was found guilty by eleven of the twelve jurors, who agreed on both counts, and has today been sentenced.

We are grateful to the CST for once again providing security for CAA personnel attending court for the trial.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Mark Collett, the leader of the far-right group Patriotic Alternative, interviewed Piers Corbyn last night where he asked Mr Corbyn about the “Jewish Question”. 

Mark Collett is the former head of the BNP’s youth wing who is reported to have dabbled in Holocaust denial, collaborated with the infamous American antisemite David Duke, and espoused antisemitic and racist views. He currently leads Patriotic Alternative, a group known for its efforts to recruit youth to its white nationalist ideology. Previously, the far-right group published an online “alternative” home school curriculum condemned as “poison” and “hateful” and attempted to recruit children as young as twelve through livestreaming events on YouTube, according to The Times.  

The interview, which ran for almost one hour and culminated with Mr Collett asking Mr Corbyn, the brother of the antisemitic former Labour Party Leader Jeremy Corbyn, if he wanted “an easy question or a spicy question”. Mr Collett, asking on behalf of one of his listeners who donated money in order to have their question read out, then asked Mr Corbyn: “Is Piers aware of the Jewish question?”

The “Jewish Question” is an antisemitic phrase that arose in nineteenth-century Europe which asserted that Jewish people’s presence in society was a problem that needed to be solved. The “Final Solution of the Jewish Question” was the name given by the Nazis to their programme to exterminate six million Jews during the Holocaust. It has been reported that this term has been reclaimed by neo-Nazis and members of the alt-right, often using “JQ” as a shorthand for the phrase.  

Mr Corbyn replied to Mr Collett’s question by saying: “Well I’m not quite sure what that means. I mean…I’m not a Holocaust denier in case it’s leading up to that, because certain things you say, we’re told we’re Holocaust deniers. Well, you know, the Holocaust happened and that was horrific. But that’s all I can say on that.”

Continuing his answer, Mr Corbyn claimed that he didn’t have the time to answer the question at that moment but showed interest in discussing it at a different time. “I mean, there’s lots of ways of defining the Jewish Question but the difficulty is in answering these can lead you up into certain dangers because you’ll say things…so, I’m not trying to get out of that but I’m not convinced we’ve got the time to elaborate on that at this point in time. But if you come and see me under different circumstances we could discuss that if you want more fully if the meaning of the question could be verified a bit more,” Mr Corbyn said. 

A video recently emerged of Mr Corbyn claiming that allegations of antisemitism against him and his brother are a “pack of lies”, and in August, Mr Corbyn suggested that “troublemakers” in Jewish areas posted leaflets created and distributed by Mr Corbyn, which compared the COVID-19 vaccines to the Auschwitz death camp, through their own doors in a “plot” to portray him as antisemitic. Mr Corbyn has compared vaccinations to Nazi policy on more than one occasion.

Mr Collett’s interview with Mr Corbyn was co-hosted by Jason Köhne, an accused white nationalist and self-proclaimed “advocate for white wellbeing” who promotes a website claiming that western civilisation is threatening white people.

Earlier this month, Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to Amazon after it was reported that the online marketplace had cut a book deal with Mr Collett, in which it was reportedly receiving profit off of his book that was found to be promoting Holocaust denial. Amazon has also been found selling Mr Köhne books.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit. 

A banner that read “Vax the Jews” was hung from a bridge in Austin, Texas over the weekend.

Also written on the banner was the domain “goyim.tv”, a website affiliated with the “Goyim Defence League”, a group whose membership reportedly contains several neo-Nazis and is understood to be led by Jon Minadeo II. The group is responsible for stunts such as visiting a Chabad centre to claim that “these Jewish terrorists” were behind 9/11, and hanging a banner on a Los Angeles overpass reading “Honk if you know the Jews want a race war.” Earlier this year, Mr Minadeo II created t-shirts carrying antisemitic slogans such as the Holocaust was “a hoax”.

Austin Mayor Steve Adler, who is himself Jewish, condemned the incident, tweeting. “I am heartbroken to see antisemitic hatred in Austin, a welcoming and respectful place. Hatred of any kind has no place in our city.”

The incident occurred close to the Shalom Austin Jewish Cultural Centre, the self-described “hub of Jewish life in Central Texas”. Shalom Austin called the incident “extremely upsetting and unsettling” and confirmed that the Austin Police Department had been incredibly supportive, adding that it was “carefully monitoring and observing the situation”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Image credit: StopAntisemitism.org

Concerns have been expressed over a Conservative councillor who appeared to entertain an equation of the COVID vaccine with Zyklon B on Twitter.

A Twitter user wrote, “I fear that this vaccination is this admins/pharma’s verision of zyclon B. Of course this is only my opinion [sic].” Zyklon B was the gas used to murder Jews in Holocaust extermination camps.

Cllr Steve Tierney, of Fenland District Council, then retweeted the tweet to his thousands of followers with a comment: “I hope, for all our sake, that turns out to be completely wrong. 🙁 :(“

While Cllr Tierney did not affirm the sentiment, engaging with it by expressing his mere hope that it will not prove to be accurate suggests that he entertains the possibility that the comparison might be valid. Instead, he should have either ignored the tweet or called out the comparison as inflammatory nonsense. Whatever one’s views on lockdown rules or vaccines, there is no basis for comparisons to the genocide of the Jewish people.

Over the past year, anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Cllr Tierney has been vocal on Twitter about antisemitism, especially in the Labour Party. This tweet therefore goes to show how even those sensitive to some manifestations of antisemitism can nevertheless have a blind spot when it comes to others.

We urge Cllr Tierney to delete the tweet and encourage his followers, whatever their views on vaccines, to avoid needless equations with the Holocaust.

Fenland District Council, where Cllr Tierney holds the Transformation, Communication and Environment portfolio, has adopted the International Adoption of Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Three state senators and more than 50 members of the Maine state legislature, including the Senate President, the Speaker of the House, and the Senate Majority Leader, signed a letter condemning Maine Representative Heidi Sampson for participating in an event hosted by an alleged “known antisemitic conspiracy theorist.”

The event held in Belfast, Maine in July was part of a tour known as the “Arise USA! Resurrection Tour.” Robert David Steele, one of the organisers, has allegedly claimed that “elite Jews” were responsible for the Holocaust and has also claimed that “Zionists” funded 9/11, “control the American media” and belong to the “Synagogue of Satan.” It also featured several speakers known for overt antisemitism.

In their letter, the legislators expressed concern at “the impact of hateful rhetoric,” and noted that Mr Steele peddles the same “baseless” antisemitic conspiracy theories “that have been used through history in vicious campaigns” to “spread fear of Jewish people”, including the idea that “satanic Zionists” kidnap children. Now, however, the letter notes that there were “new twists” with Mr Steele claiming that “Zionists” were engaged in “a plot against white people.”

The letter went on to say that by speaking at the event, Ms Sampson had “given the legitimacy of her elected office” to Mr Steele’s “hateful and false claims” that threatened “Jewish families, individuals and institutions” in Maine and as members of the legislature, “we condemn Rep Sampson’s participation in the event.”

This antisemitic rhetoric was “not only categorically false” but was “directly threatening to the safety, dignity and well-being of all Jewish people in Maine” where antisemitic incidents had “seen an uptick in recent years.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

A lay magistrate in Scotland is alleged to have promoted an antisemitic video.

According to the JC, a video from 2016 remains visible on the Facebook profile of Amjid Bashir, a broadcaster and Justice of the Peace, which contains a link to a five minute video that claims that the Rothschild family – common protagonists in antisemitic conspiracy theories – “maintains its control through the US Federal Reserve”.

The video’s accompanying caption read: “Not really one for conspiracies but this is interesting on how 5 ultra wealthy families have some [sic] much power.”

A Judician Communications spokesperson reportedly said that “this matter is now under consideration by the Judicial Office for Scotland,” adding: “All judicial office holders receive training about, and are bound by, the Statement of Principles of Judicial Ethics, and must uphold high standards of professional conduct.”

Mr Bashir reportedly wrote on social media last week that he stood “against all hate and discrimination #islamophobia #racism #antisemitism #hate”.

Image credit: JC

“Jews are behind the pandemic” and “rule the world” chants were heard at an anti-vaccine rally in Poland on Sunday.

The rally in Głogów was held by supporters of the local football team who marched to protest COVID-19 restrictions and vaccines. The organisers were reported to have called on locals to join “the fight for our common future” against “the globalists”, a term that is often used in far-right conspiratorial circles to refer to Jewish people.

It was reported that at one point during the rally, a man with a megaphone asked the crowd: “We know who is behind this whole ‘plandemic’ and who rules the world, right?”, to which someone responded “Jews”, and the man replied, “Of course it’s the Jews”.

A chant of “Every Pole can see today that behind the ‘plandemic’ are the Jews” was then reported to have broken out amongst the crowd of over 100 people.

Three arrests were made after confrontations broke out between protestors and police officers. A video of police officers retreating was uploaded to Twitter by a nationalist account, along with the caption: “You will all be held accountable someday.”

Earlier today, the account also tweeted an image of the Nazi flag and wrote: “We will never bow our knees, we will never submit, we will never become one of your sheep! Stop sanitary segregation!”

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Footage taken earlier today has shown Piers Corbyn comparing vaccinations to Nazi policy outside the Houses of Parliament, despite being arrested after a similar incident in February.  

The video shows Mr Corbyn and another man standing in front of a sign which reads “No Nazi forced jab” and yelling “arrest Matt Hancock” through a megaphone. 

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is tempting not to take conspiracy theorists Piers Corbyn seriously, but simply dismissing his antics without calling them out is how he and others like David Icke are given the space to promote their absurd and inflammatory nonsense to the public.

“Whatever one thinks of pandemic lockdowns and vaccination drives, they are not comparable to Nazi Germany and the systematic slaughter of millions of Jews. Mr Corbyn has repeatedly shown his contempt for the Jewish community, including by distributing flyers in Jewish neighbourhoods equating lockdown rules to Auschwitz. If one is seeking reasonable debate about how governments and populaces have responded to the pandemic, Piers Corbyn is no role model.”

This incident echos a similar one from earlier of this year when Mr Corbyn was arrested after distributing grotesque flyers comparing lockdown rules to Auschwitz.

Responding to his arrest, Mr Corbyn absurdly argued that he could not be antisemitic because he had been married to a Jewish woman and once employed a Jewish person who was a “superb worker.” Mr Corbyn reportedly protested: “The idea we’re antisemitic in any way is completely absurd. I was married for 22 years to a Jewess and obviously her mother’s forebears fled the Baltic states just before the war because of Hitler or the Nazis in general. I’ve worked with Jewish leading world scientists over the last 30 years. I’ve also employed Jewish people in my business Weather Action, one of whom was a superb worker.”

A spokesperson for the Metropolitan Police Service has since confirmed to Campaign Against Antisemitism that no further action would be taken against Mr Corbyn.

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Mr Corbyn has a history of controversy in relation to antisemitic conspiracy theories. He has previously retweeted @whiteknight0011, a notorious neo-Nazi who declared that “They will force Trump in to war What do you think happened to Hitler? Bilderberg CIA IMF Banker Gangsters They are the problem” along with four images. The @whiteknight0011 account has since been suspended. One image showed Lord Jacob Rothschild, the Jewish banker and philanthropist, against the background of a Nazi flag, claiming that he controls the world. A second showed Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu as a puppeteer controlling ISIS through Israeli intelligence agency Mossad, orchestrating the war in Syria and Paris attacks as Lord Rothschild and the Queen look on approvingly. A third image showed the faces of supposed Jewish conspirators who run the world to society’s detriment, proclaiming: “Know your enemy”. The last image showed a family photo of the Royal Family, claiming that they are in cahoots with these Jewish conspirators in committing “the worst genocides, invasions and theft in all history.”

Mr Corbyn has also claimed that “Zionists” were conspiring against his brother: when Jewish then-MP Louise Ellman complained of antisemitic attacks against her, Piers accused her of using it as a cover for political attack, tweeting: “ABSURD! JC+ All #Corbyns are committed #AntiNazi. #Zionists can’t cope with anyone supporting rights for #Palestine”.

A cryptocurrency company has used a Rothschild conspiracy theory in a marketing campaign, it was reported last week. 

The British fintech company, Crypterium, sent out a customer e-mail that contained a quote which has been falsely attributed to the 18th-century Jewish banker, Baron Rothschild.

The line that was used by the company, “The best time to buy bitcoin is whenever blood is on the street, everyone is panicking and no one’s talking about it,” is a variation on the classic trope, “The time to buy is when there’s blood on the streets, even if the blood is your own.”

The line is attributed to Baron Rothschild who is falsely accused of having exploited the public’s panicked state after the Battle of Waterloo in order to turn a profit. However, the line and the story have since been debunked as without foundation and inspired by anti-Jewish hatred, and at one point were even weaponised by the Nazis to spread hatred towards Jews.

George Krasukhin, the Chief Marketing Officer for Crypterium, who is himself Jewish, said: “It is not related to antisemitic theme[s] at all. It was the quote from one of the richest [men] on the earth.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Rather than simply using clichéd phrases without a second thought, marketers should research where the phrases come from and why they become cliches. Using a classic antisemitic trope associating Jews, Rothschilds and money is an inappropriate and insulting way to promote a financial product. The campaign should be withdrawn with an apology and the company must think again.”

A controversial former United States congresswoman and presidential candidate posted an antisemitic meme earlier this week which suggests that “Zionists” were responsible for the 9/11 terrorist atrocities.

Cynthia McKinney, the 2008 presidential nominee for the Green Party and congresswoman who served from 1993 to 2003 and from 2005 to 2007 as a Democratic Representative from Georgia, tweeted an image of a jigsaw puzzle which bore a photo of the 9/11 attacks along with a final jigsaw piece which reads “Zionists.” The caption below the photo says: “The final piece of the puzzle.”

The tweet was temporarily removed by Twitter for violating its policy but has since been restored.

Despite several users voicing their disgust in reaction to Ms McKinney’s abhorrent tweet, the former congresswoman doubled down by retweeting an article shared by a YouTuber, who herself has been accused of antisemitism, which attempted to back up the hateful conspiracy theory.

Ms McKinney is promoting the widespread, antisemitic conspiracy theory says that Jews, not Islamist terrorists, were responsible for flying passenger jets into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, so that they would profit from the resulting war. This is backed up by the equally false belief that no Jews were killed in the attack, as they had all been warned to stay at home that day.

Similarly, Ms McKinney’s usage of the phrase “Zionist” has been increasingly utilised in circles that promote antisemitic theories as a way to avoid saying “Jew.” People who do this will usually also exhibit other forms of antisemitic behaviour.

This is not Ms McKninney’s first instance of antisemitic behaviour. It was reported in the New York Times that in 2002, Ms McKinney made “a series of other incendiary, often racial comments” towards Jewish people.

Ms McKinney has regularly posted tweets which promulgate antisemitic tropes and conspiracy theories. This includes tweeting about central banks that are supposedly controlled by the Rothschilds family, multiple references to “Deep state ZioCons,” and alleging that Jewish people seek to harbour control of the black community. She has also referred to Donald Trump as a “Zionist puppet.”

Earlier this year, Ms McKinney promoted an antisemitic book which proposes several antisemitic conspiracy theories and stereotypes, which includes the assertion that Jewish people “control America” and accuse people of being antisemitic in order to deflect criticism of Israel. She shared a link to the book along with the comment: “One of the most important reads if you want to know what’s really happening and who the main actors are.”

Ms McKinney’s history of antisemitism also extends to Holocaust denial. Earlier this year, she retweeted an article which stated that Amazon had removed books that promoted Holocaust denial from its website, and added the comment: “More thought control and intolerance from the tolerance people.”

In May 2020, Ms McKinney posted a tweet in which she doubted that the figure of Jews killed during the Holocaust amounted to six million.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Accusing the Jews as a people, or Israel as a state, of inventing or exaggerating the Holocaust” is an example of antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A suspended nurse who reportedly described the NHS as the “new Auschwitz” has reportedly been permanently removed from the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) register.

Kate Shemirani’s removal from the register comes after she was suspended as a registered nurse for eighteen months last July, pending an investigation into her past alleged comments on COVID-19 and 5G conspiracy theories.

However, it was reportedly decided last Friday by the NMC Fitness to Practise Committee that she would be permanently struck off from the register. Ms Shemrani can appeal this ruling in five years. In the meantime, however, she will be unable to practice as a registered nurse.

Last year, Ms Shemirani led protests against mask-wearing and lockdown restrictions, defending her use of comparisons to Auschwitz and Nazis. Ms Shemirani said at the time: “When I likened this to Auschwitz and the cattle trucks – you tell me the difference? Because the only time in history I could find where the doctors and nurses were able to end people’s lives was the nurses of the Third Reich. The nurses of the Third Reich are here today. I don’t care if they find it offensive. I find it offensive that our elderly have been murdered in care homes. Stop being a special snowflake and saying you’re offended. They are killing our elderly, our most vulnerable.”

It has also been reported that Ms Shemrani is a follower of the “Committee of 300” conspiracy theory, which over a century ago laid the foundations for the antisemitic fabrication, The Protocols of the Elders of Zion.

Ms Shemirani said: “Can I state the obvious. There is no covid19. It’s a scam. There is however contaminated vaccines, contaminated tests and a lovely direct energy weapon system being primed to activate those nano particles you have injected, ingested and inhaled.”

She has also claimed: “Without the help of the doctors and nurses, the extermination of Jews, gypsies, homosexuals, blacks, disabled… in the Holocaust could not have been executed…”

According to the JC, Ms Shemirani has also made frequent reference to the Jewish financier, philanthropist and controversial political activist, George Soros, who is often the target of antisemitic conspiracy theories.

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

A councillor in Blackburn who has been suspended from the Labour Party after quoting an antisemitic conspiracy theory in chambers has refused to apologise.

Councillor Yusuf Jan-Virmani, the representative for the Audley and Queen’s Park ward, made derogatory comparisons between Israelis and animals while referencing the antisemitic blood libel conspiracy theory.

Cllr Jan-Virmani reportedly said: “Mr Mayor, councillors – I am not aware of any animal that is so cruel as the Israelis. Not even crocodiles. They bomb schools day and night… hospitals, they bomb them – they flatten them. 

“They kidnap the kids and harvest their organs… that’s been proven. That’s from the United Nations.

“They inject people there. They murder by land sea and air. And what’s worse, the Israelis slander the defenceless Palestinian victims as terrorists.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Using the symbols and images associated with classic antisemitism (e.g. claims of Jews killing Jesus or blood libel) to characterise Israel or Israelis” is an example of antisemitism.

This also references an antisemitic meme containing a quote that is falsely attributed to Sir David Attenborough, which has since been debunked.

Rick Moore, Deputy Chair of the Blackburn Conservative Association, said: “In regards to Cllr Jan-Virmani’s speech, I am concerned that it seems to be clearly antisemitic in nature, comparing the Israeli people to animals which is clearly unacceptable.”

When questioned, Cllr Jan-Virmani doubled down on his remarks, saying: “I stand by what I said. It was nothing to do with Jews. It was criticism of the Israeli Government.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has accused Jews of being “murderers” who are “only are satisfied by sucking [the] blood” of their victims.

During a speech made in Ankara, President Erdogan spoke about the conflict between Hamas and Israel. Accused of using the terms “Jews” and “Israelis” interchangeably, President Erdogan was quoted as saying: “They are murderers, to the point that they kill children who are five or six years old. They are murderers, to the point they drag women on the ground to their death and they are murderers, to the point they kill old people…they only are satisfied by sucking their blood.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Using the symbols and images associated with classic antisemitism (e.g. claims of Jews killing Jesus or blood libel) to characterise Israel or Israelis” is an example of antisemitism.

President Erdogan’s rant prompted condemnation from the United States. The State Department spokesman said: “The United States strongly condemns President Erdogan’s recent antisemitic comments regarding the Jewish people and finds them reprehensible. We urge President Erdogan and other Turkish leaders to refrain from incendiary remarks, which could incite further violence.”

These accusations were rejected by Omer Celik, President Erdogan’s Party spokesman. Mr Celik said that “accusing our President of antisemitism is an illogical and untrue approach. This is a lie said about our President.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Antisemitic flyers were discovered on a tram in Cologne, Germany on 10th February, which blamed the Jewish population for the ongoing pandemic.

The flyers read: “Do we really have a Corona problem? Or do we have a Jewish problem?”

The text was presented with a Star of David in the background next to the names of Chancellor Angela Merkel, Health Minister Jens Spahn and Minister of Foreign Affairs Heiko Maas. The flyer claimed that the three prominent politicians are Jewish, despite none of them having Jewish heritage.

The flyer further states: “The more Jews in politics and media, the worse things are!”

Several German protests against coronavirus restrictions and preventative measures have reportedly featured antisemitic slogans and epithets, and protestors have allegedly drawn comparisons between the restrictions and the persecution of Jews in the Holocaust.

The citizen-led democratic initiative, Omas Gegen Rechts, found the flyers and confirmed in a social media post that it had filed a police complaint concerning the incident.

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The founder of social-media platform Gab, has been accused of wooing far-right figures to his platform with promises of greater visibility.

The allegation against Andrew Torba emerged after Gab was hacked and messages were published by the whistle-blowing website, Distributed Denial of Secrets.

Since Gab was founded in 2016 with a claim to “champion free speech,” it has become a haven for supporters of the QAnon conspiracy theory and other far-right groups and individuals banned from mainstream platforms.

A cache of Gab data includes a conversation in which Mr Torba gave a “warm welcome” to Daryush Valizadeh. A social-media figure known as RooshV within the online “manosphere”, Mr Valizadeh has reportedly made derogatory comments about Jews as well as posting misogynistic material.

In an early exchange of messages, Mr Valizadeh thanked Mr Torba for his “warm welcome” and said: “I enjoy not having to self-censor like on Twitter.”

Mr Torba then said: “By the way feel free to back up all of your video content on Gab TV.” He later agreed to enable Mr Valizadeh to upload more than the site’s standard maximum daily video content. In a subsequent message, Mr Torba praised the notorious writer and publisher, E Michael Jones. Mr Jones has been interviewed several times on Mr Valizadeh’s podcast. Mr Torba wrote: “I am a huge fan of EMJ, too.”

Mr Jones reportedly has a long history of claiming that Jews are dedicated to “propagating and perpetrating attacks” on moral standards and on the Catholic Church and has argued that “mass killings of Jews” have been an “understandable reactions to Jewish beliefs and behaviour.”

Noting that Mr Jones hadn’t logged in to his Gab account “for some time,” Mr Torba asked Mr Valizadeh for help in encouraging Mr Jones to upload his videos to Gab TV, stating that this was “very important for the distribution and preservation of truth.”

Far-right figures have turned to sites such as Gab to avoid restrictions on hate-content on more mainstream platforms such as Facebook and Twitter. Mr Torba has tried to distance Gab from the far-right groups that have made it their home. In 2018, on a podcast, he said: “Do we have alt-right users? Certainly. Alt-right users also exist on Facebook, on Twitter, on Reddit, and everywhere else on the Internet.” He went on to insist that Gab had “good people” who “believe in individual liberty…and free expression.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

T-shirts carrying antisemitic slogans such as the Holocaust was “a hoax” have been launched by a Californian conspiracy theorist.

The line of t-shirts and apparel is being sold on a web-shop by Jon Minadeo, who is part of a group known as the Goyim Defence League, which is responsible for stunts such as visiting a Chabad centre to claim that “these Jewish terrorists” were behind 9/11, and hanging a banner on a Los Angeles overpass reading “Honk if you know the Jews want a race war.”

The merchandise – advertised as “some fresh Goy Gear” – includes t-shirts carrying the virulently anti-Jewish “Happy Merchant” image and an antisemitic parody of The Godfather logo. Others refer to the Holocaust “hoax” or have pictures of Hitler. Apparel also features homophobic images and slurs.

In a message on the website, Mr Minadeo states that sales are to finance his tours, stating that “all proceeds” go to his “Name the Nose Tour”.

The domain registrar for the online shop, Namecheap, says that it is not responsible for the content, while the software used to build the website, WooCommerce, is open source.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A university professor has been fired after posting antisemitic slurs on Twitter.

Thomas Brennan, a professor of physical science at Ferris State University in Michigan, was put on administrative leave in November after posting conspiracy theories about COVID-19, and for using racist, antisemitic and homophobic language on Twitter. The tweets included references to a “Jewish mafia” and a claim that COVID-19 was “another Jewish revolution” and a “stunt” to create a “new world order”.

Following an investigation by the University, Mr Brennan was reportedly sacked on 25th February.

Announcing the termination of his employment on Twitter, Mr Brennan added a link to his letter of defence, presented to the University administration. In it he says that he was “speaking out of despair” caused by a “personal crisis involving extremely painful migraines, EMF [electromagnetic] sensitivity and a series of break-ins” at his home.

While admitting that many of his posts were “horrible”, Mr Brennan said that he was exercising his rights to free speech.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Canada’s Jewish community has expressed outrage after a vaccine conspiracy theorist created a t-shirt using the words “Covid Caust” inside a yellow Star of David.

Canadian television network CTV reported that the t-shirt had been created by Vancouver-based anti-vaccine activist Susan Standfield. In an Instagram video explaining the design, Ms Standfield stated, “We are the official yellow star class in Canada”, and said that her design was “an act of solidarity among all persecuted people.”

One senior Jewish figure in the Vancouver community said that it was “irrational” and “makes no sense” to compare a vaccine to save people’s lives with “the genocide of a people.”

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A speaker who is alleged to endorse antisemitic conspiracy theories and has apparently referred to “thieving Jews”, was dropped by a prestigious American political conference.

The online commentator known as Young Pharaoh had been due to speak at the annual Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC), which took place in Florida from February 25th to 28th and was addressed by former President Donald Trump.

Young Pharaoh is alleged to have called Judaism a “complete lie” and to have used the phrase “thieving Jews.” In his tweets he has allegedly said that “all the censorship and paedophilia on social media is being done by Israeli Jews” and that “YouTube, Twitter, Facebook and Instagram are all owned or controlled directly by them.”

He has allegedly also promoted conspiracy theories including QAnon, which incorporates antisemitic tropes.

However, following a report by media watchdog, Media Matters, revealing his past social media comments, CPAC tweeted that a speaker with “reprehensible views” which had “no home with our conference or our organisation” had been removed from the conference programme.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Notorious Holocaust-denier David Irving is reportedly charging £2,000 per person for a tour of concentration camps.

In an interview with The Jerusalem Post earlier this month, Mr Irving claimed that he was giving tours to thirteen people at camps and execution sites in Latvia and Poland. He advertises his tours with a title “The Real History Tour of the Wolf’s Lair”, and states underneath: “Don’t miss this lifetime adventure! Make up your own mind about the truth.” In his tours, Mr Irving’s groups visit Hitler’s headquarters, where Mr Irving apparently claims that the Nazi dictator was not aware of the Holocaust.

When asked if his denial tours might fuel antisemitism, an unapologetic Mr Irving replied to his interviewer: “The Jews should ask, Why us? It is not for me to ask that question. Maybe it’s how they have acted over the thousands of years. Maybe it is all our fault. Our Riga tour includes the NKVD [Soviet Interior Ministry] headquarters, and the Skirotawa train station, where Jews also played a role.”

When asked who his paying clients are, Mr Irving claimed that two were judges and three were lawyers, with the group including Russians, Britons, Americans and one from each of France, Sweden, New Zealand and Canada.

British-born Mr Irving was previously incarcerated for thirteen months in Austria for violating its Holocaust-denial laws. He is banned from Austria, Germany and Italy where Holocaust denial is illegal and he is also banned from Canada.

Mr Irving, who was discredited as a historian at a defamation trial in 2000, said during a far-right forum in 2017 that Auschwitz is “small beer” and now “like Disneyland”.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “David Irving is a disgraced historian whose views on the Holocaust are a deep insult to Jews worldwide and to the truth. That he reportedly seeks to profit from his notoriety and peddling of untruths is disturbing and unacceptable. Mr Irving has earned his reputation as a pariah, and should be treated as such by his would-be patrons and others who have the misfortune of encountering him.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Vivian Kubrick, the daughter of famed director Stanley Kubrick, is alleged to have posted far-right conspiracy theories online.

Ms Kubrick allegedly claimed that masks were “vectors for Globalist mind control,” using a far-right trope which often carries antisemitic connotations, and compared the distribution of a coronavirus vaccine to “Nazi sterilisation experiments on Jews”.

The Daily Beast, which reported the comments, further claimed that Ms Kubrick had claimed that the COVID-19 virus is “a hoax perpetrated on our civilisation by Globalists… in collaboration with the New World Order and major transnational corporations in an effort to destroy world economies and take control.”

The report claimed that she also argued that masks were “vectors for Globalist mind control,”, and that she has also defended the far-right Proud Boys and promoted the antisemitic QAnon conspiracy theory.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

An academic with a history of promoting conspiracy theories has asserted that “Zionism is racism” and declared his objective “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world”.

In an online event, David Miller, a Professor of Political Sociology at the University of Bristol, complained of being criticised by the President of the Bristol University Jewish Society and accused the student group of being part of a worldwide Zionist conspiracy, adding that it is “fundamental to Zionism to encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”. Prof. Miller also observed that the Jewish Society and the Union of Jewish Students are Zionist, thereby implying that Jewish students (and the wider Jewish community) inherently “encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”.

He also portrayed the International Definition of Antisemitism as an attack on free speech and accused the Israeli Government of engaging in an “all-out attack” on the global Left as part of an “attempt by the Israelis to impose their will all over the world”.

In comments reminiscent of the darkest years of the United Nations, Prof. Miller insisted that “Zionism is racism” and asked how “we defeat the ideology of Zionism in practice”, “how is Zionism ended” and about the way “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world”.

This is not Prof. Miller’s first controversy in relation to Jews, antisemitism and Zionism. Last June, Campaign Against Antisemitism revealed that Prof. Miller was behind disgraced MP Chris Williamson’s Resistance Movement. The group aimed to give a home to the “politically homeless” politicians who had been expelled from the Labour Party for antisemitism, such as Jackie Walker, Tony Greenstein and Mark Wadsworth.

Prof. Miller has a history of spouting conspiracy theories about various Jewish community organisations and figures that has reportedly discomfited his Jewish students. In a presentation titled “Harms of the Powerful”, for example, Prof. Miller suggested that the “Zionist movement” is one of the “five pillars” of hatred of Muslims (redolent of the five pillars of Islam) and is bankrolled by “ultra Zionist funders”. He has also suggested that Jewish interfaith dialogue with Muslim groups represents an Israeli-backed “Trojan horse” initiative to “normalise Zionism in the Muslim community”.

Prof. Miller has previously accused the current leader of the Labour Party, Sir Keir Starmer, of taking “Zionist money”, and he has talked about what he referred to as the “witch hunt” against Labour members accused of antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism shall be writing to the University of Bristol.

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “David Miller has claimed that Bristol’s Jewish Society and the entire nationwide Jewish student body ‘encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism’. This is crystal clear incitement against Jewish students. The University of Bristol has a duty to protect them and must act without further delay. For years it has defended and protected Prof. Miller instead of its Jewish students. This crank conspiracy theorist has no place in academia, especially when he does such harm to the welfare of Jewish students.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities. Bristol University adopted the Definition in November 2019.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

The BBC World Service has been accused of failing to ensure its foreign-language content meets BBC editorial guidelines after a presenter on the BBC World Service failed to challenge an antisemitic conspiracy theory advanced on air by a Somali politician.

The BBC Somali Service is part of the London-based BBC World Service. In an edition of a programme called Dooda Jimcaha broadcast on 18th December on the Somali Service, the Somali MP Mohamed Omer Dalha claimed that there was a conspiracy against Somalia by “Jews running these affairs both in the West and the East.”

According to the translation of the segment for CAMERA UK by Dr Moshe Terdiman, Founder and Research Director on Islam and Muslims in Africa, the assertion was not challenged by the presenter.

A CAMERA spokesperson said that such antisemitic statements “should have no place in BBC content,” adding that this case once again “raises questions concerning the ability of the BBC World Service to oversee the foreign-language content put out in its name and ensure that it meets BBC editorial guidelines.”   

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

An American congresswoman who has promoted an antisemitic conspiracy theory faces expulsion from her committee posts.

Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, a Republican congresswoman from Georgia who was elected in November, is assigned to two Congressional committees by the House Republican Leader. But Democrats have introduced a resolution to strip Rep. Greene of her committee roles over a series of social media posts in which she has espoused a number of conspiracy theories.

In one Facebook post, for example, she suggested that the 2018 California wildfires had been started for financial gain by the Rothschilds in collusion with the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) using a space laser to clear areas for a high-speed rail project. “Forests don’t just catch fire, you know,” she wrote, adding that there were “too many coincidences to ignore.”

In other posts she has promoted the antisemitic conspiracy theory called the “Great Replacement,” which alleges that “Zionist supremacists” are secretly masterminding Muslim immigration to Europe to make white Europeans a minority.

Ms Greene has advanced the QAnon conspiracy theory, which includes antisemitic tropes, and wrote in one post that the Rothschild family and the controversial Jewish financier George Soros were involved in a plot against President Trump.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A right-wing, Islamist newspaper known for its support of Turkey’s controversial President Recep Erdoğan and the ruling AK Party, has aired anti-Jewish conspiracy theories including that US President-elect Joe Biden was brought to office by “Jewish controlled media organisations and powerful Jewish lobbies.”

The article, which appeared in Yeni Safak, the Turkish daily newspaper known for its hardline support of Turkey’s long-serving President, also made a series of antisemitic allegations, claiming that “Jewish capital” controlled the “deep state” in the United States. This antisemitic conspiracy has been pushed by other Islamists.

The article claimed that President Trump, the “great president” of the United States, had been removed by “Jewish lords”, adding that “the global Jewish power in America” had dealt “another blow” to President Trump. Allegedly, this was effected “first by allowing Trump supporters to raid Congress” and then by “gathering masses in front of Congress holding ‘Trump is guilty’ banners.”

The article goes on to claim that “Trump fought to free America from the occupation and yoke of Jewish power”, adding that his “great concessions” to the Jews were “to placate them”, but after taking these “concessions” the Jews did not hesitate “to have a gun on Trump’s head!”

The article, written with the byline ‘Yusuf Kaplan’, allegedly goes on to claim that “America is a guinea pig for Jewish power, from which the Jews produced and legitimized their hegemony around the world.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

An antisemitic tweet was posted by the youth wing of the Czech Republic’s far-right Workers Social Justice Party (DSSS) as part of its campaign to discourage vaccinations against COVID-19.

The tweet, featuring an anti-Jewish caricature, said: “We will not allow ourselves to be vaccinated against COVID-19! Those globalising bastards can blackmail us all they like!”

The Workers Youth organisation (DM) has frequently used Nazi images or propaganda in its posters, on its Facebook page and in other promotional items. The Czech Interior Ministry categorises the DSSS as one of the extreme right-wing parties. The DM and the DSSS share the same registered address.

The DSSS came into existence after its precursor, the DS was dissolved in 2010.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Lawyers acting for Campaign Against Antisemitism have filed a criminal complaint with the Public Prosecution Service in the Netherlands, which is where grime artist Wiley was located when he launched his tirade against Jews.

Ron Eisenmann, a partner at Eisenmann & Ravestijn, filed documents on behalf of Campaign Against Antisemitism seeking Wiley’s prosecution in the Netherlands over his antisemitic incitement. We are extremely grateful to Mr Eisenmann and his firm for agreeing to represent Campaign Against Antisemitism on a pro bono basis.

On 24th July 2020, the rapper Richard Kylea Cowie, who is known as Wiley, spent days engaged in an escalating rant on social media against Jews. After likening Jews to the Ku Klux Klan and claiming that Jews had cheated him and were “snakes”, Wiley tweeted that Jews should “hold some corn”, a slang expression meaning that they should be shot. He added: “Jewish community you deserve it”. He then also called on “black people” to go to “war” with Jews.

Wiley repeatedly evoked conspiracy theories that Jews were responsible for the slave trade and that modern-day Jews are in fact imposters who usurped black people — a conspiracy theory that has incited acts of terrorism against Jews, such as a shooting in Jersey City and a stabbing attack in Monsey, NY during the festival of Chanukah last December.

In the days that followed, Wiley continued to rail against Jews on Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. Following discussions with Campaign Against Antisemitism, a major 48-hour boycott of Twitter and Instagram in which we participated, and our projection of antisemitic tweets onto Twitter’s London headquarters, which then went viral, Twitter, Facebook (which owns Instagram), Google (which owns YouTube) and TikTok agreed to remove Wiley from their platforms, depriving him of access to his nearly one million social media followers.

Campaign Against Antisemitism immediately reported Wiley to the Metropolitan Police Service, but in September the police force confirmed to us that Wiley was not in the UK at the time of his antisemitic tirade. Under Home Office rules, that means that the Metropolitan Police must give primacy to police in the jurisdiction where Wiley was at the time.

In anticipation of this development, Campaign Against Antisemitism had already appointed Mr Eisenmann and begun to prepare our case.

We are grateful to the Community Security Trust, which was able to provide us with evidence showing that Wiley was in Rotterdam at the time of his antisemitic abuse.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is continuing its response to this incident, including:

  • Filing our criminal complaint against Wiley in the Netherlands;
  • Continuing to meet with executives from Twitter, Facebook and Google to address their response to antisemitism on their platforms;
  • Working with the Cabinet Office’s Honours Forfeiture Committee to ensure that Wiley’s MBE is revoked;
  • Seeking a change in policy so that racists are automatically stripped of their honours in future (please help by signing our Parliamentary petition);
  • Urging the Government to bring forward legislation to regulate social networks and force them to remove racist incitement (please help by signing our Parliamentary petition), which has recently borne fruit; and
  • Working with the music industry to remove Wiley’s awards and ensure that he is shunned for his racism.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Wiley used his social media following to attempt to ignite a race war between black people and Jews. He accused Jews of ‘doing anything to ruin a black man’s life’ and called for them to be shot. His brazen calls for racist violence were made whilst on Dutch soil and we will use all of the means at our disposal to ensure that he answers to a Dutch judge. Antisemites do not stop at national borders and neither will we in pursuing them. We will always do whatever it takes to defend the Jewish community. It is why we are here.”

The arch conspiracy theorist, Piers Corbyn, has reportedly distributed leaflets in Jewish neighbourhoods comparing the COVID-19 vaccines to the Auschwitz death camp.

Referencing a headline in the Evening Standard that the new COVID-19 vaccines are a “safe path to freedom”, the leaflets apparently showed the slogan atop the infamous gates to Auschwitz.

Mr Corbyn, the brother of the former Labour leader, is a vehement opponent of pandemic lockdowns and has spoken at numerous rallies against lockdown rules, including appearing alongside the antisemitic hate preacher David Icke.

Recently, the former BNP leader, Nick Griffin, also compared the lockdown to Auschwitz.

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Mr Corbyn has a history of controversy in relation to antisemitic conspiracy theories. He has previously retweeted @whiteknight0011, a notorious neo-Nazi who declared that “They will force Trump in to war What do you think happened to Hitler? Bilderberg CIA IMF Banker Gangsters They are the problem” along with four images. The @whiteknight0011 account has since been suspended. One image showed Lord Jacob Rothschild, the Jewish banker and philanthropist, against the background of a Nazi flag, claiming that he controls the world. A second showed Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu as a puppeteer controlling ISIS through Israeli intelligence agency Mossad, orchestrating the war in Syria and Paris attacks as Lord Rothschild and the Queen look on approvingly. A third image showed the faces of supposed Jewish conspirators who run the world to society’s detriment, proclaiming: “Know your enemy”. The last image showed a family photo of the Royal Family, claiming that they are in cahoots with these Jewish conspirators in committing “the worst genocides, invasions and theft in all history.”

Mr Corbyn has also claimed that “Zionists” were conspiring against his brother: when Jewish then-MP Louise Ellman complained of antisemitic attacks against her, Piers accused her of using it as a cover for political attack, tweeting: “ABSURD! JC+ All #Corbyns are committed #AntiNazi. #Zionists can’t cope with anyone supporting rights for #Palestine”.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Enforcement and Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Piers Corbyn is an arch conspiracy theorist who was among the first to claim Antisemitism allegations against his brothers were part of an Israeli plot. Comparing the lockdown to the Auschwitz death camp, as former BNP leader Nick Griffin and others have done, is despicable. To deliberately distribute leaflets making that comparison in Jewish areas is vintage Corbyn harassment and baiting of Jews, and demonstrates that this is not about protesting lockdowns: it is about trolling Jews.”

A Parliamentary antisemitism watchdog has discovered that Alexa, Amazon’s smart speaker that provides answers to questions by reference to online resources, presents antisemitic conspiracies as truthful.

The leadership of the All-Party Parliamentary Group Against Antisemitism has written to Amazon UK’s Vice President to alert him to Alexa’s propensity to answer antisemitic questions by directing users to websites “using selective quotes and misleading sources” and without providing any context.

For example, when asked “Do Jews control the media?”, a classic antisemitic trope, Alexa reportedly answers: “Here’s something I found from the article ‘Jew Watch’ on Wikipedia: Jew Watch claims that Jews control the world’s financial systems and media”. Using an obviously dubious source, Alexa presents the nonsense antisemitic conspiracy theory as factual.

To the question “Was the Holocaust a hoax?”, Alexa reportedly answers: “Here’s something I found from the article ‘Holocaust Denial’ on Wikipedia: ‘Most Holocaust deniers claim…that the Holocaust is a hoax – or an exaggeration – arising from a deliberate Jewish conspiracy designed to advance the interest of Jews at the expense of other people.” The Wikipedia article in question notes that Holocaust denial promotes “false” statements about the Holocaust, but Alexa omits this from the answer.

The letter to Amazon, which can be read below, provides further examples.

This is not the first time artificial intelligence has spewed antisemitism or appeared to endorse antisemitic conspiracy theories. Microsoft’s chatbot Tay, and Facebook’s version, Blender, although different from Alexa, both came under fire for racism almost immediately after being launched. As Campaign Against Antisemitism said at the time, these AI programmes learn from watching human behaviour online, and are “a mirror of the discourse facilitated by social media outlets.”

A professor at a Michigan university has been placed on administrative leave after allegedly posting tweets which contained antisemitic tropes and conspiracy theories relating to the coronavirus pandemic.

The tweets by Thomas Brennan, a professor of physical science at Ferris State University (FSU), included references to a “Jewish mafia” and a claim that COVID-19 was “another Jewish revolution” and a “stunt” to create a “new world order.”

FSU President David Eisler announced on Monday that Prof. Brennan had been placed on administrative leave following his comments, and said that the University condemned the professor’s offensive statements. “We strongly reject these statements, condemn them and will not tolerate them,” Mr Eisler declared. The Board of Trustees also issued a statement backing the move to our Prof. Brennan on leave.

Prof. Brennan denied being an antisemite. In a statement he said: “I do not believe that middle-class Jews are involved in an international conspiracy, only that a small number of their elites are.” He continued: “Israel and the Jews should not be blamed for the crimes of a small number of mobsters like Jeffery Epstein or Ghislane Maxwell [sic] who used paedophile blackmail to control American politicians. I’m not an antisemite. I love and respect Jews just as I do all races, and I pray for Israel, just as I pray for America.”

Prof. Brennan went on to warn that the “entire world has fallen under the spell of a satanic, globalist elite” whose “end-goal is a technocratic, one-world government, where everyone, Jew and Gentile, will be micro-chipped and tracked 24/7.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

After years of pressure from Campaign Against Antisemitism, the conspiracy theorist and antisemitic hate preacher David Icke has finally been banned from Twitter.

Twitter’s decision follows similar moves by YouTube and Facebook several months ago. Mr Icke had some 382,000 followers on Twitter.

These decisions by the leading social media companies to remove Mr Icke from their platforms come after years of promoting the antisemitic commentator, much of whose website traffic is directed from social media. Despite extensive dossiers having been provided to the tech giants by Campaign Against Antisemitism in the past detailing Mr Icke’s racist claims about Jews, it has taken this long to ban him – and in each case it was not even related to antisemitism.

Instead, Mr Icke’s YouTube channel and Facebook page – and now his Twitter handle – were removed because of his misinformation campaign regarding the COVID-19 pandemic (although as part of this campaign he has also claimed that Israel was using the COVID-19 crisis to “test its technology”).

Mr Icke uses social media, his books and his stage performances to incite hatred. His preaching is so absurd that since the 1990s he has been dismissed as a crank, but because he is dismissed, there has been no major opposition to him and he has built up a following of thousands upon thousands of disciples whom he has persuaded to adamantly believe that the world is in the grip of a conspiracy run by the “Rothschild Zionists”. His repertoire includes conspiracy myths and tropes classified as antisemitic according to the International Definition of Antisemitism. Campaign Against Antisemitism has successfully persuaded some venues to pull out of hosting his events. Last month, Ofcom sanctioned the television channel London Live for airing an interview with Mr Icke on COVID-19.

Campaign Against Antisemitism will continue to press social media companies and other outlets to bar Mr Icke and other antisemites from their forums.

A new report has exposed antisemitism in the overwhelming majority of anti-vaccination networks.

The twenty-page report, titled “From antivaxxers to antisemitism: Conspiracy theory in the Covid-19 pandemic” and produced for the Government, urges action against a “resurgence of antisemitism” within the anti-vaccination movement, which it predicts is likely to play a role if and when a vaccination for COVID-19 becomes available.

“Exposing the level of antisemitism amongst the anti-vaxxer movement now is therefore of the utmost importance,” the report warned.

The report, produced by Lord Mann, the Government’s Independent Adviser on Antisemitism, and Dr Lewis Arthurton, a molecular cell biology expert, reviewed 27 leading anti-vaccination networks on Facebook and Twitter and observed antisemitic content in 79% of them.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has previously reported on antisemitism among protests against pandemic lockdown measures, and has monitored the intersection of antisemitism and COVID-19 conspiracy theories over the past several months. Various reports, including by Campaign Against Antisemitism, have shown how the far-right and others have exploited the pandemic to target the Jewish community.

An initiative by a Gaza women’s organisation to hold a conference to discuss the banning of child marriage has been branded as “a Jewish plot to destroy Gaza society”.

Abd Al-Aziz Al-Ansari, a Qatari author who writes about social issues, reportedly described the plan for a conference as “a satanic demand”, according to MEMRI.

He made his comments in a video uploaded to his YouTube channel on 28th August after the independent Gaza women’s organisation AISHA called for a conference on the issue of child marriage.

In his video, Mr Al-Ansari urges his listeners to “marry off” their daughters at “the correct age,” which he states is “twelve or thirteen” because “delaying marriage increases depravity, homosexuality, lesbianism, prostitution and sodomy.”

He praises Yemeni society, where, he says, “they still marry their daughters off at the correct age. Early marriage is a tradition with them.”

He then mocks Western efforts to curb this practice, saying: “This has made the US Congress upset. They are losing sleep over this.”

Addressing the people of Gaza directly, Al-Ansari said: “The Jews failed to destroy you, kill you, disgrace you…They want to destroy you socially, by increasing your depravity.”

He then sought to undermine the credibility of the Islamic women’s organisation by associating it with Jews, claiming: “This is not the ‘AISHA association’, this is the ‘Golda Meir association.’…This is a satanic association that demands to delay the age of marriage. It demands to change the law of Allah upon the land. This is a message to our people in Gaza. Beware! Beware! Marry your daughters off at the age of 12…Marry them off! Don’t let the [Jews] fool you.”

According to its website, AISHA was established in 2009 and “works to achieve gender equality and integration through economic empowerment and psycho-social support.” Its website also declares that it “aspires to play a leading role in “protecting women and children.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist us with this project.

Image credit: MEMRI

A commentator who regularly appears on a Sydney-based Arabic language channel was seen on film in September repeating the classic antisemitic blood libel that claims that the Jews use the blood of Christian children to bake unleavened bread for Passover (matzot), according to the Australia/Israel & Jewish Affairs Committee (AIJAC).

According to AIJAC, Dr Moustafa El-Lidawi, who is a former Hamas representative based in Lebanon, appeared on the Iranian Arabic language TV channel Al-Alam on 6th September. In a clip translated by the Middle East Media Research Institute (MEMRI), Dr El-Lidawi declared: “The Europeans hated the Jews because of this holiday [Passover] because they used to make matzot with the blood of European children.”

He also claimed that although the practice had stopped, nevertheless “Israelis still believe that God commanded them to make matzot from the blood of the goyim [the non-Jews], and to distribute these matzot to every Jew.”

Dr El-Lidawi is a regular contributor to Farah News, a Sydney-based Arabic language news and opinion platform with several thousand followers in Australia. In August 2019, Australian academic Dr Ran Porat argued in AIJAC’s Australia/Israel Review that Farah News offered a wide range of “viciously antisemitic content” and hosted “conspiracy theorists, antisemites and fervent anti-Zionists.”

AIJAC claims that in 2015 Dr El-Lidawi was reported to have repeated an even more gruesome libel concerning Christian babies and Passover. According to Dr Porat, Farah News has published many “venomous” claims by Dr El-Lidawi, including some “quite recently”.

Earlier this year, Dr El-Lidawi reportedly claimed that Israel steals the organs of Arab prisoners due to “ancient malice, and Talmudic and Torah commandments”, which is another type of blood libel, in a Canadian newspaper, and in 2018 he accused Jews of making festive pastries out of non-Jews’ blood, which is also a classic blood libel. He apparently went on to claim that this justified the periodic expulsions of Jews from European countries during the Middle Ages.

Campaign Against Antisemitism have expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Rebecca Long-Bailey was sacked for sharing an article in which the actress Maxine Peake claimed that Israel was to blame for the racist killing of George Floyd. Ms Peake is reported in The Independent to have said: “The tactics used by the police in America, kneeling on George Floyd’s neck, that was learnt from seminars with Israeli secret services.”

Some people are wondering why this claim is antisemitic.

The idea that American police officers learned the techniques that caused Mr Floyd’s death from their Israeli counterparts is popular on the far-left. Sometimes reference has even been made to an Amnesty USA article that some, including the rapper Lowkey, the columnist Owen Jones, Novara Media’s Aaron Bastani and the expelled Labour member and antisemite Jackie Walker, understood to be evidencing the theory. In its interview with Ms Peake, The Independent also referenced the article, but mistakenly attributed it to Amnesty International.

However, not only did the Amnesty USA article not say that American police forces had learned specific policing techniques from Israel — merely that American police train with Israeli police, as police forces across the world do — but Amnesty International released a statement explicitly denying any linkage between Israel the death of Mr Floyd, saying that “the precise nature of the training offered to US police forces by Israeli officials is not something we’ve documented. Allegations that US police were taught tactics of ‘neck kneeling’ by Israeli secret services is not something we’ve ever reported and the article in question has rightly been amended to acknowledge that.”

The architect of the bilateral training programmes between American and Israeli police forces has also rejected the theory as “not only false, but dangerous,” elaborating to say: “Despite suggestions to the contrary, there is no field training involved in either the conferences or trips, and no training on holds or arrest mechanics. The exchanges, which are hosted by the Israel National Police, focus on effective techniques in thwarting terrorism. Participants learn how Israeli law enforcement deters, disrupts, and responds to terrorist attacks. They explore the ideology of suicide bombers and other attackers, ways to de-escalate an ongoing incident, and the intelligence-gathering and -sharing process.”

The theory is, therefore, without evidence, and accordingly a conspiracy.

Conspiracy theories make people stupid, because they allow them to believe stupid ideas — in this case that the Jewish state invented kneeling on people’s necks and taught American police how it is done — and to believe those stupid ideas in the absence of evidence.

This particular conspiracy theory is antisemitic, because it observes an evil — police brutality or systemic racism in the United States — and looks to link it with Israel, in order to associate the Jews through the Jewish state with that evil. Moreover, for antisemites, associating a phenomenon with Jews not only makes Jews look bad but can also make the phenomenon itself seem worse.

The conspiracy theory has also regrettably tied into revolting claims that Jewish interests and the interests of the black community are somehow at odds or that fighting antisemitism might itself be racist against black people — claims that have repeatedly been made by far-left MPs in the Labour Party.

Some understood the condemnation of the conspiracy theory linking the death of Mr Floyd to Israel as showing that criticism of Israel is silenced by claims of antisemitism, for example by Leanne Wood, the former leader of Plaid Cymru. The Communist activist Ash Sarkar also said that the “disgraceful decision” to fire Ms Long-Bailey from the Shadow Cabinet “undermines the position the Labour Party has insisted on all along that it’s possible to criticise Israeli policy without being antisemitic. Shameful, shameful stuff.”

But the linkage of Mr Floyd’s death to Israel is not criticism of Israeli policy. It is criticism of American police brutality or systemic racism in the United States that unnecessarily — and, as we have seen, baselessly — blames the Jewish state for that evil. It has nothing to do with Israel or Israeli policy and serves only (and deliberately) to tarnish Israel by attaching it to a foreign evil entirely unrelated to it.

It is antisemitic.

Prof. John Ashton has claimed that the scandal of his antisemitism recently unearthed is a “political” conspiracy, while the number of signatories to Campaign Against Antisemitism’s petition urging broadcasters to stop featuring the public health pundit has grown into the thousands.

Prof. Ashton has a long history of antisemitic and inflammatory comments, including comparing Israel to the Nazis and holding Jews responsible for the actions of the State of Israel, both of which are breaches of the International Definition of Antisemitism, as well as trolling Jewish women MPs.

In remarks to The Canary, a controversial hard-left blog under investigation by the Government’s Independent Advisor on Antisemitism, Prof. Ashton said that “the fact they’ve dug this stuff up – whatever the validity of it – after six years, it’s obviously political isn’t it? That’s where we are.”

Prof. Ashton tried to explain away his record of racism rather than apologising for it, and was more concerned about the timing of the revelations and their impact on him rather than the effect of his words on Jews. The Canary, rather than encouraging Prof. Ashton to make amends for his antisemitism described the exposure of his anti-Jewish sentiments as a “witchhunt”, a common refrain of the far-left.

Since our petition calling on the BBC, ITV and Sky News to stop featuring Prof. Ashton on their programmes was launched, Prof. Ashton appears to have had fewer bookings by major broadcasters. You can sign our petition here: https://www.change.org/p/bbc-bbc-itv-sky-news-get-prof-john-time-for-jews-to-reflect-ashton-off-our-televisions

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

A veteran left-wing activist has linked Israel to the racist murder of George Floyd by claiming that American police forces are trained in Israel and have learned dubious techniques of restraint from their Israeli counterparts. He went on to accuse “Israeli embassies” of claiming that any criticism of Israel is antisemitic and that one of the “central targets” of this campaign has been the former Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn.

Tariq Ali made the incendiary comments in an online conversation with Mr Corbyn, who listened quietly to his remarks without objecting, under the aegis of the Stop the War Coalition, which has appeared in the past to advocate war against Israel and whose marches have featured antisemitic tropes.

Mr Ali said during the panel event with Mr Corbyn: “I would now like to come to another part of the world which ironically links the knee on the neck to George Floyd to this region because a lot of the American police forces have been trained in Israel. Not just the Americans but many from right-wing countries in South America. And the methods in dealing with protests or ordinary citizens is virtually the same. You can find lots of photos of Israelis when these people are brave enough to take photographs with their knees on the neck of Palestinians.”

He added: “This is another subject which has virtually been downgraded compared to even five or six years ago because people have got frightened about this campaign which alleges everyone is antisemitic except those who support Israel. That’s basically the campaign that was waged by Israeli embassies everywhere of which one of the central targets was Jeremy Corbyn.”

The claim that Israel is in any way responsible for the racist killing of George Floyd is reminiscent of repeated defamations of the Jewish people who have been blamed throughout history for atrocities. Moreover, the suggestion that allegations of antisemitism have been used to silence criticism of Israel is itself an antisemitic trope popularised by Ken Livingstone and accuses Jews of acting in bad faith when they call out anti-Jewish racism. Mr Ali’s claim that this campaign was led by “Israeli embassies” is a further popular and outrageous conspiratorial belief.

It is shameful that in a discussion of the racist killing of George Floyd, a speaker felt the need to accuse another minority.

Naturally, Mr Corbyn, who is himself an antisemite, did not object to Mr Ali’s claims. Later in the conversation he declared: “Let’s get it clear, antisemitism is wrong, it’s evil and it should never be condoned in any circumstances. I never would, you never would, in any way and we must all be united against racism of any sort — antisemitism, Islamophobia or racism in the USA following the murder of our friend in Minnesota.” His comments rang even more hollow than usual given what Mr Ali had just said in his presence.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Conspiracy theorists are reportedly transforming Holocaust denial, far-right racist tropes and misinformation about COVID-19 into a video game.

It is understood that thousands of users of Discord, a voice and text communication platform intended for gamers, are posting conspiracy theories in order to accumulate ‘points’ that can then be cashed for rewards.

The game is designed to be addictive, awarding a user the title “verified truther” after he or she has posted at least three conspiracy theories and undertaken an interview with a more experienced conspiracy theorist on the platform.

While Discord has removed some of the chat channels discussing conspiracy theories, others rise in their place. Among the theories posted are discussion of the “Holohoax”, whether the Holocaust has been exagerrated and claims that “Zionists” are “a class of people that controls the world”.

Others include a theory that 5G mobile phone signals were designed by “scheming” Jews and played a role in the COVID-19 pandemic, similar to a conspiracy theory promoted by the antisemitic hate preacher David Icke.

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

A survey carried out by the University of Oxford polling attitudes towards conspiracy theories relating to COVID-19 claims that around twenty percent of respondents believed that “Jews have created the virus to collapse the economy for financial gain.” However, the polling has come under criticism.

The research, called Oxford Coronavirus Explanations, Attitudes, and Narratives Survey, polled a representative sample of 2,500 English adults from 4th to 11th May 2020. Other conspiracy theories included ideas about the source of the virus, claims about Muslims, Bill Gates and celebrities, and the suggestion that the Prime Minister faked having contracted the virus.

The results, published in the journal Psychological Medicine, suggested that while almost 81% of respondents disagreed with the statement, 5.3% said that they “agree a little”; 6.8% said that they “agree moderately”; 4.6% said that they “agree a lot”; and 2.4% said that they “agree completely”. The figures were very similar for other statements, such as the claim that “Muslims are spreading the virus as an attack on Western values.”

Popular conspiracy theorists like David Icke have made claims such as that Israel was using the COVID-19 crisis to “test its technology”.

According to the researchers at the National Institute of Health Research’s Oxford Health Biomedical Research Centre at the University of Oxford, the “results indicate that half of the nation is excessively mistrustful and that this reduces the following of government coronavirus guidance.”

Professor Daniel Freeman, Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Oxford and a Consultant Clinical Psychologist at the Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust, noted: “The details of the conspiracy theories differ, and can even be contradictory, but there is a prevailing attitude of deep suspicion. The epidemic has all the necessary ingredients for the growth of conspiracy theories, including sustained threat, exposure of vulnerabilities, and enforced change. The new conspiracy ideas have largely built on previous prejudices and conspiracy theories. The beliefs look to be corrosive to our necessary collective response to the crisis. In the wake of the epidemic, mistrust looks to have become mainstream.”

Dr Sinéad Lambe, a clinical psychologist who worked on the study, observed: “Conspiracy beliefs arguably travel further and faster than ever before. Our survey indicates that people who hold such beliefs share them; social media provides a ready-made platform.”

However, the polling has been strongly criticised by academics who argued that there were more polling options to agree with the statements than to disagree with them, perhaps giving rise to what is known as ‘acquiescence bias’. They argued that not only might the survey therefore be unreliable, but that it may even serve to normalise the conspiracy theories it set out to examine.

The study comes after a previous report claimed that the COVID-19 pandemic is “amplifying” far-right voices, while another poll showed the sustained popularity of antisemitic conspiracy myths.

A Labour councillor in Brent and the former Mayor of the borough who shared an antisemitic video on a local residents’ WhatsApp group has conceded that it was an “accident” that was “racist and unacceptable” and that he is “seeking to undertake training on antisemitism”.

The JC recently revealed that Cllr Aslam Choudry, who represents the Dudden Hill ward, had posted the video and, after being confronted by other members of the messaging group, said “I’m sorry sent by mistake”.

Following the outcry, he was apparently suspended by the Labour Party, which said in a statement: “The Labour Party takes all complaints of antisemitism extremely seriously and they are fully investigated in line with our rules and procedures and any appropriate action is taken. We cannot comment on individual complaints.”

The video apparently said that just as in Nazi Germany one could not criticise the Nazi Party, so in contemporary America one cannot criticise the “Jewish lobby”, comparing the situation to other totalitarian states. “Both sides, Democrats and Republicans, they both bow down to the Israeli lobby”, the narrator on the video explained, apparently using the phrases ‘Jewish lobby’ and ‘Israeli lobby’ interchangeably.

The video was from Real Face Media, a channel that purports to “spread the true message of Islam.”

Cllr Choudry reportedly said: “As you may have seen reported in the media, I recently shared an antisemitic video in a WhatsApp group. This video promotes appalling antisemitic tropes falsely claiming that Jewish people control America. This is not only untrue, it is racist and unacceptable. I am so deeply sorry for sharing this link. I shared the link by accident and when colleagues pointed out that it was an extremely offensive video, I deleted it and apologised. I am so sorry for the hurt and offence I have caused and I will be seeking to undertake training on antisemitism.”

In 2016, Cllr Choudry shared a video on social media with the caption, “Zionists are even worst [sic] than animals,” for which he said “I apologise unreservedly”.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against 

Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A new report has warned that the COVID-19 pandemic is “amplifying” far-right voices. Meanwhile, the far-left and Islamists on social media have sought to tie Israel to the virus with the hashtag ‘#COVID48’, alluding to the establishment of the Jewish state in 1948.

The Royal United Services Institute (RUSI), a British think-tank, has published a report noting the “conspiracy theories propagated widely online” in connection with COVID-19 and calls for violence against minority communities, among them Jews. The report observed that “the pandemic has amplified antisemitic tropes and calls for violence against Jewish communities”, and also noted that there have been “calls online by groups such as the British National Socialist Movement for the virus to be ‘weaponised’”.

Recently, Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring the antisemitic hate preacher and conspiracy theorist David Icke, who suggested that Israel was using the COVID-19 crisis to “test its technology”, among other conspiratorial contentions.

Meanwhile, the far-left and Islamists have been active on social media trying to tie Israel to the virus by promoting the hashtag ‘#COVID48’. It is understood that the hashtag originated on Yom Hashoah, the day on which the Jewish world commemorates the Holocaust.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been closely monitoring the connections between COVID-19 and antisemitism, especially online, since the pandemic began, and has been offering advice and assistance to the Jewish community.

Antisemites have wasted no time in blaming Jews for the COVID-19 outbreak or hoping that Jews are disproportionately impacted by it.

One commentator on Turkish television explained that “Jews, Zionists have organised and engineered the novel coronavirus as a biological weapon just like bird flu” in order to “design the world, seize countries and neuter the world’s population.” Some have claimed that the proof of Jewish involvement would be if Israel invented the vaccine.

An Iraqi political analyst has claimed that the novel coronavirus is an American and Jewish plot to reduce the world’s population.

A professor at California State University predicted that Israel would use the virus as an opportunity to put all the non-Jews in prison.

On Twitter, one user joked that the novel coronavirus is not as bad as the Jews because it does not kill children, a comment invoking the antisemitic blood libel.

Another user urged the President of the United States to use the virus as an opportunity to expel the Jews.

Others insisted that the Jews invented the virus or hoped that the cure would be pork-based in the belief that this might mean the Jews could not use it.

The notion that the Jews have a sinister role in global pandemics goes back at least to the Black Plague, when, during the period from 1348 to 1351, there were attacks on Jewish communities which were scapegoated for the epidemic.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is monitoring for UK-based examples of such antisemitic conspiracy theories, the promotion of which would be very likely to constitute a criminal offence.

Despite the COVID-19 outbreak, Campaign Against Antisemitism is continuing our work as usual. We have taken internal measures to avoid exposing our team to risks, but our charity is built to be extremely resilient and we are lucky to be able to rely on extraordinary volunteers. Our ability to raise funds has been impacted however and we would be especially grateful for donations at this time. We wish everyone good health.

Activists from the Scottish National Party (SNP) have invited a controversial former diplomat, Craig Murray, to address them at an event in Edinburgh.

Mr Murray, a blogger and conspiracy theorist, suggested in March 2018 that Israel was more likely than Russia to have been behind the Salisbury poisoning of the Russian double agent, Sergei Skripal, reportedly writing on his blog: “While I am struggling to see a Russian motive for damaging its own international reputation so grievously, Israel has a clear motivation for damaging the Russian reputation.”

It is understood that Joanna Cherry, the SNP’s Justice Spokesperson in Parliament, will not be present at the event at the Party’s Braidburn branch to hear Mr Murray, a former ambassador to Uzbekistan who failed vetting to become an SNP candidate in 2014 apparently due to a “lack of a commitment to group discipline”.

A spokesman for Ms Cherry said that she planned to leave the branch before Mr Murray’s speech.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life, To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

British publishing giant, Penguin Random House UK, has finally withdrawn the English language edition of Colonel Pedro Baños’ Rothschild conspiracy book entitled “How they rule the world”, following an independent external review.

In light of the review by Baroness Julia Neuberger BDE, the rights over the English language edition will revert to the Spanish publisher and audio and e-book editions will no longer be available.

The review followed an outcry by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others after Penguin published an English translation of the Spanish book but sanitised passages about the Rothschild family.

We welcome the decision to cease publication of the English language edition but it should never have come to this. It should have been plain to anyone that the Rothschild conspiracy theories popularised by the Nazis are inherently antisemitic. By publishing the book, they played right into the hands of antisemites by legitimising this blatant antisemitism. It is outrageous that such an esteemed publisher had a hand in perpetuating this.

While Baroness Neuberger, who serves as the senior Rabbi at West London Synagogue did not consider the English edition of the book and the original Spanish edition of the book to be antisemitic, she did describe certain passages and references which did not appear in the English edition, as carrying echoes of anti-Jewish conspiracy theories. She also believed that the publisher “should therefore have asked more questions and conducted deeper due diligence to determine whether it was appropriate to publish.”

In a statement, the publisher said: “Penguin Random House UK has carefully considered these findings and notes the review’s judgement that the book is not in itself antisemitic, but that some passages are problematic. It therefore accepts the review’s finding that some of the material should have prompted further enquiry and due diligence on Ebury’s part in view of the complex and highly sensitive subject matter, in order to inform its publishing decision-making.”

Antisemitic conspiracy myths have long placed the predominantly Jewish Rothschild family of bankers and philanthropists behind the world’s ills, accusing them of leading a global Jewish conspiracy. The myth gained widespread currency when the Nazis recognised its potency for turning Germans against the supposed hidden hand of the Jews, who their propaganda claimed were ruining Germany’s national future.

Author Jeremy Duns exposed Penguin’s removal of passages about the Rothschild family from book and suggested that the publisher can only have made such changes “knowingly.” He purchased the e-book in Spanish which featured the Rothschilds, but found that the section on the Rothschilds was missing in the English edition: “That entire section is missing from the English version of the book. Perhaps because British readers would cry foul?” There was also no mention of the Rothschilds in the book summary on the Penguin UK website.

The book cover depicts an octopus which was sometimes used by the Nazis as a euphemism for Jewish tentacles trying to control the world.

Mr Duns researched Colonel Baños’ views and uncovered other anti-Jewish conspiracy theories, including that the Jews killed President John Kennedy, supposedly because he did not want Israel to have nuclear weapons.

It appears that the publisher removed the references to “Rothschilds” in the book to protect their reputation. Mr Duns described this as “very dodgy non-fiction practices.” While Colonel Baños, it seems, will still get the proceeds of the book.

After the initial row, Penguin undertook what they called a “thorough” review of the book. They concluded that while Colonel Baños’s views, including in the parts omitted, are “robust”, they were not antisemitic. Their rationale that the views in the publication, including the omissions on the antisemitic Rothchild conspiracy myth, were “robust” but not antisemitic was pure sophistry.

As the backlash continued, Penguin commissioned its independent external review. Baroness Neuberger was tasked with analysing both the English language and a translation of the Spanish edition of the book, along with any other aspects that she felt were relevant to making an overall assessment.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is pleased that Penguin Random House UK has finally arrived at the correct decision. It appears however that while senior management was not involved in the original decision to publish, it was involved in the decision to initially defend the book, and then to order an independent review, rather than immediately grasping that conspiracy theories about the Rothschild family are part of an antisemitic narrative that they should have played no part in perpetuating.

British publishing giant, Penguin UK, has published an English translation of a Spanish book by antisemitic conspiracy theorist, Colonel Pedro Banos, called “How they rule the world” but has reportedly removed passages about the Rothschild family.

Antisemitic conspiracy myths have long placed the predominantly Jewish Rothschild family of bankers and philanthropists behind the world’s ills, accusing them of leading a global Jewish conspiracy. The myth gained widespread currency when the Nazis recognised its potency for turning Germans against the supposed hidden hand of the Jews, who their propaganda claimed were ruining Germany’s national future.

Author Jeremy Duns has exposed Penguin’s amendments to the antisemitic book and suggested that the publisher can only have done so “knowingly.” He purchased the e-book in Spanish which featured the Rothschilds. Yet, he explained that the section on the Rothschilds was missing in the English edition: “That entire section is missing from the English version of the book. Perhaps because British readers would cry foul?” There is also no mention of the Rothschilds in the book summary on the Penguin UK website.

The book cover depicts an octopus which was an antisemitic caricature used by the Nazis as a euphemism for Jewish tentacles trying to control the world.

Mr Duns researched Colonel Banos’ views and uncovered other antisemitic conspiracy theories, including that the Jews killed President John Kennedy, supposedly because he did not want Israel to have nuclear weapons.

It appears that the publisher removed the clearly antisemitic references to “Rothschilds” in the book to protect their reputation. Mr Duns described this as “very dodgy non-fiction practices.” While Colonel Banos, it seems, will still get the proceeds of the book.

Conspiracy theories are often the vector for antisemitism and should not be perpetuated by reputable publishers. Campaign Against Antisemitism calls for Penguin UK to withdraw the title and investigate who is responsible for the decision to publish and translate it.

The Asian Image has exposed a conspiracy-theory laden antisemitic video that blames Jews for deliberately increasing the gas content in carbonated drinks during the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan.

Campaign Against Antisemitism thanks and commends The Asian Image for reporting this story and for bravely calling out antisemitism. The Asian Image is the “North West’s biggest and most widely read Asian Newspaper.”

The newspaper voices concerns about the dissemination of antisemitic videos, stating: “One of the most alarming features is how people are now sharing videos without realising the antisemitic nature of the content. Some of these are in English but a growing number are in other languages.”

It concludes with: “If a video was being shared which supported anti-Muslim conspiracy theories there would indeed be understandable uproar. So, why are we so irresponsible when it comes to such content?”

In the video, a man speaking Urdu states that it is important not to begin fasting with carbonated drinks, claiming that cold and carbonated drinks can even cause death. He then claims that many carbonated drinks companies are owned and run by Jews who have “purposely planned” to increase the carbonation of some soft drinks, and that according to the Quran, Muslims are not permitted to have relations or friendships with Jews in any way.

This is one of the most bizarre antisemitic conspiracy theories that we have come across and we applaud The Asian Image for bringing this to the attention of their large readership. The persecution of Jews has often been underpinned by the idea that Jews participate in secret and sinister plots to exert wide-ranging control throughout the world.

The pro-Corbyn campaign group, Momentum, has produced a short video posted on Twitter about antisemitic conspiracy theories titled “The conspiracy behind conspiracy theories” narrated by Michael Walker.

The video might seem to be an admirable attack on some of the lies that are spread about Jews, many of which were popularised by the Nazi propaganda effort, but its narrator, Mr Walker, has expressed some very problematic views in the past about Jewish conspiracies.

Mr Walker, who is a regular contributor to Novara Media, a pro-Corbyn social media outlet, sent out a series of tweets last year alleging that Jewish community organisations were conspiring to cause Labour’s antisemitism crisis as some way of suppressing critics of Israel.

On 1st August 2018, Mr Walker tweeted that: “Many members are genuinely scared of talking about what’s going on. They can see many of the attacks on Corbyn are politically motivated, that many mainstream Jewish orgs have strong ties with Israel, and that part of this row is to suppress Palestinians and their advocates.”

On 5th August, he tweeted again, this time to say: “Corbyn denies calling [Jewish Labour MP] Ellsman [sic] the Rt Hon Member for Tel Aviv, but even if he did, that’s unlikely to be antisemitic. It’s fair to point out ties to Israel if someone repeats Israeli govt talking points, it needn’t have anything to with whether or not they’re Jewish.” Under the International Definition of Antisemitism, adopted by the British Government: “Accusing Jewish citizens of being more loyal to Israel, or to the alleged priorities of Jews worldwide, than to the interests of their own nations” is antisemitic. The Labour Party adopted the Definition with a caveat in September last year.

The next month, on 4th September, Mr Walker tweeted in response to Labour’s adoption of the definition, that: “If true, this is a complete abdication of responsibility by Labour and represents us selling out the Palestinian cause. Multiple Palestinian civil society organisations and QCs have warned IHRA will have a chilling effect. Saying ‘it won’t be chilling’ doesn’t make it so.”

After being challenged on Twitter, Mr Walker decided that rather than apologising for his tweets, he would instead suggest that they were simply poorly worded, tweeting: “Tbh [to be honest] — some of my tweets last summer I might have worded differently if it were today. I’ve come to take the problem of AS [antisemitism] in Lab[our] more seriously after initially seeing it primarily as a smear. But happy to discuss any of the substantive issues.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has referred Labour to the Equality and Human Rights Commission for investigation, because the Party’s leaders clearly have no intention of addressing antisemitism themselves.

In the past six months, eleven MPs have quit the Labour Party over its institutional antisemitism.

The Athena in Leicester has cancelled a show by David Icke following contact from Campaign Against Antisemitism, Leicestershire Police and Leicester City Council. He has now made a terribly dull 17-minute video haranguing us, the venue, a local counter-terrorism police officer and the Council.

Mr Icke preaches to large audiences that the world is run by an evil group mostly consisting of prominent Jews whom he calls “Rothschild Zionists”. He tells his disciples that these “Rothschild Zionists” are in fact inhuman “reptilians” conspiring to cheat all of humanity, with governments, media and banks in their grasp.

We contacted the Athena in Leicester in August last year to alert them to Mr Icke’s views. Subsequently, representatives from Leicestershire Police and Leicester City Council approached the venue and made their views clear.

A Leicestershire Police spokesman told the Leicester Mercury: “Leicestershire Police and Leicester City Council were made aware of an event due to be held by David Icke and that a number of letters and e-mails from concerned members of the public had already been received by the venue in Leicester. Representatives from both organisations met with the venue’s owners to discuss these public concerns and to ensure the owners of the premises were aware of their obligations under licensing legislation. The venue subsequently decided to cancel the event.”

We commend Leicestershire Police and Leicester City Council for stepping in, and the management of the Athena for making the right decision.

The Athena joins a long list of venues which have recently cancelled Mr Icke’s bookings, including Manchester United’s Old Trafford stadium, Central Hall in Southampton, St Andrew’s Hall in Norwich, the Lowry Hotel in Salford, Sheffield City Hall and the Gladstone Theatre in Wirral.

The last time Mr Icke’s event was cancelled at Manchester United’s Old Trafford stadium, he was forced to cram his followers into a strange half-built cellar.

However other shamelessly help Mr Icke to reach a wider audience, such as viral social media video company Unilad which made a special ten-minute video in which Mr Icke spoke about his views, albeit not his invective about “Rothschild Zionists”.

Mr Icke uses social media, his books and his stage performances to incite hatred. His preaching is so absurd that since the 1990s he has been dismissed as a crank, but because he is dismissed there has been no major opposition to him and he has built up a following of thousands upon thousands of disciples whom he has persuaded to adamantly believe that the world is in the grip of a conspiracy run by the “Rothschild Zionists”. His repertoire includes conspiracy myths and tropes classified as antisemitic according to the International Definition of Antisemitism, adopted by the British Government.

You may wish to join Campaign Against Antisemitism by sending thanks to the Athena by e-mailing [email protected], and also thanking Leicestershire Police using their website and Leicester City Council by e-mailing [email protected].

Tahra Ahmed, who holds a prominent role as a Grenfell Tower volunteer coordinator, reportedly claimed the victims were “burnt alive in a Jewish sacrifice.” The Times has today reported about Ms Ahmed’s many alleged antisemitic outbursts.

After the tragic fire that left 71 dead, Ms Ahmed said that she had been coordinating the work of volunteers, coaching them and running workshops with the aim of empowering them. She has reportedly discussed her beliefs with some of the people she has helped. When The Times confronted her about her views, she said that she did not care about other people’s opinions.

According to the paper, she reportedly said: “Watch the live footage of people trapped in the inferno with flames behind them. They were burnt alive in a Jewish sacrifice. Grenfell is owned by a private Jewish property developer just like the twin towers. I wonder how much Goldman [Goldman Sachs, a bank often targeted by antisemites] is standing to make in the world’s most expensive real estate location [Kensington].”

Attending a town hall protest two days after the fire, she told reporters there that the fire was a “holocaust.” She has allegedly previously described the Holocaust as the “holohoax” and posted on Facebook: “Hitler and the Germans were the victims of the Jewish conspiracy to destroy Germany.” She is also a proponent of the antisemitic conspiracy theory that the 9/11 terror attacks were faked by Jews. In one Facebook comment found by Campaign Against Antisemitism after The Times published its article, she wrote: “All the leadership of ISIS is directly recruited by CIA and the leadership are all Arab Jews, trained by Mossad.”

Councillors in Kensington and Chelsea are reportedly so worried about unchecked volunteers’ involvement with Grenfell Tower survivors that they have written to the Secretary of State to complain.

Campaign Against Antisemitism calls for Ms Ahmed to be immediately stood down in her role assisting volunteers. To blame the unspeakable tragedy of Grenfell on a historically persecuted people is to let down those victims she claims to represent and support and exacerbate social division in Britain.

We have also revealed that Councillor Beinazir Lasharie, who reportedly said that “I’ve seen compelling evidence that links Zionists to ISIS”, was appointed Deputy Mayor of Kensington and Chelsea “to help the Council rebuild trust with residents following the tragedy at Grenfell Tower.”

It is “game over” for modern-day antisemitic hate preacher David Icke, as Manchester United has confirmed to Campaign Against Antisemitism that it has decided to cancel his event at Old Trafford this evening.

The venue of “An evening with David Icke” had been a closely guarded secret until two tickets with a face value of £85 each were spotted on eBay and reported to Campaign Against Antisemitism by actor Marlon Solomon and Sussex Friends of Israel.

We immediately wrote to the club alerting them to Mr Icke’s views, following which they cancelled the booking.

A reporter for the Jewish Telegraph learned that the event had been booked through an agency without mentioning that Mr Icke would be speaking, but as soon as management received the information that Mr Icke was the speaker, they stopped the event. This was then confirmed to us directly by a source at the football club, followed by an official statement that “The booking was made by a junior member of staff who was unaware of Icke and his objectionable views. The event has been cancelled.”

Mr Icke is a modern-day antisemitic hate preacher who uses social media, his books and his stage performances to incite hatred towards Jewish people. His preaching is so absurd that since the 1990s he has been dismissed as a crank, but because he is dismissed there has been no major opposition to him and he has built up a following of thousands upon thousands of disciples whom he has persuaded to adamantly believe that the world is in the grip of a conspiracy run by the “Rothschild Zionists”.

His repertoire includes conspiracy myths and tropes classified as antisemitic in the International Definition of Antisemitism, adopted by the British Government, including: “making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy or of Jews controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions” and “accusing Jews as a people of being responsible for real or imagined wrongdoing committed by a single Jewish person or group, or even for acts committed by non-Jews.”

Mr Icke’s antisemitic views have resulted in some venues cancelling bookings for his show in 2018. Central Hall in Southampton and St Andrew’s Hall in Norwich have both taken a highly principled stand. North West Friends of Israel have also been successful in causing the cancellation of Mr Icke’s events at the Lowry Hotel in Salford, Sheffield City Hall and the Gladstone Theatre in Wirral.

We commend Manchester United for immediately reacting to our letter by cancelling Mr Icke’s event.

You may wish to join Campaign Against Antisemitism by sending thanks to Manchester United by e-mailing [email protected].

At the eleventh hour, it has emerged that tomorrow, Friday 17th November, Manchester United will welcome antisemitic conspiracy-theorist David Icke. The location for “An evening with David Icke” had been a closely guarded secret until two tickets with a face value of £85 each were spotted on eBay and reported to Campaign Against Antisemitism by actor Marlon Solomon and Sussex Friends of Israel.

David Icke is a modern-day antisemitic hate preacher who uses social media, his books and his stage performances to incite hatred towards Jewish people. His preaching is so absurd that since the 1990s he has been dismissed as a crank, but because he is dismissed there has been no major opposition to him and he has built up a following of thousands upon thousands of disciples whom he has persuaded to adamantly believe that the world is in the grip of a conspiracy run by the “Rothschild Zionists”.

His repertoire includes conspiracy myths and tropes classified as antisemitic in the International Definition of Antisemitism, adopted by the British Government, including: “making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy or of Jews controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions” and “accusing Jews as a people of being responsible for real or imagined wrongdoing committed by a single Jewish person or group, or even for acts committed by non-Jews.”

David Icke’s antisemitic views have resulted in some venues cancelling bookings for his show in 2018. Central Hall in Southampton and St Andrew’s Hall in Norwich have both taken a highly principled stand. North West Friends of Israel have also been successful in causing the cancellation of Mr Icke’s events at the Lowry Hotel in Salford, Sheffield City Hall and the Gladstone Theatre in Wirral. It is disgraceful therefore that one of the country’s pre-eminent sporting institutions is willing to provide him with a platform. The Premier League is a funder of Kick It Out, professional football’s equality and inclusion organisation.

It is shocking that Manchester United, one of the country’s most iconic sporting institutions is willing to give Mr Icke a platform, whether he intends to use it to promote his repugnant views about Jews or not. The directors of Manchester United have claimed to back the Kick It Out campaign to kick racism out of football, and if their words are to be believed then they must now act to cancel this event.

Even at this late stage, it is not too late for Manchester United to make the right decision and cancel Mr Icke’s event. We call on the club’s directors to search their consciences and act accordingly.

You may wish to join Campaign Against Antisemitism in sending complaints to [email protected] and [email protected].

Notorious antisemite Gilad Atzmon, has reportedly claimed that the Grenfell Tower tragedy was the responsibility of “Jerusalemites” who were “following mitzvot” and blamed the Jews for the collapse of traditional left-wing politics. Mitzvot means commandments, and is a word normally used to describe the biblical rules that Jews obey.

The alleged comments were made at a launch for his new book, Being in Time — A Post-Political Manifesto. Organised by Reading Friends of Palestine, the event was part of the Reading International Festival and took place on 22nd October at the Reading International Solidarity Centre.

Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to the Reading International Solidarity Centre before the event to alert them that Gilad Atzmon is a notorious antisemite. We also lodged a formal complaint with the Charity Commission following the event.

According to a report in the JC, during the 90-minute speech, Mr Atzmon attempted to blame the Grenfell Tower tragedy “on people who could be characterised as those who followed ‘commandments’”. He reportedly discussed what he described as a difference between critical thinkers whom he labelled “Athenites” and the “Jerusalemites” who followed “mitzvot.”

He explained how it was related to the Grenfell Tower tragedy: “Very simple. People who think things through, who understand about responsibility and morality and ethics don’t clad buildings all over the country with flammable materials. But when it happens, it is ‘We were following regulations, we were following mitzvot.’” He reportedly continued: “Athens and Jerusalem is not Jews versus goyim [non-Jews] or Jews versus gentiles. Athens and Jerusalem is thinking things through as opposed to following regulations, mitzvot, commandments, laws. The Ten Commandments is Jerusalem. I don’t need you to tell me I should not kill. Athens is ethics, Jerusalem is anti-ethics.”

“Jerusalemites” were not necessarily Jews, Mr Atzmon said, claiming: “It’s not Jews and gentiles because Tony Blair is not a Jew and he’s a Jerusalemite.”

Mr Atzmon reportedly talked about Zionist power and control, alleging that a global pro-Israel lobby dominates politics: “Even the democratic process does not really matter. If you vote Labour, the policies are shaped by Labour Friends of Israel, if you vote Conservative it’s CFI [Conservative Friends of Israel]. The same thing happens in America, in France, and even Turkey is pro-Israeli now.”

He blamed “the Jews” for the collapse of the traditional left-wing politics that he said once appealed to him. He said “The Jewish lobby is a cosmopolitan lobby. It has turned every person in the universe [into] a tribe who operates like a Jew. Look at it: the gays are doing fine, the blacks are doing fine, the women are doing fine, but the Jews are doing really fine. They have a state, hundreds of atomic bombs, they have F16s, F35s [fighter aircraft]. How many gays have a state, an atomic bomb,  an army? How many blacks have a lobby that shapes American foreign policy so everyone is tribal like a Jew? But the Jews are doing way better than everyone else.”

In March this year, Mr Atzmon attended a talk at the London School of Economics with Richard Falk, the discredited and disgraced fringe antisemitic conspiracy theorist and the former UN envoy, where he reportedly told those around him that “the Jews were expelled from Germany for misbehaving.” Stunned audience members asked him to repeat what he had said and he did. Mr Atzmon was also reportedly heard recommending the works of disgraced historian David Irving, who in 2000 was proven in court to be an antisemite, a Holocaust denier and an admirer of Hitler. It is also reported that Mr Atzmon later said: “Jews are always expelled for a reason.”

In December 2014, he told a Jewish Twitter user, “I am not a Jew any more. I indeed despise the Jew in me (whatever is left). I absolutely detest the Jew in you.”

Another of his books, The Wandering Who, was described in 2011 as “quite probably the most antisemitic book published in this country in recent years.”

He has stated that Jews were responsible for their persecution by the Nazis, Jews should apologise for making gentiles hate them, burning synagogues is “a rational act”, Jews are trying to control the world, Jews are harming the planet, Jews caused the credit crunch, and Israel is worse than Nazi Germany. He has also trivialised the scale and impact of the Holocaust.

The International Definition of Antisemitism, adopted by the British government, states, among other things, that the following are antisemitic:

  • Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy or of Jews controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions.
  • Denying the fact, scope, mechanisms (e.g. gas chambers) or intentionality of the genocide of the Jewish people at the hands of National Socialist Germany and its supporters and accomplices during World War II (the Holocaust).
  • Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis.

In March 2012, a collective of Palestinian writers and activists disavowed Mr Atzmon for his attacks on Jews and Judaism, as well as his denial of the Holocaust.

Mr Atzmon also performanced this past weekend at the Pizza Express Jazz Club in Soho in Central London. Before the event, Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to the Chief Executive of Pizza Express, Jinlong Wang, to inform him that Mr Atzmon is a notorious antisemite.

Mr Atzmon should be shunned by any self-respecting decent venue and audience.

Having already written to the Charity Commission and donors to the Reading International Solidarity Centre, we will now do so again to bring these allegations to their attention.

You may wish to contact the Charity Commission, as well as the Reading International Solidarity Centre’s donors, Reading Borough Council, the Earley Charity, the European Union, the Naturesave Trust, Food 4 Families and the Big Lottery Fund.

Central Hall in Southampton and St Andrew’s Hall in Norwich have confirmed to Campaign Against Antisemitism that they have cancelled the bookings for shows by modern-day antisemitic hate preacher, David Icke, on 27th and 30th April 2018.

Campaign Against Antisemitism contacted them and other venues in the UK where Mr Icke is scheduled to perform in November this year and April next year.

Some venues have not yet cancelled their planned events with Mr Icke, including The Caves in Edinburgh on 13th November 2017, The Troxy in London on 15th November 2017, Athena in Leicester on 20th April 2018 and Komedia in Bath on 24th April 2018. Their contact details are below, should members of the public wish to politely add their voices to calls for the shows to be cancelled.

We alerted the venues that Mr Icke uses social media, his books and his stage performances to incite hatred towards Jewish people by repeating centuries-old libels, as well as conspiracy myths that were used by Nazi Germany to justify the Holocaust.

We explained that Mr Icke’s repertoire includes conspiracy myths and tropes classified as antisemitic in the International Definition of Antisemitism, adopted by the British Government, including: “making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy or of Jews controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions” and “accusing Jews as a people of being responsible for real or imagined wrongdoing committed by a single Jewish person or group, or even for acts committed by non-Jews.”

Mr Icke is also listed to appear at “Top Secret” locations in Manchester on 17th November 2017, Southport/Liverpool on 14th April 2018 and Sheffield on 17th April 2018.

Campaign Against Antisemitism thanks the management at Central Hall and St Andrew’s Hall for taking a principled stand and cancelling the bookings. We trust that the other venues will follow their example and lead.

We also commend and thank North West Friends of Israel for successfully intervening to get events with Mr Icke cancelled at the Lowry Hotel in Salford, Sheffield City Hall and the Gladstone Theatre in Wirral.

The venues that have not yet decided to cancel Mr Icke’s shows are:

13th November 2017
The Caves, 8-10 Niddry Street South, Edinburgh EH1 1NS
Telephone: 0131 510 1122
E-mail: [email protected]

15th November 2017
The Troxy, 490 Commercial Road, London E1 0HX
Telephone: 020 7790 9000
E-mail: [email protected]

20th April 2018
Athena, Queen Street, Leicester LE1 1QD
Telephone: 0116 262 6556
E-mail: [email protected]

24th April 2018
Komedia, 22-23 Westgate Street, Bath BA1 1EP
Telephone: 0122 548 9070
E-mail: [email protected]

A secret meeting of neo-Nazi Holocaust deniers scheduled for tomorrow evening at a community centre in Holborn in central London has been cancelled following intervention from Campaign Against Antisemitism.

The meeting was part of the “Keep Talking” series of meetings organised by conspiracy theorist, Ian Fantom. Campaign Against Antisemitism informed the venue about the true nature of the meeting following a tip-off from Searchlight.

A recent Keep Talking event in nearby Camden saw notorious Holocaust denier Nick Kollerstrom attempt to speak, before the meeting was cancelled by Camden council, after pressure from activists. Copies of Kollerstrom’s Holocaust denying books have reportedly been on open sale at previous Keep Talking meetings.

According to Searchlight, an invitation to tomorrow’s meeting was allegedly circulated among London’s top neo-Nazis by the far-right London Forum organiser, Jeremy Bedford-Turner. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss conspiracy theories about the death of Princess Diana.

In March, a landmark High Court judicial review action brought by Campaign Against Antisemitism forced the Crown Prosecution Service to cancel its decision not to prosecute Bedford-Turner over an antisemitic speech to neo-Nazis in July 2015.

The Keep Talking meetings were started in the United States in the aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. The conspiracy theory group has spread the antisemitic lies that Jews were behind the tragedy and that Jews working in the World Trade Centre towers were warned not to attend work on the day of the attacks.

Campaign Against Antisemitism thanks Searchlight for bringing this event to our attention, and we commend the venue for taking swift action in cancelling it.

As Britain mourns those murdered in the terrorist atrocity in Manchester and treats the injured, antisemites have poured onto social media to blame the attack on a murderous Jewish conspiracy.

All of us at Campaign Against Antisemitism deplore the sickening attack on children and their families in Manchester last night. As the details of the attacker’s cowardice and barbarity became clear, and we heard the stories of families never to be reunited and casualties whose lives will be forever changed, we also began to see the all-too-familiar phenomenon of people rushing to social media to blame Jews.

Whilst politicians urged unity and “#WeStandTogether” trended on social media, people from around the world took to Twitter, Facebook and other platforms to claim that the suicide bombing was a plot by Jewish conspirators to fuel wars against oil-rich Muslim states, or some other variant of the depraved conspiracy myths that place Jews at the centre of the world’s every ill.

On Twitter, “Carlos” wrote: “Zionists just bombed Manchester”. “Geeky Artist Arab Woman” opined that Zionists are “the sources of all terrorism #Manchester”. “Isaac Mintman” posted his theory that “Zionists and fascists want more Islamic terror attacks in hopes of sparking civil war”. “Mama Snarf” replied to a tweet from an Israeli minister: “Most terror attacks ordered by Israel anyway. Manchester don’t need anymore Zionists”. “Dowlut Nawshad” tweeted: “The World should drive out the ‘Zionists debts theft genocide false flags monetary system?$’ they ordered and responsible for Manchester.”

Over on Facebook, Oxford-educated “James Harper” posted his theory that “The Manchester incident is just another Zionist psy-op to promote hatred towards Muslims as an excuse to blame Iran and give cause for reason to attack them.” “Terry Vincent” posted: “False flag Manchester. Rothschild needs this to make the elections look legitimate. If you can’t see it, you’re still sleeping.” “Zeeshan Hussain” decided that the attack was a Zionist plot against the Labour Party, posting: “Manchester Attack is atteach [sic] to elections in UK because ISIS is under control of Mossad and Zionists don’t like Labour Party”. He gave his post a colourful background to make sure that it stood out. “Shaji Mohammad Khan” posted his own lengthy hypothesis, beginning: “More false flag propaganda.. Another MOUSSAD [sic] cooked Hollywood productions.. Wait ‘til they spice the story, as they detail it.. They always start with a bang, and then slowly pretend to investigate and follow clues to some made up MUSLIM name, and profile…” Meanwhile, “James Bay Wong Wingchiao” posted: “Smells like a ZIONIST BOMB PLANTED BY MI6 MI5 and freemasons”. “Edward Joseph Carmona” was similarly sure of Zionist involvement, posting: “Now the Zionist will pick who to blame.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy or of Jews controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions” is antisemitic, as is “Accusing Jews as a people of being responsible for real or imagined wrongdoing committed by a single Jewish person or group, or even for acts committed by non-Jews”.

It is absolutely right that in the aftermath of this attack, British people should stand together. Indeed the only positive news to emerge has been story after story about individual acts of heroism and generosity.

Yet as the social media giants and our police forces mobilise to ensure that British Muslims do not suffer a backlash following this terrorist attack, we hope that they will show the same diligence in protecting Jews from those who seek to incite hatred against us.

If you would like to join our Online Monitoring and Investigations Unit, our Crime Unit or one of our other teams, please volunteer now.

https://twitter.com/IsaacMintman/status/866979161163923458

https://twitter.com/MammaSnarf/status/866999464447406080

https://twitter.com/nash90025/status/867000120310681600

Both the Labour and Conservative candidates in Birmingham’s Hall Green ward have been deselected by their parties after they both separately opined on social media about Jewish conspiracies.

The Conservative Party’s candidate, Obaid Khan, hit out at “Jew agents” and accusing a “Jewish lobby” of paying Twitter users he disagreed with. A Conservative spokesman told the Birmingham Mail: “He is no longer a member of the party. Views like that have no place in the party or our society.”

The Labour Party’s candidate, Alison Gove-Humphries, shared articles putting forward the conspiracy myths that Israel is the “key link in exporting ISIS oil” and that the “Israel lobby manufactured [the] UK Labour Party’s antisemitism crisis.” When criticised by other Labour councillors, she claimed that the allegations against her constituted “intrusion and misrepresentation” and said that she did not want to be “distracted by these hurtful allegations.”

The International Definition of Antisemitism states that “Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy or of Jews controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions” is antisemitic.

Whilst Gove-Humphries has been replaced by another candidate, the Conservatives discovered Khan’s antisemitism too late and have had to withdraw from the election as the deadline for proposing new candidates had passed before he was deselected. Khan is no longer a member of the Conservative Party, but it is less unclear what action, if any, the Labour Party has taken against Gove-Humphries as a member.

It is utterly sickening that local politics in Birmingham Hall Green has been infested with antisemitism, with the local Conservative candidate obsessing about ‘Jewish agents’ and his Labour counterpart believing that antisemitism is a fabrication by a shadowy ‘Israel lobby’. We are pleased that on this occasion, both of the local Conservative and Labour parties have done the right thing and deselected their antisemitic candidates.

Hilton has become the latest brand to welcome Nazis, after a sting by The Herald exposed a secret conference at a Hilton in Glasgow at which Holocaust denier David Irving made racist remarks about Jews.

As the Lord Provost greeted guests for a black-tie Burns Supper banquet elsewhere in the hotel on Friday, Irving sat in a moth-eaten jumper and gave an audience of forty people, including a child, a self-pitying account of his life, peppered with racism.

His delusional views about Jews were on open display. He began by attacking historian Martin Gilbert’s books on Sir Winston Churchill, noting that the books were “very good, but he’s Jewish. Everything negative towards the Jews has been cut out. That’s what happens”.

He also complained about negative reviews of his own books, saying:  “I remember we got a four-page review in the Sunday Times from Arthur Koestler. He didn’t like the book. [There was] another Jew, what was his name, Rosenthal… something like that. He called it a ‘bucketful of slime’.”

According to The Herald, after signing books at the mid-way point of the event, Irving appeared to relax and stepped up his hateful comments: “I am very conscious of the fact that we are not being disturbed here this evening. I am wondering whether this means that the Jews now have given me carte blanche and said, ‘Lay off him, he’s getting old’.”

He then began voicing antisemitic conspiracy theories, saying that after 1938, “we allowed in hundreds of thousands of Jews who have taken over the country,” before a woman interrupted to shout: “And the judiciary”. Irving continued: “When you look at the way these people for the last 50 years have spent 50 years trying to destroy me and my family, as Jews, they have done this as Jews, I criticise them and they accuse me of antisemitism.” Irving also repeated his debunked fantasy that “Hitler was uninterested in the Jews and was constantly applying the brakes on all these anti-Jewish operations.” Asked by his audience about President Trump, Irving replied: “It’s very interesting to see the problems he is already having with the judiciary and the Jews.”

Irving’s audience clearly shared his views. When Irving said that there had been a plan during the Second World War to expel Jews to Madagascar, a man sneered: “Certainly improve the banking industry.”

Irving famously bankrupted himself by suing historian Deborah Lipstadt and her publisher for libel after she called him an antisemite and Holocaust denier. The case has been retold in the film Denial which was released in the UK last month. Irving has also been jailed in Austria for calling the gas chambers at Auschwitz a “fairytale”.

Perhaps Irving’s revolting views therefore come as no surprise, but the views of the Hilton management were startling. Rather than condemning Irving and explaining that he had reserved a room through a company which does not bear his name, a spokesperson for the DoubleTree by Hilton Glasgow Central said: “The hotel management does not adopt, share or promote the views of the individuals or groups to which we provide accommodations and services.”

Neutrality on antisemites and Holocaust deniers seems to be a newly-discovered problem amongst British hotels. Just last week, Campaign Against Antisemitism exposed the disgraceful neutrality of the InterContinental Hotels Group towards neo-Nazis.

On Saturday, a conference for neo-Nazis and Holocaust deniers convened in secret at the Holiday Inn Kensington Forum, however the location of the meeting was discovered by protesters who caused the meeting to end early.

The original speaker lineup included James Thring, the antisemitic conspiracy theorist, Elizabeth Hobson, Jason Reza Jorjani, Editor-in-Chief of Arktos, Shahin Nehzad, leader of Iranian Renaissance, Ian Millard, a neo-Nazi former barrister who was recently disbarred for his views, and Ole Dammegard, another conspiracy theorist.

As usual, in attendance were various neo-Nazi antisemites and much of the conversation centred on how “oppressed” the activities of Campaign Against Antisemitism make them feel.

However, the hotel which hosted them was unashamed. We contacted InterContinental Hotels Group, which operates the hotel, which told us that they do not “discriminate” against their neo-Nazi “guests”. In a statement, a spokesman told Campaign Against Antisemitism: “When taking bookings for group or individual business we do not discriminate on the basis of affiliation or personal preference. Bookings are permitted as long as the activities do not violate any laws or constitute a significant risk to guests or employees. On Saturday the hotel was open and operating as usual and hotel staff liaised with Police to ensure that disruption to guests was kept at a minimum.”

Sometimes neo-Nazi groups manage to make bookings under false names without venues realising that they were hosting antisemites, but in this case, InterContinental Hotels Group is unabashed.

We assumed that there must be some mistake and contacted Richard Solomons, CEO of InterContinental Hotels Group, drawing his attention to the outrageous statement we had been sent. We were contacted by Emma Corcoran, Vice President for Corporate Affairs for Europe who discussed the matter with our Chairman who she told that the company was neutral in such matters. When asked whether that meant that the company was for, against or indifferent towards neo-Nazis, she promised to consult senior executives. She then confirmed in an e-mail that InterContinental Hotels Group would not be changing its stance. She wrote: “As long as the activities associated with a proposed booking at a hotel are legal and do not pose a significant risk to guests or employees, we do not determine whether or not to accept a booking based on the political affiliation, religious beliefs, personal preferences or philosophies of the relevant third party.”

On the day of the event, upon discovering that Holiday Inn Kensington Forum was unwittingly hosting a neo-Nazi conference, after the police arrived, the Duty Manager should have told the attendees to leave. Instead, we now learn that were the neo-Nazis and Holocaust deniers of the London Forum to book another conference room at an InterContinental Hotels Group venue, so long as they paid the fee, they would not be discriminated against.

You may wish to let Mr Solomons and Ms Corcoran know what you think of their policy at [email protected] and [email protected].

David Icke is a modern-day antisemitic hate preacher who uses social media, his books and his stage performances to incite hatred towards Jewish people. His preaching is so absurd that since the 1990s he has been dismissed as a crank, but because he is dismissed there has been no major opposition to him and he has built up a following of thousands upon thousands of disciples whom he has persuaded to adamantly believe that the world is in the grip of a conspiracy run by the “Rothschild Zionists”.

Earlier this week we asked Manchester City Council to impose a fine and licence conditions on the O2 Apollo theatre for providing a platform to antisemitic hate preacher David Icke, who delivered a twelve-hour sermon on his world view, including his notorious segment on the supposed conspiracy he calls “Rothschild Zionism”. We asked witnesses to the performance to e-mail us, and interestingly Icke’s associates urged his disciples to contact us. We have received numerous e-mails from Icke’s devotees unanimously reassuring us that Icke is no antisemite, and his message is one of love and compassion.

We decided to publish extracts below, unedited save for the grammar and spelling.

While their comments are patently risible, they are also highly dangerous. They illustrate how easy it is for a demagogue like Icke to convince people that age-old antisemitic conspiracy myths are real. Icke passionately warns his followers that the “Rothschild Zionists” have the world in their grip, and that even the antisemitic Protocols of the Elders of Zion should be heeded. It is perhaps unsurprising that people who are willing to pay up to £80 to be lectured for twelve hours straight by Icke are susceptible to his views. It is, nonetheless, extremely alarming. He preys on ordinary people who are suggestible, and persuades them that he is revealing a hidden truth, and that they cannot trust anybody else to be honest with them. Like a cult leader, he “wakes them up” from the “dreamworld” they were living in before they met him.

Take David Wright for example. He resoundingly endorsed Icke’s philosemitic credentials, telling us: “Just because he believes a Jewish elite run the world doesn’t make him an antisemite.” In a separate e-mail, he assured us that: “David Icke is nothing like an antisemite,” reinforcing the point with a link to David Icke’s “Rothschild Zionism” speech.

Kevin Whittle sent us an equally impassioned rebuttal of the accusation that Icke is an antisemite: “Mr Icke did indeed mention the Rothschild Zionists and global elite who are factually running things in this world. He also gave proof of this in his presentation. More and more people understand what the Rothschild Zionists have done to the world […]. Problem is they have 80% of the lobby in the UK and practically own the US congressionals. When talking about Zionism David always referred to the Rothschild Zionists to make it clear to the thought police he was talking about a particular faction hiding behind the Jewish faith.”

Kaya Davidson expressed her indignation at the notion that Icke is an antisemite thus: “It is my understanding that he believes, upon conducting extensive unbiased research, a group of Zionists control the media, many political decisions that affect us all. How is that antisemitic?”

Bob Alford suggested that broadening our choice of reading matter would help us to understand Icke better: “May I recommend you read a book called ‘The falsification of history’ by John Hamer. Here you will find documented and remembered proof about the Hitler myth. (I am NOT a neo-Nazi, by the way, before you start accusing me of causing all the s*** the ‘Jews’ bring on themselves for self pity. Check it out, they even have a word for it.)” In order to leave us in absolutely no doubt that he is “NOT a neo-Nazi”, Mr Alford added a postscript: “There’s a great video on YouTube called ‘Adolf Hitler – the greatest story NEVER told’. If you are non-biased, give it a look, you might learn something you’re not taught to believe. Then, who knows, you might even find some self respect and pack in your well-paid job of attacking ‘antisemites’ for your Zionist masters.” The Greatest Story Never Told is a virulently antisemitic film that seeks to rehabilitate Hitler and his policies, while blaming Jews for the circumstances that led to World War 2.

A fan writing in under the name “Tym R”, in his defence of Icke, adds Holocaust denial to classic antisemitic conspiracy theory: “…a nefarious cabal of Khazar-Ashkenazi ersatz Jews of convenience control the world to the global society’s detriment and have hijacked the term ‘antisemitic’ (as per the six million Holohoax fiction).”

These sentiments expressed to us by Icke’s fans are representative of the vast majority of those who contacted us after attending his show. They insist that Icke, an advocate for love and compassion, cannot possibly be antisemitic because he is only telling the truth about Jews. We would urge them to acquaint themselves with the International Definition of Antisemitism, recently adopted by the British government. It cites various examples of antisemitism, including:

  • Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy or of Jews controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions; and
  • Denying the fact, scope, mechanisms (e.g. gas chambers) or intentionality of the genocide of the Jewish people at the hands of National Socialist Germany and its supporters and accomplices during World War II (the Holocaust).

Many correspondents allowed their enthusiasm for defending Icke to lure them into another antisemitic conspiracy theory, insisting that accusations of antisemitism only exist to shut down criticism of Israel. The International Definition of Antisemitism identifies these practices as antisemitic, especially:

  • Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour);
  • Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis; and
  • Accusing Jews as a people of being responsible for real or imagined wrongdoing committed by a single Jewish person or group, or even for acts committed by non-Jews.

But Kate Coley e-mailed us to inform us that: “David Icke may use a different definition of Zionism to the one that you use.” There is only one useful definition of Zionism: it is the aspiration of the Jewish people to self-determination in their ancestral homeland — an ideal that has always been central to Judaism. Other definitions of Zionism are almost always manufactured by antisemites. Icke can be found on video clearly distinguishing between the Jews he approves of (those who disavow Israel) and those he regards as objectionable (Zionists). Over 90% of British Jews identify as Zionists.

A man calling himself “Neil” was scathing about the the Jewish right to self-determination: “I have come to learn a lot about Zionism and find it repulsive. All my friends and family understand the sickness that is Zionism, and all their friends and family have been duly enlightened.” Wendy Steele went further: “I have lived long enough to see the Israelis behave worse than the Nazis. On that, it was a great number of Jewish bankers who brought that pathetic wee man, Hitler to power.” A correspondent who identified himself only as “hocusfocus” agreed wholeheartedly: “It is evident to many of us now that the Israeli regime is akin to Nazi Germany”

A fan e-mailing under the name of “scousepies” was convinced that Israel is behind far-right extremisim: “Zionism is not Judaism. It bears no resemblance to it — it only hijacks the religion as a front for other activities. Same as the Vatican does with Christianity, same as the KKK does, same as any extremist minds warp their views and goals into a more acceptable front…Exposing a group of people who claim to be ‘Jews’ when in fact they are only using that religion as a front to hide the fact they are Satanists is not hating Jewish people.”

Max Johnson reminded us of a more modern conspiracy theory that is popular among antisemites: “The sad realisation that 9/11 was an inside job carried out by Israeli dual nationals in the Bush administration brought me to the conclusion; over the last 15 years we have been lied to and manipulated which is absolutely disgusting.”

E-mails continue to pour in from the many people all over the world that Icke has convinced that “Rothschild Zionists” are behind many of the world’s ills.

Icke is a modern-day antisemitic hate preacher who uses social media, his books and his stage performances to incite hatred towards Jewish people by repeating centuries-old libels, as well as the same conspiracy myths that were used by Nazi Germany to justify the Holocaust. His appearance at the O2 Apollo in Manchester was the only UK appearance of his international tour. Not only did the O2 Apollo allow Icke to address their packed venue for twelve hours, they profited from it. Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to Manchester City Council asking that they fine the venue an amount in excess of the profits from the evening and impose licence conditions so that this does not happen again.

You may wish to contact O2’s Chief Executive, Mark Evans, at [email protected] to let him know how you feel about the decision by the O2 Apollo, which O2 sponsors, to host a modern-day antisemitic hate preacher to address a sell-out audience for twelve hours. You may also want to contact Manchester City Council’s Licensing Unit at [email protected] setting out how you feel about the venue hosting speakers of this nature.

On Saturday, the O2 Apollo in Manchester provided the sold-out venue for David Icke’s twelve-hour-long stage show: Worldwide Wake Up Tour 2016/17.

Icke is a modern-day antisemitic hate preacher who uses social media, his books and his stage performances to incite hatred towards Jewish people by repeating centuries-old libels, as well as the same conspiracy myths that were used by Nazi Germany to justify the Holocaust. The appearance is the only UK appearance of the international tour.

In a clip from one of Icke’s stage shows, published on YouTube, Icke talks repeatedly about “Rothschild Zionists”. Invoking the Rothschild family of Jewish bankers and philanthropists has long been used by antisemites to support myths of a worldwide Jewish conspiracy. Icke also repeatedly implies a distinction between bad Jews who support Israel and good Jews who disavow it.

Icke exhorts his audience to believe conspiracy myths and tropes classified as antisemitic in the International Definition of Antisemitism, recently adopted by the British government, including:

  • making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy or of Jews controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions;
  • accusing Jews as a people of being responsible for real or imagined wrongdoing committed by a single Jewish person or group, or even for acts committed by non-Jews; and
  • denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour).

Once a well-known sports presenter, Icke has been a figure of ridicule for a quarter of a century since claiming in a 1991 interview with the late Sir Terry Wogan that he is the son of G-d. Subsequent pronouncements on the world being run by reptiles, and the British royal family being shape-shifting lizards have only added to the misplaced notion that he is a crank who can safely be ignored.

Icke has not, however, been ignored and is, in fact, extremely dangerous. Hiding behind his cloak of absurdity, he has seen his popularity rise as he continues to profit hugely from his antisemitism. In advance of the Manchester show, blogger Marlon Solomon assembled an extensive collection of Icke’s comments, many of which are direct incitement to hatred of Jews.

He reportedly promotes as authentic the Protocols of the Elders of Zion, a notorious antisemitic forgery that was proven to be a hoax used to whip up antisemitism almost a century ago. When asked about the Protocols, Icke allegedly retorted, “Just because Hitler used the knowledge for negative reasons doesn’t reflect on the knowledge itself.”

In his book, And The Truth Shall Set You Free, he writes: “I strongly believe that a small Jewish clique which has contempt for the mass of Jewish people worked with non-Jews to create the First World War, the Russian Revolution, and the Second World War. This Jewish elite used the First World War to secure the Balfour Declaration and the principle of the Jewish State of Israel (for which, given the genetic history of most Jewish people, there is absolutely no justification on historical grounds or any other).”

Prior to Icke’s Manchester performance, Campaign Against Antisemitism contacted the O2 Apollo as well as O2’s PR department and its Chief Executive, Mark Evans. There was no response until the day of the show, when O2’s Head of Sponsorship replied to us, stating that “The General Manager for O2 Apollo Manchester has spoken to the show promoter to seek assurance about this show, which has been given,” and “The venue’s police contact has been informed.”

Given the information provided by Campaign Against Antisemitism and Icke’s track record to date, this is a wholly inadequate response. It is implausible that a twelve-hour unscripted performance could have been thoroughly vetted independently of its promoter. O2’s unscrupulous acquiescence to a venue they sponsor hosting a vehement antisemite is reprehensible.

David Icke preaches that a Jewish conspiracy controls the world, started both world wars and that Hitler acted on valid information. Not only did the O2 Apollo allow Icke to address their packed venue for twelve hours, they profited from it.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to Manchester City Council asking that they fine the venue an amount in excess of the profits from the evening and impose licence conditions so that this does not happen again.

We would like to hear from anybody who witnessed the performance. If you attended or know someone who did, please e-mail [email protected].

You may wish to contact O2’s Chief Executive, Mark Evans, at [email protected] to let him know how you feel about the decision by the O2 Apollo, which O2 sponsors, to host a modern-day antisemitic hate preacher to address a sell-out audience for twelve hours. You may also want to contact Manchester City Council’s Licensing Unit at [email protected] setting out how you feel about the venue hosting speakers of this nature.

David Irving, the convicted Holocaust denier who has been banned from several countries, has reportedly to the Jewish Telegraph in an e-mail: “I have led groups of international tourists to the sites where the Holocaust really occurred in Latvia and Poland (like Sobibór, Treblinka and Belzec). But then Britain’s Jewish guests objected even to those tours. They are some hard-to-please people.” When we asked Irving to elaborate on ‘Britain’s Jewish guests’ comments, he reportedly responded: “The non-British Jews arrived in the years before 1938 and settled here,” refusing to comment further.

David Irving’s tour will visit 21 venues, but the exact locations will only be revealed to vetted ticket-buyers.

In 2002, David Irving was bankrupted after unsuccessfully suing historian Deborah Lipstadt and her publisher for libel, after she called him a Holocaust denier, a racist and a bigot in her book.  Lipstadt told the Jewish Telegraph: “As Anthony Julius said to me during my legal battle, ‘fighting David Irving is like the s*** you step in on the street — it has no intrinsic importance unless you fail to clean it off your feet and you bring it into your home’. He will preach to his small choir who are convinced and will remain convinced of the rectitude of his position.”

In its ruling on Irving’s libel lawsuit, the court found that Irving was an active Holocaust denier, antisemite, and racist, who “for his own ideological reasons persistently and deliberately misrepresented and manipulated historical evidence” to distort the history of Adolf Hitler’s role in the Holocaust to depict Hitler in a favourable light.

Irving has a long history of the most vile Holocaust denial. For example, in October 1991 Irving told a conference to ridicule Holocaust survivors, and then added: “Ridicule alone isn’t enough, you’ve got to be tasteless about it. You’ve got to say things like ‘More women died on the back seat of Edward Kennedy’s car at Chappaquiddick than in the gas chambers at Auschwitz.’ Now you think that’s tasteless, what about this? I’m forming an association especially dedicated to all these liars, the ones who try and kid people that they were in these concentration camps, it’s called the Auschwitz Survivors, Survivors of the Holocaust and Other Liars, ‘ASSHOLs’. Can’t get more tasteless than that, but you’ve got to be tasteless because these people deserve our contempt.”

Irving’s humiliating defeat by Deborah Lipstadt and her publisher is the subject of a new film starring Rachel Weisz, Andrew Scott and Timothy Spall due to be released in Britain in January.

As the world reacted with shock to the horrific attack on families celebrating Bastille Day in Nice on Thursday night, many on social media turned to a familiar scapegoat, convinced that this atrocity, like all others, real or perceived, could be pinned on Jews.

Search on Twitter, Facebook and elsewhere and the outpouring of sadness and sympathy is overwhelming, however, it is all too easy to find oneself stumbling upon the antisemitic opportunists and Jew haters who take every opportunity to profess and publicise their hatred. A search on Twitter for hashtags “#NiceAttack”, “#Nice” or “#PrayForNice” and the words “Jew”or “Zionist” displays pages of antisemitic conspiracy myths.

One of the truly awful aspects of these posts is that they are rarely contradicted.  Mostly they are supported or discussed in blind faith and acceptance that this is the truth. By remaining unopposed, these heinous statements gain traction and credibility. Each time a few more will follow the train of thought, that possibly previously they would have not.

The latest antisemitic libel comes in the week that the Home Affairs Select Committee’s Inquiry into Antisemitism heard from the Chief Rabbi that more must be done by social networks, governments and internet service providers to stop the spread of racism and antisemitism in particular. This is another spectacular failure to do so and in the process antisemitic libels have just gained a few more believers.

https://twitter.com/WorldWarMeme/status/753761056204267520

https://twitter.com/tvdh_3/status/753926253317619713

https://twitter.com/jdavismemphis/status/753977102991396864

https://twitter.com/FUFeelinz/status/753744864311926784

https://twitter.com/altrightnation1/status/753795252549357568

https://twitter.com/LibertySlap/status/753715228194594816

https://twitter.com/OperationNation/status/753994011984076800

Keith Porteous Wood, Executive Director of the National Secular Society, has told LBC radio that the Jewish community has corrupted the political system and subverted due process in order to build unregistered schools in London. The presence of unregistered Jewish schools has been criticised heavily by many in the Jewish community.

Porteous Wood told LBC on 3rd April: “It’s far worse than what you’re reporting. There is a very very strong Jewish Lobby that actually undermines — of which the government appear to be frightened — and allows the rule of law to be undermined. Whether we are talking about education or indeed as is another open secret effectively in places like Stamford Hill planning rules just don’t apply. If the Jewish community wants to build — massively overbuild — and extend their houses, then they just get away with it. It’s another open secret. It’s less of a surprise that local authorities feel intimidated — as I think they do — and no doubt there are an awful lot of Jewish Councillors elected who are going to be very happy to look in the other direction, but when it gets to central government just thinking ‘Well actually we won’t do anything about it’, then it is a national disgrace.”

Not only does he think there is a “very very strong Jewish Lobby” which is successfully stopping the Department of Education from regulating Jewish schools, he also believes that Jews are successfully intimidating local authorities into failing to enforce planning regulations. Most appallingly, he thinks that Jewish Councillors ‘look the other way’ when it comes to enforcing planning regulations. Such language is straight out of the Protocols of the Elders of Zion.

Porteous Wood has yet to personally publicly apologise. A National Secular Society official said that “no malice was intended”, which is strange because the statement was extremely malicious.

The National Secular Society has also been criticised this week after the discovery on its website of an article about Jewish schools which claims that Jewish schools are responsible for rising antisemitism: “As more Jewish kids are taken into faith schools and fewer are taught alongside non Jews should we be surprised that the horror of antisemitism is prospering in Britain, with more attacks in 2014 than for decades?”

Opposing all religion is not discriminatory, nor should the National Secular Society be criticised for objecting to lawbreaking unregistered schools, but this week an antisemitic subtext has burst to the surface.

Please feel free to contact the National Secular Society’s Honorary Associates about this, however amongst the names of the great and the good you may also notice the names of the infamous, such as Baroness Jenny Tonge.

You may even wish to add your voice to the calls for Keith Porteous Wood to resign. One of Stamford Hill’s most senior rabbis, Rabbi Avrohom Pinter has commented: “The National Secular Society has now moved from promoting a secular lifestyle to blatant antisemitism. With Mr Porteous Wood at its CEO the NSS can no longer claim any form of legitimacy in the political sphere when we know their opinions are based on prejudice and hate. We have long wondered what fascinated the NSS about Jewish schools. We now know that their bias is against Jews and not schools. I trust that Government ministers and the media will take this on board when analysing NSS campaigns in future. There are some very decent people associated with the NSS and although we don’t see eye to eye on many matters, I am sure that a number of the NSS’s Honorary Associates will wish to cease their association with an organisation run by an individual who is actively promoting classic antisemitic myths and stereotypes.”