Rabbi Menachem Margolin, the Chairman and founder of the European Jewish Association (EJA), an organisation that promotes and defends Jewish interests in Europe, a large part of which involves raising awareness of, and tackling, antisemitism, appeared on the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism where he spoke about the EJA’s first-of-its-kind index which polled the best European countries for Jews to live in.

When asked if he was surprised that the report ranked Italy and Hungary as the top two countries for Jews to live in, while Poland, Belgium and France came out bottom, he said that he was not.

“What is important is not what the media says” he said. “We have to concentrate on what is important for Jewish life.”

Rabbi Margolin said that in the case of Hungary, he noticed “a renaissance of Jewish life” taking place, noting the country’s growth of synagogues as an indicator.

Rabbi Margolin said that he hoped that world leaders would take notice of the findings and that they would back up any promises to enhance Jewish life with actions. 

“The action,” he explained, “is providing the Jewish communities the conditions they need to grow. They need security, they need freedom of religion, they need support, they need to see zero tolerance towards antisemitism, they need to see the government is really committed to combating antisemitism, they would like to see governments treat Israel in a fair way; not with double standards.”

Throughout the interview, Rabbi Margolin touched upon a variety of other issues which included the rise of antisemitism in the United States and his advice for tackling antisemitism.

The podcast with Rabbi Margolin can be listened to here, or watched here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox.

Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, television personality Robert Rinder, writer Eve Barlow, Grammy-Award-winning singer-songwriter Autumn Rowe, and actor Eddie Marsan.

A new poll has revealed that one in three Germans believe that Israel acts like the Nazis.

Bertelsmann Stiftung, an independent German foundation, surveyed thousands of Israelis and Germans to explore relations between the countries, but also examined antisemitic views among the German public.

To the statement, “What the State of Israel is doing to the Palestinians today is in principle no different than what the Nazis in the Third Reich did to the Jews,” 36 percent of respondents said that they agreed or strongly agreed. A further quarter of those polled said that they did not know, leaving only 40 percent who disagreed or strongly disagreed with the statement.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

Responding to another question, 24 percent of Germans polled said that Jews have too much influence in the world, whereas 62 percent disagreed, with the balance saying that they did not know.

The survey also, however, found that a large majority of 82 percent agreed with the statement that “Jews naturally belong in Germany”, while 13 percent disagreed and 5 percent said that they did not know.

With regard to the statement that Germany “has a special responsibility for the Jewish people,” 58 percent of Israelis agreed or strongly agreed compared to only 35 percent of Germans, while 25 percent of Israelis and 33 percent of Germans said that they “partly agree”. 31 percent of Germans and 11 percent of Israelis disagreed or strongly disagreed.

Asked about the statement, “Almost 80 years after the end of the Second World War, we should no longer talk so much about the persecution of the Jews under the Nazis, but finally put the past behind us,” 49 percent of Germans agreed while only fourteen percent of Israelis did. 33 percent of Germans and 60 percent of Israelis disagreed. The rest were undecided.

The study reportedly found a correlation between lower levels of formal education levels and prejudices against Jews.

The research was conducted in 2021 but only released last week.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout Europe.

It has been reported that two personalised vehicle registration plates incorporating Nazi references have been observed in Belgium.

One plate reportedly included the digits “HH-88”, alluding to the phrase “Heil Hitler”, “H” being the eighth letter of the alphabet.

Another had the phrase “1-RAS-88”, a reference to the phrase “Een ras”, meaning “one race”.

UNIA, the Centre for Equal Opportunities and Opposition to Racism in Belgium, observed that “it is highly unlikely that this choice of the plate was a coincidence, especially considering the €1,000 fee that the person paid for.”

The Department of Vehicles Registration (DIV) was reprotedly contacted by UNIA but declined to deregister the plates, apparently claiming that the “88” on the second plate referred to “the year the applicant was born” and that the owner assured them that there was no intention of racism nor was offence intended. UNIA was justifiably unpersuaded.

The Minister of Mobility reportedly responded to UNIA agreeing that the response was “schooling” but that “the current legislation does not allow the automatic cancellation of a licence plate already in circulation. If a plate is not on the DIV’s black list, there is currently little the authorities can do.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout Europe.

A European arrest warrant has been issued for a radical imam who has a history of making inflammatory comments about Jews, after the imam went on the run following a court ruling last week permitting the French Government to deport him.

Earlier this month, the Government vowed to change the law in order to be able to deport the imam, but this is no longer necessary after the decision from the Conseil d’Etat, the supreme court for administrative justice, which overturned a previous ruling that suspended Hassan Iquioussen’s deportation order.

The new decision rejected the claims of Mr Iquioussen’s defence that deporting the imam to Morocco would not be a disproportionate interference with his right to lead a normal previous and family life.

Interior Minister Gérald Darmanin, who has previously said that Mr Iquioussen is an enemy of France who had “no place” in the country, hailed the decision as “a big victory for the Republic,” adding of the imam: “He will be deported from national soil.”

Mr Iquioussen, 59, is a Moroccan citizen who has lived in France all his life but who has become a symbol of President Emmanuel Macron’s battle against Islamism, whom the President accuses of rejecting French laws and values. He did not take up French citizenship at a younger age and his attempts to do so since then have failed.

Morocco already delivered a laissez-passer to authorise his travel, which cleared the way for Mr Iquioussen’s expulsion “by force”, but the imam won an injunction halting his deportation at the Paris Administrative Court, which ruled that the expulsion was a “disproportionate infringement…of [Iquioussen’s] right to a private and family life.” Mr Iquioussen has five children and numerous grandchildren in France.

During the previous court hearing, prosecutors highlighted statements allegedly made by Mr Iquioussen in 2003 and 2004 in which he described Jews as “miserly usurers” and claimed that Zionists had “connived with Hitler…to push Jews to leave Germany”. He also reportedly said: “The Zionists said…there has to be someone in Europe who does bad things to Jews so that they…will leave [for Israel].” They also noted a conference in 2012 at which Mr Iquioussen allegedly described terrorist attacks in the West as “pseudo-attacks whose objective is to frighten non-Muslims so that they are afraid of Islam and of Muslims,” and claimed that he has also publicly denied the 1915 Armenian genocide and pointed to allegedly misogynistic comments.

In a post on Facebook, Mr Iquioussen “strongly contested” the allegations that he had used “discriminatory or violent language.” His supporters argue that the comments cited in the case were dated and taken out of context, and pointed to other statements by the imam, such as: “We have never had, and have, nothing against Jews because Islam is a religion based on justice.”

Following the latest decision, Mr Iquioussen’s says that he is considering an appeal to the European Court of Human Rights.

According to a report published by the French Jewish Community Security Service, antisemitic incidents in France have skyrocketed. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism in France and throughout Europe.

A court has ruled that the French Government can after all expel a radical imam with a history of making inflammatory comments about Jews.

Earlier this month, the Government vowed to change the law in order to be able to deport the imam, but this may now not be necessary after this decision from the Conseil d’Etat, the supreme court for administrative justice, which overturns a previous ruling that suspended Hassan Iquioussen’s deportation order.

The new decision rejected the claims of Mr Iquioussen’s defence that deporting the imam to Morocco would not be a disproportionate interference with his right to lead a normal previous and family life.

Interior Minister Gérald Darmanin, who has previously said that Mr Iquioussen is an enemy of France who had “no place” in the country, hailed the decision as “a big victory for the Republic,” adding of the imam: “He will be deported from national soil.”

Mr Iquioussen, 59, is a Moroccan citizen who has lived in France all his life and has become a symbol of President Emmanuel Macron’s battle against Islamism, whom the President accuses of rejecting French laws and values. He did not take up French citizenship at a younger age and his attempts to do so since then have failed.

Morocco already delivered a laissez-passer to authorise his travel, which cleared the way for Mr Iquioussen’s expulsion “by force”, but the imam won an injunction halting his deportation at the Paris Administrative Court, which ruled that the expulsion was a “disproportionate infringement…of [Iquioussen’s] right to a private and family life.” Mr Iquioussen has five children and numerous grandchildren in France.

During the previous court hearing, prosecutors highlighted statements allegedly made by Mr Iquioussen in 2003 and 2004 in which he described Jews as “miserly usurers” and claimed that Zionists had “connived with Hitler…to push Jews to leave Germany”. He also reportedly said: “The Zionists said…there has to be someone in Europe who does bad things to Jews so that they…will leave [for Israel].” They also noted a conference in 2012 at which Mr Iquioussen allegedly described terrorist attacks in the West as “pseudo-attacks whose objective is to frighten non-Muslims so that they are afraid of Islam and of Muslims,” and claimed that he has also publicly denied the 1915 Armenian genocide and pointed to allegedly misogynistic comments.

In a post on Facebook, Mr Iquioussen “strongly contested” the allegations that he had used “discriminatory or violent language.” His supporters argue that the comments cited in the case were dated and taken out of context, and pointed to other statements by the imam, such as: “We have never had, and have, nothing against Jews because Islam is a religion based on justice.”

Following the latest decision, Mr Iquioussen’s says that he is considering an appeal to the European Court of Human Rights.

According to a report published by the French Jewish Community Security Service, antisemitic incidents in France have skyrocketed. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism in France and throughout Europe.

Following the graphic reports of the murder of a French Jewish man by his Muslim roommate, authorities have already ruled out an antisemitic motive.

Eyal Haddad, 34, from the town of Longperrier, north-east of Paris, was reportedly murdered on 20th August.

The alleged perpetrator has been identified as Mohamed Dridi, 22, who is said to have used an axe to attack his victim before burning the victim’s face and attempting to bury the body.

In response to the news, Jewish groups asked that when the authorities investigate, they should do so by “considering the antisemitic character [of the allegations] and not dismissing it a priori” and “investigate and shed light on the true motives of [Mr Haddad’s] killer.”

The International Affairs Advisor to the European Parliament, Manel Msalmim tweeted: “It is not the first time that a Jew is murdered by his neighbour. We condemn this barbaric and criminal act and we call for justice for Eyal.”

However, on 30th August, it was reported that following authorities’ initial investigations, it has been decided that there was no antisemitic intent.

The authorities’ decision arrives despite the suspect allegedly turning himself in to the police and confessing that his motivation was because he was owed 100 euros and because the victim was Jewish.

There have also been claims in the French Jewish media that the suspect had made Islamist comments on social media in the days before the killing.

2022 has seen two other instances of Jewish people being killed in alleged antisemitic attacks.

In February, Jeremy Cohen, 31, was fatally wounded after being hit by a tram. At first, Mr Cohen’s death was treated as a traffic accident, until video footage released by the family appeared to show a group of men attacking Mr Cohen, prompting him to flee for safety without noticing the tram. He was then taken to hospital but did not survive his injuries.

Mr Cohen is believed to have been wearing his kippah, or skullcap, during the attack, and the family have now called upon the police to reopen the investigation into his death as they feel his visible Jewish identity played a role in his attackers’ motivation.

It was reportedly only when the family started asking questions, handing out fliers in post boxes throughout the neighbourhood and urging witnesses to come forward, that someone eventually came forward with the crucial video footage that showed that the victim was being attacked moments before his death.

In April, two men, reported to be aged 27 and 23, were charged with causing Mr Cohen’s death. However, the public prosecutor denied there was enough evidence to “establish the discriminatory nature of the attack.”

The next month, Rene Hadjaj, 90, was allegedly defenestrated from an apartment block in Lyon. Mr Hadjaj’s neighbour, 51, was arrested in connection with the event.

Police said that the incident related to an argument between the two and was not connected to the victim’s Jewish identity, and ruled out an antisemitic motive. This decision elicited outrage from parts of the French community.

A few days later, however, it was announced that the investigation was to be extended following new information that was discovered on social media arising from investigations carried out by concerned members of the Jewish community.

These incidents followed the well-publicised death of Sarah Halimi, a 65-year-old Jewish woman who was murdered by her Muslim neighbour, Kobili Traoré, 27, who tortured her before pushing her out of a window to her death.

Mr Traoré was said to have yelled “Allah Akbar,” “I killed the shaitan,” which is an Arabic word for ‘devil’ or ‘demon’, along with antisemitic vitriol. It took time for the police to recognise the antisemitic motive, but Mr Traoré was deemed unfit to stand trial because he was under the influence of drugs at the time. The judgement was highly controversial and let to protests around the world – including a rally outside the French embassy in London organised by Campaign Against Antisemitism – and a parliamentary inquiry.

However, in June 2021, it was announced that a French Parliamentary commission of inquiry would be established in order to investigate Ms Halimi’s death.

Ms Halimi’s death is a well-known case, but it is not the only instance of this kind. In 2018, 85-year-old Mireille Knoll, a Holocaust survivor, was stabbed eleven times during a botched robbery that also saw her body set alight in an effort by the perpetrators to burn her apartment. In this instance, the authorities did accept that there was an antisemitic motive and the perpetrators were jailed.

According to a report published by the French Jewish Community Security Service, antisemitic incidents in France have skyrocketed.

An Italian politician has been suspended by his party after he made what appeared to be jokes about the Holocaust.

Councillor Giorgio Longobardi, who represents Naples for the Fratelli d’Italia (Brothers of Italy) Party, joked that the rival Democratic Party wanted to show Holocaust films, including Schindler’s List, Anne Frank’s Diary, The Pianist, and Life is Beautiful, on television prior to the upcoming general election, which would be, he claimed, “interspersed with insights and testimonies from Holocaust survivors”.

Mr Longobardi later defended himself, releasing a statement which said that the councillor has “never made fun of the tragedy of the Holocaust” and his comments were “aimed only at highlighting the means that the left uses in the electoral campaign.”

A joint statement released by the Italy-Israel Federation and Naples’s Jewish community said that Mr Longobardi’s comments were “offensive to the memory of six million Jews” and accused the councillor of at one point “plaster[ing] his office” with posters praising Benito Mussolini, Italy’s former fascist dictator.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism incidents in Italy which have markedly increased according to a recent report.

Over one in eight Jewish Russians have emigrated since the country invaded Ukraine, according to the Jewish Agency, which facilitates Jewish immigration to Israel.

The sizeable migration has elicited a crackdown by the Russian Government on the Jewish Agency reminiscent to some of antisemitic persecution of Jews by the Soviet Union and restrictions on Jewish immigration.

The Jewish Agency estimates that 20,500 Russian Jews of an estimated total of 165,000 have moved to Israel, with thousands more leaving for other countries.

Even the Chief Rabbi of Moscow, Pinchas Goldschmidt, left the country two weeks after the invation.

Anna Shternshis, Professor of Yiddish studies at Toronto University and a specialist in Russian-Jewish history who was herself born and raised in Russia, told the BBC: “I have been thinking quite a bit about why there is such a rush to go because we are not seeing a huge surge of antiseemitism. But then putting my historian hat on, I see that every time something happens in Russia, some upheaval, some change, Jews are always in danger.” Referencing over a century of recent Russian antisemitism, she said that “Not everyone acts on it, but every Jew in Russia today is thinking about this.”

One Russian Jew also recounted in dismay: “After 24th February, my family realised we were absolutely against this war but we did not know how we could protest. One of my children is the age of military service, so that is another reason we want to go. The authorities in Russia are unpredictable and they have a bad tendency; Jews become one of their propaganda targets, we are traditionally a good way to find internal enemies. My great-grandparents and grandparents suffered from those times.”

For those Russian Jews wishing to leave in anticipation of a possible rise in antisemitism, the shuttering of the Jewish Agency in Russia is alarming. The same individual said: “All of a sudden we see that on the news, and we wonder what is next? We feel very unsafe and we think could we lose our jobs, or go to jail. Things have become very scary.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism worldwide.

The German Chancellor has condemned remarks by the President of the Palestinian Authority (PA) made while on a visit to Berlin.

PA President Mahmoud Abbas, also known by his nom de guerre, Abu Mazen, refused to condemn the horrific attack by Arab terrorists at the Munich Olympics in 1972, when they murdered eleven Israeli athletes. The fiftieth anniversary of the attack is due to be commemorated this year.

Instead of condemning the terrorist atrocity, Mr Abbas accused Israel of committing “50 Holocausts”. He said: “From 1947 to the present day, Israel has committed 50 massacres in Palestinian villages and cities, in Deir Yassin, Tantura, Kafr Qasim and many others, 50 massacres, 50 Holocausts.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

German Chancellor Olaf Scholz, who was standing next to Mr Abbas when he made his remark, later condemned it on Twitter, writing: “For us Germans in particular, any relativisation of the singularity of the Holocaust is intolerable and unacceptable. I am disgusted by the outrageous remarks made by Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas.”

The Israeli Prime Minister also condemned the comments, writing on Twitter: “Mahmoud Abbas accusing Israel of having committed ‘50 Holocausts’ while standing on German soil is not only a moral disgrace, but a monstrous lie. History will never forgive him.”

Decades ago, Mr Abbas argued in his faux doctoral dissertation in the Soviet Union that the Zionist movement and its leaders were “fundamental partners” of the Nazis and shared equal responsibility for the Holocaust.

The official Palestinian Authority news agency, Wafa, did not include the Holocaust comments in its report of the meeting between Mr Abbas and Mr Scholz, and the Palestinian Authority dismissed the condemnations and issued no apology.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism worldwide.

German tourists are reportedly buying wine with images of Adolf Hitler as collectibles.

The wine, which has been widely known to be on sale in Italy for some time, is the work of winemaker Vini Lunardelli, who founded his winery in 1967. He has been producing wine with dictator themes since 1995. He also has labels featuring Stalin, Lenin, Che Guevara, Napoleon and Franco.

A prominent Austrian cosmetic surgeon recently brought the wines to new prominence after alleging that German and Austrian holidaymakers were travelling to Jesolo, a resort town about twenty miles from Venice, to purchase the wine.

The labels on the €8.50 bottles show Hitler with slogans such as “Mein Führer”, “Sieg Heil” and “Ein Volk, Ein Reich, Ein Führer”.

Although there have been occasional protests over the labelling and the company’s own website observes that the wines are a “cult object among the collectors”, sale of such products is legal in Italy, even if it may be illegal in Germany and Austria.

In 2018, Andrea Gnassi, the then-Mayor of Rimini, a town elsewhere on the coast, said of the sale that his hands were tied and that attempts to press for national legislation against fascist products had been unsuccessful. He said: “We receive reports like this at least five to six times a year. As long as a new law is not approved, all attempts at [action by the municipality] can achieve nothing.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout Europe.

Image credit: Vini Lunardelli

The Catholic Church in Spain has announced an investigation into claims made in an Israeli newspaper that some towns and villages in the country still observe rituals relating to the antisemitic “blood libel”.

The blood libel is a racist claim that Jews use the blood of Christian children in religious rituals, and has been part of Christian – and, in the modern era, also Islamic – antisemitism for centuries. It was also used to justify the expulsion of the Jews from Spain in 1492.

According to the Haaretz newspaper, parishes in Toledo, Zaragoza and elsewhere continue to practice rituals, backed by the local churches and councils, based on the blood libel.

In Toledo, for example, the Santo Niño de La Guardia myth, which dates back to 1480, imagines that a child from the village was abducted and murdered by Jews, even though no child was reported missing at the time. Still, every September villagers carry an effigy of a child to the church where it is blessed by the clergy over the course of a five-day festival, with the child venerated as a saint.

Meanwhile, in the basilica of Zaragoza there is a chapel dedicated to a child allegedly abducted and tortured by local Jews, with a special service held on 13th October every year.

Jacob Daniel Benzaquén, the President of Spain’s Jewish communities, said: “The case of the Niño de La Guardia is especially serious because year after year the civil authorities continue to support this celebration. It’s very sad that these events continue to this day and are celebrated with such enthusiasm and a shame that the ecclesiastical authorities haven’t put an end to them, despite our requests.”

The El Confidencial news site reported that sources close to the Archbishop of Madrid have said that the church was revising “cults and rituals involving saints such as the Niño de La Guardia that refer to the legend that Jews killed Christian children in order to celebrate Passover.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout Europe.

The French Government has vowed to change the law in order to be able to expel a radical imam with a history of inflammatory comments about Jews.

Interior Minister Gérald Darmanin said that Hassan Iquioussen is an enemy of France who had “no place” in the country.

Mr Iquioussen, 59, is a Moroccan citizen who has lived in France all his life and has become a symbol of President Emmanuel Macron’s battle against Islamism, whom the President accuses of rejecting French laws and values. He did not take up French citizenship at a younger age and his attempts to do so since then have failed.

Morocco has reportedly delivered a laissez-passer to authorise his travel, which cleared the way for Mr Iquioussen’s expulsion “by force”, but the imam won an injunction halting his deportation at the Paris Administrative Court, which ruled that the expulsion was a “disproportionate infringement…of [Iquioussen’s] right to a private and family life.” Mr Iquioussen has five children and numerous grandchildren in France.

During last week’s court hearing, prosecutors highlighted statements allegedly made by Mr Iquioussen in 2003 and 2004 in which he described Jews as “miserly usurers” and claimed that Zionists had “connived with Hitler…to push Jews to leave Germany”. He also reportedly said: “The Zionists said…there has to be someone in Europe who does bad things to Jews so that they…will leave [for Israel].” They also noted a conference in 2012 at which Mr Iquioussen allegedly described terrorist attacks in the West as “pseudo-attacks whose objective is to frighten non-Muslims so that they are afraid of Islam and of Muslims,” and claimed that he has also publicly denied the 1915 Armenian genocide and pointed to allegedly misogynistic comments.

In a post on Facebook, Mr Iquioussen “strongly contested” the allegations that he had used “discriminatory or violent language.” His supporters argue that the comments cited in the case were dated and taken out of context, and pointed to other statements by the imam, such as: “We have never had, and have, nothing against Jews because Islam is a religion based on justice.”

Mr Darmanin has announced that the Government will appeal against the injunction at the State Council, France’s highest administrative court, and warned that if the appeal fails, he would change the law to allow for the deportation.

Confirming that intelligence agencies put Mr Iquioussen on a watchlist of allegedly dangerous radicals eighteen months ago, Mr Darmanin said: “This imam…uses antisemitic language. He denies equality between men and women. He denies genocides. He calls for terrorist attacks in France to be considered as conspiracies.” He added: “The enemies of the Republic have no place in the Republic.”

According to a report published by the French Jewish Community Security Service, antisemitic incidents in France have skyrocketed. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism in France and throughout Europe.

Two minors have been sentenced in Germany following a brutal assault on a Jewish man in Hamburg last year.

The court heard how the two unnamed brothers, aged seventeen and fifteen, approached a small demonstration against antisemitism and in support of Israel in the city in September 2021. The brothers, accompanied by a female friend, reportedly shouted “f**k Israel” and “Free Palestine” and insulted the demonstrators.

They then assaulted a 61-year-old demonstrator, leaving him with broken cheekbones, smashed glasses and a damaged eye, about which the victim now says: “I’m practically blind, I can only see light and dark in my right eye.”

The assailants fled the scene on rented scooters.

The brothers were charged with antisemitic incitement, and the elder was also charged with grievous bodily harm (GBH).

The elder brother received a sixteen-month suspended sentence, along with community service and anti-violence training, while the younger brother also received a community service order.

Stefan Hensel, Hamburg’s Antisemitism Commissioner, said: “This is a is a clear sign to all antisemitic violent criminals that their actions will not remain without consequences.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism in Germany, which have increased considerably.

Image credit: Jorge Franganillo

The Equality Officer of the youth wing of a major Irish political party has skipped a visit to a Jewish museum after antisemitism allegations emerged against him.

Brian Crehan, who holds the equalities brief for Ogra Fianna Fail, did not attend a visit to the Irish Jewish Museum last month, it has emerged, after the museum was informed about an investigation into him launched following two separate complaints against him by some of his peers.

One complaint apparently relates to a photograph of Mr Crehan, when he was fourteen years old, allegedly dressed as Adolf Hitler. The Party has reportedly been aware of the image for some years since it first surfaced during internal elections.

Mr Crehan, who organised the visit to the museum, has described the complaints as “misconstrued and exaggerated.”

The museum did not prevent Mr Crehan from attending, but he chose not to visit of his own accord, saying in a statement: “The Jewish Museum…contacted our Party headquarters for further details on that complaint, [but] headquarters couldn’t clarify anything due to the complaint being an ongoing investigation. I decided not to attend as I felt it could upset the people in the Jewish Museum who were kind enough to host us. I did not want to put them into a difficult position.

“I find it frustrating that these complaints have been misconstrued and exaggerated, and have upset the membership of my organisation and the people in the Jewish Museum.”

A spokesperson for Fianna Fail said: “The protocols in place for dealing with complaints are clearly established and always adhered to in circumstances where a formal complaint is made.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout Europe.

The Jewish community in Ukraine has announced that it would like to see a former Deputy on Kyiv’s City Council prosecuted for promoting antisemitism.

The United Jewish Communities of Ukraine said that it hopes that Mykhailo Kovalchuk will face legal action for a Facebook post in which he claimed that “some Orthodox Jews practice ritual murder of people, most often their victims are small children, children of non-Jews (Goyim).”

Mr Kovalchuk went on to say that Jews gain “money and power over other peoples…they do not care what will happen to them after death,” before quoting from the Gospel of John in the New Testament: “You belong to your father, the devil, and you want to carry out your father’s desires. He was a murderer from the beginning, not holding to the truth, for there is no truth in him. When he lies, he speaks his native language, for he is a liar and the father of lies.”

The Jewish Community’s statement maintains that Mr Kovalchuk had violated Article 161 of Ukraine’s Criminal Code, which prevents people from making “false, inhumane, demonising or stereotypical statements about Jews.”

They said that “Such statements are unacceptable in united Ukraine, and even more so during martial law and from a deputy of the city council.”

Mr Kovalchuk was a member of the centre-right Baktivshchyna Party, and entered the Kyiv City Council following the October 2020 local elections. Baktivshchyna favours Ukraine’s integration into the European Union and NATO.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout Europe.

Bosnia and Herzegovina has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The decision took place at both the parliamentary level and the level of the cabinet of the Presidency, and was spearheaded by Bosnia and Herzegovina’s Chairman of Parliament, Dargan Čović, and the Serb member of the Presidency Cabinet, Milorad Dodnik.

According to statistics collected over the last decade, there were estimated to be between 500 and 1000 Jews in Bosnia and Herzegovina, making up between 0.01 and 0.03 percent of a total population.

The Jewish population has seen a significant decline in recent decades, with about 1,500 Jewish people leaving the territory during the Yugoslav Wars of the 1990s following the breakup of Yugoslavia.

The Head of the Cabinet of the Chairman of the Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Tonka Krešić Gagro, said that “I am excited to adopt the IHRA working definition of antisemitism, an effort that was made by Mr Dragan Čović. For me, as a citizen of Bosnia and Herzegovina, with a Jewish legacy in my family, it is a step forward for our people. It is a way to show deep respect for the millions who were murdered during the Holocaust, and to those who survived, and to preserve their legacy and remember history.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds the decision, which demonstrates the Bosnian/Herzegovinian Government’s solidarity with the Jewish community at this worrying time for Jews in Europe.

Britain was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism and Lord Pickles worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street. Bosnia and Herzegovina joins a growing list of national governments and public bodies to use the Definition.

Two different German memorials to the Holocaust have been attacked by vandals in one week.

At the former Nazi camp at Buchenwald, some trees that had been planted in order to honour the memory of the victims were cut down.

The trees were planted earlier in the year by the relatives of some of the victims as part of a project called “1,000 Beeches for Buchenwald”.

Though a spokesperson from the Holocaust survivors’ association, The International Auschwitz Committee, said that the incident was a “hateful and calculated demonstration of power by neo-Nazis”, the local police say that they do not have any clear information about who is responsible and the suspects remain unidentified.

At the Holocaust memorial in Berlin, Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, meanwhile, unidentified perpetrators have drawn two swastikas and written the Nazi-era phrase “Heil Hitler” (“Hail Hitler”) into one of the concrete slabs meant to represent the Jews murdered by the Nazis. The police say that, while they are currently looking for those responsible, they have not yet made any arrests.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism in Germany, which have increased considerably.

Rabbi Michael Schudrich, Poland’s current, and longest-serving, Chief Rabbi, appeared on the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism where he discussed the revival of the Polish Jewish community and the way in which the country dealt with antisemitism following the Holocaust.

Outlining the devastating effects of the Holocaust on Polish Jewry, Rabbi Schudrich said: “September 1st, 1939. The beginning of World War Two. At that point, there are 3.5 million Jews living in Poland. The heart, the soul of the Ashkenazi world. Only five years later, ninety percent are no longer alive having been murdered by Germans and accomplices,” before adding: “That statement is so horrific, most people don’t think how many survive. Ten percent survived, that’s 350,000 Polish Jews.

“The question is, ‘Where are they?’ The vast majority of the survivors leave Poland in the 25 years after World War Two. If you want to feel safe saying the statement ‘I am a Jew,’ it made good sense to leave post-Holocaust, Soviet-occupied Communist Poland, and so most of the Jews left. But not all the Jews left and those that stayed, most of them agreed with those that left; Stay Jewish, leave Communist Poland. Stay in Communist Poland, stop being Jewish, to the extent that you often didn’t even tell your children or grandchildren.

“And so while a couple hundred thousand left, some tens of thousands stayed. Most gave up their Jewish identity, keeping the deep, dark secret of who their real identity was for fifty years…from 1939 to 1989, the fall of communism, and at that point, there was a new phenomenon; people were starting to tell their children and grandchildren, friends, colleagues neighbours, that they’re really Jewish. Since 1989, thousands of Poles have rediscovered their real Jewish roots. That’s the Jewish community of Poland today.”

Speaking on the existence of antisemitism in Poland before and after the Holocaust, he said: “It was not socially unacceptable to be an antisemite before the war. The Holocaust changed that. The only thing was, after the Holocaust, many Jews left Poland so quickly and the other ones were hiding, [Poland] never had a chance to deal with what it means to be an antisemite after the Holocaust. And so with the fall of communism in 1989, people could start to look and say ‘What role should antisemitism play in Poland today?’ 

“After 1989, with Poland once again being democratic, they were challenged with recreating the old, new Poland, meaning they kept some values from before the war and they rejected others. So out went communism, out went fascism, and for many, also, it meant rejecting antisemitism. It represented something from the bad, old Poland. It doesn’t mean everyone rejected antisemitism, it doesn’t mean there’s no antisemitism today, but it does mean that there’s less than what people expect.”

However, while Rabbi Schudrich celebrated how far the country’s Jewish community has come, and indeed, how far the country has come in accepting it, he acknowledged that antisemitism has begun to creep up again.

“Unfortunately, about five years ago, things became less good than they were before since 1989. What happened? We have to look at it within a Western world context, meaning Europe and the United States. Something happened five or six years ago where it became more acceptable, more respectable, to say antisemitic things than it was since the Holocaust. And this is something that happened very sadly not only in Poland but throughout Europe and the United States.”

Throughout the interview, Rabbi Schudrich touched upon a variety of other issues including antisemitism in Japan, where he served as the rabbi of the country’s Jewish community, as well as detailing the incidents of an antisemitic attack in which he was involved.

The podcast with Rabbi Schudrich can be listened to here, or watched here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox.

Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, television personality Robert Rinder, writer Eve Barlow, Grammy-Award-winning singer-songwriter Autumn Rowe, and actor Eddie Marsan.

The bestselling author, Stephen King, has come under fire for appearing to praise the antisemitic Second World War-era Ukrainian nationalist leader and Nazi collaborator, Stepan Bandera, who played a key role in creating the conditions that made the Holocaust possible.

This came during a phone call with someone whom Mr King believed was current Ukrainian President Volodomyr Zelenskyy.

During what turned out to be a prank call organised by the Russian comedy duo, Vovan and Lexus, Mr King, who is a vocal supporter of Ukraine, appeared to call Bandera a “great man”.

Mr King compared the “flaws” of American leaders George Washington and Thomas Jefferson with Bandera’s, saying that “On the whole, I think Bandera is a great man, and you’re a great man, and Viva Ukraine.”

The duo also encouraged Mr King to offer “Zelenskyy” a role in a new film of one of Mr King’s novels, and to comment on Ukraine’s Azov Batallion, which is known to have members with neo-Nazi sympathies.

As head of the Organisation of Ukrainian Nationalists, Stepan Bandera was responsible for drafting the Party’s “Minority Policy”, which included a line about how “Jews are to be isolated, removed from governmental positions in order to prevent sabotage…Those who are deemed necessary may only work under strict supervision and removed from their positions for slightest misconduct…Jewish assimilation is not possible.” 

During Nazi Germany’s attack on the Soviet Union in June 1941, Bandera declared that Ukraine was henceforth an independent state led by Adolf Hitler. After Bandera wrote a proclamation that included the words “Glory to the heroic German army and its Führer, Adolf Hitler”, a series of attacks broke out against and Jews and Poles.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the world.

The Director of Documenta, the quinquennial art festival held in the German city of Kassel, has resigned after the fifteenth edition of the festival displayed works that contained inflammatory references toward Jews.

Director Sabine Schormann has agreed with Documenta’s supervisory board that her contract will be terminated and an interim director will be appointed in her stead.

After months of controversy and speculation about alleged antisemitism, Documenta 15 opened in June and featured the artwork People’s Justice (2002) by the Indonesian collective, Taring Padi, which includes images of soldiers who have pigs’ heads for faces and are labelled with the word “Mossad”, the Israeli intelligence agency, and what appears to be a caricature of a visibly Jewish person with sidelocks, smoking a cigar, accompanied by symbols of the SS, the Nazi paramilitary unit, on his hat.

Jewish groups in Germany and throughout the world had expressed their concerns about Documenta 15, which has been curated by the Indonesian art collective, ruangrupa, because they included another foreign collective, the Question of Funding, which supports the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) campaign against Israel, in the exhibition. Taring Padi were, however, not included in those initial complaints.

The organisers of Documenta initially placed a black drape over People’s Justice, which was later dismantled, but some Jewish groups complained that the festival’s organisers had not gone far enough to address the issue.

Antisemitic incidents in Germany have increased considerably. Campaign Against Antisemitism is reports on antisemitic incidents in Germany.

Five children have been arrested following the news that several Jewish graves had been smashed in Istanbul, Turkey.

The Turkish Chief Rabbinate said that it expects “those who carried out this vandalism to be caught as soon as possible.”

81 gravestones were desecrated in the Jewish cemetery of the Hasköy Cemetery in Beyoğlu, according to the Istanbul Governor’s office.

A statement from the Office read: “After examining security camera footage it was determined that the incident was carried out by children aged between eleven and thirteen who live close to the cemetery. 

“The suspects have been detained. The investigation into the matter continues. We send our Jewish citizens our wishes for a speedy recovery.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism worldwide.

A German soldier who holds far-right views has been found guilty of attempting to carry out “false flag” attacks on politicians and people in the public eye while pretending to be a Syrian refugee.

Franco Albrecht, 33, a former first lieutenant in the joint Franco-German Brigade, was sentenced to five and a half years in prison for conspiracy to commit a “serious act of violent subversion” at the higher regional court in Frankfurt.

The judge, Christoph Koller, told the court that Mr Albrecht held “right-wing extremist and ethnicist-nationalist” views and blames the supposed “disintegration of the German nation” on politicians sympathetic to refugees.

The investigation showed that Mr Albrecht owned a copy of Adolf Hitler’s notorious autobiographical manifesto, Mein Kampf, and thought that immigration was a kind of “genocide”.

Mr Albrecht had also posed as a Syrian Christian asylum seeker called “David Benjamin” and had registered himself under that name with authorities in the town of Erding, Bavaria.

It was also alleged that Mr Albrecht had visited conspiracy theorist and antisemitic hate preacher, David Icke, though it was left unclear if the two had indeed met each other.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism in Germany, which have increased considerably.

The Nazi Adolf Eichmann can be heard in newly-unearthed audio admitting having helped to devise the Final Solution.

Eichmann, a leading SS officer in the Third Reich, made the admissions in a secret interview in his adopted home of Buenos Aires, to which he fled after the war. 

The interview was conducted by the Dutch Nazi sympathiser and journalist Willem Sassen in 1957, a few years before Eichmann was captured by Israeli intelligence agents in 1960 and flown to Israel, where he stood trial and, after being found guilty, was executed.

In the audio, Eichmann is heard saying: “If we had killed 10.3 million Jews, I would say with satisfaction, ‘Good, we destroyed an enemy.’ Then we would have fulfilled our mission.” In another clip, he says: “Jews who are fit to work should be sent to work. Jews who are not fit to work must be sent to the Final Solution, period.” He added that he “did not care” whether those sent to Auschwitz lived or died.

The audio recordings, which are part of a $3 million new documentary called The Devil’s Confession, also capture Eichmann swatting a fly during the interview and describing it as having “a Jewish nature”.

Although in his trial, Eichmann claimed that he was merely a low-ranking functionary and proclaimed his innocence of the charges, in the interview audio he is open about his role, saying: “It’s a difficult thing that I am telling you and I know I will be judged for it. But I cannot tell you otherwise. It’s the truth. Why should I deny it? Nothing annoys me more than a person who later denies the things he has done.”

Part of the transcript of the interview was sold to Life magazine following Eichmann’s capture, but the quoted material was believed to be highly selective and sanitised.

Although the Israeli court had 700 pages of transcript, including corrections made by Eichmann’s own hand, he claimed that the record distorted his words and Israel’s Supreme Court did not permit the documents to be submitted in evidence. Nevertheless, during the trial Eichmann taunted the prosecutor, Gideon Hausner, to produce the original tapes, safe in the knowledge that they were protected by Nazi sympathisers. Although Hausner was offered the tapes for an exorbitant sum, the seller reportedly insisted that they not be brought to Israel until after the trial had concluded. Eventually, the tapes came into the hands of the German federal archives Koblenz, with instructions that they should be used only for academic research.

The audio was unearthed by the documentary makers after access was finally granted to the material by the German authorities.

Statistics published by the Federation of Jewish Communities in the Czech Republic (FZO) show that antisemitism has dramatically increased in the country.

According to the data, there were 1,128 antisemitic incidents in 2021, representing a 29 percent increase on the year before.

98 percent of those incidents took place online, including threats of violence as well as approval or justifications of incitement to violence. 

The FZO said that the far-right is responsible for large numbers of these incidents, stating: “For the first time ever, the number of such registered incidents exceeded the category that includes incidents without a clear ideological background.”

With antisemitism increasing worldwide, Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on antisemitic incidents everywhere, including the Czech Republic.

A new report has been published which shows that there were 2,738 antisemitic incidents recorded in 2021, marking a 40 percent increase from the year before.

According to the report from the Department for Research and Information on Antisemitism (RIAS), a Berlin-based monitoring institute, large numbers of these incidents can be traced to Islamist reactions to Israel’s war with the genocidal antisemitic terror group Hamas in May 2021.

RIAS’ report mentioned Israel 147 times in their 68-page report, with far-right extremists only being responsible for only seventeen percent of the recorded incidents.

RIAS researcher, Daniel Poensgen, said that “In view of the corona pandemic and the Arab-Israeli conflict, opportunity structures emerged in which people considered it legitimate to articulate their antisemitic attitudes even more openly and to attack Jews and show hostility toward Jews.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on antisemitic incidents in Germany, which have risen considerably.

Jews in Norway are planning to send a petition to their Supreme Court in an attempt to get Jewish holidays recognised by the national calendar system.

The current law states that all employees have a guaranteed twelve days of annual leave and most of this time has some connection with a Christian holiday. Non-Christians are, however, allowed an extra two days of paid leave that can be taken whenever they choose.

Jewish groups have noted that this system is unfair to Jews who work in the public sector, who are sometimes forced to work on Jewish holidays, or choose between one festival to miss or another.

These groups argue that this violates part of the Norwegian constitution, which guarantees free religious practice, though this applies primarily to Jews who work in the public sector, since some private companies tend to be better at meeting the needs of their religious employees.

The petition comes at the same time as the Liberal Party of Norway’s youth movement published a position calling for all employees to be given the choice of when they take twelve days off, regardless of those days’ connection to the Christian calendar.

The former leader of the Jewish Community in Oslo, and board trustee, Ervin Kohn, said that the Liberal Party’s proposal may solve the problem, but that “it is important that we as a society have common public holidays”.

The Luxembourg-based charity, Research and Information on Antisemitism in Luxembourg (RIAL), has reported new statistics showing that antisemitic incidents have risen by 64 percent in the last year.

The group recorded 80 antisemitic incidents in 2021, including harassment, damage to Jewish cemeteries, and online abuse. The total recorded the previous year was 64, with cases doubling since 2019 and 30 reports received in 2022 so far.

RIAL said that some of these incidents were based on coronavirus conspiracy theories, with some comparing the government’s response to the pandemic to the Nazis and the Holocaust, while others turned to antisemitism to explain or justify Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

There are approximately 1,200 Jews in Luxembourg, making up under 0.19% of a total population of over 645,000.

Jewish groups have expressed their outrage at a number of Polish websites that have been found to be selling mugs featuring a well-known antisemitic image.

The mugs display caricatures of Jews with hunched shoulders and grotesque hooked noses who smirk malevolently while rubbing their hands. Critics have been quick to point out that they look similar to the well-known antisemitic “smirking merchant” meme.

The mugs are being sold in order to promote Teodor Jeske-Choiński’s book Poznaj Żyda (Meet the Jew), which describes Jews as a “parasitic tribe”.

First published in 1912, the book is now coming out in a new edition published by far-right media group Magna Polonia. The front cover of this new edition depicts this stereotyped Jewish figure in numerous forms, including a communist, a journalist, and an activist for LGBTQ rights, suggesting that a sinister cabal of Jews are secretly working behind the scenes in these ways, which is a classic antisemitic canard.

With antisemitism increasing worldwide, Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on antisemitic incidents globally.

A 101-year-old man who served as an SS guard has been jailed for five years in Germany. 

‘SS’, the abbreviation of Schutzstaffel, was the leading paramilitary organisation under Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party.

The unnamed man, who was convicted of 3,518 counts of accessory to murder at Sachsenhausen concentration camp, denied his role as an SS guard and insisted that he had been a farm labourer during the time period in question.

The trial at Brandenburg’s Landgericht Neuruppin court lasted nine months, partially owing to the fact that the defendant was only able to attend sessions for a maximum of two-and-a-half hours each day due to his age. 

Judge Udo Lechtermann said: “The court has come to the conclusion that, contrary to what you claim, you worked in the concentration camp as a guard for about three years. 

“You willingly supported this mass extermination with your activity.”

In March, Dr Efraim Zuroff, the Chief Nazi Hunter at the Simon Wiesenthal Center, appeared on Podcast Against Antisemitism where he discussed the trial, calling it “an important reminder of the terror of the camp”.

He added: “Every generation needs its own reminders and the passage of time in no way diminishes the guilt of the killers.

“What people have to remember is today they look old and frail but when they committed these crimes they were young people full of energy and they devoted all their energy to murder innocent men, women and children simply because they were Jews or other enemies of the Reich.”

The Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum in Poland has accused Russia of posting images of the Nazi death camp for propaganda purposes.

Museum authorities have argued that a Russian agency has used fake images from Auschwitz, using the Holocaust as a way of giving credence to the unfounded claim that there is a genocide being committed against ethnic Russians in Ukraine.

The Russian Arms Control Delegation in Vienna, an organisation which claims to be the Delegation to the Negotiations on Military Security and Arms Control based in the Austrian capital but is actually considered to be a media disinformation arm of The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation, tweeted that there are labels in Auschwitz that say “Russia and Russians, we hate you. The only gas you and your country deserve is Zyclone B [sic]”. 

The Auschwitz Museum responded with a tweet which said that the pictures were “gross propaganda” that “strengthens theories about the need for denazification of Ukraine”.

This is not the first time that Russia has invoked the history of Nazism and the Holocaust since its invasion of Ukraine. In May, the Russian Foreign Minister, Sergei Lavrov, outrageously claimed that Hitler had “Jewish origins” and accused Jews themselves of being the primary source of antisemitism.

In January, the Director of the Auschwitz-Birkeneau State Museum, Piotr Cywiński, appeared on Podcast Against Antisemitism and explained why the Museum is so important in preserving the memory of the Holocaust and the lessons that we must take away from it. 

With antisemitism increasing worldwide, Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on antisemitic incidents globally.

The Swedish Medical Association, the Swedish doctors’ and medical students’ union, is suing Karolinska University Hospital for discrimination against a Jewish doctor.

The doctor says that he was the victim of longstanding antisemitic abuse while working at the hospital and that he was removed from his post for being Jewish.

The lawsuit says that the doctor and other Jewish employees at the hospital were subject to antisemitic harassment on Facebook. The comments included references to his nose, and he was told that he “whined like a Jew”.

It is also alleged that the hospital prevented the doctor from conducting his research, reassigned him to other tasks, and awarded him a lower salary than other, less-qualified colleagues, even though he is well-known and very experienced in his field of practice.

The doctor claims that these instances of antisemitic harassment became worse after he initially lodged a complaint and that staff at the hospital started taking revenge on him, which eventually led to his dismissal.

Karolinska University Hospital maintains that the doctor has his employment terminated after he refused to follow the instructions of the hospital management for an extended period.

The Swedish Medical Association, however, argues that the doctor was not dismissed in good faith, and they have filed a motion requesting that his dismissal be invalidated and that he is awarded compensation.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on antisemitic incidents in Europe, including Sweden. A recent study has reported that, in 2020, Jewish people in Sweden were the victims of 27 percent of religious hate crimes even though they make up only 0.1 percent of the population.

The Prime Minister of France has spoken publicly about the suicide of her father, who was a Holocaust survivor, when she was eleven years old.

Prime Minister Elisabeth Borne explained her personal history in interviews with Paris Match and LCI Television after critics accused her of lacking emotion in her public persona.

Ms Borne’s father, Joseph Bornstein, was a Jewish refugee who fled Poland for France in 1940, before going on to fight for the French resistance during the Second World War. He was captured by German forces and sent to Auschwitz in 1944, but he survived. He later took his own life.

Ms Borne said: “It’s shocking for an eleven-year-old girl to lose her father in these conditions. And I think I closed up and that I avoid showing my emotions too much. I think…this closing up, maybe, goes a little far. Yes.”

According to a report published by the French Jewish community’s main watchdog, antisemitic incidents in France have skyrocketed. Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on antisemitic incidents in France.

After months of controversy, the fifteenth edition of the quinquennial contemporary art festival, Documenta, has opened in Kassel, Germany, amid controversy, including allegations that one of the artworks contains inflammatory representations of Jewish people.

The artwork, entitled People’s Justice (2002), was produced by the Indonesian collective, Taring Padi, and appears to show the violence committed by Indonesia’s Suharto dictatorship. However, the work also includes images of soldiers who have pigs’ heads for faces and are labelled with the word Mossad, the Israeli intelligence agency, and what appears to be a caricature of a visibly Jewish person with sidelocks, smoking a cigar, and with symbols of the SS, the Nazi paramilitary unit, on his hat.

Jewish groups in Germany and throughout the world had expressed their concerns about Documenta 15, which has been curated by the Indonesian art collective, ruangrupa, because they included another foreign collective, the Question of Funding, which supports the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) campaign against Israel, in the exhibition. Taring Padi were, however, not included in those initial complaints.

The organisers of Documenta initially placed a black drape over People’s Justice, but it has now been reported that the work will now be dismantled entirely.

Germany’s Minister of Culture, Claudia Roth, said that “human dignity, protection against antisemitism, racism, and misanthropy are the foundations of our coexistence and this is where artistic freedom finds its limits.” The President of Germany also urged the organisers to do more to address the allegations of antisemitism.

Antisemitic incidents in Germany have increased considerably. Campaign Against Antisemitism is reports on antisemitic incidents in Germany.

Germany’s High Court has ruled that the Judensau sculpture relief on the side of a church in Wittenberg must not be removed.

The sculpture, which represents Jews suckling on a sow while a rabbi lifts its tail, is widely regarded as emblematic of German Medieval Jew-hatred, and an inspiration for subsequent antisemitism running from the writings and teachings of Protestant Reformation leader Martin Luther to the Nazis.

Martin Luther in fact preached from this church and wrote about the sculpture in his 1543 book Vom Schem Hamphoras und vom Geslecht Christi (Of the Unknowable Name and the Generations of Christ), which compares Jews to the devil. The Nazis used Luther’s work to promote their own genocidal antisemitism.

The case was brought by Michael Duellmann, who is Jewish. Mr Duellmann decried the sculpture’s historical effect, saying that the sculpture is “a defamation of and insult to the Jewish people.” Mr Duellmann did not argue for the destruction of the sculpture, however, saying that it should instead be moved to the nearby Luther House Museum.

Mr Duellman brought the case to local courts in Dessau in 2019, and Naumberg in 2020, losing both times.

Following the legal battles, church leaders have promised to do more to distance current church teachings and practice from the sculpture and to provide more context around it.

Antisemitic incidents in Germany have increased considerably. Campaign Against Antisemitism is reports on antisemitic incidents in Germany.

A report published by Germany’s Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution shows that there has been a 29 percent increase in antisemitic incidents in 2021, compared to a year earlier.

The report shows that 3,027 antisemitic incidents were recorded in 2021. This is up from 2,351 in 2020.

Although the overwhelming majority of the incidents were reported as being related to far-right extremism, there are indications that antisemitic attacks motivated by Islamism are also increasing.

Many of the crimes are to do with the publication of hate speech that is banned in Germany, such as Holocaust denial, but there were also examples of attacks on individuals and Jewish religious institutions.

The number of incidents increased during the conflict between the genocidal antisemitic terror group Hamas and Israel in May 2021, as well as coronavirus conspiracy theories.

However, the Director of the Berlin-based Research and Information Centre on Antisemitism (RIAS), Benjamin Steinetz, warned that there is a “dark field of antisemitic incidents” that are not reported and thus not represented in government statistics. Mr Steinetz said: “We have to assume that…recorded incidents are only the tip of the iceberg.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A Jewish man in France was reportedly beaten and called a “dirty Jew” while campaigning as part of the French legislative elections.

Liron Rozenhaft, 41, was putting up campaign posters for his wife, Audrey, who is running for a legislative seat for the Republicans in Strasbourg when two men approached him.

Upon noticing Ms Rozenhaft’s name on the poster, the two men are alleged to have called Mr Rozenhaft a “dirty Jew”, pulled down the posters, and followed him to other locations on a scooter, accompanied by several other men.

Ms Rozenhaft took to Facebook to claim that her husband had been beaten and left unconscious. Other accounts said that Mr Rozenhaft suffered minor injuries, including a concussion.

Local police are investigating the incident.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Two men in France’s north-eastern Alsace region were arrested after police raided the home of alleged neo-Nazis and found a large cache of weapons and ammunition.

They found 23 illegal weapons, eighteen legal weapons and 120,000 rounds of ammunition, as well as Kalashnikovs, magazines and more than 35 kilograms of explosives.

Prosecutor Edwige Roux-Morizot said during a press conference that two of the four men arrested on 31st May had been indicted for arms trafficking and put in prison. They face ten years in jail.

Two other men are free but under judicial supervision, while a further individual was released without charge.

Mr Roux-Morizot said that the men were not believed to be planning an attack, but with the large weapons cache there was a fear that they could “take action.” Police were monitoring their computer data, he said.

The raid also yielded three machines for making ammunition, a machine to heat casings, two silencers, a banknote counter and more than 25,000 euros in banknotes.

Judicial police chief Lieutenant-Colonel Yann Wanson said that the haul was “intended” for “war,” adding that one of the suspects had trained as a sniper.

Mr Roux-Morizot said that the suspects were aged between 45 and 53 and had jobs. Their alleged neo-Nazi affiliation was reportedly confirmed by the literature found among their belongings.

According to a report published by the French Jewish community’s main watchdog, antisemitic incidents in France have skyrocketed. Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on antisemitic incidents in France.

Police in the Alsace region of France have reportedly arrested four neo-Nazis on weapons charges.

The haul reportedly included forty-one guns, twenty-three of which were illegal. Also found was the equivalent of at least 120,000 bullet cartridges. Approximately 200 police officers were involved in the arrest of the four men, aged 45 to 53.

French intelligence services also believe that the men had taken part in a “Jew hunt” where they sought out Jewish people to attack during a football match in Strasbourg.

The four men face ten years in prison for amassing a vast amount of weaponry, as well as antisemitic and Holocaust-denial literature found in their belongings, though investigators are not yet able to say whether the men had planned a large-scale attack.

According to a report published by the French Jewish community’s main watchdog, the Jewish Community Security Service, antisemitic incidents in France skyrocketed by 75% in 2021.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

German news outlets have expressed alarm after three Jewish cemeteries were vandalised.

On 23rd May, swastikas were found graffitied on a wall in Altona cemetery, Hamburg, which dates back to 1913.

Earlier in May, alleged perpetrators, who are yet to be identified, knocked down sixteen headstones at a Jewish cemetery in Köthen, south-west of Berlin. One publication, the Jüdische Allgemeine reported that the damage done is estimated at about nearly £8,000.

Police in Cologne are also investigating a suspected arson attack at a Jewish cemetery.

In Dresden, meanwhile, a plaque commemorating Jewish victims of the Holocaust was found to have been desecrated with Nazi symbols.

This comes after the Federal Ministry of the Interior and Community published a report on 10th May that stated that 3,027 antisemitic incidents were recorded in Germany in 2021, marking a 28 percent rise since 2020.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Following the news that an antisemitic motive had initially been ruled out after yet another elderly French Jew was allegedly thrown out of a window to his death, it was announced today that the investigation has been extended to determine whether or not antisemitism may have played a role. 

Rene Hadjaj, a 90-year-old Jewish man, was allegedly defenestrated from an apartment block on 17th May in Lyon. A 51-year-old neighbour, believed to have known the victim well, was arrested.

Police initially believed that the incident related to an argument between the two and was not connected to the victim’s Jewish identity. They then proceeded to rule out an antisemitic motive, a decision that elicited outrage from parts of the French community.

Today, however, it was announced that the investigation will be extended following new information that was discovered on social media. It is understood that the new information arose from investigations carried out by concerned members of the Jewish community, which is similar to the recent case of Jeremy Cohen, where police also ruled out antisemitism before an investigation by the family of the victim turned up evidence that forced the police to reconsider.

French Jewry has been here before too many times in recent years.

In 2017, Sarah Halimi, a 65-year-old Jewish woman, was murdered by her 27-year-old Muslim neighbour, Kobili Traoré, after he tortured her before pushing her out of a window to her death. Mr Traoré was said to have yelled “Allah Akbar,” “I killed the shaitan,” which is an Arabic word for ‘devil’ or ‘demon’, along with antisemitic vitriol. It took time for the police to recognise the antisemitic motive, but Mr Traoré was deemed unfit to stand trial because he was under the influence of drugs at the time. The judgement was highly controversial and let to protests around the world – including a rally outside the French embassy in London organised by Campaign Against Antisemitism – and a parliamentary inquiry.

In 2018, 85-year-old Mireille Knoll, a Holocaust survivor, was stabbed eleven times during a botched robbery that also saw her body set alight in an effort by the perpetrators to burn her apartment. In this instance, the authorities did accept that there was an antisemitic motive and the perpetrators were jailed.

Then, last month, after the police had judged the death of Jeremy Cohen, a 31-year-old Jewish man who was hit by a tram, to be a traffic accident, his family undertook their own investigation, including leafleting neighbours for information. Footage emerged of a gang of men attacking the visibly Jewish Mr Cohen apparently causing him to flee and resulting in his death, leading to a new investigation.

These are just some of the high-profile recent cases in France, where antisemitism has skyrocketed by 75% in the past year, from already staggeringly high figures.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Concerns have been raised about a controversial Hungarian media figure invited to the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Budapest on 20th May.

Hungarian journalist Zsolt Bayer has a history of making inflammatory remarks. 

The journalist, whose political views have variously been described as “ultra-conservative” and “far-right”, is reported to have said that the Hungarian Academy of Science had been infiltrated by Jews.

Mr Bayer is also reported to have written in a 2008 column about the “limitless hunger of the Jewish financiers in Brooklyn and Wall Street yuppies, which plunged the American and as a consequence the global monetary world into depression.”

A 2011 article for the conservative, pro-government Hungarian daily newspaper Magyar Hírlap contains several inflammatory remarks relating to Guardian journalist Nick Cohen and other Jewish figures with typically Jewish surnames.

Nick Cohen’s article criticised the rightward turn in Hungarian politics. Mr Cohen wrote that he would not call the conservative government headed by Viktor Orbán “fascist” or “neo-fascist”, but that “a foul stench wafts from the ‘new society’ Orbán’s patriots are building on the Danube. You can catch a smell of it in [the ruling party] Fidesz’s propaganda” which, Mr Cohen argues, involves forming a political pact with Jobbik, a political party that was at the time explicitly far-right and which blamed Jews, Roma people and homosexuals for Hungary’s social problems.

In response, Mr Bayer is reported to have written an article in Hungarian calling Mr Cohen “stinking excrement”. Mr Bayer’s article goes on to use more subtle pejorative references. Mr Bayer juxtaposes the typically Jewish surname Cohen with the names Cohn-Bendit and Schiff.

The former is believed to refer to former MEP and radical student leader, Daniel Cohn-Bendit. Mr Cohn-Bendit is a vocal supporter of the European Union, and has criticised Mr Orbán in the European Parliament for adopting laws that allegedly restrict the freedom of the press. Mr Cohn-Bendit says that this has resulted in Mr Orbán’s allies harbouring a “hatred” for him.

The name “Schiff” refers to Sir András Schiff, a Hungarian-born classical pianist and conductor who is an outspoken critic of Mr Orbán. Mr Schiff has questioned whether Hungary was worthy of taking on the Presidency of the Council of the European Union due to its Government’s policies, said that he would refuse to perform or even visit Hungary due to antisemitism, and said that “antisemitic baiting has become socially acceptable in Hungary” under Fidesz and Mr Orbán’s rule.

Both Mr Cohn-Bendit and Mr Schiff are Jewish. Then Mr Bayer writes that “There is nothing new under the sun. Unfortunately they were not all buried up to their necks in the forest of Orgovány.”

Orgovány was the site of a series of massacres committed by the leaders of the Hungarian White Terror. This was a period of repressive violence between 1919-21 carried out by opponents of Hungary’s short-lived Soviet Republic and its Red Terror. Far-right Hungarian figures often associate the 1919 Hungarian Soviet Republic with Jewish influence, which fits into a conspiracy theory about “Judeo-Bolshevism”, which holds Jews responsible for communism. As many as 1,000 people were killed in the White Terror, many of them Jewish. Mr Bayer’s appeared to imply that he is unhappy that these Jewish journalists were not also killed during this period.

On another occasion, Mr Bayer referred to US Secretary of State Antony Blinken, who has a Hungarian-Jewish background, as a “ROOTLESS Hungarian”, echoing a typical trope about Jews that questions whether Jews have sufficient allegiance or loyalty to their countries of residence.

Though Mr Bayer rarely uses the word “Jew” or “Jewish” directly, it is believed that readers in Hungary are aware of what Mr Bayer may be implying when he refers to these events and who he may mean when he claims that the interests of white European Christians are under attack.

In 1988, Mr Bayer co-founded the Fidesz political party together with Mr Orbán. At the time, the Party was a centre-left and liberal activist movement formed in opposition to the ruling Marxist-Leninist Hungarian Socialist Workers’ Party, which had held power since the failed democratic revolution in 1956. Fidesz took a national-conservative turn during the 1990s.

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Leading figures at SS Lazio, the football club based in Rome, as well as figures from the Italian Government, have condemned racist insults aimed at a steward working in the stadium during a game with Hellas Verona, and inflammatory slogans directed at fans of Lazio’s local rivals, AS Roma.

Italy’s Minister of Foreign Affairs, Luigi Di Maio, branded the Lazio fans “cowards”, while officials from Lazio condemned the appearance of the slogans.

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A Jewish lawyer is reported to have been spat at and abused in the Italian city of Milan by four men of Middle Eastern appearance.

The victim, 30, who was wearing a kippah (skullcap) and did not wish to be named, gave an account of what happened in a private Facebook group.

He claimed that on a street in central Milan in daylight, he was accosted by a man asking if he was Jewish.

“One of the two men shouted ‘Yeudi’, which is what Jews are called in Arabic,” the victim related, adding that he was then “showered” with saliva and verbal abuse.

“They were about to be joined by another two,” he said, “so I ran.”

He said that the four men started to chase him “but soon gave up.”

“People in the street” the victim reported, “pretended not to see.”

According to a recent report, there has been a marked increase in antisemitic incidents in Italy.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on antisemitic incidents in Italy.

The French Jewish community has reacted with a combination of outrage and resignation after yet another elderly French Jew was allegedly thrown out of a window to his death, with the police all too quickly ruling out an antisemitic motive.

Rene Hadjaj, a 90-year-old Jewish man, was allegedly defenestrated from an apartment block last Tuesday in Lyon. A 51-year-old neighbour, believed to have known the victim well, was arrested.

Police believe that the incident related to an argument between the two and was not connected to the victim’s Jewish identity, and have therefore ruled out an antisemitic motive. The decision has elicited outrage from parts of the French community.

It has also provoked a feeling of resignation, as French Jewry has been here before too many times in recent years.

In 2017, Sarah Halimi, a 65-year-old Jewish woman, was murdered by her 27-year-old Muslim neighbour, Kobili Traoré, after he tortured her before pushing her out of a window to her death. Mr Traoré was said to have yelled “Allah Akbar,” “I killed the shaitan,” which is an Arabic word for ‘devil’ or ‘demon’, along with antisemitic vitriol. It took time for the police to recognise the antisemitic motive, but Mr Traoré was deemed unfit to stand trial because he was under the influence of drugs at the time. The judgement was highly controversial and let to protests around the world – including a rally outside the French embassy in London organised by Campaign Against Antisemitism – and a parliamentary inquiry.

In 2018, 85-year-old Mireille Knoll, a Holocaust survivor, was stabbed eleven times during a botched robbery that also saw her body set alight in an effort by the perpetrators to burn her apartment. In this instance, the authorities did accept that there was an antisemitic motive and the perpetrators were jailed.

Then, last month, after the police had judged the death of Jeremy Cohen, a 31-year-old Jewish man who was hit by a tram, to be a traffic accident, his family undertook their own investigation, including leafleting neighbours for information. Footage emerged of a gang of men attacking the visibly Jewish Mr Cohen apparently causing him to flee and resulting in his death, leading to a new investigation.

These are just some of the high-profile recent cases in France, where antisemitism has skyrocketed by 75% in the past year, from already staggeringly high figures.

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German police are investigating two allegedly antisemitic incidents.

A 16-year-old suspect was arrested by federal officers on suspicion of planning to bomb a high school in Essen. When the police raided the teenager’s home, they found explosives and antisemitic, far-right literature.

Police in Cologne, meanwhile, are investigating a suspected arson attack at a Jewish cemetery.

It has been reported that an unidentified person poured a flammable substance around the burial site in the western Cologne suburb of Bocklemünd. The police are investigating whether the incident had antisemitic intent.

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Lufthansa has apologised after apparently barring all visibly Jewish passengers from a flight due to a mask dispute with a few passengers who happened to be Jewish.

It was reported that there was a dispute between staff managing the boarding of flight LH1334 from Frankfurt to Budapest on 4th May and some visibly Jewish passengers, reportedly over the wearing of masks. The pilot then apparently decided that no visibly Jewish passengers were to be allowed on to the flight, regardless of whether they were part of the same group or were prepared to wear a mask.

video was recorded appearing to show a member of the airline’s ground staff explaining to a passenger that he was being prevented from boarding because he was Jewish.

The Jewish passengers were predominantly American and many had flown from New York in order to visit the grave of a Hasidic rabbi. Around 100 passengers were affected.

The German airline apologised and said that it was investigating the incident, which has caused an uproar in the Jewish world.

In a statement, the airline said: “Lufthansa regrets the circumstances surrounding the decision to exclude the affected passengers from the flight, for which Lufthansa sincerely apologises. While Lufthansa is still reviewing the facts and circumstances of that day, we regret that the large group was denied boarding rather than limiting it to the non-compliant guests. We apologise to all the passengers unable to travel on this flight, not only for the inconvenience, but also for the offense caused and personal impact.

“Lufthansa and its employees stand behind the goal of connecting people and cultures worldwide. Diversity and equal opportunity are core values for our company and our corporate culture. What transpired is not consistent with Lufthansa’s policies or values. We have zero tolerance for racism, antisemitism and discrimination of any type. We will be engaging with the affected passengers to better understand their concerns and openly discuss how we may improve our customer service.”

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A swastika and antisemitic tags were discovered on the walls of a kindergarten in the Paris suburb of Courbevoie.

The city of Paris filed a formal police complaint following the spray-painting of the Nazi symbol and message supporting Nazism on the walls of the La Marelle nursery school.

In a tweet, Aurélie Taquillain, Municipal Councillor and Regional Councillor for Ile-de-France, said that she was “shocked” by the symbol and pro-Nazi tags and “strongly condemned” the incident.

She continued: “The values of the Republic are stronger than all these stains and provocations,” adding that “together in Courbevoie as everywhere in France” we will remain “mobilised” against hate.

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The Russian Foreign Ministry has doubled down on Sergei Lavrov’s grotesque claim that Hitler had Jewish origins by accusing Jews of collaborating with Nazis and inviting antisemitic genocidal terrorists to a meeting in Moscow.

Mr Lavrov was condemned for remarks on the Italian Rete 4 television channel on Sunday. Asked why Russia needed to “de-Nazify” Ukraine – as Russian President Vladimir Putin and Mr Lavrov have argued repeatedly in recent months – given that Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy is Jewish, Mr Lavrov answered: “Zelenskyy a Jew? Even Hitler had Jewish origins, the main antisemites are Jews themselves.”

Speaking through an Italian interpreter, Mr Lavrov continued: “For a long time now we’ve been hearing the wise Jewish people say that the biggest antisemites are the Jews themselves.”

After a chorus of international condemnation for his remarks – including by the Israeli Foreign Minister, Yair Lapid, who observed that portraying Hitler as Jewish and accusing Jews of being the real and worst antisemites was the “basest level of racism” – the Russian Foreign Ministry has doubled down.

In a statement, the Ministry reportedly said: “We have paid attention to the anti-historical statements of the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Yair Lapid, which largely explain the decision of the current [Israeli] Government to support the neo-Nazi regime in Kyiv. Unfortunately, history knows tragic examples of cooperation between Jews and Nazis.” The Ministry further claimed that Israeli mercenaries were fighting with neo-Nazi Ukrainian militias against invading Russian troops.

In addition, it has been reported that a delegation from the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group, Hamas, has been invited to a meeting with the Russian Foreign Ministry in Moscow after a rare phonecall between Mr Lavrov and the Hamas leader.

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The Russian Foreign Minister has claimed that Hitler had “Jewish origins” in his latest insulting attempt to justify his country’s invasion of Ukraine.

Sergei Lavrov made the false assertion, which is based on a long-discredited and antisemitic theory, on Italian television on Sunday.

Asked why Russia needed to “de-Nazify” Ukraine – as Russian President Vladimir Putin and Mr Lavrov have argued repeatedly in recent months – given that Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy is Jewish, Mr Lavrov answered: “Zelenskyy a Jew? Even Hitler had Jewish origins, the main antisemites are Jews themselves.”

Speaking through an Italian interpreter on the Rete 4 channel, Mr Lavrov continued: “For a long time now we’ve been hearing the wise Jewish people say that the biggest antisemites are the Jews themselves.”

The President of Ukraine and the Prime Minister of Israel led a chorus of international condemnation of the remarks, and were joined by the US Secretary of State, Germany’s Antisemitism Commissioner and the Italian and Canadian Prime Ministers.

The Israeli Foreign Minister, Yair Lapid, observed that portraying Hitler as Jewish and accusing Jews of being the real – and worst – antisemites was the “basest level of racism”.

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The European Evangelical Alliance (EEA) has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The EEA, a body which unifies Evangelical Christian communities throughout Europe from its offices in Brussels and Bonn, made its commitment to fighting antisemitism in a ceremony held at the Yad Vashem Holocaust museum in Jerusalem on 27th April.

In a statement read during the ceremony, EEA Board Member and Secretary General Reverend Connie Duarte and EEA President Reverend Dr. Frank Hinkelmann said: “This is a moment of utmost importance to the European Evangelical Alliance. After having visited Yad Vashem today, we had the privilege to hold a commemoration ceremony in the hall of remembrance together with our friends of the International Jewish Committee for Interreligious Consultations, with whom members of the global Evangelical Community have been engaged in a dialogue for several years.”

During the ceremony, the EEA representatives laid a wreath bearing the words “In awe and profound shame, yet with the promise for future solidarity”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds the decision, which demonstrates the European Evangelical Alliance’s solidarity with the Jewish community at this worrying time for Jews in Europe.

Britain was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism and Lord Pickles worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street. The European Evangelical Alliance joins a growing list of national governments, public bodies and civic organisations to use the Definition.

A senior policeman in Italy’s northern province of Monza and Brianza allegedly posted a message on Facebook saying: “Finally we are again in our natural position of dominance over the Jews.”

The alleged comment by Massimo Vergani, Deputy Police Commander of Seregno, was a reference to the victory of Inter-Milan over AC Milan in a 19th April football match. He attempted to excuse and justify his comments by claiming that he was “only using the language of Ultras groups.”

Mr Vergani has reportedly previously described a tie between Inter-Milan and Fiorentina the previous month as a “gift to the Jews.”

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A Swedish newspaper has handed an award to a celebrated journalist despite him having written a pitying article for a terrorist who murdered Jewish children in Toulouse in 2012.

Veteran journalist Göran Greider, who has been Editor-in-Chief of the newspaper Dala-Demokraten since 1999, has been given the prestigious Lagercrantzen award by Sweden’s biggest newspaper, Dagens Nyheter, to celebrate a career in which he has published approximately 30 books and already won many other prizes. Those who awarded him the prize state that he is a “lovely body of a man in Swedish cultural life.”

However, in March 2012, Mr Greider penned a piece sympathising with Islamist terrorist Mohammed Merah, who shot three Jewish children in the Toulouse school massacre, and blamed the state of Israel for their murder.

Mr Merah, 23, born and raised in Toulouse, went on a killing spree beginning on 11th March, shooting an off-duty French Army paratrooper. Four days later, he killed two off-duty French soldiers and wounded another. On 19th March, he burst into the Ozar Hatorah Jewish day school in Toulouse, opening fire and killing rabbi Jonathan Sandler, 30, and his two sons Arié, five, and Gabriel, four, and Myriam Monsonego, seven, who Mr Merah shot at point-blank range after his first gun jammed. Mr Merah also wounded Bryan Bijaoui, seventeen.

In his article for Dala-Demokraten, published five days after the murders, Mr Greider described Mr Merah as “a tragic example of how an unstable man is torn apart by his time: he hated the military for the war against the Taliban and he hated Israeli for what the Israeli military exposed the Palestinians to,” citing Mr Mehra as a victim of French class injustice and xenophobia, and suggesting that he would become a political pawn in that year’s French Presidential election.

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Easter carol singers in the Dutch city of Ootmarsum have faced criticism for the alleged antisemitic content of one of their songs.

Ootmarsum, about 80 miles east of Amsterdam, has hosted the traditional carolling procession – known to locals as vlöggeln – since at least 1840. It consists of dozens of Catholic men singing as they walk a particular route through the city several times a day on the first and second days of Easter.

They sing a song entitled “Christ Resurrected” and its lyrics, which are printed and handed around to onlookers, excoriate “the Jews who with their false council sacrificed Jesus on the cross”.

It is not only the content of the song that has drawn protests from the Jewish community, but the connotations of how it is organised.

Eight lead singers dressed in raincoats, known as the Poaskerls, lead the carolling. They must be single Catholic men who have no intention of getting married in the next four years. The point is a rite of passage: the eight Poaskerls accept that they are no longer youths and become adults. The oldest of them smokes a cigar. He is the treasurer of the group and given the nickname of the “Judas”.

The accusation of “Deicide” – the belief that the Jews are collectively responsible for the death of Jesus Christ – is part of the classic repertoire of antisemitism, and has led to innumerable acts of violence against and mendacious claims about Jews for centuries. Since 1965, however, the Catholic Church asserted, though “the Jewish authorities and those who followed their lead pressed for the death of Christ”, Jews cannot be held collectively responsible for this, then or now.

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Loud, antisemitic chants were heard from supporters of some of Italy’s premier sides, including Genoa, Torino and Rome’s famed Lazio club.

The chanting was heard when Genoa played Lazio on 10th April, and again the week after when Lazio played Torino on 16th April.

According to local reports, the chants featured antisemitic slurs that referenced Anne Frank and the Holocaust, and appended them to earthier and more general expletives. Local reports also noted that those chanting “very loudly” included many young people who would “most likely not even understand” the meaning of the “shameful, antisemitic chants,” which included: “Go pray in the synagogue, I will always scare you off, Rome-supporter f*** off…, Rome-supporter f*** off.”

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Antisemitic chanting broke out during Genoa Vs Lazio (April 10) and Lazio Vs Torino (April 16): “Go pray in the synagogue, I will always scare you off, Rome-supporter fxxk off…, Rome-supporter fxxk off”.

Germany’s Federal Minister of the Interior, Nancy Faeser, has spoken out about the use of antisemitic slogans during anti-Israel demonstrations.

Hundreds of protestors took to the streets of Berlin, Hanover and Dortmund for the annual Al-Quds Day march – an Iranian-backed anti-Israel parade held throughout the world – chanting antisemitic slogans and reportedly attacking journalists and the police.

Some of the chants, like “Free Palestine from the river to the sea”, are common features at these demonstrations. The chant of “From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free” only makes sense as a call for the destruction of the world’s only Jewish state — and its replacement with a State of Palestine — and is thus an attempt to deny Jews, uniquely, the right to self-determination, which is a breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Video footage posted to social media showed participants in these protests also shouting phrases like “Scheiße Jude!” (“S**tty Jew!”), “Drecksjude” (“dirty Jew”), and “Strike, oh Qassam, don’t let the Zionists sleep.” The latter is a reference to the kind of rocket fired by the genocidal antisemitic terrorist group Hamas at Israeli civilian targets, and Hamas’ military unit – the Izz ad-Din al-Qassam Brigades – shares the name of the rocket.

Samuel Salzborn, Professor of Political Science at Justus Liebig University in Gießen and the Antisemitism Officer for the City of Berlin, said: “Antisemitic terror against Israel was backed up with anti-Israel slogans, while at the same time the hatred is directed against all Jews. The core of these assemblies is antisemitism – nothing else.”

Nancy Faeser said: “There is no place in our society for antisemitism. The rule of law must act consistently here. We must never get used to antisemitic insults – no matter from where and from whom they come.”

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A sentence imposed on Dieudonné over videos that he released in 2020 has been reduced by the Paris Court of Appeal to a fine roughly equivalent to £75. However, the Appeal Court upheld a fine of 10,000 euros (£80,000) in another case against him.

Dieudonné, whose real name is Dieudonné M’Bala M’Bala, is a French comedian and political activist who has been convicted for hate speech and advocating terrorism, among other offences, in France, Belgium and Switzerland.

At his trial in May 2021, Dieudonné M’Bala M’Bala, 56, was found guilty of antisemitic insults, incitement to hatred and a crime against humanity. He claimed that the videos in question were fake, created through a sophisticated digital technique.

The original custodial sentence of four months’ imprisonment plus a fine was reduced to a fine of 100 euros. However, the Court of Appeal upheld a fine of 10,000 euros plus 3,000 euros in damages against Dieudonné for a video released in September 2020 defaming anti-racism delegate Frédéric Potier, who is involved in the fight against antisemitism and LGBT hatred.

In the summer of 2020, in a move to combat hateful content, Dieudonné was banned from major online platforms, such as YouTube, Facebook, TikTok and Instagram.

In May 2021, he was also sentenced to three years’ imprisonment, only one of which must be served, plus a further fine of 200,000 euros for a string of financial crimes, including tax fraud and money laundering.

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Jewish leaders in Rome have spoken out against a cartoon depicting Ukrainian President Volodomyr Zelenskyy, who is Jewish, with a hooked nose, which is a classic antisemitic stereotype.

The image, by satirical cartoonist Vauro Senesi, shows profiles of Mr Zelenskyy and Russian President Vladimir Putin side-by-side surrounded by the words “No alla guerra…senza ze e sensa vla!” (“No to war without Zes and Vlas”, a pun on the phrase ‘No ifs or buts’). While Mr Putin is represented with a stern, square visage, Mr Vauro’s representation of the Ukrainian President gives him a very prominent hooked nose.

In a tweet, President of the Comunità Ebraica di Roma (Jewish Community of Rome), Ruth Dureghello, said that “It is not a coincidence, but a habit that a certain gentleman depicts Jews with hooked noses in the style of the Defence of the Race. Not for this reason is it less serious and no one can get used to shame.”

Ms Dureghello was referring to the fortnightly Italian publication Difesa della razza (Defence of the Race) that ran from 1938 to 1943. It is widely regarded as the main tool for promoting antisemitism by the Italian fascist regime headed by Benito Mussolini, which ended in 1945 with the Allied victory in World War Two. Difesa began publication shortly after the 1938 Manifesto della razza (Manifesto of Race), which stripped Italian Jews of their citizenship and Government and professional positions.

This is not the first time that Mr Senesi has been accused of drawing inflammatory cartoons. In 2012, an Italian court fined Italian journalist Peppino Caldarola €25,000 for allegedly slandering Mr Senesi, after Mr Caldarola produced a satirical version of one of Mr Senesi’s cartoons that allegedly depicted Jewish Italian politician Fiamma Nirenstein in a classic antisemitic form. The President of the World Jewish Congress, Ronald S. Lauder, called the ruling “a travesty”.

Mr Senesi has denied any allegations of antisemitism, describing himself as an “anti-Nazi communist”. He said: “In this drawing there is no reference to the Jewishness of Zelenskyy, something which is wholly meaningless to me. If I draw a caricature (it’s called that because it ‘charges’ the facial features) it is obvious that I exaggerate his features so that it resembles him: Zelenskyy has a major nose not because he is Jewish but because it is his nose. I have never thought that Jews necessarily have a hooked nose, also because I know very many who have noses of various kinds. I would have preferred not to answer all those cretins who have commented on Zelenskyy’s nose. I’m only doing so because it is bad faith unless it is imbecility.”

Italian Senator Andrea Marcucci took to Twitter to denounce Mr Senesi, writing: “Re-proposing Nazi propaganda on the Jews to draw President Zelenskyy is literally a disgusting operation.”

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It has been reported that two men have been charged with causing the death of a French Jewish man who was fatally wounded after being hit by a tram.

The two suspects, reported to be aged 27 and 23, are now the subject of a manslaughter investigation by police in Bobigny, six miles north-east of the centre of Paris. However, though the alleged antisemitism behind the crime has been widely reported, the public prosecutor said: “There is currently no evidence to establish the discriminatory nature of this attack.”

The suspects are instead being investigated for “intentional violence resulting in death without the intention of causing it.”

While the death of Mr Cohen, 31, was at first treated as a traffic accident, his family went on to release video footage that appears to show him being attacked by a group of men, leading him to flee for safety without noticing the oncoming tram. Mr Cohen was taken to hospital but did not survive his injuries.

Mr Cohen is believed to have been wearing a kippah, or skullcap, during the attack, and the family called upon the police to reopen the investigation into his death as they felt his visible Jewish identity played a role in his attackers’ motivation.

It was reportedly only when the family started asking questions, handing out fliers in post boxes throughout the neighbourhood and urging witnesses to come forward, that someone eventually came forward with the crucial video footage that showed that the victim was being attacked moments before his death.

The victim’s father, Gerald Cohen, said: “Why is the family the one who needs to bring the evidence to police investigators? If we hadn’t done that we wouldn’t have known the truth. We want justice for our son Jeremy.”

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The global governing body behind the international motor sport, The Federation Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA), has launched an investigation after the winner of a karting race appeared to make a Nazi salute while celebrating his victory on the podium.

Russian driver Artem Severiukhin, fifteen, who was competing under the Italian flag due to sanctions against the country of his birth since its invasion of Ukraine, seemed to thump his chest and raise his right arm with a flat palm before laughing after winning the first round of the European Championship in Portugal on 10th April.

Following the incident, Mr Severiukhin has had his contract with Swedish team Ward Racing terminated. The team said that it condemned the driver’s behaviour in the “strongest possible terms” and is “deeply in shame”.

In a tearful video account of the incident, Mr Severiukhin said: “Standing on the podium I made a gesture which many perceived as a Nazi salute. I have never supported Nazism and consider it one of the most terrible crimes against humanity. I know it’s my fault, I know I’m stupid, and I’m ready to be punished. But please understand that I did not support Nazism or fascism with this gesture.”

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The Union of Jewish Students of France (UEJF) has condemned antisemitic messages discovered written in the bathroom of the law building at the Paris Nanterre University.

The graffiti includes a Star of David with “MEDIA” written on top, phrases such as “Hitler, you’re the best”, and other slogans that evoke the concept of Jewish control over the media.

“This antisemitism, unabashed, assumed, in front of thousands of students and in the total indifference, it is every day,” reported the UEJF president Samuel Lejoyeux to Le Figaro Étudiant. “It’s complicated to be a Jewish student…we are constantly brought back to the question of Israel, to the conspiracy that whites dominate everything, and that Jews are ‘super whites”.

“We condemn in the strongest terms and in an absolute manner”, responded Philippe Gervais-Lambony, president of the university “any antisemitic and racist act”. The university then reported that it was cleaning the graffiti and launching an investigation.

According to a survey commissioned by UEJF in 2019, 45% of Jewish and non-Jewish respondents have witnessed antisemitism at school.

In February, a report by France’s Jewish Community Security Service said that antisemitic incidents in France had skyrocketed by 75% in 2021.

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A far-right political party has won seven seats in Hungary’s general election.

Mi Hazánk (Our Homeland) won 6.7% of the vote in the election, which means that it is now not only in Parliament for the first time, but it has also become Hungary’s third-largest party.

Our Homeland was founded in 2018 after a split with the nationalist Jobbik party, which first came to Europe-wide attention in the 2009 European Parliament elections. The President of the European Jewish Congress has described Jobbik as an “unashamedly neo-Nazi party” and, elsewhere, the Party has been referred to as an “antisemitic organisation”. Jobbik’s use of well-known antisemitic canards about Jewish financial control has been called “overt antisemitism” and antisemitic rhetoric has even been described as Jobbik’s “trademark”.

The Party has, however, spent the last seven years recasting itself as a moderate conservative party. Our Homeland was formed by former Jobbik members unhappy with this rebranding exercise.

Though Rabbi Shlomó Köves, Chief Rabbi of the Orthodox EMIH-Association of Hungarian Jewish Communities, has described Hungary as one of the safest places for Jews to live in Europe, the emergence of Our Homeland as an electoral force has drawn concern from Hungary’s 100,000-strong Jewish community. 

However, Rabbi Köves also made a point of saying that in the past, both Jobbik and Our Homeland “openly had racism and antisemitism on their agenda.”

“Both at this point are not openly making antisemitic statements, but they’re very dangerous. And the real problem that I see is that since the left joined Jobbik [to oppose Fidesz], if in the future anyone else in the government would want to cooperate with Mi Hazank — not that it seems necessary for any reason — but it would be very hard to argue why they shouldn’t do it.

“Throughout this whole [opposition building] process there’s been a legitimisation of these extreme-right neo-Nazi groups.” 

Our Homeland’s criticisms of globalisation have been described as being “spiced up” with antisemitic conspiracy theories, including references to a “global elite”, the Jewish Hungarian financier George Soros, and the Rothschild banking dynasty.

Hungary’s controversial long-time Prime Minister, Viktor Orbán, and his national-conservative Fidesz Party, won Sunday’s election, increasing its vote by about twenty points and gaining two parliamentary seats. This marks Mr Orbán’s fourth successive term as Prime Minister, his fifth in total.

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The family of a French Jewish man who was fatally wounded after being hit by a tram has said that antisemitism may have played a role in the incident. 

While Mr Jeremy Cohen’s death in February was initially treated as a traffic accident, new video footage released by the family appears to show a gang of men attacking Mr Cohen, 31, prompting him to flee for safety without noticing the tram. 

Mr Cohen is believed to have been wearing his kippah, or skullcap, during the attack, and the family have now called upon the police to reopen the investigation into his death as they feel his visible Jewish identity played a role in his attackers’ motivation.

It was reportedly only when the family started asking questions, handing out fliers in post boxes throughout the neighbourhood and urging witnesses to come forward, that someone eventually came forward with the crucial video footage that showed that the victim was being attacked moments before his death.

The victim’s father, Gerald Cohen, said: “Why is the family the one who needs to bring the evidence to police investigators? If we hadn’t done that we wouldn’t have known the truth. We want justice for our son Jeremy.”

The footage of Mr Cohen was released to the public this past Monday, which was also the anniversary of the murder of Sarah Halimi, a 74-year-old Jewish woman living in Paris who was murdered in 2017 by her twenty-seven-year-old Muslim neighbour, Kobili Traoré. Mr Traoré tortured Ms Halimi before throwing her out of a window, yelling “Allah Akbar,” “I killed the shaitan,” which is an Arabic word for ‘devil’ or ‘demon’, along with antisemitic vitriol.

In a disgraceful decision last year, France’s Court of Cassation ruled that Ms Halimi’s killer could not stand trial due to being high on cannabis whilst committing the murder.

Last year, Campaign Against Antisemitism held a rally outside of the French Embassy in solidarity with French Jews opposing the Court of Cassation’s unjust ruling, joining simultaneous rallies around the world.

The speeches can be watched in full on our YouTube channel.

A few months later, it was announced ​​that a French Parliamentary commission of inquiry would be established in order to investigate the murder of Sarah Halimi. However, in January of this year, the inquiry was closed. The results of the 67,000 word report found that police had arrived on the scene before Ms Halimi was killed but waited outside of her apartment during the entire incident, apparently unable to hear her screams. The report shockingly concluded that the officers, judges and psychiatrists involved in the case had done everything by the book.

This led to a disagreement between those on the committee itself, with the report only being passed on a seven to five vote, with Meyer Habib, the French Parliamentarian who formed the commission, accusing police and fellow lawmakers of lying and engaging in a cover-up. 

In February, a report by France’s Jewish Community Security Service said that antisemitic incidents in France had skyrocketed by 75% in 2021.

Last year, the murderer of French Holocaust survivor Mireille Knoll was sentenced to life in prison.

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A neo-Nazi activist and rapper from Austria has been handed a ten-year jail sentence by a Vienna court.

The 37-year-old artist, who recorded music under the name ‘Mr Bond’, was found guilty of glorifying Nazi ideology. This is a crime in Austria under the country’s 1947 Verbotsgesetz (Prohibition Act), which not only banned the far-right paramilitary organisations that flourished even after the defeat of the Nazi regime, but made it illegal to deny, condone or try to justify the Holocaust.

Mr Bond’s music was based on the appropriation of existing rap songs, to which he gave new lyrics with Nazi and antisemitic themes. One such song was used by the assailant of the October 2019 attack outside a synagogue in the eastern German city of Halle, in which two people died. The murderer, Stephan Balliet, filmed his crime and put it on the internet, soundtracked by Mr Bond’s song.

Mr Bond was described as “particularly dangerous” by the court. In the same trial, his brother was sentenced to four years in prison for running an antisemitic website.

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It has been reported that the director of the Jewish community in the western Ukrainian city of Ivano-Frankivsk has been stabbed by an attacker shouting antisemitic statements.

Igor Perelman was reportedly stabbed three times while out for a walk in the centre of the city.

Vitaliy Kamozin, Chief Operating Officer of the United Jewish Community of Ukraine, stated that Mr Perelman’s wounds have been treated and he is recovering from the attack. Mr Kamozin said: “There were antisemitic statements, but the motive is not yet clear.” The incident is apparently being examined by the police.

The Russian war on Ukraine has elicited a plethora of Nazi comparisons and is witnessing actual neo-Nazi soldiers on the battlefield.

President Putin of Russia justified his war on Ukraine in part by claiming that he needed to “denazify” the country, a stance that was reinforced by Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov and apparently also adopted by China. Mr Lavrov also compared the United States to Hitler, stating: “Napoleon and Hitler, they had the objective to have the whole of Europe under their control…Now Americans have got Europe under their control. And we see the situation has really demonstrated what role the EU is playing in the context of the global situation. They are just fulfilling a role. So we see, like in Hollywood, there is absolute evil and absolute good and this is unfortunate.”

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Councillors in the northern Bavarian town of Bayreuth have voted to give new names to two streets once dedicated to noted antisemites.

One was named after the bishop, Hans Meiser, the first Landesbischof (Regional Bishop) of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Bavaria from 1933 to 1955. Bishop Meisner, boasting a huge following among Bavarian Protestants, was said to have had Nazi ties and once wrote that there was something “corrosive, caustic, dissolving about the Jewish mind”. It has been renamed Dietrich-Bonhoeffer-Straße in honour of the anti-Nazi theologian.

Hans-von-Wolzogen-Straße, named after the friend and biographer of the antisemitic composer Richard Wagner, is now to be called Friedelind-Wagner-Straße. Friedelind Wagner, the composer’s granddaughter, escaped Nazi Germany to the United States in 1941 after being implicated in anti-Nazi propaganda. Baron von Wolzogen, believed to have shared the composer’s antisemitic views, was the editor of the publication Bayreuther Blätter, which published antisemitic material, from 1878-1938.

Richard Wagner lived in Bayreuth from 1873 until his death in 1883. The Bayreuth Festspielhaus (Opera House) was constructed especially for the purpose of showing Wagner’s operas. His villa, Wahnfriend, was converted into a museum dedicated to his life and work after the Second World War.

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German football club Borussia Dortmund has hosted a conference aimed at tackling antisemitism in world football.

The club organised the event in collaboration with the German Football League, the Central Council of Jews in Germany and the World Jewish Congress.

Problems with the far-right loom large in Borussia Dortmund’s history. Though it does not distinguish the club from many other German organisations at the time, the club’s chairman in the 1930s was a member of the Nazi Party. During the 1980s, the club’s fanbase included the Borussenfront, a far-right faction who would regularly target Dortmund’s Turkish population and sing songs about sending fans of arch-rivals Schalke to Auschwitz.

During a 2013 Champions League match with Ukraine’s Shaktar Donetsk, a group of far-right Dortmund fans launched themselves at fan representative Jens Volke and Thilo Danielsmeyer, the leader of the Dortmund Fan Project, a group founded in 1988 to combat xenophobia and racism and promote tolerance and inclusion. Mr Volke was struck in the face when he confronted three neo-Nazis chanting far-right slogans. Mr Danielsmeyer was followed into a toilet and then beaten. 

For some time, Borussia Dortmund appeared reluctant to recognise the problem of far-right activism and antisemitism among a minority of its fans.

Recently, however, the club has made strenuous efforts to challenge this culture, and reach out to the Jewish community.  The club’s Head of Corporate Responsibility, Daniel Lörcher, said that making “clear statements against antisemitism” had a huge impact on the city’s Jews, who now feel that their home town is “against antisemitism and is open for Jewish people.”

Tottenham Hotspur also hosted a conference this week that includes tackling antisemitism on its agenda, after the event was moved from Chelsea Football Club in light of recent events.

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A pig’s head and an antisemitic epithet were reportedly left outside the Moscow apartment of a respected Russian journalist.

Alexei Venediktov, the Editor of the Echo of Moscow radio station, took to social media to report the incident, posting one photograph of a pig’s head with a wig on, lying on the floor by his front door, and another picture of a Ukrainian coat of arms fixed to the door itself with an antisemitic slur attached to it.

Echo of Moscow was formed towards the end of the Soviet Union, and since then has been a significant representative of the new freedoms granted as part of the policy of Glasnost (openness) instituted by Mikhail Gorbachev, the last President of the Soviet Union, as part of a campaign to increase government transparency, allowing citizens to publicly discuss problems with the communist system, and potential solutions, for the first time.

Later, Mr Veneditkov, who has Jewish heritage, revealed a still from CCTV footage outside his apartment building. It appears to show a figure posing as a food delivery worker arriving at his front door. However, Mr Venediktov said that the food company in question contacted him and explained that the uniform seen in the video has been out of use for several years.

Mr Venediktov expressed his concern on the social media platform Telegram, writing: “This in the country that defeated fascism. Why not just fix a six-pronged star to my apartment door?”

In addition to the antisemitic element, this incident is also the latest example of the Russian Government’s crackdown on independent media.

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A Jewish man from the Netherlands is reported to have been the victim of multiple antisemitic attacks, but claims that his complaints have been ignored by Dutch authorities.

Kevin Ritstier, 34, from the town of Wijchen in the east of the country, says that he has been repeatedly attacked by a street gang sometimes numbering up to fifteen young men.

Mr Ristier says the harassment originated when the men targeted him after seeing him returning home from a Bar Mitzvah celebration wearing items of traditional Jewish religious clothing, including a kippah and a tallit, or prayer shawl.

This rapidly turned into a campaign of harassment in which the men pounded on Mr Ritstier’s front door and made antisemitic remarks, including “Hamas, Hamas, Jews to the gas” (a common chant among Dutch football fans) and “Cancer Jew”.

Mr Ristier has also been physically harmed. After one assault, his leg was slashed and he was left bruised and suffering from a split lip.

He added that his numerous formal complaints to the police, lodged after each incident, have led nowhere, claiming that the authorities have ignored each one and that he has been made to feel like he has been bothersome.

The police have reportedly said that criminal proceedings have not been taken against any members of the gang due to lack of evidence, but insist that Mr Ristier’s complaints are being taken “very seriously”.

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To commemorate the 80th anniversary of the first trains taking the country’s Jews to Auschwitz, the National Council of the Slovak Republic has officially denounced the transport and appealed to remaining survivors and their relatives for forgiveness.

Slovakia was originally the eastern province of the first Czechoslovak Republic, formed after the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian empire in 1918. After Hitler annexed the Sudetenland in the wake of the 1938 Munich Agreement, Slovakia seceded from Czechoslovakia, becoming the Slovak Republic.

This state would, in turn, become a Nazi satellite state following the racial policies of the Third Reich, in which Slovakian Jews were robbed of their human and civil rights. Eventually, 70,000 of them were sent to Nazi concentration camps in two waves, the first from March to October 1942 and the second from September 1944 to March 1945. The vast majority of the Jews reported to these camps would be murdered. 

Slovak parliamentarians also observed a minute’s silence in honour of the victims.

The only party that did not take part in the vote on the resolution was the openly neo-Nazi People’s Party Our Slovakia. Party leader Marian Kotleba is a vocal supporter of Jozef Tiso, President of the Slovak Nazi puppet state. Mr Kotleba has called Jews “devils in human skin” and promoted the “Zionist Occupied Government” conspiracy theory. Other party members have been charged with Holocaust denial, a criminal offence in Slovakia, on several occasions.

In the 2020 Slovakian parliamentary elections, People’s Party Our Slovakia won seventeen of the 150 available seats with a vote share of 7.97%. The Party reportedly has almost no support in any of the country’s major cities, including the capital Bratislava.

On 5th April 2020, Marian Kotleba was given a six-month suspended sentence for harbouring neo-Nazi sympathies. The appeals court did, however, dismiss an earlier ruling convicting Mr Kotleba of the illegal use of neo-Nazi symbols, for which he had been sentenced to four years and four months in prison.

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Two Austrian men who publicised myths about coronavirus vaccinations by wearing Stars of David have reportedly been convicted of violating the Alpine republic’s strict anti-Nazi laws.

The two men, who have both refused to be vaccinated, had worn yellow felt stars bearing the word “Ungeimpft” (unvaccinated) at anti-vaccination demonstrations held in Vienna.

A court in Vienna heard that the defendants, known as “Mr K”, 50, and “Mr B”, 34, pled not guilty to infringing upon Austria’s 1947 Verbotsgesetz (Prohibition Act), which not only banned Nazi paramilitary organisations, but made it illegal to publish or broadcast denials or minimisation of the Holocaust. Austria’s Jewish community has recently argued that these laws should be extended to ban the utilisation of Holocaust-related imagery and slogans in order to push anti-vaccination conspiracy theories.

Much of the rhetoric that has emerged from anti-vaccination conspiracy theorists has compared lockdowns to the Holocaust. These crude and inflammatory comparisons have included protesters donning yellow stars bearing the word “Unvaccinated”, a comparison that has been made across the world, including in the United Kingdom, Canada, Ukraine and elsewhere.  

Such symbolism is reminiscent of the kind of insignia that Jews in Germany and occupied Europe were forced to wear by the Nazis. Those wearing such items in 2021 do so in order to compare the persecution of the Jewish people with protective measures sanctioned by the German federal government in order to deal with the pandemic. Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

The judge handed both men fifteen-month suspended sentences and three years’ probation.

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The publication of the 2021 Antisemitism Report by the Berlin Attorney General’s Office has reportedly sparked concerns among authorities in the German capital.

The annual report, which has recorded rising antisemitism in recent years, states that there have been two main trends in antisemitic discourse over the last twelve months: coronavirus conspiracy theories and incidents apparently inspired by developments in the Israel-Palestine conflict.

Much of the rhetoric that has emerged from anti-vaccination conspiracy theorists has compared lockdowns to the Holocaust. These crude and inflammatory comparisons have included Berliners donning yellow stars bearing the word “Unvaccinated”, a comparison that has been made across the world, including in the United Kingdom, Canada, Ukraine and elsewhere.  

Such symbolism is reminiscent of the kind of insignia Jews in Germany and occupied Europe were forced to wear by the Nazis. Those wearing such items in 2021 do so in order to compare the persecution of the Jewish people with protective measures sanctioned by the German federal government in order to deal with the pandemic. Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

The report also contains a section on antisemitic incidents relating to Israel. It states that these kinds of incidents are inspired by the intensification of the conflict between Israel and Hamas, the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group. Protests and demonstrations against Israel resulted, it says, in “many anti-Jewish and anti-Israel incidents.” In response to the spike in antisemitic incidents, Germany banned the Hamas flag in June.

The report clearly shows a growing antisemitism problem in the German capital. In 2021, Berlin authorities dealt with up to 661 cases motivated by antisemitism, including “antisemitic animosities, insults, threats and physical attacks.” This marks an increase from 417 such incidents in 2020 and 386 in 2019. This follows a similar report put out by the Federal Association of Departments for Research and Information on Antisemitism (RIAS), a Berlin-based agency that reports and documents antisemitic incidents throughout Germany. The RIAS study revealed that there had been 522 antisemitic incidents registered in Berlin between January and June 2021 – a period that includes the elevated tensions between Israel and Hamas – marking a seventeen percent year-on-year increase, and the highest number of such incidents since 2018.

Chief Prosecutor Claudia Vanoni said of the most recent report that “In 2021, the year of the 1700th anniversary of Jewish life in Germany, antisemitism was omnipresent as well.”

We reported last year that the German Government will pay €35 million to combat antisemitism. German Education and Research Minister Anja Karliczek said: “This is the highest number [of antisemitic incidents] in the last couple of years. There’s reason for worry that this is only the tip of the iceberg and that the unreported number of daily attacks on Jews is substantially higher.”

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A book that claimed to expose the betrayer of Anne Frank has been removed from circulation after its findings were revealed to be unsound.

Prompted by research by Dutch historians, Canadian author Rosemary Sullivan’s The Betrayal of Anne Frank, published by the Amsterdam-based firm Ambo Anthos, will no longer be available.

The Betrayal of Anne Frank alleged that Arnold van den Bergh, a member of Amsterdam’s Jewish council – an administrative body forcibly established by the Nazis as part of their occupation of the Netherlands – led the police to the Frank family’s address at Westermarkt.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reported in February 2022 that Ms Sullivan’s book would no longer be printed until more work could be done to verify Ms Sullivan’s claims. However, after a 69-page report refuting the author’s findings, the publisher has now asked bookstores to return any stock they have already bought.

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A new survey of French Jews has found that 85 precent believe that antisemitism is widespread in their country.

The survey was published by IFOP, a French international polling and market research firm.

The survey also found that 64 percent of the overall French population believes that antisemitism is widespread.

According to the survey, 68 percent of French Jews have faced antisemitic harassment or abuse. Twenty percent of French Jews have reported being the victims of at least one antisemitic physical assault. It was noted that attacks were more likely if the victim was wearing a religious symbol.

Around 30 percent of people polled said that “Jews are richer than the average French person,” while 37 percent believed that Jews had “too much influence in the French economy and financial system.”

It is over 65-year-olds who are more likely to have antisemitic prejudices according to the survey.

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Denmark has become the latest country to develop an official action plan to tackle antisemitism for students in schools.

In a statement published by Eurydice, the European Union’s network for Europe-wide analysis and information about education systems and policies, Danish policymakers state that they have advanced fifteen initiatives to improve young people’s understanding and knowledge of the Holocaust and antisemitism.

Of the initiatives about antisemitism research and prevention, protection of Jews and Jewish institutions, information for how to deal with antisemitic incidents, and issues surrounding foreign policy, the Eurydice statement specifies five: compulsory education about the Holocaust at all levels of the Danish education system, from primary to secondary school pupils; expanding efforts towards Holocaust remembrance; ensuring teachers understand the harms caused by ostracising pupils based on their background; broadening interreligious dialogue between young people; and providing students with more information about the life and culture of Danish Jews.

These initiatives aim to let pupils know how to fight antisemitism within a broader framework based on mutual tolerance and recognising how what they say and do may well have negative consequences for others. They also encourage educational institutions to make sure that students acquire the knowledge and skills to fight antisemitic myths and conspiracy theories.

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The Russian war on Ukraine has elicited a plethora of Nazi comparisons and is witnessing actual neo-Nazi soldiers on the battlefield. The war has also divided opinion within the far-right globally, as discussed on this week’s episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism.

President Putin of Russia justified his war on Ukraine in part by claiming that he needed to “denazify” the country, a stance that was reinforced by Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov and apparently also adopted by China. Mr Lavrov also compared the United States to Hitler, stating: “Napoleon and Hitler, they had the objective to have the whole of Europe under their control…Now Americans have got Europe under their control. And we see the situation has really demonstrated what role the EU is playing in the context of the global situation. They are just fulfilling a role. So we see, like in Hollywood, there is absolute evil and absolute good and this is unfortunate.”

Meanwhile, Ukraine’s President Zelenskyy has compared Mr Putin to Hitler and described the invasion of his country as “pure Nazism”. The comparisons drew condemnation from Yad Vashem Israel’s Holocaust museum, for “trivilisation” of the Holocaust.

The Holocaust references became particularly acute when reports emerged of the Babyn Yar Holocaust Memorial Center being hit by a Russian missile aiming for a nearby Kyiv television mast. Mr Zelenskyy then called for Jewish people around the world to speak out against the Russian invasion, saying: “For any normal person who knows history, Babyn Yar is a special part of Kyiv, a special part of Europe…It is a place of prayer and a place of remembrance for the 100,000 people killed by the Nazis…Who do you think you are, to make it a target for your missiles?” It subsequently emerged that the Memorial had not been damaged. 

While war inevitably gives rise to unpleasant and inflammatory rhetoric, the presence of actual neo-Nazis on the battlefield has been a greater cause for alarm. In particular, attention has been drawn to Ukraine’s Azov Battalion, a neo-Nazi militia that formed during the 2014 War in the Donbas and has since been subsumed into the Ukrainian National Guard, putting neo-Nazi troops on the Government’s payroll. In 2020, Facebook came under pressure following the revelation that a network of 80,000 white supremacists was operating on its platform In more than 40 neo-Nazi websites, where merchandise sales were funding the Azov Battalion and the Misanthropic Division, another far-right Ukrainian group. One of the Azov Battalion’s Facebook pages at the time was reportedly called “Gas Chambers”, and visitors were directed to websites featuring imagery of white skinheads standing next to murdered Jews and black people.

Marking International Women’s Day, NATO tweeted a message of solidarity with Ukrainian women, only to delete the tweet after observers noticed that a female soldier in one of the images was displaying a neo-Nazi sun symbol on her uniform.

All this being said, the Azov Battalion ran in Ukraine’s 2019 election but won only two percent of the vote, which is markedly lower than far-right gains in other Eastern European countries. Indeed, Ukraine voted overwhelmingly to elect Volodymyr Zelenskyy as President, a Jewish man whose family was partially wiped out during the Holocaust.

On the Russian side, it was reported that the Russian President hired the Wagner Group, a collective of mercenaries who have been described as a private paramilitary organisation, to assassinate Mr Zelenskyy. The head of the group is Dmitry Utkin, a reported neo-Nazi. Photographs of Mr Utkin show Nazi SS tattoos on his shoulders and a Nazi-style eagle, or Reichsadler, on his chest.

In addition to those on the ground, the global far-right has also been divided in its stance on the war. Some on the far-right have expressed regret that two “white” nations are engaged in a “brother war”, with sympathy shown for Ukrainian civilians. Others are backing Ukraine, and the Azov Battalion in particular, inferring that if the Battalion is opposing Mr Putin, he must be the real enemy. Yet others are siding with Russia, which is viewed by its far-right supporters as the saviour of the white race, in contrast to Ukraine, which has supposedly been heading towards self-destruction through efforts to integrate with Western, liberal Europe.

One thing that the far-right does agree on, predictably, is that the Jews (or, as they are sometimes more subtly described in these circles, “globalists”) have masterminded the war. Whether it is because Mr Zelenskyy is Jewish (as are, for that matter, several senior Ukrainian politicians), or because Mr Putin is supposedly in thrall to Jewish oligarchs, the far-right agrees that the Jews are to blame. For example, Nick Griffin, the former leader of the BNP, posted on his Telegram channel: “#IStandWithRussia against NATO and those Jesus referred to as the Synagogue of Satan,” while the former KKK leader David Duke too has said that the war is a conspiracy by Jews to kill non-Jews.

Full analysis of this topic is available in Episode 15 of Podcast Against Antisemitism.

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The Council of the European Union has developed new “conclusions” in the fight against antisemitism. 

The Council, which is composed of the heads of government of each member state of the EU, has passed a resolution to treat antisemitism as something different from other kinds of racism, inviting member states to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism. commit to urging social media companies to “rapidly detect, assess and remove illegal online hate speech of a racist and antisemitic nature”, increase security at Jewish institutions, strengthen the powers of law enforcement to tackle antisemitic hate crime, and implement various other measures.

The document calls on the European Commission to treat “the fight against all forms of racism and antisemitism as priorities of the European Union.”

The resolution comes after the European Commission published a strategy to tackle antisemitism for the first time last year.

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It has been reported that Dutch universities have denied an anti-Israel group’s request in which they asked universities to reveal any ties they may have with Israeli and Jewish organisations.

Universiteiten van Nederland (UNL), an umbrella group that represents fourteen Dutch universities, said last week that the request had caused “considerable unrest” but under freedom of information rules, they were obligated to reply. 

The request was made by The Rights Forum, an organisation founded in 2009 by former Dutch Prime Minister Andreas van Agt, after alleging that pro-Israel university groups were stifling debates concerning Israel.

The organisation said that it had requested the universities to reveal their ties with Israeli academic institutions and companies, and other groups “known for their active and unconditional support for Israel’s domination of the Palestinians”.

Binyomin Jacobs, the Chief Rabbi of the Netherlands, remarked that the request “reeks of antisemitism” and that it implied a “shadowy Zionist/Jewish cabal is operating in the Dutch university system”.

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For the first time in the country’s history, Romanian officials have paid tribute to the hundreds of Jewish refugees fleeing persecution during the Holocaust who died in the tragic sinking of a ship.

In December 1941, nearly 800 Jewish people boarded the MV Struma, a ship due to travel from the southern Romanian coastal city of Constanţa to Mandatory Palestine via Turkey. However, once the boat docked in Istanbul, Turkish authorities refused to provide entry to the refugees, leaving the boat in the harbour for over two months. Authorities then towed the boat out to sea without an anchor or working engine, and the boat sank the very next day. It is believed that a Soviet submarine mistook the MV Struma for a hostile vessel, and torpedoed it, leaving only one survivor.

On Tuesday, a ceremony, attended by approximately 80 people, was held in commemoration at Constanţa. Romanian Rear Admiral Mihai Panait said at the event: “We commemorate today not only a tragic event, but we also bring back the attention to the suffering caused by the repression of the Jews during the Second World War.”

David Saranga, Israel’s ambassador to Romania, said: “It’s the first time that Romania officially commemorates the Struma’s tragedy on Romanian soil, and it’s part of the efforts of successive governments in recent years to face the past and the events of the Holocaust era, when half of the country’s Jewish community was murdered.”

Last month, a Romanian political party was criticised for referring to Holocaust education as a “minor topic”.

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Antisemitic conspiracy theories are believed to have been a contributing factor as to why a man murdered his own family last year.

German police said that the man, who lived in the State of Brandenburg and, before killing himself, reportedly shot his wife and children aged four, eight and ten on 7th December, feared that his children would be taken away from him owing to a forged coronavirus document.

According to Germany’s Interior Ministry, investigators uncovered messages sent by the man that indicated he was fearful that Germany’s vaccine mandates were part of a plan to “to halve the world population and establish a new world order under Jewish leadership.”

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

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A prominent Athens bishop has been acquitted by a court of antisemitic rhetoric, with the activists behind the claims being found guilty of “falsely accusing” him.

In 2015, Bishop Seraphim, the Metropolitan of Piraeus, allegedly said that the “international Zionist monster” that “controlled” the left-leaning government in power at the time was to blame for new legislation increasing civil rights among same-sex couples, while five years earlier he told a local television station that Jews were to blame for Greece’s debilitating debt crisis and that they had orchestrated the Holocaust. He later stated that these comments were his personal opinions and not those of the church.

Instead, the two human rights activists were found guilty of “falsely accusing” the Greek Orthodox bishop of racist hate speech by the three-member Athens tribunal and were given twelve-month jail sentences, suspended for three years.

Andrea Gilbert, one of the two activists who works at the Greek Helsinki Monitor rights group, said that the “outrageous” verdict was “representative of the institutionalised antisemitism that exists in Greece.” Ms Gilbert added: “We have immediately appealed and will fight it all the way.”

Ms Gilbert, in addition to the other convicted activist, the Helsinki Monitor spokesperson, Panayote Dimitras, had brought the complaint against Bishop Seraphim in April 2017. The pair accused the Bishop of public incitement to violence and hatred, in addition to abuse of ecclesiastical office.

The accusations referred to a statement that Greece’s Central Board of Jewish Communities, KIS, described as containing “well-known antisemitic stereotypes, conspiracy theories and traditional Jew-hating attitudes.”

Over two years later, their complaint was dismissed by a prosecutor, who argued that the Bishop’s statement should have been viewed within the framework of the Christian Orthodox church. The pair were charged in November and the case was referred to trial by a prosecutor after the Bishop filed his own complaint against the activists for reportedly making false statements.

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It has been reported that Dutch universities have requested more time from a pro-Palestinian group’s request in which they asked universities to reveal any ties they may have with Israeli and Jewish organisations.

Universiteiten van Nederland (UNL), an umbrella group that represents fourteen Dutch universities, said that the request had caused “considerable unrest” but under freedom of information rules, they were obligated to reply. 

The request was made by The Rights Forum, an organisation founded in 2009 by former Dutch Prime Minister Andreas van Agt, after alleging that pro-Israel university groups were stifling debates concerning Israel.

The organisation said that it had requested the universities to reveal their ties with Israeli academic institutions and companies, and other groups “known for their active and unconditional support for Israel’s domination of the Palestinians”.

Binyomin Jacobs, the Chief Rabbi of the Netherlands, remarked that the request “reeks of antisemitism” and that it implied a “shadowy Zionist/Jewish cabal is operating in the Dutch university system”.

Rabbi Jacobs added that he was concerned by “the number of universities that were so compliant with such a transparently antisemitic request. It reminds us that most mayors cooperated during the occupation to pass on the names of their Jewish citizens to the Germans.”

UNL has said that it has asked the Rights Forum for a delay “so that they have time to process it”, and added: “The request is for the disclosure of institutional partnerships between Dutch universities and the organisations specified in the request. It specifically excludes partnerships between individual academics.”

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Police in Germany have reportedly pressured Telegram to remove far-right content.

Telegram is a Russian-founded online messaging app with end-to-end encryption as well as ‘self-destruct timers’ on messages and media. Though used by many ordinary people, the service has also become the main messenger app for the far-right.

Recently, Telegram blocked 64 channels due to pressure from the German Government and police. 

Among those blocked from the platform are Attila Hildmann, a far-right German nationalist who has been accused of anti-Jewish prejudice.

Germany’s Federal Criminal Police (BKA) asserted that Telegram has been more aggressive in removing propaganda from Islamist terror groups than far-right conspiratorial content. The BKA argues that Germany’s Network Enforcement Act makes it an obligation for Telegram to monitor and remove illegal content. 

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A German politician has condemned education officials for failing to remove antisemitic stereotypes from school textbooks.

Jonas Weber of the Social Democrat Party (SPD) in Baden-Württemberg said that disturbing portrayals of Jewish people could still be found in the State’s educational resources, stating: “Unfortunately, we have the impression the Ministry of Education does not want to set the necessary priorities in the fight against antisemitic stereotypes in textbooks.”

It was said that some of Mr Weber’s primary concerns lie with medieval and Renaissance period texts and cites examples such as Martin Luther’s “Against the Jews And Their Lies” from 1543, a seventeenth-century Spanish Catholic text, as well as enlightenment thinkers including Voltaire, Feuerbach, Marx and Schopenhauer.

Dr. Michael Blume, the first antisemitism commissioner for the State of Baden-Württemberg, asked for the creation of a committee “to make textbook approval in Baden-Württemberg more transparent”, prompting the State’s Ministry of Education to analyse a sample of textbooks for examples of antisemitism, with the assistance of the Central Council of Jews and Baden-Württemberg’s Centre for School Quality and Teacher Training (ZSL).

However, Michael Kilper, Head of the Department for General Education schools, said: “The representations of Judaism are predominantly technically correct and appropriately differentiated.”

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The German public broadcaster Deutsche Welle has fired five employees – including four from its Arabic desk – and has dropped a number of freelancers following an audit on antisemitism.

The audit was prepared by former Justice Minister Sabine Leutheusser-Schnarrenberger, integration expert Ahmad Mansour, and Beatrice Mansour, an expert on the prevention of radicalisation.

Although the audit found no systemic problem, it led to the firings. Another eight cases are still under investigation.

According to the Bild newspaper, one of the fired journalists had described Israel as a “cancer that should be cut out”. Another wrote in a 2018 essay that a “Jewish lobby controls many German institutions” to prevent criticism of Israel.

In 2019, a freelancer and trainer at the Deutsche Welle Academy compared Jews to “ants” that had invaded “through our weak points”.

The audit began last year, seeking online postings and information on those implicated in allegations of antisemitism, including , including “distributors and partners of Deutsche Welle.”

According to the audit, the staff in question had not merely engaged in criticism of Israel, which is protected free speech, but had used “classic antisemitic imagery up to and including Holocaust denial.”

The Director General of Deutsche Welle, Peter Limbourg, apologised this week and announced that a ten-point “code of ethics” would be established to prevent such problems in the future. It will reportedly include explanations of antisemitism, and the difference between legitimate criticism of Israel and calling for the destruction of the Jewish state. Deutsche Welle also announced plans to strengthen its Israel desk.

The country’s main Jewish umbrella group, the Central Council of Jews in Germany (CCJ), welcomed Deutsche Welle’s actions. “There must not be taxpayer-financed Israel-hatred and antisemitism in the media,” declared CCJ president Josef Schuster.

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A circular issued by the Italian Ministry of Education to heads of schools has caused anger in Italy’s Jewish community for comparing a local massacre to the Holocaust.

The guidelines were issued ahead of the National Memorial Day, or Day of the Exiles, on 10th February, which also commemorates events known as Foibe, during which up to 350,000 members of the ethnic Italian population in north-east Italy were killed by Yugoslav Partisans during and after WWII.  

The guidelines, which seek to draw a parallel between the killing of the Italians, whose leader Mussolini was a close ally of Hitler, with the wholesale slaughter of Europe’s Jews, has generated outrage.

The National Association of Italian Partisans (ANPI) – who fought against Mussolini – has stated that the parallel is “aberrant and unacceptable”, while Emanuele Fiano, a member of the Italian Chamber of Deputies and a prominent figure in the Italian Jewish community, said that the comparison between “the project of total extermination of the Jewish people [and the] massacre of Foibe by Tito’s troops is totally wrong.”

On Twitter, ANPI London wrote that “By comparing the Foibe killings with Nazi genocide, the Italian right is whitewashing the country’s past.”

Osvaldo Napoli of the centre-right political party, Cambiamo, said that comparing the persecution of the Jewish people, who were victims of “the Nazi-Fascist genocide,” with the violence of Marshal Tito’s national-communism is “offensive to the Jews who survived the extermination.”

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The Dutch publisher Ambo Anthos has apologised for releasing a book that claimed a Jewish person betrayed Anne Frank, stating that not enough research was put into the book in order to make this claim.

The Betrayal of Anne Frank, the book which made international headlines after it was released last month, will no longer be printed until more work can be done to verify claims made. 

The disputed claim alleged that Arnold van den Bergh, who was a member of the Jewish council in Amsterdam, which was an administrative body the German authorities forced Jews to establish, led the police to Frank’s address. However, critics argue that Mr van den Bergh would not have had access to that information.

The publishing house said in a statement that it should have taken a more “critical” stance.

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Antisemitic incidents in France have skyrocketed by 75% in 2021.

According to the French Jewish community’s main watchdog, the Jewish Community Security Service (SPCJ), 589 antisemitic hate crimes were recorded in 2020, including an increase of 36% in physical assaults. 

The use of knives and guns was also noticeably higher than in previous years, and the SPCJ further noted that there was an increasing phenomenon of attacks happening inside or just outside of the victims’ homes.

In almost a third of incidents, attackers argued that they had “anti-Israel” motivations. During the height of the flare-up in May 2021 between Israel and Hamas, the SPCJ documented an average of five antisemitic incidents a day.

Last year, the murderer of French Holocaust survivor Mireille Knoll was sentenced to life in prison.

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Jan Lipavský, the Czech Foreign Minister and member of the progressive Czech Pirate Party, has announced that the Czech Republic will adopt a national strategy to combat antisemitism.

The Czech Foreign Affairs Ministry is reportedly preparing the strategy in tandem with the Czech Interior Ministry, other ministries and Jewish organisations.

Mr Lipavský noted that the Czech Republic could be proud of the fact that the country has a relatively low number of antisemitic incidents, but added that “even here the amount of speech and other forms of racial intolerance on the Internet is rising. This also applies to the Romani minority.” 

The move comes after the Federation of the Jewish Communities of the Czech Republic reported a rise in antisemitism, though still believed that antisemitism was at a relatively low level compared with other European countries and remained safe for Jews.

Mr Lipavský also added that the country would be hosting an international forum on the Holocaust in November. 

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A Canadian academic accused of involvement in a terrorist bombing outside a Parisian synagogue in 1980 is to stand trial.

Hassan Diab, 67, a Lebanese-born sociologist at Carleton University in Ottawa, is to stand trial in France in 2023 over the attack on the rue Copernic synagogue in Paris that killed four people and wounded 46. The bombing took place on Friday evening on 3rd October 1980, near the beginning of Shabbat and during the Jewish festival of Simchat Torah.

The bombing was the first deadly attack against Jewish people in France since the end of WWII.

The neo-Nazi Federation of National and European Action took responsibility, but investigators concluded that Arab terrorists were in fact behind the attack, and eventually sought the extradition of Prof. Diab, which was granted in 2011. He spent over three years in prison in France while the investigation continued, only for the charges to be dismissed in 2018, with Prof. Diab able to return to Canada. Appeals courts in France reversed the dismissal, however, and the trial is now set to go ahead in April 2023.

Prof. Diab claims that he was in Lebanon at the time of the bombing, and it remains unclear whether prosecutors have sufficient evidence to make out a case against him. It is believed that the prosecution is relying in part on evidence that allegedly links Prof. Diab’s handwriting to that of the suspected bomber.

The Hassan Diab Support Committee, which includes the former Secretary General of Amnesty International Canada, condemned the prosecution, describing it as “surreal and disgraceful”. The committee also called for changes to Canada’s extradition treaty with France to prevent Prof. Diab from being extradited again.

prof. Diab has asserted: “My life has been turned upside down because of unfounded allegations and suspicions. I am innocent of the accusations against me. I have never engaged in terrorism. I have never participated in any terrorist attacks. I am not an anti-Semite.”

For now, French authorities have not yet made an extradition request to Canada, and Prof. Diab’s lawyers have reportedly told Canadian media that he may be tried in absentia.

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Image credit: Justice for Hassan Diab

A new study has reported that in 2020, Jewish people in Sweden were on the receiving end of 27% of religious hate crimes, despite them only making up 0.1% of the population.

The report noted 170 antisemitic hate crimes occurred in 2020. Sweden has a population of 10 million, of which Jews make up approximately 14,900. 

The report from the Swedish National Council for Crime Prevention also says that the figure is lower than that of the 280 antisemitic hate crimes documented in the 2018 report. However, it added that the 2020 numbers may be skewed due to structural changes in its most recent report.

In October, world leaders called for further measures to tackle antisemitism and Holocaust denial at Sweden’s Malmö International Forum on Holocaust Remembrance and Combating Antisemitism.

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At a recent funeral in Rome, a coffin was draped in a Nazi flag while mourners gave Nazi salutes, sparking outrage among Italian clergy.

The funeral was reportedly for neo-Fascist Forza Nuova Party member Alessia Augello.

In a statement, the Vicariate of Rome dubbed the incident as “serious, offensive, and unacceptable.”

A Roman Jewish community organisation reportedly said that the incident was “even more outrageous because it took place in front of a church,” adding: “It is unacceptable that a flag with a swastika can still be shown in public in this day and age, especially in a city that saw the deportation of its Jews by the Nazis and their fascist collaborators.”

Police are investigating the incident as a hate crime.

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A Romanian political party has been criticised for referring to Holocaust education as a “minor topic”.

The Alliance for the Union of Romanians party, or AUR, which holds 43 seats in Romania’s Parliament, issued a statement accusing the Government of relegating “fundamental subjects” such as “exact sciences, Romanian language and literature and national history” in favour of “minor topics” such as “sexual education” and “history of the Holocaust.”

The Government, the statement said, is trying “to undermine the quality of the education system in Romania.”

The Government’s Special Representative for Combating Antisemitism, Alexandru Muraru, reportedly hinted at the possibility of outlawing AUR, calling the Party “a threat to Romania’s constitutional order.”

In his Party’s defence, AUR’s co-leader, Claudiu Tarziu said: “We are Christians, so we can’t be antisemites.” He denied calling the Holocaust a “minor topic” and referenced the “sinister horrors” visited upon on Jews by “the Nazi regime”.

The AUR has drawn controversy since its surprising election result in 2020, when it won 9% of the vote and entered Parliament for the first time, as its leaders have reportedly defended historical figures who served in Ion Antonescu’s wartime regime, which was allied with the Nazis.

According to official Romanian statistics, between 280,000 and 380,000 Jews were murdered or died in territories under Romanian administration during WWII.

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A French mosque has been shuttered over support for Islamist groups and dissemination of antisemitism, just two weeks after another was ordered to close for inciting hatred.

Interior Minister Gerald Darmanin confirmed that he had ordered a mosque in the southern city of Cannes to close due to antisemitic remarks heard there and its alleged support for two Islamist groups, CCIF and BarakaCity, which the Government dissolved last year because they were spreading Islamist propaganda.

The closure of the mosque came just two weeks after the closing of another mosque in Beauvais in northern France due the content of its imam’s sermons, which reportedly included hatred, violence and Jihad “targeting Christians, homosexuals and Jews.”

Late last year, yet another mosque – in Allonnes, 200km west of Paris – was closed for six months after sermons were delivered apparently defending armed jihad and “terrorism”.

In an interview, Mr Darmanin said that 70 mosques in France were considered to be “radicalised”.

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Belgian police are investigating videos circulating on social media which appeared to show a group of soccer fans in Antwerp giving Nazi salutes and shouting antisemitic slogans and chants that included references to Hamas and to gassing and burning Jews.

According to the local newspaper which reported the incident, it took place at a restaurant near the soccer stadium and involved fans of Antwerp’s Beerschot team.

In an unrelated development, the Royal Belgian Soccer Association fined Brugge soccer team, Club Brugge, around £2,000 for antisemitic chants heard at three recent matches. Fans of the club were heard shouting “Whoever doesn’t jump is a Jew.”

Antisemitic soccer chants occur regularly where the fans of certain teams perceive the rival team as having strong Jewish support or links to the Jewish community, such as Amsterdam’s Ajax and Britain’s Tottenham Hotspur. There are times, however, that the soccer chants have also been heard outside the context of sports, including at a graduation party of high school students in the Netherlands.

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A “Nazi druid” is on trial in Germany on charges of sedition and violation of gun laws.

Seventy-one-year-old Karl Burghard Bangert, the so-called “Nazi druid,” is one of four men on trial. Mr Bangert is also charged with sedition over a series of social media posts in which he reportedly called for the murder of Jews, denied the Holocaust and incited hatred against refugees.

Mr Bangert and his three co-defendants are allegedly members of Reichsbürger, a right-wing, German conspiracy movement. They are charged with illegally hoarding explosives and weapons between 2015 and 2017. Weapons found in a 2017 raid by security services included a flamethrower.

According to reports, Mr Bangert is a former insurance agent who became well-known locally for his eccentric appearance and for a TV news report of 2008, in which he claimed to have been born 2,500 years ago and to have been raised, after his mother’s death, by an uncle “the great wizard Merlin.”

According to Nicholas Potter, an expert on the far-right from Berlin’s Amadeu Antonio Foundation, Mr Bangert had a “virulent antisemitic, conspiracy-driven worldview” alongside his belief in New Age spiritualism. In this world-view, Jews “have been waging a secret war against the German people for centuries,” explained Mr Potter.

Another far-right expert, Jan Rathje from the Centre for Monitoring, Analysis and Strategy, said that Mr Bangert presented himself “on the one hand as a druid” and on the other “especially via social media” as an “antisemitic resistance fighter.” 

Extremism experts say that while New Age and far-right beliefs might “seem unlikely bedfellows,” their adherents share “an anti-authoritarian and anti-State mindset.” Experts also warn that connections between new age and far-right ideology have become “particularly visible during the pandemic.”

The trial, in Mannheim, has been adjourned until April.

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A 74-year-old Jewish woman has reportedly been beaten and robbed in Paris, France. 

According to the Paris-based National Bureau for Vigilance Against Antisemitism (BNVCA), the attack occurred on 13th December where the two suspects, described as being Black and around sixteen or seventeen years of age, reportedly pretended to be members of the building’s security personnel and rang the victim’s door.

When the victim, currently identified only as Mrs LU, opened the door, the suspects reportedly forced their way into the abode before beating and robbing the victim. 

The suspects allegedly tied Mrs LU to a chair, punched her repeatedly across the face and ordered her to reveal where she kept her jewellery. A piece of tape was also reportedly applied over her mouth to muffle her cries. 

It was also alleged that while one of the suspects robbed the apartment, the other stood guard over the victim. The pair then fled the scene with all of the victim’s jewellery, leaving the victim bruised and in a state of shock.

The BNVCA noted that Mrs LU’s apartment was affixed with a mezuzah which would have identified her as Jewish to the suspects. The organisation said: “We call on the police to do everything possible to identify the two attackers, and to carry out patrols in order to protect the residents of this neighborhood, which has become dangerous and infamous.” 

In 2017, Ms Halimi, a 65-year-old Jewish woman, was murdered by her 27-year-old Muslim neighbour, Kobili Traoré, after he tortured her before pushing her out of a window to her death. Mr Traoré was said to have yelled “Allah Akbar,” “I killed the shaitan,” which is an Arabic word for ‘devil’ or ‘demon’, along with antisemitic vitriol.

Campaign Against Antisemitism held a rally in April in solidarity with French Jews in opposition to the Court of Cassation’s ruling to let Sarah Halimi’s murderer go free.

In November, Yacine Mihoub was convicted of stabbing 85-year-old Mireille Knoll, a French Holocaust survivor, eleven times in her Paris apartment and was sentenced to life in prison. Ms Knoll was murdered during a botched robbery in March 2018 that also saw her body set alight in an effort by the perpetrators to burn her apartment.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

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While Arsenal have been strongly linked with Club Brugge player Noa Lang, some have voiced their concerns about video footage of the player allegedly singing an inflammatory song at rival fans.

Videos from May 2021 have surfaced of Mr Lang appearing to sing lyrics including “I’d rather die than be a Jew” at fans of Club Brugge’s Brussels-based rivals Anderlecht. Like some other clubs in Europe, including Tottenham Hotspur, Ajax and Cracovia, Anderlecht have a reputation for being a “Jewish” club.

Although it has been reported that Mr Lang has come under investigation by the Belgian Football Association for his alleged involvement in the chant, instead of apologising Mr Lang reportedly said in a statement: “My dad’s Surinamese and my mother’s Dutch. I know all about racism and bias. I chanted enthusiastically with supporters I met for the first time after winning. As a former Ajax fan I know very well the soccer world’s nicknames. I did not mean to offend anyone. I’m done with the subject and won’t be revisiting it.” 

Club Brugge released a statement that defended Mr Lang and denied that there was anything antisemitic about the chant, saying “When Noa Lang sang with our fans, there was no antisemitic undertone. Noa did not mean to insult or hurt anyone in any way and we are sorry if this happened.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues to act against instances of anti-Jewish racism in all sports.

Graffiti that read “Juif = Nazi” has been scrawled on a street in Uccle, a Jewish area of Brussels.

The vandalism, which was discovered in Belgium’s capital city earlier this week, was described by Rabbi Menachem Margolin, Head of the European Jewish Association, as “pure antisemitism”. “It is one thing to write a ridiculous comment on a wall, and we can put any manner of graffiti down to ignorance or sheer stupidity. But this on public footpaths and at a road junction is much more calculated, much more sinister,’’ he said.

“It is no secret that a large part of the Jewish community in Brussels lives in Uccle. And this is a message to them, and indeed to every Jew in Brussels. We are equated to those who murdered six million of us. We are not welcome. We are responsible for something unspoken, unnamed.

‘’This is pure antisemitism. On the streets of an affluent neighbourhood in Brussels today. I hope to hear from politicians and community groups of all hues that this is not something that will be tolerated. Or is in any way reflective of the society where we all seek to live in peace and dignity,’’ Rabbi Margolin added.

Uccle Mayor Boris Dilles reportedly labelled the act “heinous”, adding that “The police on the one hand and the road services on the other are doing what is necessary.”

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An online shop in Ukraine has removed a sweatshirt from its website that parodies the brand Lacoste with the word “Holocoste” after receiving complaints.

Action came about after Elina Katz, a Program Coordinator for Project Kesher in Ukraine, noticed the merchandise online. Members of the organisation then wrote a letter to the website and within two hours, the article of clothing had been removed.

Vlada Nedak, the Executive Director of Project Kesher Ukraine, said: “Our lawyer said to me, ‘Two hours, it’s too long. They should answer you in less than 30 minutes.’

“The next time I will know this better.”

In September, the Ukrainian Parliament passed a law banning “antisemitism and its manifestations”. Despite this, multiple Chanukah displays were vandalised across three cities in Ukraine during the festival of Chanukah.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

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Image credit: Screenshot from Project Kesher

Thierry Baudet, leader of the ring-wing party Forum for Democracy (FvD), posted content to Twitter in which he compared the Dutch Government’s policy on combating COVID-19 to the Holocaust. However, Mr Baudet was ordered by a judge to delete the four tweets or face a fine of €25,000 a day until they have been deleted. 

Mr Baudet was also forbidden from making such references in future speeches. 

In one tweet dated from 14th November, Mr Baudet wrote: “The current situation can be compared to the 1930s and 1940s. The unvaccinated are the new Jews, the ignorant who exclude them are the new Nazis and NSB [wartime Dutch Nazi organization] members.”

“There, I said it,” he added.

In another tweet, accompanied by images of unvaccinated children paired with one of a Jewish boy wearing a yellow star in Nazi Germany, Mr Baudet wrote: “Ask yourself: is this really the country you want to live in? In which children who are ‘unvaccinated’ are not allowed to go and see Santa Claus? And need to be dried off outside after swimming lessons?” 

“If not: THEN RESIST! Do not participate in this apartheid, this exclusion!”

The case was brought against the right-wing party leader by two Dutch Jewish organizations, the Center for Information and Documentation on Israel (CIDI) and the umbrella Central Jewish Consultation (CJO), and was backed by four Jewish Holocaust survivors. The plaintiffs asserted that the tweets were “seriously insulting and unnecessarily hurtful to the murdered victims of the Holocaust, survivors and relatives.” 

The judge, upholding the ruling, said that Mr Baudet “spoke in an unnecessarily offensive way to victims of the Holocaust and their relatives,” before adding that “The right to freedom of expression for a representative of the people is not unlimited.”

The FvD have said that it will be appealing with the decision, tweeting that “Freedom of expression is restricted by the judge,” and called the ruling a “totally hallucinatory statement.”

In February, Mr Baudet provoked outrage by stating that the trials against Nazi leaders in Nuremberg after World War II were “illegitimate”.

Mr Baudet resigned as leader last year after several members of his Party were accused of antisemitism, but was reinstated shortly after. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

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