Concerns have been raised about a controversial Hungarian media figure invited to the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Budapest on 20th May.

Hungarian journalist Zsolt Bayer has a history of making inflammatory remarks. 

The journalist, whose political views have variously been described as “ultra-conservative” and “far-right”, is reported to have said that the Hungarian Academy of Science had been infiltrated by Jews.

Mr Bayer is also reported to have written in a 2008 column about the “limitless hunger of the Jewish financiers in Brooklyn and Wall Street yuppies, which plunged the American and as a consequence the global monetary world into depression.”

A 2011 article for the conservative, pro-government Hungarian daily newspaper Magyar Hírlap contains several inflammatory remarks relating to Guardian journalist Nick Cohen and other Jewish figures with typically Jewish surnames.

Nick Cohen’s article criticised the rightward turn in Hungarian politics. Mr Cohen wrote that he would not call the conservative government headed by Viktor Orbán “fascist” or “neo-fascist”, but that “a foul stench wafts from the ‘new society’ Orbán’s patriots are building on the Danube. You can catch a smell of it in [the ruling party] Fidesz’s propaganda” which, Mr Cohen argues, involves forming a political pact with Jobbik, a political party that was at the time explicitly far-right and which blamed Jews, Roma people and homosexuals for Hungary’s social problems.

In response, Mr Bayer is reported to have written an article in Hungarian calling Mr Cohen “stinking excrement”. Mr Bayer’s article goes on to use more subtle pejorative references. Mr Bayer juxtaposes the typically Jewish surname Cohen with the names Cohn-Bendit and Schiff.

The former is believed to refer to former MEP and radical student leader, Daniel Cohn-Bendit. Mr Cohn-Bendit is a vocal supporter of the European Union, and has criticised Mr Orbán in the European Parliament for adopting laws that allegedly restrict the freedom of the press. Mr Cohn-Bendit says that this has resulted in Mr Orbán’s allies harbouring a “hatred” for him.

The name “Schiff” refers to Sir András Schiff, a Hungarian-born classical pianist and conductor who is an outspoken critic of Mr Orbán. Mr Schiff has questioned whether Hungary was worthy of taking on the Presidency of the Council of the European Union due to its Government’s policies, said that he would refuse to perform or even visit Hungary due to antisemitism, and said that “antisemitic baiting has become socially acceptable in Hungary” under Fidesz and Mr Orbán’s rule.

Both Mr Cohn-Bendit and Mr Schiff are Jewish. Then Mr Bayer writes that “There is nothing new under the sun. Unfortunately they were not all buried up to their necks in the forest of Orgovány.”

Orgovány was the site of a series of massacres committed by the leaders of the Hungarian White Terror. This was a period of repressive violence between 1919-21 carried out by opponents of Hungary’s short-lived Soviet Republic and its Red Terror. Far-right Hungarian figures often associate the 1919 Hungarian Soviet Republic with Jewish influence, which fits into a conspiracy theory about “Judeo-Bolshevism”, which holds Jews responsible for communism. As many as 1,000 people were killed in the White Terror, many of them Jewish. Mr Bayer’s appeared to imply that he is unhappy that these Jewish journalists were not also killed during this period.

On another occasion, Mr Bayer referred to US Secretary of State Antony Blinken, who has a Hungarian-Jewish background, as a “ROOTLESS Hungarian”, echoing a typical trope about Jews that questions whether Jews have sufficient allegiance or loyalty to their countries of residence.

Though Mr Bayer rarely uses the word “Jew” or “Jewish” directly, it is believed that readers in Hungary are aware of what Mr Bayer may be implying when he refers to these events and who he may mean when he claims that the interests of white European Christians are under attack.

In 1988, Mr Bayer co-founded the Fidesz political party together with Mr Orbán. At the time, the Party was a centre-left and liberal activist movement formed in opposition to the ruling Marxist-Leninist Hungarian Socialist Workers’ Party, which had held power since the failed democratic revolution in 1956. Fidesz took a national-conservative turn during the 1990s.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

While America mourns for the ten people killed and three injured, eleven of whom were Black, reportedly at the hands of self-described “ethno-nationalist eco-fascist national socialist” Payton Gendron on 14th May, many have turned their attention to the shooter’s 180-page-long manifesto.

The document details the alleged Buffalo supermarket killer’s interest in what is known as the “Great Replacement Theory”. This antisemitic far-right conspiracy theory claims that Jews are the secret masterminds behind a planned “invasion” of non-white immigrants into western countries with the aim of making white people a minority to further an insidious, but largely unclear, agenda.

The theory’s origins are said to date back to early-20th century France, but it was formalised and popularised more recently, by the writer Renaud Camus in his 2011 essay “Le Grand Remplacement” (“The Great Replacement”).

Over time, the theory was adopted by white supremacists who professed hatred for Jews and other non-whites, with one prominent example including those behind the August 2017 “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.

The theory has also influenced terrorist murderers like neo-Nazi terrorist Anders Breivik, Pittsburgh Tree of Life Synagogue shooter Robert Bowers, and Christchurch mosque shooter Brenton Tarrant, from whose manifesto the alleged Buffalo shooter’s writings are reported to have borrowed heavily.

One Twitter user stated that Mr Gendron’s manifesto included a “scientific”-style chart distinguishing between different types of supposedly Jewish faces based on animals and mythical creatures, including hawks, trolls, goblins, demons, “nightmare” creatures and rats. It is illustrated with famous faces, including former Labour Party MP Luciana Berger, actor Ron Perlman, billionaire financier and activist George Soros, and philosopher Max Horkheimer, whose writings often feature in far-right conspiracy theories about “cultural Marxism”.

The gunman apparently explained that, although the primary problem in the United States is supposed Jewish influence, he chose to attack immigrants and Black people to stop them from having any more impact on the country.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Pulitzer prize-winning author Alice Walker, who has previously garnered media attention for her inflammatory comments and support for conspiracy theories, is set to speak at San Diego Community College for the investiture ceremony for its new chancellor.

Ms Walker won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1983 for her novel The Colour Purple. She is, however, also known to have made inflammatory comments about Jews, one example of which can be seen in her poem “To Study the Talmud”. Excerpts from Ms Walker’s poem reads:

“Are Goyim (us) meant to be slaves of Jews, and not only
“That, but to enjoy it?
“Are three year old (and a day) girls eligible for marriage and intercourse?
“Are young boys fair game for rape?
“Must even the best of the Goyim (us, again) be killed?”

While also receiving little scrutiny from the press about her views due to the forthcoming publication of her journals, Ms Walker has been asked to speak at the investiture of San Diego Community College’s new chancellor, Carlos O. Cortez.

Ms Walker has also voiced her support for the antisemitic hate preacher David Icke, citing with approval his books Human Race Get off Your Knees: The Lion Sleeps No More, which states that the world is secretly run by shape-shifting reptilian humanoids and “Rothschild Zionists”, and And the Truth Shall Set You Free, which promotes the antisemitic conspiracy theories contained in The Protocols of the Elders of Zion and questions whether the Holocaust happened.

The author reportedly described Mr Icke’s work as “a curious person’s dream come true” and denied that there was anything antisemitic or anti-Jewish about its content.

Mr Icke uses social media, his books and his stage performances to incite hatred. His preaching is so absurd that since the 1990s he has been dismissed as a crank, but because he is dismissed, there has been no major opposition to him and he has built up a following of thousands upon thousands of disciples whom he has persuaded to adamantly believe that the world is in the grip of a conspiracy run by the “Rothschild Zionists”. His repertoire includes conspiracy myths and tropes classified as antisemitic according to the International Definition of Antisemitism, adopted by the British Government. Campaign Against Antisemitism has successfully persuaded some venues to pull out of hosting his events.

After years of pressure from Campaign Against Antisemitism, Mr Icke was banned from most social media platforms.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A Labour Party councillor is alleged to have posted a horrific article arguing “The Germans were completely justified in persecuting and expelling the Jews…just as we would be today.”

Belgica Guaña is alleged to have posted the article, titled “The Holocaust Hoax and the Jewish Promotion of Perversity”, on Facebook in 2016, two years before she became a councillor in Newham in London, where she is running for re-election this week.

The article says that “The so-called ‘Holocaust’ is propaganda in an ongoing war between the Jews and those with the courage to stand up to them – a war that began with the National Socialists coming to power in Germany in the 1930s and continues to this very day. The Jews do not have the means or the numbers to defeat Europeans with the force of arms so they have to rely mainly on infiltration, subversion, and economic and psychological warfare, with the Holocaust hoax being the best example of the latter. 

“The Germans were completely justified in persecuting and expelling the Jews (which is all that was actually happening), just as we would be today. Hitler and the National Socialists freed Germany from the death grip of the Jews and gave it back to the German people.”

The essay also argues that Jews use pornography to control western societies by way of the “Holocaust hoax”, and pushes the “white genocide” conspiracy theory, as well as claiming that teenage diarist Anne Frank, murdered by the Nazis at Bergen-Belsen, was a “bisexual degenerate” whose popular diary is an “obvious fraud…laced with pornographic and sexually subversive messages”.

In May 2016, Cllr Guaña reportedly shared a post that said that “The Nazi holocaust [sic] was a crime against humanity, and the Israeli Genocide against Palestinians can not be ignored or denied,” and in December 2017, Cllr Guaña is said to have shared a video of the United Nations General Assembly, writing: “If you can have a minute of silence for the 6 million Jews who died in the Holocaust. So how much time should I ask for the more than 50 years of invasion and oppression of the Palestinian people?” Both posts are further breaches of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The allegation that Cllr Guaña posted the article was made in the JC, based on research by Labour Against Antisemitism.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The article allegedly shared by this councillor is a not only an abhorrent collection of antisemitic tropes, from Holocaust denial and paedophilia to comparisons of Israel with the Nazis and support for the far-right ‘Great Replacement Theory’, but it may also imply support for Jewish genocide. In view of just how horrific this post is, we are examining legal options.

“The Labour Party must urgently investigate both the veracity of the allegation and how Belgica Guaña was allowed to become and remain a councillor in spite of the post, and why she was endorsed by the Party in her bid for reelection.”

Cllr Guaña is not the only Labour candidate in the coming elections to be embroiled in controversy.

Cllr Lee Garvey, an independent candidate representing Pallister and Berwick Hills in Middlesbrough, had applied to become a member of the Labour Party, but was rejected after concerns were raised about material that he had allegedly shared online. Cllr Garvey allegedly compared Israel’s policies to the Holocaust and referenced antisemitic conspiracy theories surrounding the Rothschild family.

In a 2015 Facebook post referencing then-Conservative Prime Minister David Cameron, Cllr Garvey reportedly wrote: “Just saw an interview with [Channel 4 News presenter John] snow and CaMORON where he says, we need to stop the Demonisation of Jews…Lets look at how I see it…Israel is doing to the Palestinians what they themselves suffered at the hands of the Nazi’s [sic].”

On another occasion, Cllr Garvey allegedly complained about the number of Jewish characters on television, saying: “Watch any US sitcom or show, you will find the vast majority have at least one Jewish character if not a Jewish family. Why is this when they make up JUST 2.2% of the population?? And if like me you fear the TV is just a Propaganda, it certainly makes you think [sic].”

In another alleged 2015 Facebook post, Cllr Garvey is claimed to have referenced classic antisemitic conspiracy theories about the Rothschild family, writing: “I also take the sleeping enhancer from those drug companies I despise, use money to purchase items given to us by the Rothschild family who I regard as less than poo and I also maek most of my living in churches and we all know how I feel about them…”

Another Labour candidate, Anne Pissaridou, representing North Portslade in Brighton, has been suspended by the Party for a second time after new revelations about her social media output. She is accused of posting messages on social media downplaying antisemitism allegations in the Labour Party and reportedly appeared to condone an online attack on a Jewish party member.

A third figure caught up in controversy is former Labour MP Martin Linton. Mr Linton served as the MP for Battersea between 1997 and 2010, but is now running as a council candidate in Wandsworth’s Lavender ward. He has allegedly made a number of inflammatory statements in the past.

In 2010, while Mr Linton was Chair of Labour Friends of Palestine, he reportedly claimed that the “Israel lobby” played a malign role in marginal constituencies. During a meeting held at the House of Commons by the Palestine Solidarity Campaign and Friends of al-Aqsa, Mr Linton is reported to have said that “There are long tentacles of Israel in this country who are funding election campaigns and putting money into the British political system for their own ends…When you make decisions about how you vote and how you advise constituents to vote, you must make them aware of the attempt by Israelis and by pro-Israelis to influence the election.”

In an appearance on the Islam Channel, Mr Linton said that the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group Hamas should not be called “terrorists”. That is, Mr Linton explained “the wrong word to use when you are talking about someone who is fighting a military occupation”. Mr Linton’s preferred term is “Gazan militants”, because, while the actions of individuals may be described as terroristic, the same apparently cannot be said for groups and governments.

In 2010, Mr Linton appeared on the Iranian-backed news outlet PressTV to, it has been claimed, defend Hamas terrorists in Israeli prisons. On another occasion, he appeared on PressTV to defend Raed Salah, a prolific antisemite who claims that Israel planned 9/11.

Murad Qureshi, the candidate for the ward of Little Venice in west London, is also embroiled in controversy. Mr Qureshi is alleged to have made comments about the “powerful pro-Israel lobby” in the United States, and retweeted a Twitter post which read “You can get away with offending anyone so lomng as they’re not Jewish”. In a 2013 blog post, Mr Qureshi also reportedly questioned the “legal basis” for the trial of the leading Nazi Adolf Eichmann. Mr Qureshi allegedly wrote that “I am not sure the Eichmann trial can be held up as a model of due processes [sic].” From 2016 to 2021, Mr Qureshi was Chair of Stop the War Coalition, and has been photographed alongside Hamas politicians including leader Ismail Haniyeh.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The Liberal Democrats appear to have reintegrated a member once suspended for reportedly sharing antisemitic material online.

In 2019, local Liberal Democrat candidate Abjol Miah was suspended during a council by-election in the Shadwell ward of Tower Hamlets after he reportedly shared antisemitic content, including a video produced by David Duke, five years earlier.

Mr Duke is a former Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard, and runs a daily radio show that promotes the antisemitic “Zionist Occupied Government” conspiracy theory inspired by the infamous antisemitic conspiracy theory The Protocols of the Elders of Zion and Henry Ford’s notorious collection of antisemitic articles, The International Jew. The video reportedly shared by Mr Miah was titled “CNN Goldman Sachs and the Zio Matrix”.

“Zio”, short for “Zionist”, is an epithet invented and disseminated by Mr Duke, used to disparage anything that he deems to have come from a Jewish source, whether or not the individuals in question are actually Jewish themselves.

Mr Miah also allegedly shared other examples of antisemitic conspiratorial material. They include a picture of the globe with a Star of David on it featuring the words “Zionist globalism”, a picture that collected a series of logos of major newspapers and media companies with an Israeli flag in the background and the headline “Zionist dominated media”, and an illustration of a figure with a withered face, its mouth gagged with an Israeli flag, and words that appear to say “Zio globalist tyranny!” above it.

Mr Miah is understood to have campaigned for London Mayor, Sadiq Khan, in 2016, before having his Liberal Democrat membership “revoked, pending an investigation” following his alleged online activity. However, he is now understood to have been reintegrated into the Party as part of the campaign for Rabina Khan to become Mayor of Tower Hamlets

Ms Khan is a former member of George Galloway’s Respect Party who also campaigned for Sadiq Khan in 2016 before switching allegiance to the Liberal Democrats.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Dr Efraim Zuroff, the Chief Nazi Hunter at the Simon Wiesenthal Center, appeared on the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism where he said that he believes anti-vaccination protesters who wear yellow Stars of David are trivialising the Holocaust.

Much of the rhetoric that has emerged from anti-vaccination conspiracy theorists has compared lockdowns to the Holocaust. These crude and inflammatory comparisons have included protesters donning yellow stars bearing the word “Unvaccinated”, a comparison that has been made across the world, including in the United Kingdom, Canada, Ukraine and elsewhere.  

Such symbolism is reminiscent of the kind of insignia Jews in Germany and occupied Europe were forced to wear by the Nazis. Those wearing such items in 2021 do so in order to compare the persecution of the Jewish people with protective measures sanctioned by governments and other administrative bodies in order to deal with the pandemic. Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

“It’s Holocaust trivialisation,” Dr Zuroff said. “In other words, to, in a sense, turn the Holocaust into a far more trivial event than it was in fact.”

He continued: “It’s very ironic but in a certain sense, I have to say that there’s a small silver lining here which goes to prove the success of the people who have devoted their lives to promoting Holocaust education, Holocaust research, Holocaust commemoration. In other words, the Holocaust has become the ultimate tragedy, and that’s why everyone who has a cause wants to connect that cause or to claim that it’s similar to the Holocaust…related to the Holocaust, because that’s the most effective tool.”

However, Dr Zuroff went on to lament the negative effect that wearing the yellow star has on the Holocaust. 

“It’s a horrible thing because it basically turns the Holocaust into something much, much more minor than it actually was.”

Throughout the interview, Dr Zuroff touched upon a wide variety of topics which included highlights from his storied career, the details of ongoing trials of alleged Nazi war criminals, and explained the difference between Holocaust denial and distortion.

The podcast with Dr Zuroff can be listened to here, or watched here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox. Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, The Sunday Telegraph columnist Zoe Strimpel and actor Eddie Marsan.

Two Austrian men who publicised myths about coronavirus vaccinations by wearing Stars of David have reportedly been convicted of violating the Alpine republic’s strict anti-Nazi laws.

The two men, who have both refused to be vaccinated, had worn yellow felt stars bearing the word “Ungeimpft” (unvaccinated) at anti-vaccination demonstrations held in Vienna.

A court in Vienna heard that the defendants, known as “Mr K”, 50, and “Mr B”, 34, pled not guilty to infringing upon Austria’s 1947 Verbotsgesetz (Prohibition Act), which not only banned Nazi paramilitary organisations, but made it illegal to publish or broadcast denials or minimisation of the Holocaust. Austria’s Jewish community has recently argued that these laws should be extended to ban the utilisation of Holocaust-related imagery and slogans in order to push anti-vaccination conspiracy theories.

Much of the rhetoric that has emerged from anti-vaccination conspiracy theorists has compared lockdowns to the Holocaust. These crude and inflammatory comparisons have included protesters donning yellow stars bearing the word “Unvaccinated”, a comparison that has been made across the world, including in the United Kingdom, Canada, Ukraine and elsewhere.  

Such symbolism is reminiscent of the kind of insignia that Jews in Germany and occupied Europe were forced to wear by the Nazis. Those wearing such items in 2021 do so in order to compare the persecution of the Jewish people with protective measures sanctioned by the German federal government in order to deal with the pandemic. Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

The judge handed both men fifteen-month suspended sentences and three years’ probation.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Antisemitic conspiracy theories are believed to have been a contributing factor as to why a man murdered his own family last year.

German police said that the man, who lived in the State of Brandenburg and, before killing himself, reportedly shot his wife and children aged four, eight and ten on 7th December, feared that his children would be taken away from him owing to a forged coronavirus document.

According to Germany’s Interior Ministry, investigators uncovered messages sent by the man that indicated he was fearful that Germany’s vaccine mandates were part of a plan to “to halve the world population and establish a new world order under Jewish leadership.”

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Tahra Ahmed, a prominent Grenfell Tower volunteer aid worker who was reported to the police by Campaign Against Antisemitism has been sentenced to 11 months in prison after being found guilty of publishing written material in order to stir up racial hatred.

Ms Ahmed, 51, was exposed in The Times as having claimed that the victims of the Grenfell Tower fire were “burnt alive in a Jewish sacrifice.” After the tragic fire that left 71 dead, Ms Ahmed said that she had been coordinating the work of volunteers, coaching them and running workshops with the aim of empowering them. She reportedly discussed her beliefs with some of the people she has helped.

Ms Ahmed, who described herself during her testimony as “very very bright”, was found guilty of two counts of incitement to racial hatred, following the trial instigated after Campaign Against Antisemitism, CST and others reported the matter to the police.

Sentencing Ms Ahmed today, His Honour Judge Mark Dennis QC said that “stirring up racial hatred is an abhorrent act”. Noting that she had received a good education, he said: “I have no doubt you knew full well what you were doing and it’s likely affect,” adding that he had “no reason to conclude you have any remorse.”

He also read from character statements from Ms Ahmed’s family, noting that it was “unfortunate” that one of them had claimed: “There seems to be a special rule for the Jewish people…one rule for them, another rule for us. Is that fair?” A defence plea for Ms Ahmed to receive a light sentence on account of her care duties for her 74-year old diabetic mother was brushed aside as the judge observed that Ms Ahmed is not her mother’s primary carer and in fact visits about once or twice a week.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “For years we have pursued justice against Tahra Ahmed and today we are vindicated by this strong sentence, which sends a very clear message to those who seek to stir up anti-Jewish racism through conspiracy theories.

“Ms Ahmed sought to twist the Grenfell Tower tragedy to fit her venomous world view in which it seems that any evil can be attributed to Jews. She used people’s suffering and anger in the aftermath of the Grenfell tragedy and tried to wield it as a weapon against Jews before an audience of tens of thousands on social media. We are pleased that she will now go to prison for her wicked fabrications.

“As we have seen, her hatred has not only enabled her to abuse the Grenfell tragedy, but also to accuse Jews of being responsible for 9/11 and of supposedly exaggerating the Holocaust. As the prosecution observed, she used her position as an aid volunteer in the aftermath of Grenfell to ‘bait the mob’ against Jewish people, making her conduct particularly repulsive.”

In her social media posts, Ms Ahmed had written: “Watch the live footage of people trapped in the inferno with flames behind them. They were burnt alive in a Jewish sacrifice. Grenfell is owned by a private Jewish property developer just like the twin towers. I wonder how much Goldman [Goldman Sachs, a bank often targeted by antisemites] is standing to make in the world’s most expensive real estate location [Kensington].”

She has also described the Holocaust as the “holohoax” and posted on Facebook that “Hitler and the Germans were the victims of the Jewish conspiracy to destroy Germany.” She is also a proponent of the antisemitic conspiracy theory that the 9/11 terror attacks were faked by Jews. In one Facebook comment found by Campaign Against Antisemitism after The Times published its article, she wrote: “All the leadership of ISIS is directly recruited by CIA and the leadership are all Arab Jews, trained by Mossad.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism also uncovered posts by Ms Ahmed claiming that “Jews have always been the ones behind ritual torture, crucifixion and murder of children,” a comment redolent of the blood libel. Other posts described the antisemite Gilad Atzmon as her “good friend” and complained about the “hold of Jewish power over our so-called free and democratic society”, claimed that “Zioborg overlords are engineering a civil war”, and referenced a supposed “Zioborg Banking cartel”, among other inflammatory comments. She has also promoted the far-right, antisemitic “Kalergi Plan” conspiracy theory, which claimed that there is a plot to mix white Europeans with other races through immigration.

Following The Times’ exposé and the further research by Campaign Against Antisemitism, we reported Ms Ahmed to the police and called for her to be prosecuted. The five-day trial, held at the Old Bailey after Westminster Magistrates’ Court declined jurisdiction, ended today with a guilty verdict from a jury.

Ms Ahmed, who denied two counts of stirring up racial hatred by publishing written material, was described by prosecutor Hugh French as having “published two posts that were virulently antisemitic and crossed the line as to what is acceptable in a liberal society.”

During the trial, the prosecution read a statement by Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Chief Executive, Gideon Falter.

Giving evidence, Ms Ahmed said that she campaigns against the arms trade, with her lawyer describing her work as being part of the “social justice movement.”

She claimed to have a problem with “Zionist Jews, not all Jews,” and that when she talks about “Zionist Jews” or “Talmudic Jews” or “Satantic Jews” people know whom she is referring to, conceding that there were times when she wrote something and failed to make a distinction between the particular Jews whom she was talking about and Jews in general. She claimed that she detests publicity and that The Times, by publishing her posts, is guilty of inciting racial hatred, rather than her.

As her evidence turned to Grenfell, she explained that in 2014 she began working as a life coach, confirming, however, that she had no training in this field. She set out to provide support for the volunteers who were supporting the victims. When asked about her description of the Grenfell fire as a “Jewish sacrifice”, she answered that “the Talmud talks about sacrificing children, Satanic ritual abuse, a lot of it coming from the Jewish circles…the Ba’al Jews, Talmudic Jews, Zionist Jews they’re a small number of the Jewish community but they are criminals.” Asked whether the fire was started deliberately, she claimed that many people believe so. Pressed on whether the Jews were to blame, she said that at the time she did think that, “just like they bombed Gaza every couple of years.”

Asked by her lawyer whether she accepts that the post was insulting, she agreed, but she denied that it amounted to racial hatred, saying: “Absolutely not, no way. No racial hatred except to the criminals. I’ll be bold to the criminals and I’m entitled to be.” The prosecution noted, however, that with passions running high in the immediate aftermath of the fire, people would be looking for someone to blame, and Ms Ahmed’s posts were an attempt to “bait the mob”, which she denied.

When Ms Ahmed was asked about her claim that “Jews are always the ones behind ritual murder, especially young boys, to atone and be let back in Palestine,” she insisted that “there are millions of Jewish people who are anti-Zionist and many are Facebook friends, so if any of them were offended they would have pointed it out,” adding that “If it [the comment] stirred up racial hatred, it would have happened by now.”

Regarding her posts about the disgraced Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein, Ms Ahmed told the court about “Satanic ritual abuse practiced by secret societies in order to control people…horrific torture of children, raping them, et cetera…Weinstein, the Hollywood mogul, my suggestion was he was not involved in SRA [Satanic Ritual Abuse] or the upper echelons of the cult and was therefore dispensible.”

The defence asked Ms Ahmed who the “Satanic ruling Jews” are, to which she responded that they are “the bankers, owners of media and corporations, they manipulate and control a lot of evil in the world and I want it to end and so I expose who they are. Unfortunately, sometimes I don’t qualify by saying ‘Satanic’ and some racists would comment and I’d delete the comment or tell them off. People would share racist or inflammatory memes and I’d delete them, even though I’m passionate about freedom of speech. My intention is to educate them.” When pressed by the prosecution on whether she could provide any examples of her calling out racism or removing posts as she claimed to have done, she could not.

On the Holocaust, Ms Ahmed told the court, “I’m not a Holocaust denier…unfortunately, six million Jews is a number that has been perpetuated and the actual number has been revised down by experts.” She affirmed using the term “Holohoax”, arguing that “it [the figures] was manipulated and exaggerated at the time” and that, regarding the actual number of deaths in the Holocaust, “The Jewish council [sic] says 3.5 million…the Red Cross says 283,000.” She also baselessly asserted that “Hitler had an agreement with Rothschild to put Jews in concentration camps so Rothschild could transfer Jews to Palestine” and approvingly quoted a known Holocaust denier. She was also pressed on why she described the expulsion of the Jews from England in the Middle Ages as a “final solution to the Jewish problem.”

The judge asked Ms Ahmed about 9/11: “It’s a yes or no question. Do you believe Jews were responsible for 9/11?” Ms Ahmed replied that “It’s not fair to answer that without context,” also variously describing the terrorist attack as a “false flag” operation and a “Mossad” operation. She further claimed that “Before US Presidents are elected, they show their allegiance to Israel to pay homage to say ‘we’re here to serve you’.”

During her testimony, Ms Ahmed also invoked far-right conspiracy theories, for example asserting that “Kabbalistic Jews don’t want Europe to remain white. Personally, I’m multicultural and love diversity. This plan is to bring other people into the land to deliberately destroy cultures,” a claim akin to the replacement theory antisemitic conspiracy theory popular with white nationalists. Her testimony also featured further comments about “Rothschild” control of the banking system; “ZioNazis”; “real Ashkenazis” and “Satanic Ashkenazis”; the “Bilderberg group” (which often features in conspiracy theories); “powerful people behind world governments”; a “cabal” akin to the “deep state” and “the most powerful ones at the top are Jewish”; the Khazar myth, which holds that contemporary Jews are actually a converted Central Asian people with no claim to the Land of Israel, and other conspiracy theories, including about the CIA and the COVID-19 “scamdemic”.

The prosecution accused Ms Ahmed of “using the witness box as a pulpit for your views” and of knowingly and deliberately “whipping up the mob with her social media posts.”

In her defence, over the course of her extended and rambling testimony Ms Ahmed insisted that “I’m not racist or antisemitic but passionate which sometimes looks like anger. They don’t care I write about Muslim terrorist organisations, I’m not accused of being islamophobic or anti-white or anti-British.” She described the trial as a “witchhunt” and claimed that, during case management and her plea hearing last year, she was “unlawfully arrested, incarcerated and tortured for six days” and suffered from “post-traumatic stress disorder” as a result, inhibiting her from mounting a strong defence. At more than one point, she was rebuked by the judge for misleading the jury about the case management process.

Ms Ahmed was found guilty by eleven of the twelve jurors, who agreed on both counts, and has today been sentenced.

We are grateful to the CST for once again providing security for CAA personnel attending court for the trial.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Mark Collett, the leader of the far-right group Patriotic Alternative, interviewed Piers Corbyn last night where he asked Mr Corbyn about the “Jewish Question”. 

Mark Collett is the former head of the BNP’s youth wing who is reported to have dabbled in Holocaust denial, collaborated with the infamous American antisemite David Duke, and espoused antisemitic and racist views. He currently leads Patriotic Alternative, a group known for its efforts to recruit youth to its white nationalist ideology. Previously, the far-right group published an online “alternative” home school curriculum condemned as “poison” and “hateful” and attempted to recruit children as young as twelve through livestreaming events on YouTube, according to The Times.  

The interview, which ran for almost one hour and culminated with Mr Collett asking Mr Corbyn, the brother of the antisemitic former Labour Party Leader Jeremy Corbyn, if he wanted “an easy question or a spicy question”. Mr Collett, asking on behalf of one of his listeners who donated money in order to have their question read out, then asked Mr Corbyn: “Is Piers aware of the Jewish question?”

The “Jewish Question” is an antisemitic phrase that arose in nineteenth-century Europe which asserted that Jewish people’s presence in society was a problem that needed to be solved. The “Final Solution of the Jewish Question” was the name given by the Nazis to their programme to exterminate six million Jews during the Holocaust. It has been reported that this term has been reclaimed by neo-Nazis and members of the alt-right, often using “JQ” as a shorthand for the phrase.  

Mr Corbyn replied to Mr Collett’s question by saying: “Well I’m not quite sure what that means. I mean…I’m not a Holocaust denier in case it’s leading up to that, because certain things you say, we’re told we’re Holocaust deniers. Well, you know, the Holocaust happened and that was horrific. But that’s all I can say on that.”

Continuing his answer, Mr Corbyn claimed that he didn’t have the time to answer the question at that moment but showed interest in discussing it at a different time. “I mean, there’s lots of ways of defining the Jewish Question but the difficulty is in answering these can lead you up into certain dangers because you’ll say things…so, I’m not trying to get out of that but I’m not convinced we’ve got the time to elaborate on that at this point in time. But if you come and see me under different circumstances we could discuss that if you want more fully if the meaning of the question could be verified a bit more,” Mr Corbyn said. 

A video recently emerged of Mr Corbyn claiming that allegations of antisemitism against him and his brother are a “pack of lies”, and in August, Mr Corbyn suggested that “troublemakers” in Jewish areas posted leaflets created and distributed by Mr Corbyn, which compared the COVID-19 vaccines to the Auschwitz death camp, through their own doors in a “plot” to portray him as antisemitic. Mr Corbyn has compared vaccinations to Nazi policy on more than one occasion.

Mr Collett’s interview with Mr Corbyn was co-hosted by Jason Köhne, an accused white nationalist and self-proclaimed “advocate for white wellbeing” who promotes a website claiming that western civilisation is threatening white people.

Earlier this month, Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to Amazon after it was reported that the online marketplace had cut a book deal with Mr Collett, in which it was reportedly receiving profit off of his book that was found to be promoting Holocaust denial. Amazon has also been found selling Mr Köhne books.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit. 

A banner that read “Vax the Jews” was hung from a bridge in Austin, Texas over the weekend.

Also written on the banner was the domain “goyim.tv”, a website affiliated with the “Goyim Defence League”, a group whose membership reportedly contains several neo-Nazis and is understood to be led by Jon Minadeo II. The group is responsible for stunts such as visiting a Chabad centre to claim that “these Jewish terrorists” were behind 9/11, and hanging a banner on a Los Angeles overpass reading “Honk if you know the Jews want a race war.” Earlier this year, Mr Minadeo II created t-shirts carrying antisemitic slogans such as the Holocaust was “a hoax”.

Austin Mayor Steve Adler, who is himself Jewish, condemned the incident, tweeting. “I am heartbroken to see antisemitic hatred in Austin, a welcoming and respectful place. Hatred of any kind has no place in our city.”

The incident occurred close to the Shalom Austin Jewish Cultural Centre, the self-described “hub of Jewish life in Central Texas”. Shalom Austin called the incident “extremely upsetting and unsettling” and confirmed that the Austin Police Department had been incredibly supportive, adding that it was “carefully monitoring and observing the situation”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Image credit: StopAntisemitism.org

Concerns have been expressed over a Conservative councillor who appeared to entertain an equation of the COVID vaccine with Zyklon B on Twitter.

A Twitter user wrote, “I fear that this vaccination is this admins/pharma’s verision of zyclon B. Of course this is only my opinion [sic].” Zyklon B was the gas used to murder Jews in Holocaust extermination camps.

Cllr Steve Tierney, of Fenland District Council, then retweeted the tweet to his thousands of followers with a comment: “I hope, for all our sake, that turns out to be completely wrong. 🙁 :(“

While Cllr Tierney did not affirm the sentiment, engaging with it by expressing his mere hope that it will not prove to be accurate suggests that he entertains the possibility that the comparison might be valid. Instead, he should have either ignored the tweet or called out the comparison as inflammatory nonsense. Whatever one’s views on lockdown rules or vaccines, there is no basis for comparisons to the genocide of the Jewish people.

Over the past year, anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Cllr Tierney has been vocal on Twitter about antisemitism, especially in the Labour Party. This tweet therefore goes to show how even those sensitive to some manifestations of antisemitism can nevertheless have a blind spot when it comes to others.

We urge Cllr Tierney to delete the tweet and encourage his followers, whatever their views on vaccines, to avoid needless equations with the Holocaust.

Fenland District Council, where Cllr Tierney holds the Transformation, Communication and Environment portfolio, has adopted the International Adoption of Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Three state senators and more than 50 members of the Maine state legislature, including the Senate President, the Speaker of the House, and the Senate Majority Leader, signed a letter condemning Maine Representative Heidi Sampson for participating in an event hosted by an alleged “known antisemitic conspiracy theorist.”

The event held in Belfast, Maine in July was part of a tour known as the “Arise USA! Resurrection Tour.” Robert David Steele, one of the organisers, has allegedly claimed that “elite Jews” were responsible for the Holocaust and has also claimed that “Zionists” funded 9/11, “control the American media” and belong to the “Synagogue of Satan.” It also featured several speakers known for overt antisemitism.

In their letter, the legislators expressed concern at “the impact of hateful rhetoric,” and noted that Mr Steele peddles the same “baseless” antisemitic conspiracy theories “that have been used through history in vicious campaigns” to “spread fear of Jewish people”, including the idea that “satanic Zionists” kidnap children. Now, however, the letter notes that there were “new twists” with Mr Steele claiming that “Zionists” were engaged in “a plot against white people.”

The letter went on to say that by speaking at the event, Ms Sampson had “given the legitimacy of her elected office” to Mr Steele’s “hateful and false claims” that threatened “Jewish families, individuals and institutions” in Maine and as members of the legislature, “we condemn Rep Sampson’s participation in the event.”

This antisemitic rhetoric was “not only categorically false” but was “directly threatening to the safety, dignity and well-being of all Jewish people in Maine” where antisemitic incidents had “seen an uptick in recent years.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

A lay magistrate in Scotland is alleged to have promoted an antisemitic video.

According to the JC, a video from 2016 remains visible on the Facebook profile of Amjid Bashir, a broadcaster and Justice of the Peace, which contains a link to a five minute video that claims that the Rothschild family – common protagonists in antisemitic conspiracy theories – “maintains its control through the US Federal Reserve”.

The video’s accompanying caption read: “Not really one for conspiracies but this is interesting on how 5 ultra wealthy families have some [sic] much power.”

A Judician Communications spokesperson reportedly said that “this matter is now under consideration by the Judicial Office for Scotland,” adding: “All judicial office holders receive training about, and are bound by, the Statement of Principles of Judicial Ethics, and must uphold high standards of professional conduct.”

Mr Bashir reportedly wrote on social media last week that he stood “against all hate and discrimination #islamophobia #racism #antisemitism #hate”.

Image credit: JC

“Jews are behind the pandemic” and “rule the world” chants were heard at an anti-vaccine rally in Poland on Sunday.

The rally in Głogów was held by supporters of the local football team who marched to protest COVID-19 restrictions and vaccines. The organisers were reported to have called on locals to join “the fight for our common future” against “the globalists”, a term that is often used in far-right conspiratorial circles to refer to Jewish people.

It was reported that at one point during the rally, a man with a megaphone asked the crowd: “We know who is behind this whole ‘plandemic’ and who rules the world, right?”, to which someone responded “Jews”, and the man replied, “Of course it’s the Jews”.

A chant of “Every Pole can see today that behind the ‘plandemic’ are the Jews” was then reported to have broken out amongst the crowd of over 100 people.

Three arrests were made after confrontations broke out between protestors and police officers. A video of police officers retreating was uploaded to Twitter by a nationalist account, along with the caption: “You will all be held accountable someday.”

Earlier today, the account also tweeted an image of the Nazi flag and wrote: “We will never bow our knees, we will never submit, we will never become one of your sheep! Stop sanitary segregation!”

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Footage taken earlier today has shown Piers Corbyn comparing vaccinations to Nazi policy outside the Houses of Parliament, despite being arrested after a similar incident in February.  

The video shows Mr Corbyn and another man standing in front of a sign which reads “No Nazi forced jab” and yelling “arrest Matt Hancock” through a megaphone. 

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is tempting not to take conspiracy theorists Piers Corbyn seriously, but simply dismissing his antics without calling them out is how he and others like David Icke are given the space to promote their absurd and inflammatory nonsense to the public.

“Whatever one thinks of pandemic lockdowns and vaccination drives, they are not comparable to Nazi Germany and the systematic slaughter of millions of Jews. Mr Corbyn has repeatedly shown his contempt for the Jewish community, including by distributing flyers in Jewish neighbourhoods equating lockdown rules to Auschwitz. If one is seeking reasonable debate about how governments and populaces have responded to the pandemic, Piers Corbyn is no role model.”

This incident echos a similar one from earlier of this year when Mr Corbyn was arrested after distributing grotesque flyers comparing lockdown rules to Auschwitz.

Responding to his arrest, Mr Corbyn absurdly argued that he could not be antisemitic because he had been married to a Jewish woman and once employed a Jewish person who was a “superb worker.” Mr Corbyn reportedly protested: “The idea we’re antisemitic in any way is completely absurd. I was married for 22 years to a Jewess and obviously her mother’s forebears fled the Baltic states just before the war because of Hitler or the Nazis in general. I’ve worked with Jewish leading world scientists over the last 30 years. I’ve also employed Jewish people in my business Weather Action, one of whom was a superb worker.”

A spokesperson for the Metropolitan Police Service has since confirmed to Campaign Against Antisemitism that no further action would be taken against Mr Corbyn.

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Mr Corbyn has a history of controversy in relation to antisemitic conspiracy theories. He has previously retweeted @whiteknight0011, a notorious neo-Nazi who declared that “They will force Trump in to war What do you think happened to Hitler? Bilderberg CIA IMF Banker Gangsters They are the problem” along with four images. The @whiteknight0011 account has since been suspended. One image showed Lord Jacob Rothschild, the Jewish banker and philanthropist, against the background of a Nazi flag, claiming that he controls the world. A second showed Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu as a puppeteer controlling ISIS through Israeli intelligence agency Mossad, orchestrating the war in Syria and Paris attacks as Lord Rothschild and the Queen look on approvingly. A third image showed the faces of supposed Jewish conspirators who run the world to society’s detriment, proclaiming: “Know your enemy”. The last image showed a family photo of the Royal Family, claiming that they are in cahoots with these Jewish conspirators in committing “the worst genocides, invasions and theft in all history.”

Mr Corbyn has also claimed that “Zionists” were conspiring against his brother: when Jewish then-MP Louise Ellman complained of antisemitic attacks against her, Piers accused her of using it as a cover for political attack, tweeting: “ABSURD! JC+ All #Corbyns are committed #AntiNazi. #Zionists can’t cope with anyone supporting rights for #Palestine”.

A cryptocurrency company has used a Rothschild conspiracy theory in a marketing campaign, it was reported last week. 

The British fintech company, Crypterium, sent out a customer e-mail that contained a quote which has been falsely attributed to the 18th-century Jewish banker, Baron Rothschild.

The line that was used by the company, “The best time to buy bitcoin is whenever blood is on the street, everyone is panicking and no one’s talking about it,” is a variation on the classic trope, “The time to buy is when there’s blood on the streets, even if the blood is your own.”

The line is attributed to Baron Rothschild who is falsely accused of having exploited the public’s panicked state after the Battle of Waterloo in order to turn a profit. However, the line and the story have since been debunked as without foundation and inspired by anti-Jewish hatred, and at one point were even weaponised by the Nazis to spread hatred towards Jews.

George Krasukhin, the Chief Marketing Officer for Crypterium, who is himself Jewish, said: “It is not related to antisemitic theme[s] at all. It was the quote from one of the richest [men] on the earth.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Rather than simply using clichéd phrases without a second thought, marketers should research where the phrases come from and why they become cliches. Using a classic antisemitic trope associating Jews, Rothschilds and money is an inappropriate and insulting way to promote a financial product. The campaign should be withdrawn with an apology and the company must think again.”

A controversial former United States congresswoman and presidential candidate posted an antisemitic meme earlier this week which suggests that “Zionists” were responsible for the 9/11 terrorist atrocities.

Cynthia McKinney, the 2008 presidential nominee for the Green Party and congresswoman who served from 1993 to 2003 and from 2005 to 2007 as a Democratic Representative from Georgia, tweeted an image of a jigsaw puzzle which bore a photo of the 9/11 attacks along with a final jigsaw piece which reads “Zionists.” The caption below the photo says: “The final piece of the puzzle.”

The tweet was temporarily removed by Twitter for violating its policy but has since been restored.

Despite several users voicing their disgust in reaction to Ms McKinney’s abhorrent tweet, the former congresswoman doubled down by retweeting an article shared by a YouTuber, who herself has been accused of antisemitism, which attempted to back up the hateful conspiracy theory.

Ms McKinney is promoting the widespread, antisemitic conspiracy theory says that Jews, not Islamist terrorists, were responsible for flying passenger jets into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, so that they would profit from the resulting war. This is backed up by the equally false belief that no Jews were killed in the attack, as they had all been warned to stay at home that day.

Similarly, Ms McKinney’s usage of the phrase “Zionist” has been increasingly utilised in circles that promote antisemitic theories as a way to avoid saying “Jew.” People who do this will usually also exhibit other forms of antisemitic behaviour.

This is not Ms McKninney’s first instance of antisemitic behaviour. It was reported in the New York Times that in 2002, Ms McKinney made “a series of other incendiary, often racial comments” towards Jewish people.

Ms McKinney has regularly posted tweets which promulgate antisemitic tropes and conspiracy theories. This includes tweeting about central banks that are supposedly controlled by the Rothschilds family, multiple references to “Deep state ZioCons,” and alleging that Jewish people seek to harbour control of the black community. She has also referred to Donald Trump as a “Zionist puppet.”

Earlier this year, Ms McKinney promoted an antisemitic book which proposes several antisemitic conspiracy theories and stereotypes, which includes the assertion that Jewish people “control America” and accuse people of being antisemitic in order to deflect criticism of Israel. She shared a link to the book along with the comment: “One of the most important reads if you want to know what’s really happening and who the main actors are.”

Ms McKinney’s history of antisemitism also extends to Holocaust denial. Earlier this year, she retweeted an article which stated that Amazon had removed books that promoted Holocaust denial from its website, and added the comment: “More thought control and intolerance from the tolerance people.”

In May 2020, Ms McKinney posted a tweet in which she doubted that the figure of Jews killed during the Holocaust amounted to six million.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Accusing the Jews as a people, or Israel as a state, of inventing or exaggerating the Holocaust” is an example of antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A suspended nurse who reportedly described the NHS as the “new Auschwitz” has reportedly been permanently removed from the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) register.

Kate Shemirani’s removal from the register comes after she was suspended as a registered nurse for eighteen months last July, pending an investigation into her past alleged comments on COVID-19 and 5G conspiracy theories.

However, it was reportedly decided last Friday by the NMC Fitness to Practise Committee that she would be permanently struck off from the register. Ms Shemrani can appeal this ruling in five years. In the meantime, however, she will be unable to practice as a registered nurse.

Last year, Ms Shemirani led protests against mask-wearing and lockdown restrictions, defending her use of comparisons to Auschwitz and Nazis. Ms Shemirani said at the time: “When I likened this to Auschwitz and the cattle trucks – you tell me the difference? Because the only time in history I could find where the doctors and nurses were able to end people’s lives was the nurses of the Third Reich. The nurses of the Third Reich are here today. I don’t care if they find it offensive. I find it offensive that our elderly have been murdered in care homes. Stop being a special snowflake and saying you’re offended. They are killing our elderly, our most vulnerable.”

It has also been reported that Ms Shemrani is a follower of the “Committee of 300” conspiracy theory, which over a century ago laid the foundations for the antisemitic fabrication, The Protocols of the Elders of Zion.

Ms Shemirani said: “Can I state the obvious. There is no covid19. It’s a scam. There is however contaminated vaccines, contaminated tests and a lovely direct energy weapon system being primed to activate those nano particles you have injected, ingested and inhaled.”

She has also claimed: “Without the help of the doctors and nurses, the extermination of Jews, gypsies, homosexuals, blacks, disabled… in the Holocaust could not have been executed…”

According to the JC, Ms Shemirani has also made frequent reference to the Jewish financier, philanthropist and controversial political activist, George Soros, who is often the target of antisemitic conspiracy theories.

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

A councillor in Blackburn who has been suspended from the Labour Party after quoting an antisemitic conspiracy theory in chambers has refused to apologise.

Councillor Yusuf Jan-Virmani, the representative for the Audley and Queen’s Park ward, made derogatory comparisons between Israelis and animals while referencing the antisemitic blood libel conspiracy theory.

Cllr Jan-Virmani reportedly said: “Mr Mayor, councillors – I am not aware of any animal that is so cruel as the Israelis. Not even crocodiles. They bomb schools day and night… hospitals, they bomb them – they flatten them. 

“They kidnap the kids and harvest their organs… that’s been proven. That’s from the United Nations.

“They inject people there. They murder by land sea and air. And what’s worse, the Israelis slander the defenceless Palestinian victims as terrorists.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Using the symbols and images associated with classic antisemitism (e.g. claims of Jews killing Jesus or blood libel) to characterise Israel or Israelis” is an example of antisemitism.

This also references an antisemitic meme containing a quote that is falsely attributed to Sir David Attenborough, which has since been debunked.

Rick Moore, Deputy Chair of the Blackburn Conservative Association, said: “In regards to Cllr Jan-Virmani’s speech, I am concerned that it seems to be clearly antisemitic in nature, comparing the Israeli people to animals which is clearly unacceptable.”

When questioned, Cllr Jan-Virmani doubled down on his remarks, saying: “I stand by what I said. It was nothing to do with Jews. It was criticism of the Israeli Government.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has accused Jews of being “murderers” who are “only are satisfied by sucking [the] blood” of their victims.

During a speech made in Ankara, President Erdogan spoke about the conflict between Hamas and Israel. Accused of using the terms “Jews” and “Israelis” interchangeably, President Erdogan was quoted as saying: “They are murderers, to the point that they kill children who are five or six years old. They are murderers, to the point they drag women on the ground to their death and they are murderers, to the point they kill old people…they only are satisfied by sucking their blood.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Using the symbols and images associated with classic antisemitism (e.g. claims of Jews killing Jesus or blood libel) to characterise Israel or Israelis” is an example of antisemitism.

President Erdogan’s rant prompted condemnation from the United States. The State Department spokesman said: “The United States strongly condemns President Erdogan’s recent antisemitic comments regarding the Jewish people and finds them reprehensible. We urge President Erdogan and other Turkish leaders to refrain from incendiary remarks, which could incite further violence.”

These accusations were rejected by Omer Celik, President Erdogan’s Party spokesman. Mr Celik said that “accusing our President of antisemitism is an illogical and untrue approach. This is a lie said about our President.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Antisemitic flyers were discovered on a tram in Cologne, Germany on 10th February, which blamed the Jewish population for the ongoing pandemic.

The flyers read: “Do we really have a Corona problem? Or do we have a Jewish problem?”

The text was presented with a Star of David in the background next to the names of Chancellor Angela Merkel, Health Minister Jens Spahn and Minister of Foreign Affairs Heiko Maas. The flyer claimed that the three prominent politicians are Jewish, despite none of them having Jewish heritage.

The flyer further states: “The more Jews in politics and media, the worse things are!”

Several German protests against coronavirus restrictions and preventative measures have reportedly featured antisemitic slogans and epithets, and protestors have allegedly drawn comparisons between the restrictions and the persecution of Jews in the Holocaust.

The citizen-led democratic initiative, Omas Gegen Rechts, found the flyers and confirmed in a social media post that it had filed a police complaint concerning the incident.

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The founder of social-media platform Gab, has been accused of wooing far-right figures to his platform with promises of greater visibility.

The allegation against Andrew Torba emerged after Gab was hacked and messages were published by the whistle-blowing website, Distributed Denial of Secrets.

Since Gab was founded in 2016 with a claim to “champion free speech,” it has become a haven for supporters of the QAnon conspiracy theory and other far-right groups and individuals banned from mainstream platforms.

A cache of Gab data includes a conversation in which Mr Torba gave a “warm welcome” to Daryush Valizadeh. A social-media figure known as RooshV within the online “manosphere”, Mr Valizadeh has reportedly made derogatory comments about Jews as well as posting misogynistic material.

In an early exchange of messages, Mr Valizadeh thanked Mr Torba for his “warm welcome” and said: “I enjoy not having to self-censor like on Twitter.”

Mr Torba then said: “By the way feel free to back up all of your video content on Gab TV.” He later agreed to enable Mr Valizadeh to upload more than the site’s standard maximum daily video content. In a subsequent message, Mr Torba praised the notorious writer and publisher, E Michael Jones. Mr Jones has been interviewed several times on Mr Valizadeh’s podcast. Mr Torba wrote: “I am a huge fan of EMJ, too.”

Mr Jones reportedly has a long history of claiming that Jews are dedicated to “propagating and perpetrating attacks” on moral standards and on the Catholic Church and has argued that “mass killings of Jews” have been an “understandable reactions to Jewish beliefs and behaviour.”

Noting that Mr Jones hadn’t logged in to his Gab account “for some time,” Mr Torba asked Mr Valizadeh for help in encouraging Mr Jones to upload his videos to Gab TV, stating that this was “very important for the distribution and preservation of truth.”

Far-right figures have turned to sites such as Gab to avoid restrictions on hate-content on more mainstream platforms such as Facebook and Twitter. Mr Torba has tried to distance Gab from the far-right groups that have made it their home. In 2018, on a podcast, he said: “Do we have alt-right users? Certainly. Alt-right users also exist on Facebook, on Twitter, on Reddit, and everywhere else on the Internet.” He went on to insist that Gab had “good people” who “believe in individual liberty…and free expression.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

T-shirts carrying antisemitic slogans such as the Holocaust was “a hoax” have been launched by a Californian conspiracy theorist.

The line of t-shirts and apparel is being sold on a web-shop by Jon Minadeo, who is part of a group known as the Goyim Defence League, which is responsible for stunts such as visiting a Chabad centre to claim that “these Jewish terrorists” were behind 9/11, and hanging a banner on a Los Angeles overpass reading “Honk if you know the Jews want a race war.”

The merchandise – advertised as “some fresh Goy Gear” – includes t-shirts carrying the virulently anti-Jewish “Happy Merchant” image and an antisemitic parody of The Godfather logo. Others refer to the Holocaust “hoax” or have pictures of Hitler. Apparel also features homophobic images and slurs.

In a message on the website, Mr Minadeo states that sales are to finance his tours, stating that “all proceeds” go to his “Name the Nose Tour”.

The domain registrar for the online shop, Namecheap, says that it is not responsible for the content, while the software used to build the website, WooCommerce, is open source.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A university professor has been fired after posting antisemitic slurs on Twitter.

Thomas Brennan, a professor of physical science at Ferris State University in Michigan, was put on administrative leave in November after posting conspiracy theories about COVID-19, and for using racist, antisemitic and homophobic language on Twitter. The tweets included references to a “Jewish mafia” and a claim that COVID-19 was “another Jewish revolution” and a “stunt” to create a “new world order”.

Following an investigation by the University, Mr Brennan was reportedly sacked on 25th February.

Announcing the termination of his employment on Twitter, Mr Brennan added a link to his letter of defence, presented to the University administration. In it he says that he was “speaking out of despair” caused by a “personal crisis involving extremely painful migraines, EMF [electromagnetic] sensitivity and a series of break-ins” at his home.

While admitting that many of his posts were “horrible”, Mr Brennan said that he was exercising his rights to free speech.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Canada’s Jewish community has expressed outrage after a vaccine conspiracy theorist created a t-shirt using the words “Covid Caust” inside a yellow Star of David.

Canadian television network CTV reported that the t-shirt had been created by Vancouver-based anti-vaccine activist Susan Standfield. In an Instagram video explaining the design, Ms Standfield stated, “We are the official yellow star class in Canada”, and said that her design was “an act of solidarity among all persecuted people.”

One senior Jewish figure in the Vancouver community said that it was “irrational” and “makes no sense” to compare a vaccine to save people’s lives with “the genocide of a people.”

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A speaker who is alleged to endorse antisemitic conspiracy theories and has apparently referred to “thieving Jews”, was dropped by a prestigious American political conference.

The online commentator known as Young Pharaoh had been due to speak at the annual Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC), which took place in Florida from February 25th to 28th and was addressed by former President Donald Trump.

Young Pharaoh is alleged to have called Judaism a “complete lie” and to have used the phrase “thieving Jews.” In his tweets he has allegedly said that “all the censorship and paedophilia on social media is being done by Israeli Jews” and that “YouTube, Twitter, Facebook and Instagram are all owned or controlled directly by them.”

He has allegedly also promoted conspiracy theories including QAnon, which incorporates antisemitic tropes.

However, following a report by media watchdog, Media Matters, revealing his past social media comments, CPAC tweeted that a speaker with “reprehensible views” which had “no home with our conference or our organisation” had been removed from the conference programme.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Notorious Holocaust-denier David Irving is reportedly charging £2,000 per person for a tour of concentration camps.

In an interview with The Jerusalem Post earlier this month, Mr Irving claimed that he was giving tours to thirteen people at camps and execution sites in Latvia and Poland. He advertises his tours with a title “The Real History Tour of the Wolf’s Lair”, and states underneath: “Don’t miss this lifetime adventure! Make up your own mind about the truth.” In his tours, Mr Irving’s groups visit Hitler’s headquarters, where Mr Irving apparently claims that the Nazi dictator was not aware of the Holocaust.

When asked if his denial tours might fuel antisemitism, an unapologetic Mr Irving replied to his interviewer: “The Jews should ask, Why us? It is not for me to ask that question. Maybe it’s how they have acted over the thousands of years. Maybe it is all our fault. Our Riga tour includes the NKVD [Soviet Interior Ministry] headquarters, and the Skirotawa train station, where Jews also played a role.”

When asked who his paying clients are, Mr Irving claimed that two were judges and three were lawyers, with the group including Russians, Britons, Americans and one from each of France, Sweden, New Zealand and Canada.

British-born Mr Irving was previously incarcerated for thirteen months in Austria for violating its Holocaust-denial laws. He is banned from Austria, Germany and Italy where Holocaust denial is illegal and he is also banned from Canada.

Mr Irving, who was discredited as a historian at a defamation trial in 2000, said during a far-right forum in 2017 that Auschwitz is “small beer” and now “like Disneyland”.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “David Irving is a disgraced historian whose views on the Holocaust are a deep insult to Jews worldwide and to the truth. That he reportedly seeks to profit from his notoriety and peddling of untruths is disturbing and unacceptable. Mr Irving has earned his reputation as a pariah, and should be treated as such by his would-be patrons and others who have the misfortune of encountering him.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.