CCTV footage has been released of the suspect believed to be responsible for a series of Jewish-owned shops being smashed in Stamford Hill.

Last month, a series of Jewish-owned shops had their windows smashed in Stamford Hill on at least two separate occasions, which we understand caused £25,000 worth of damage.

The incidents were reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 4620417/22 or CAD 8616 02/08/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A barrister has been handed a £500 fine over tweets written from an anonymous Twitter account containing inflammatory remarks about antisemitism.

Daniel Bennett resigned from Doughty Street Chambers after he was found to have been responsible for “inappropriate and offensive” messages about antisemitism sent between September 2018 and June 2019 and directed at his colleague and fellow barrister, Adam Wagner, who is Jewish.

The Twitter account allegedly connected to Mr Bennett, which had some 4500 followers, described Mr Wagner, who had taken issue with how the Labour Party dealt with antisemitism allegations under the leadership of Jeremy Corbyn, as “a lying propagandist”, decried the stories about antisemitism as “fraudulent”, and claimed that antisemitism allegations were made up for “factional political gain”.

Mr Wagner said that the messages had caused him “considerable anxiety and unwelcome attention”.

Mr Bennett told the tribunal that the tweets “reflected his own strongly held views” but he “could and should have stopped them appearing”.

Although the Bar Standards Board, which regulates barristers, did not specify that Mr Bennett sent the tweets himself, it said that he “allowed” them to be sent and in doing so behaved in a way which was likely to diminish the trust and confidence in him and the profession.

Mr Bennett has 21 days to appeal the decision, but the ruling does not provide any context about his misconduct or say whether mitigation has been offered or accepted.

It has previously been reported that Mr Bennett has apologised for any offence caused.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

It has been reported that a Jewish primary school in Stamford Hill had to lock down and prevent its students from leaving in order to protect them from an apparent aggressor waiting outside.

A suspect captured on video appeared to be shouting a torrent of abuse towards the school that included yelling “You’re evil…the wasteland is where you’re from.”

The incident was reported on Monday by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 4055 12/09/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

It has been reported that two personalised vehicle registration plates incorporating Nazi references have been observed in Belgium.

One plate reportedly included the digits “HH-88”, alluding to the phrase “Heil Hitler”, “H” being the eighth letter of the alphabet.

Another had the phrase “1-RAS-88”, a reference to the phrase “Een ras”, meaning “one race”.

UNIA, the Centre for Equal Opportunities and Opposition to Racism in Belgium, observed that “it is highly unlikely that this choice of the plate was a coincidence, especially considering the €1,000 fee that the person paid for.”

The Department of Vehicles Registration (DIV) was reprotedly contacted by UNIA but declined to deregister the plates, apparently claiming that the “88” on the second plate referred to “the year the applicant was born” and that the owner assured them that there was no intention of racism nor was offence intended. UNIA was justifiably unpersuaded.

The Minister of Mobility reportedly responded to UNIA agreeing that the response was “schooling” but that “the current legislation does not allow the automatic cancellation of a licence plate already in circulation. If a plate is not on the DIV’s black list, there is currently little the authorities can do.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout Europe.

A European arrest warrant has been issued for a radical imam who has a history of making inflammatory comments about Jews, after the imam went on the run following a court ruling last week permitting the French Government to deport him.

Earlier this month, the Government vowed to change the law in order to be able to deport the imam, but this is no longer necessary after the decision from the Conseil d’Etat, the supreme court for administrative justice, which overturned a previous ruling that suspended Hassan Iquioussen’s deportation order.

The new decision rejected the claims of Mr Iquioussen’s defence that deporting the imam to Morocco would not be a disproportionate interference with his right to lead a normal previous and family life.

Interior Minister Gérald Darmanin, who has previously said that Mr Iquioussen is an enemy of France who had “no place” in the country, hailed the decision as “a big victory for the Republic,” adding of the imam: “He will be deported from national soil.”

Mr Iquioussen, 59, is a Moroccan citizen who has lived in France all his life but who has become a symbol of President Emmanuel Macron’s battle against Islamism, whom the President accuses of rejecting French laws and values. He did not take up French citizenship at a younger age and his attempts to do so since then have failed.

Morocco already delivered a laissez-passer to authorise his travel, which cleared the way for Mr Iquioussen’s expulsion “by force”, but the imam won an injunction halting his deportation at the Paris Administrative Court, which ruled that the expulsion was a “disproportionate infringement…of [Iquioussen’s] right to a private and family life.” Mr Iquioussen has five children and numerous grandchildren in France.

During the previous court hearing, prosecutors highlighted statements allegedly made by Mr Iquioussen in 2003 and 2004 in which he described Jews as “miserly usurers” and claimed that Zionists had “connived with Hitler…to push Jews to leave Germany”. He also reportedly said: “The Zionists said…there has to be someone in Europe who does bad things to Jews so that they…will leave [for Israel].” They also noted a conference in 2012 at which Mr Iquioussen allegedly described terrorist attacks in the West as “pseudo-attacks whose objective is to frighten non-Muslims so that they are afraid of Islam and of Muslims,” and claimed that he has also publicly denied the 1915 Armenian genocide and pointed to allegedly misogynistic comments.

In a post on Facebook, Mr Iquioussen “strongly contested” the allegations that he had used “discriminatory or violent language.” His supporters argue that the comments cited in the case were dated and taken out of context, and pointed to other statements by the imam, such as: “We have never had, and have, nothing against Jews because Islam is a religion based on justice.”

Following the latest decision, Mr Iquioussen’s says that he is considering an appeal to the European Court of Human Rights.

According to a report published by the French Jewish Community Security Service, antisemitic incidents in France have skyrocketed. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism in France and throughout Europe.

Researchers studying human remains that were discovered in a medieval well in Norwich have said that they are the bones of Jews who may have been murdered in an antisemitic massacre.

The DNA of these seventeen skeletons, first found in 2004, may now enable researchers, who published their findings in the journal Current Biology, to find out new information about the medical history of Jews in Europe. It may also allow historians to identify the victims of a pogrom written about by the contemporary writer, Ralph de Diceto. 

The account describes how, in February 1190, crusaders stopped in Norwich on their way to Jerusalem, and massacred “all the Jews who were found in their own houses.”

The bodies were first found eighteen years ago by a group of construction workers.

Using recent advances in genetics, the genomes of six of the bodies – who were mostly children at the time of their deaths – are being analysed. These samples are the oldest Jewish genomes to have ever been sequenced.

This may indicate that the origins of Ashkenazi Jews date back a few centuries earlier than the commonly-accepted account.

Once the researchers had established to whom the remains belonged, the local community organised a formal Jewish burial for them.

The research was co-authored by Professor Mark Thomas from University College London and the evolutionary geneticist, and Merit Researcher at London’s Natural History Museum, Ian Barnes.

Dr Barnes said: “When you study ancient DNA from people who’ve died hundreds to thousands of years ago, you don’t often get to work with a living community at the same time. It’s been really satisfying to work with this community on a story that’s so important to them.”

A court has ruled that the French Government can after all expel a radical imam with a history of making inflammatory comments about Jews.

Earlier this month, the Government vowed to change the law in order to be able to deport the imam, but this may now not be necessary after this decision from the Conseil d’Etat, the supreme court for administrative justice, which overturns a previous ruling that suspended Hassan Iquioussen’s deportation order.

The new decision rejected the claims of Mr Iquioussen’s defence that deporting the imam to Morocco would not be a disproportionate interference with his right to lead a normal previous and family life.

Interior Minister Gérald Darmanin, who has previously said that Mr Iquioussen is an enemy of France who had “no place” in the country, hailed the decision as “a big victory for the Republic,” adding of the imam: “He will be deported from national soil.”

Mr Iquioussen, 59, is a Moroccan citizen who has lived in France all his life and has become a symbol of President Emmanuel Macron’s battle against Islamism, whom the President accuses of rejecting French laws and values. He did not take up French citizenship at a younger age and his attempts to do so since then have failed.

Morocco already delivered a laissez-passer to authorise his travel, which cleared the way for Mr Iquioussen’s expulsion “by force”, but the imam won an injunction halting his deportation at the Paris Administrative Court, which ruled that the expulsion was a “disproportionate infringement…of [Iquioussen’s] right to a private and family life.” Mr Iquioussen has five children and numerous grandchildren in France.

During the previous court hearing, prosecutors highlighted statements allegedly made by Mr Iquioussen in 2003 and 2004 in which he described Jews as “miserly usurers” and claimed that Zionists had “connived with Hitler…to push Jews to leave Germany”. He also reportedly said: “The Zionists said…there has to be someone in Europe who does bad things to Jews so that they…will leave [for Israel].” They also noted a conference in 2012 at which Mr Iquioussen allegedly described terrorist attacks in the West as “pseudo-attacks whose objective is to frighten non-Muslims so that they are afraid of Islam and of Muslims,” and claimed that he has also publicly denied the 1915 Armenian genocide and pointed to allegedly misogynistic comments.

In a post on Facebook, Mr Iquioussen “strongly contested” the allegations that he had used “discriminatory or violent language.” His supporters argue that the comments cited in the case were dated and taken out of context, and pointed to other statements by the imam, such as: “We have never had, and have, nothing against Jews because Islam is a religion based on justice.”

Following the latest decision, Mr Iquioussen’s says that he is considering an appeal to the European Court of Human Rights.

According to a report published by the French Jewish Community Security Service, antisemitic incidents in France have skyrocketed. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism in France and throughout Europe.

Concerns have been raised that a mural in Westchester, New York, promoting Black Lives Matter (BLM), features the image of the antisemitic hate preacher, Louis Farrakhan.

The mural, located on Manhattan Avenue under the I-287 highway, includes a depiction of Mr Farrakhan, the leader of the Nation of Islam, speaking with an accusatory raised finger.

Mr Farrakhan has referred to Judaism as a “gutter religion”, seemed to imply that Jews are “evil” and “satanic” and encourage paedophilia and “sexual perversion”, blamed Jews for slavery and racist Jim Crow laws in the United States, described Adolf Hitler as a “great man” and said that Jews financed their own destruction in the Holocaust, claimed that Jews have a “stranglehold” on the US Congress using their “tentacles”, and accused Israelis and Zionists of being behind the 9/11 terrorist attacks on New York City. 

“I am not an antisemite,” Mr Farrakhan wrote in October 2018 in a tweet that he later deleted, “I’m anti-Termite”.

The Westchester Jewish Council released a statement saying that Mr Farrakhan is “one of the country’s most prominent antisemites. His long public history of anti-Jewish and other bigoted comments makes his inclusion in this project completely improper.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has previously called out the British chapter of Black Lives Matter after it claimed that “Zionism” had “gagged” Britain.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the United States.

A synagogue and a Jewish school in Stamford Hill have been vandalised.

A 50-year-old man is accused of drawing symbols in what appears to be marker pen on and around Bobov Synagogue on Egerton Road on 20th August.

When the alleged perpetrator was confronted by an identifiably Jewish man, he is reported to have said: “I will take you Jews to Africa and burn you all.”

The incident was reported on by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD4243 30/08/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Following the graphic reports of the murder of a French Jewish man by his Muslim roommate, authorities have already ruled out an antisemitic motive.

Eyal Haddad, 34, from the town of Longperrier, north-east of Paris, was reportedly murdered on 20th August.

The alleged perpetrator has been identified as Mohamed Dridi, 22, who is said to have used an axe to attack his victim before burning the victim’s face and attempting to bury the body.

In response to the news, Jewish groups asked that when the authorities investigate, they should do so by “considering the antisemitic character [of the allegations] and not dismissing it a priori” and “investigate and shed light on the true motives of [Mr Haddad’s] killer.”

The International Affairs Advisor to the European Parliament, Manel Msalmim tweeted: “It is not the first time that a Jew is murdered by his neighbour. We condemn this barbaric and criminal act and we call for justice for Eyal.”

However, on 30th August, it was reported that following authorities’ initial investigations, it has been decided that there was no antisemitic intent.

The authorities’ decision arrives despite the suspect allegedly turning himself in to the police and confessing that his motivation was because he was owed 100 euros and because the victim was Jewish.

There have also been claims in the French Jewish media that the suspect had made Islamist comments on social media in the days before the killing.

2022 has seen two other instances of Jewish people being killed in alleged antisemitic attacks.

In February, Jeremy Cohen, 31, was fatally wounded after being hit by a tram. At first, Mr Cohen’s death was treated as a traffic accident, until video footage released by the family appeared to show a group of men attacking Mr Cohen, prompting him to flee for safety without noticing the tram. He was then taken to hospital but did not survive his injuries.

Mr Cohen is believed to have been wearing his kippah, or skullcap, during the attack, and the family have now called upon the police to reopen the investigation into his death as they feel his visible Jewish identity played a role in his attackers’ motivation.

It was reportedly only when the family started asking questions, handing out fliers in post boxes throughout the neighbourhood and urging witnesses to come forward, that someone eventually came forward with the crucial video footage that showed that the victim was being attacked moments before his death.

In April, two men, reported to be aged 27 and 23, were charged with causing Mr Cohen’s death. However, the public prosecutor denied there was enough evidence to “establish the discriminatory nature of the attack.”

The next month, Rene Hadjaj, 90, was allegedly defenestrated from an apartment block in Lyon. Mr Hadjaj’s neighbour, 51, was arrested in connection with the event.

Police said that the incident related to an argument between the two and was not connected to the victim’s Jewish identity, and ruled out an antisemitic motive. This decision elicited outrage from parts of the French community.

A few days later, however, it was announced that the investigation was to be extended following new information that was discovered on social media arising from investigations carried out by concerned members of the Jewish community.

These incidents followed the well-publicised death of Sarah Halimi, a 65-year-old Jewish woman who was murdered by her Muslim neighbour, Kobili Traoré, 27, who tortured her before pushing her out of a window to her death.

Mr Traoré was said to have yelled “Allah Akbar,” “I killed the shaitan,” which is an Arabic word for ‘devil’ or ‘demon’, along with antisemitic vitriol. It took time for the police to recognise the antisemitic motive, but Mr Traoré was deemed unfit to stand trial because he was under the influence of drugs at the time. The judgement was highly controversial and let to protests around the world – including a rally outside the French embassy in London organised by Campaign Against Antisemitism – and a parliamentary inquiry.

However, in June 2021, it was announced that a French Parliamentary commission of inquiry would be established in order to investigate Ms Halimi’s death.

Ms Halimi’s death is a well-known case, but it is not the only instance of this kind. In 2018, 85-year-old Mireille Knoll, a Holocaust survivor, was stabbed eleven times during a botched robbery that also saw her body set alight in an effort by the perpetrators to burn her apartment. In this instance, the authorities did accept that there was an antisemitic motive and the perpetrators were jailed.

According to a report published by the French Jewish Community Security Service, antisemitic incidents in France have skyrocketed.

Abdullah Qureshi has pleaded not guilty to the reinstated racially/religiously aggravated charges that the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) initially dropped, before intervention by Campaign Against Antisemitism and other groups.

On 7th April, Mr Qureshi, 28, from Dewsbury in West Yorkshire, pleaded guilty at Thames Magistrates’ Court to one count of assault by beating and one count of grievous bodily harm with intent. The charges related to a series of assaults on 18th August 2021 in Stamford Hill in which five religious Jews in the North London neighbourhood were violently attacked.

In one incident at 18:41 on the day of the attacks last August, an Orthodox Jewish man was struck in the face with what appeared to be a bottle. In another at 19:10, a child was slapped on the back of the head, and in yet another at 20:30, a 64-year-old victim was struck and left unconscious on the ground, suffering facial injuries and a broken ankle. Two further incidents were also alleged.

The incidents received significant media attention at the time, and the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, condemned “this appalling attack,” adding: “Let me be clear, racist abuse and hate crime, including antisemitism, have absolutely no place in our city.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism then revealed that the CPS had dropped the racially/religiously aggravated element of those charges as part of a plea deal with Mr Qureshi. After we, Shomrim, CST and other communal organisations made representations to the CPS, it agreed to reinstate the aggravated elements, but Mr Qureshi appeared in court to resist the reinstatement of the aggravated element.

Earlier this month, Stratford Magistrates’ Court agreed to reinstate the racially/religiously aggravated element to the charges against Mr Qureshi.

Today’s plea hearing in relation to the three reinstated charges took place at Thames Magistrates’ Court, where Mr Qureshi pleaded not guilty. He did not have legal representation, having previously dismissed his lawyer.

The prosecution argued today that Mr Qureshi travelled from Dewsbury to Stamford Hill “to deliberately target the Jewish community” and “commit antisemitic assaults on Jewish victims,” describing the victims as “noticeable members of the Jewish community.”

Mr Qureshi questioned the extent of the victims’ injuries.

He has been given conditional bail, with an order not to enter N16. The judge initially considered maintaining the GPS tag but Mr Qureshi argued that he had observed his bail conditions and therefore that it was unnecessary, and the tag was removed.

The trial is scheduled to take place in November at Stratford Magistrates’ Court.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “While it is regrettable that it took an intervention by us and others to get us here, we are nonetheless pleased to see this case progressing and the CPS making the argument that these were racially motivated crimes. We will do whatever it takes to ensure that the victims of these violent crimes have justice.”

Efforts to encourage interfaith dialogue between Jews and Muslims have been denounced during the meeting of an anti-Israel organisation.

Speakers at a meeting of the anti-Israel group Palestinian Forum in Britain (PFB) have reportedly described attempts for Jews to enter into dialogue with Muslims as “faithwashing”.

The group held a meeting at an art gallery in London entitled “How interfaith groups are being used to normalise Israeli apartheid”.

Video footage of the meeting appears to show the Director of the news website Middle East Monitor, and the former Deputy Chairman of the Muslim Council of Britain, Daud Abdullah, saying that interfaith dialogue, which received the backing of “rich Jewish philanthropists” is used to “cover up the crimes committed against the Palestinian people” and soften the opinions of Muslims towards Israel.

James Thring, who has apparently been linked to the former Ku Klux Klan grand wizard David Duke and who spoke unchallenged about Holocaust denial at a Keep Talking event, claiming that no deaths were recorded at the Auschwitz concentration camp, also appeared at this meeting and said that Israeli policy is determined by how Jews “think they are the chosen people, they think they have the right to attack other people, to deceive other people, to rob other people.”

Fiyaz Mughal, the founder of Muslims Against Antisemitism and the interfaith network Faith Matters, told the JC that “Those who seek to smear, falsify and undermine interfaith work do not understand what binds our communities together, and their malicious attempt to politicise this must be rejected.”

Mr Mughal has spoken at Campaign Against Antisemitism’s events in the past and in May, he appeared on Podcast Against Antisemitism, which can be listened to here, or watched in its entirety here.

Rabbi David Mason of Muswell Hill synagogue said: “I’m proud we have built positive relationships with Muslim communities in my borough and across London…The idea that such positive interfaith work is a Zionist plot grotesquely misses the point of our achievements.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2021 showed that almost eight in ten British Jews consider the threat from Islamists to be very serious.

Authorities in the town of Hempstead, New York have found antisemitic graffiti outside the Town Hall.

The Hempstead Town Supervisor, Don Clavin, said that “These cowards come here and write that message on the Town of Hempstead sign welcoming residents. Well, I speak for everyone when I say, ‘No way we’re gonna allow it, we’re gonna hold you accountable and you’re a disgrace.’”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the United States.

An identifiably Jewish woman has reportedly been attacked in a New York subway station.

It was reported that the woman, who is apparently in her 40s, was approached by a man who went on to put his hands around her neck and choke her while making antisemitic comments.

The woman was apparently taken to Mt. Sinai hospital, where her injuries were treated.

The incident is now being investigated by the NYPD’s Hate Crimes Unit.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the United States.

Flyers claiming that “challenging Jewish privilege” is “social justice” were distributed to homes in Brighton and Hove recently.

The flyers utilise classic antisemitic tropes of power and control in asking why Jewish people “get special privilege when it comes to top universities?”

It goes on to state: “Challenging White Privilege and Jewish Privilege is not antisemitic. It is not defamatory. It does not insult anyone. It is social justice.”

The flyers also depict the yellow star containing the word German ‘Jude’, meaning ‘Jew’, that was forced upon Jewish people during the Holocaust and advertises the online domain of the Goyim Defense League (GDL).

The GDL is a hate group whose membership reportedly contains several neo-Nazis and is understood to be led by Jon Minadeo II, who created t-shirts carrying antisemitic slogans such as the Holocaust was “a hoax”. The GDL is responsible for stunts such as hanging a banner from a bridge in Austin, Texas that read “Vax the Jews” and driving around Los Angeles dressed as Nazis.

The group is divided into regional branches and regularly distributes antisemitic flyers across the United States. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism closely monitors the far-right, which remains a dangerous threat to the Jewish community and other minority groups.

A councillor representing the Democratic Unionist Party has condemned antisemitic graffiti found in his local park, and claimed to have spent an hour attempting to remove it.

Alderman Mark Baxter has branded the graffiti “vile and racist”. The graffiti included attempts to draw a swastika and was found in a children’s play area in Waringstown, County Down.

Mr Baxter said that he “did manage to get rid of the worst of it. I just can’t comprehend what goes through people’s heads.”

A spokesperson for Armagh City, Banbridge and Craigavon Borough Council said that the Council “strongly condemn[s] these acts of vandalism and anyone caught causing criminal damage to play park equipment will be reported to the PSNI [Police Service of Northern Ireland].

“The graffiti which recently appeared in Waringstown play park was cleaned and removed by council staff the morning after it was reported, an unfortunate incident which has now occurred twice at this spot.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The far-right group, Patriotic Alternative, hung a “White Lives Matter” banner over Clifford’s Tower in York earlier this week.

In 1190, a massacre of York’s 150 Jews took place after the community gathered there seeking refuge from the belligerent townspeople. The massacre at York was one of a series of antisemitic pogroms in England in 1189-90 which also included Norwich and Lincoln.

Video footage of the stunt depicts dramatic music and drone shots of the Tower as activists from the far-right group unfurl the banner. 

In the group’s Telegram, it wrote that it “narrowly avoided disaster and a mob of 40 Hasidic Jews”.

Patriotic Alternative is a UK-based group headed by the former leader of the youth wing of the BNP, Mark Collett. Mr Collett is reported to have dabbled in Holocaust denial, is regularly heard as a guest on the radio show of the former Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard, David Duke, and has described the Holocaust as “an instrument of white guilt”.

The group is known for its efforts to recruit youth to its white nationalist ideology. Previously, the far-right group published an online “alternative” home school curriculum condemned as “poison” and “hateful” and attempted to recruit children as young as twelve through livestreaming events on YouTube, according to The Times.

Campaign Against Antisemitism closely monitors the far-right, which remains a dangerous threat to the Jewish community and other minority groups.

A poster asking if antisemitism is “humane” was found on a Golders Green bus stop earlier this week.

Also written on the poster were the words “Israel = ISIS” and “Restore Palestine”.

In June, a near-identical poster was discovered, also in Golders Green. 

Golders Green is a neighbourhood renowned for its large Jewish population. According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the State of Israel” and “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour)” are both examples of antisemitism. 

A rabbi has alleged that he was kept on hold for hours by Toronto Police when he was trying to report multiple attempted break-ins at a Jewish community centre.

Rabbi Shmuel Neft, the Director of the Jewish Russian Community Centre (JRCC) in North Toronto, has claimed that on several recent occasions, video surveillance showed that an individual attempted to break into the centre. The suspect apparently managed to damage the building but was not successful in accessing it.

On a recent radio show, Rabbi Neft explained the series of events:

“So when we finally got a hold of the security footage that showed the incident, which was, by the way, the third of a series of incidents. Second break-in, but a third incident was involved with the same individual…So I found the footage. I was ready to hand it over to the police, and I called as soon as we were able to download it, I called 32 Division to the non-emergency hotline.

“And yes, like you said, I stayed on hold for just about two hours. I managed to pray in the afternoon services and evening services, as well as go out to dinner with a community member, all while on hold with the Toronto Police Service.”

He added: “The truth is that I never really reached them in a direct way… I pretty much gave up on the phone call and drove to 32 Division, which is not so far away, on Yonge Street, thinking that I would be able to get their attention in person. And I was basically told that the system that they have is that non-emergency reports go exclusively through the phone line, the hotline.

“I said, ‘you know, I was on hold for two hours.’

“‘Yeah, we know, you might be on hold for two hours, three hours, four hours.’

“‘So why is that?’ They said, ‘Well frankly we’re understaffed right now’ — which is mind blowing.”

“And so basically, yeah, 10:30 at night he said, ‘Get back on the phone, wait until they answer, and then you’ll be able to report the crime.’ And, that’s when I decided I’m going to take other measures in trying to get the attention of the police department.”

Rabbi Neft then observed: “By the way, I have to make mention that after all the noise we made, 32 Division was on the job, on ball. The detectives calling me almost daily updating me. I called, I have the lead detective’s personal cell phone number. We were in touch about things throughout the week… so they’ve been on the ball ever since we made a lot of noise.

“But like you said…we don’t take these things lightly… this is not just a community centre, it happens to be a synagogue. This is this is the heart of the local Jewish community.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout Canada, where a recent audit shows that antisemitic incidents have drastically increased.

The French Government has vowed to change the law in order to be able to expel a radical imam with a history of inflammatory comments about Jews.

Interior Minister Gérald Darmanin said that Hassan Iquioussen is an enemy of France who had “no place” in the country.

Mr Iquioussen, 59, is a Moroccan citizen who has lived in France all his life and has become a symbol of President Emmanuel Macron’s battle against Islamism, whom the President accuses of rejecting French laws and values. He did not take up French citizenship at a younger age and his attempts to do so since then have failed.

Morocco has reportedly delivered a laissez-passer to authorise his travel, which cleared the way for Mr Iquioussen’s expulsion “by force”, but the imam won an injunction halting his deportation at the Paris Administrative Court, which ruled that the expulsion was a “disproportionate infringement…of [Iquioussen’s] right to a private and family life.” Mr Iquioussen has five children and numerous grandchildren in France.

During last week’s court hearing, prosecutors highlighted statements allegedly made by Mr Iquioussen in 2003 and 2004 in which he described Jews as “miserly usurers” and claimed that Zionists had “connived with Hitler…to push Jews to leave Germany”. He also reportedly said: “The Zionists said…there has to be someone in Europe who does bad things to Jews so that they…will leave [for Israel].” They also noted a conference in 2012 at which Mr Iquioussen allegedly described terrorist attacks in the West as “pseudo-attacks whose objective is to frighten non-Muslims so that they are afraid of Islam and of Muslims,” and claimed that he has also publicly denied the 1915 Armenian genocide and pointed to allegedly misogynistic comments.

In a post on Facebook, Mr Iquioussen “strongly contested” the allegations that he had used “discriminatory or violent language.” His supporters argue that the comments cited in the case were dated and taken out of context, and pointed to other statements by the imam, such as: “We have never had, and have, nothing against Jews because Islam is a religion based on justice.”

Mr Darmanin has announced that the Government will appeal against the injunction at the State Council, France’s highest administrative court, and warned that if the appeal fails, he would change the law to allow for the deportation.

Confirming that intelligence agencies put Mr Iquioussen on a watchlist of allegedly dangerous radicals eighteen months ago, Mr Darmanin said: “This imam…uses antisemitic language. He denies equality between men and women. He denies genocides. He calls for terrorist attacks in France to be considered as conspiracies.” He added: “The enemies of the Republic have no place in the Republic.”

According to a report published by the French Jewish Community Security Service, antisemitic incidents in France have skyrocketed. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism in France and throughout Europe.

Charges have been issued in connection to antisemitic graffiti found on residential mailboxes last week in Pikesville, Maryland.

Benjamin Katz, 31, has been arrested by Baltimore County Police in connection with the graffiti, which reportedly resembled a large swastika with the word “Cox” spraypainted above, an apparent reference to Dan Cox, a politician who won a recent gubernatorial primary election.

Accordingly, police have determined the vandalism to be politically-motivated, but antisemitic graffiti found in Bethesda, also in Marlyand, is still under investigation.

The Montgomery County Police Department is looking into the “white power 1488” and swastikas found on the Bethesda Trolley Trail over the weekend, near Bradley Boulevard and Arlington Road.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the United States.

Two minors have been sentenced in Germany following a brutal assault on a Jewish man in Hamburg last year.

The court heard how the two unnamed brothers, aged seventeen and fifteen, approached a small demonstration against antisemitism and in support of Israel in the city in September 2021. The brothers, accompanied by a female friend, reportedly shouted “f**k Israel” and “Free Palestine” and insulted the demonstrators.

They then assaulted a 61-year-old demonstrator, leaving him with broken cheekbones, smashed glasses and a damaged eye, about which the victim now says: “I’m practically blind, I can only see light and dark in my right eye.”

The assailants fled the scene on rented scooters.

The brothers were charged with antisemitic incitement, and the elder was also charged with grievous bodily harm (GBH).

The elder brother received a sixteen-month suspended sentence, along with community service and anti-violence training, while the younger brother also received a community service order.

Stefan Hensel, Hamburg’s Antisemitism Commissioner, said: “This is a is a clear sign to all antisemitic violent criminals that their actions will not remain without consequences.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism in Germany, which have increased considerably.

Image credit: Jorge Franganillo

The Department of Justice has disclosed that a man from St Louis, Missouri, has admitted to threatening to blow up a local synagogue in 2021.

Cody Steven Rush, 30, made the declaration in US District Court on Monday.

Mr Rush said that he called the FBI on 5th November 2021 saying that he wanted to blow up the local Central Reform Congregation “when they open tomorrow,” because “he hates Jews”.

According to local media, Mr Rush called a second time and said that he hears voices. He reportedly has schizoaffective disorder and suffers from PTSD, anxiety, depression and social anxiety disorder. Referring to Jews, Mr Rush also said, “I hate them with rage.”

It is understood that, in a third call, Mr Rush provided his location, which was on the same street as the synagogue, and that in return calls from the authorities, he made further threats.

Mr Rush pleaded guilty to the use of a telephone to make a threat, and is due for sentencing in November, facing a maximum term of ten years in federal prison.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the United States.

A teenager has been sentenced to three years and seven months in a young offenders’ institute in what is the first conviction from the wave of antisemitic incidents in May 2021.

Rabbi Rafi Goodwin, who leads the Chigwell and Hainault Synagogue in Essex, was driving outside the synagogue on 16th May 2021 when two men walked in front of his car, forcing him to brake.

Chelmsford Crown Court heard on Friday that the men then attacked him and stole his mobile phone.

Leeds-born father of two Rabbi Goodwin, who is in his thirties, was brutally beaten, punched five times in the face until he fell to the floor and then hit on the head with a brick, sustaining head injuries, according to the police. The United Synagogue, the umbrella body to which Chigwell and Hainault Synagogue belongs, said that Rabbi Goodwin sustained injuries necessitating a stay in hospital so that he could be treated and assessed for concussion. A police statement issued soon after the incident added that he was treated for cuts to his head and eye.

Rabbi Goodwin’s children were in the car at the time and witnessed the gruesome attack.

Souraka Djabouri, 19, of Ilford, admitted religiously aggravated damage to Rabbi Goodwin’s vehicle and theft of a mobile phone, and was sentenced for grievous bodily harm without intent.

The second attacker, believed to have been 25 at the time of the attack, has not been identified.

Recorder Richard Conley told Mr Djabouri: “The reason for this behaviour was the fact you and your associate recognised Mr Goodwin was a member of the Jewish faith,” adding: “It’s nothing short of miraculous that Mr Goodwin didn’t sustain life-threatening or life-changing injuries.”

The court heard that Rabbi Goodwin has “fully recovered” from his physical injuries but has also become “hypervigilant about who’s around me” and “looking over my shoulder”.

Mr Djabouri reportedly showed a “genuine level of remorse,” the court heard.

The judge observed that the number of attacks on British Jews had become “increasingly and worryingly commonplace.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It has taken almost a year and a half, but finally one solitary person has been convicted and sentenced for an incident that formed part of the record-breaking wave of antisemitic crimes that took place in May 2021 – and he pleaded guilty. It is not at all reassuring that the number of other defendants facing hate crime charges in relation to incidents in that period can be counted on one hand. The police, CPS and courts all have a duty to help deliver justice to the Jewish community, and we will continue to hold them to account until they do.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2021 showed that over two thirds of British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

In an article in the Jewish News last week, Lionel Idan, the hate crime lead prosecutor for the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) claimed that the CPS takes antisemitic crime seriously. Our experience, however, has suggested otherwise.

In our response in this week’s Jewish News, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, Gideon Falter, argued that “most of the article sought to defend the CPS against the accusation levelled by 59 percent of British Jews in our most recent polling that his organisation fails to do enough to protect our community,” but that the examples and statistics that he cited failed to provide the reassurance that the CPS believed that they would.

To find out why, read the full article at https://www.jewishnews.co.uk/opinion-smoke-and-mirrors-from-the-cps-cannot-hide-the-truth/

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

If you need advice in relation to an antisemitic incident, please contact us in confidence at [email protected] or call +44 (0)330 822 0321.

A court has agreed to reinstate the racially/religiously aggravated element to charges against Abdullah Qureshi. The decision comes after Campaign Against Antisemitism and other groups applied pressure to the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), which had earlier dropped the hate element from the charges.

On 7th April, Mr Qureshi, 28, from Dewsbury in West Yorkshire, pleaded guilty at Thames Magistrates’ Court to one count of assault by beating and one count of grievous bodily harm with intent. The charges related to a series of assaults on 18th August 2021 in Stamford Hill in which five religious Jews in the North London neighbourhood were violently attacked.

Campaign Against Antisemitism then revealed that the CPS had dropped the racially/religiously aggravated element of those charges as part of a plea deal with Mr Qureshi. After we, Shomrim, CST and other communal organisations made representations to the CPS, it agreed to reinstate the aggravated elements, but Mr Qureshi appeared in court to resist the reinstatement of the aggravated element.

Explaining the reinstatement at court, the prosecutor said that these are “serious allegations” and that “the file was reviewed again and a decision was made to proceed with the offences.” However, counsel for Mr Qureshi argued that this submission should not be accepted, describing it as “ridiculous” and an “abuse of process”.

The CPS was instructed to provide its reasons in writing, with an opportunity for the defence to respond in writing, followed by a hearing in the summer.

That hearing took place today at Stratford Magistrates’ Court, where the court decided in favour of the reinstatement. There will now be a plea hearing later this month at Thames Magistrates’ Court.

In one incident at 18:41 on the day of the attacks last August, an Orthodox Jewish man was struck in the face with what appeared to be a bottle. In another at 19:10, a child was slapped on the back of the head, and in yet another at 20:30, a 64-year-old victim was struck and left unconscious on the ground, suffering facial injuries and a broken ankle. Two further incidents were also alleged.

The incidents received significant media attention at the time, and the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, condemned “this appalling attack,” adding: “Let me be clear, racist abuse and hate crime, including antisemitism, have absolutely no place in our city.”

More windows of Jewish-owned shops appear to have been smashed in Stamford Hill, just days after vandals attacked other Jewish-owned shops in the area, reportedly causing £25,000 worth of damage.

The incidents were reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 4620417/22 or CAD 8616 02/08/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A woman has reportedly used a rod as a weapon against, and also threw liquid over, two Jewish women in separate incidents, both occurring in Stamford Hill.

In the first incident, a Jewish woman was said to have been returning from a hospital visit when she was accosted at a bus stop on Seven Sisters road and was hit over the head by a female suspect brandishing a wooden stick who shouted: “I am doing it because you are a Jew.”

The suspect then reportedly threw a liquid over the victim. 

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: 4620417/22

In a second incident, occurring on Wargrave Avenue, the suspect allegedly assaulted a Jewish mother who was pushing her baby in a pram. 

The suspect reportedly brandished a stick and shouted “show me your baby” before spraying a liquid substance over the infant.  

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 363 29/07/22

The suspect has been described as being a physically imposing Black female of around 40 years who wore a turban.

Both incidents were reported on Friday by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

£25,000 worth of damage has been reported following attacks on Jewish-owned shops in Stamford Hill.

Images uploaded online appear to show shops boarded up after the windows of the buildings were smashed in.

The incident was reported on Sunday by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: 4620417/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A woman has been witnessed shouting “F*** you Jews, I will kill you” at identifiably Jewish people leaving a synagogue on Portland Avenue, Stamford Hill.

The incident occurred on 29th July and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 2480 01/08/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Hundreds of Jewish men and boys have been abused on their way home from attending prayers at their local synagogue, it has been reported.

A woman allegedly blocked the group’s path and shouted “Jews don’t belong on the pavement” and “f****** Jews”.

The incident is believed to have occurred on Friday night in the North London area of Stamford Hill and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 8214 31/07/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A thirteen-year-old Jewish boy called was reportedly called a “f****** Jew” and had his skullcap snatched from him in Stamford Hill.

The Metropolitan Police are investigating the incident as a hate crime.

The incident is believed to have occurred on Manor Road in North London and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 155 29/07/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

An identifiably Jewish eight-year-old boy has reportedly been attacked by two gang members in North London.

The gang is believed to be associated with the nearby Webb Estate and is accused of harassing Jewish residents for years.

The boy was said to have had his head smashed against a lamp post and a photograph in connection with the incident appears to show a young child with a head wound. 

The incident is believed to have occurred yesterday at approximately 18:00 in Clapton Common and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 6113 26/07/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A group of protesters have held a rally featuring Nazi and SS flags outside a conference organised by a conservative group in Tampa, Florida, prompting outrage.

Video footage shows a small group gathered outside the convention centre where the Turning Point USA conference was being held, featuring speakers including the former US President, Donald Trump, and the current Florida Governor, Ron Desantis.

The group can be seen apparently brandishing flags and signs with neo-Nazi imagery, including Nazi flags and flags with the insignia of the SS Nazi paramilitary organisation.

Following the events in Tampa, Turning Point USA released a statement denying any connection between the protestors and the conference.

In a statement, the Chairman of the Florida Holocaust Museum, Mike Igel, said that “This isn’t about politics or religion. It’s about humanity. The Florida Holocaust Museum calls upon everyone, Jew and non-Jew, regardless of political affiliation, to condemn this blatant antisemitism in the strongest possible terms. This should matter to everyone.”

Florida Senator Rick Scott, tweeted: “This is a disgusting act of hateful antisemitism and doesn’t belong in Florida, our nation or anywhere across the world. We stand with our Jewish community and against this hate. It must end.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the United States.

Two different German memorials to the Holocaust have been attacked by vandals in one week.

At the former Nazi camp at Buchenwald, some trees that had been planted in order to honour the memory of the victims were cut down.

The trees were planted earlier in the year by the relatives of some of the victims as part of a project called “1,000 Beeches for Buchenwald”.

Though a spokesperson from the Holocaust survivors’ association, The International Auschwitz Committee, said that the incident was a “hateful and calculated demonstration of power by neo-Nazis”, the local police say that they do not have any clear information about who is responsible and the suspects remain unidentified.

At the Holocaust memorial in Berlin, Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, meanwhile, unidentified perpetrators have drawn two swastikas and written the Nazi-era phrase “Heil Hitler” (“Hail Hitler”) into one of the concrete slabs meant to represent the Jews murdered by the Nazis. The police say that, while they are currently looking for those responsible, they have not yet made any arrests.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism in Germany, which have increased considerably.

The head of the California National Guard will retire at the end of July, after the organisation has been rocked by a number of scandals over the last few years, including allegations of antisemitism.

Major General David Baldwin, has led the Guard, which is a branch of the California Military Department, since 2011 but was installed in his current position in 2019.

Following a number of other public scandals, it has been reported that officers in the Guard have made allegedly antisemitic remarks to their subordinates during Maj. Gen. Baldwin’s tenure.

Brigadier General David Hawkins has been accused of antisemitic slurs on a number occasions, including, according to the LA Times, openly claiming that Jews are “unrepentant sinners”.

In another instance, a captain reportedly asked a Jewish soldier if cigar ashes were his “relatives”, presumably a reference to the practice of cremating the bodies of murdered victims in Nazi death camps.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the United States.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is exploring legal options after the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) dropped charges against two suspects in relation to a high-profile incident on a Ryanair flight last year.

Lee Carey, 55, and Jak Bruce, 31, were arrested in connection with an incident on a flight from London Stansted to Eindhoven in November 2021 in which numerous West Ham supporters were videoed chanting an antisemitic song, apparently at a Hasidic passenger. They were charged with racially aggravated harassment 

The group was filmed to be chanting “I’ve got a foreskin haven’t you, f***ing Jew”, as they flew to a Europa League match between their team and KRC Genk in Belgium.

In May, the defendants sought to have the case dismissed, arguing that the court lacked jurisdiction under the Civil Aviation Act and therefore could not hear the case, as there are specific rules about jurisdiction for crimes committed on airplanes. The case was adjourned while the CPS considered the issue. In the meantime, last month, Judge Walker, sitting at Chelmsford Crown Court, rejected an application to dismiss the case, and a further hearing was due later this year.

It has now emerged, however, that the case has collapsed, with the CPS deciding that it has “insufficient evidence” to establish that the alleged offences took place under British jurisdiction and that, therefore, the CPS is unable to advance the prosecution.

A spokesperson for the CPS said: “Following a careful review of all the available evidence, we concluded there was insufficient evidence to prove that the alleged offences took place in British airspace and therefore within remit of our courts. The CPS takes racism, homophobia, and antisemitism in sport extremely seriously because of the devastating impact it has on victims and wider society.

“Where there is sufficient evidence and it is in the public interest, we will prosecute these cases. We are working with sporting bodies and the police to advise them on the evidence required to build strong cases so that offenders can be brought to justice.”

This is the third time in almost as many months that the CPS has dropped or reduced charges against suspects in antisemitic hate crime incidents.

Polling for our 2021 Antisemitism Barometer showed that a majority of British Jews do not believe that the CPS is doing enough to protect them.

West Ham confirmed last year that it had banned two supporters for life, although it is not known if those fans are the defendants in this case.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “This incident was caught on video that went viral, with plenty of witnesses on the plane, including Ryanair cabin crew. It is beyond belief that sufficient evidence cannot be amassed to establish jurisdiction and that potential culprits are free to go without sanction. This is the third time in almost as many months that the CPS has dropped or reduced charges against suspects in high-profile antisemitic hate crime incidents, and members of the Jewish community are writing to us in indignation. It is no wonder that our polling shows that a majority of British Jews do not believe that the CPS does enough to protect them. With regard to this case, we are exploring legal options to ensure that justice is done.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A football supporter who performed a Nazi salute at fans of Tottenham Hotspur has been banned from attending matches for three years.

Shay Asher, 24, who is a fan of Newcastle United, admitted to the charge of racially aggravated harassment during the match between Newcastle and Tottenham at Newcastle’s home ground, St James’ Park, in October 2021.

Though Mr Asher initially denied the offence, claiming that he was waving to someone, Newcastle Magistrates’ Court heard that he performed a Nazi salute with his finger over his mouth to make a moustache, and was overheard saying that he wanted to fight Tottenham fans.

The court heard that when the former Royal Engineer was confronted by one of the stadium’s stewards, “his face dropped and he quickly ran off towards the exit.”

Mr Asher was initially fined £200, with £85 costs and a £34 surcharge, but returned to court to challenge a Football Banning Order, which the prosecution had applied for.

The panel decided to impose the Order, however, which includes an order to Mr Asher to surrender his passport should he apply for one, not to enter football grounds and to keep away from England matches.

The court said that the ban was being imposed to help prevent disorder at football matches in the future.

The prosecutor, Brian Payne, said that “This defendant took it upon himself to produce a Nazi salute. He knew or must have known that there was a likelihood of there being a strong Jewish presence among the away supporters. It was a pretty deliberate and cynical action.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues to act against instances of anti-Jewish racism in all sports.

A teenage member of a banned neo-Nazi group has pleaded guilty to terrorism offences at Winchester Crown Court.

Luca Benincasa, 19, has become the first person to be convicted of belonging to the Feuerkrieg Division since it was banned in July 2020.

When the police raided Mr Benincasa’s residence, they found a flag depicting the logo of the SS, the Nazi paramilitary organisation, hanging from his bedroom wall, and a Nazi dagger and parts of an SS officer’s uniform, including a hat and a swastika armband, among his possessions.

His laptop, meanwhile, was found to contain Nazi and neo-Nazi literature and documents.

Mr Benincasa was remanded in custody by Judge Jane Miller QC, and sentencing has been adjourned until 20th September.

Campaign Against Antisemitism closely monitors the far-right, which remains a dangerous threat to the Jewish community and other minority groups.

Image credit: South Wales Police

A man has reportedly spat in the face of an identifiably Jewish woman in Stamford Hill, before allegedly yelling: “F****** Jews, no one will help you”. 

The woman was walking with her five children, aged between two and twelve years old, when the reported incident occurred. 

The incident is believed to have occurred yesterday at 18:50 and was reported today by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 8353 18/07/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Five children have been arrested following the news that several Jewish graves had been smashed in Istanbul, Turkey.

The Turkish Chief Rabbinate said that it expects “those who carried out this vandalism to be caught as soon as possible.”

81 gravestones were desecrated in the Jewish cemetery of the Hasköy Cemetery in Beyoğlu, according to the Istanbul Governor’s office.

A statement from the Office read: “After examining security camera footage it was determined that the incident was carried out by children aged between eleven and thirteen who live close to the cemetery. 

“The suspects have been detained. The investigation into the matter continues. We send our Jewish citizens our wishes for a speedy recovery.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism worldwide.

A German soldier who holds far-right views has been found guilty of attempting to carry out “false flag” attacks on politicians and people in the public eye while pretending to be a Syrian refugee.

Franco Albrecht, 33, a former first lieutenant in the joint Franco-German Brigade, was sentenced to five and a half years in prison for conspiracy to commit a “serious act of violent subversion” at the higher regional court in Frankfurt.

The judge, Christoph Koller, told the court that Mr Albrecht held “right-wing extremist and ethnicist-nationalist” views and blames the supposed “disintegration of the German nation” on politicians sympathetic to refugees.

The investigation showed that Mr Albrecht owned a copy of Adolf Hitler’s notorious autobiographical manifesto, Mein Kampf, and thought that immigration was a kind of “genocide”.

Mr Albrecht had also posed as a Syrian Christian asylum seeker called “David Benjamin” and had registered himself under that name with authorities in the town of Erding, Bavaria.

It was also alleged that Mr Albrecht had visited conspiracy theorist and antisemitic hate preacher, David Icke, though it was left unclear if the two had indeed met each other.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism in Germany, which have increased considerably.

The Court of Appeal has struck down Nicholas Nelson’s original sentence and sent him to prison immediately, after Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to the Attorney General’s Office asking that the original sentence be reviewed as it was unduly lenient.

Mr Nelson, the defendant in a criminal case that resulted from first-of-its-kind litigation by Campaign Against Antisemitism, was given an eighteen-month sentence, suspended for two years, at Southwark Crown Court last month. However, given that his campaign of harassment endured for a period of time against multiple victims — including Oscar-nominated writer Lee Kern and communications strategist Joanne Bell — and came after he had committed several similar offences, we considered this sentence to be inexplicably lenient, a mockery of the victims and an insult to the Jewish community.

Accordingly, we wrote to the Attorney General’s Office, which has the power to refer sentences for certain offences which are believed to be unduly lenient, to the Court of Appeal. The Solicitor General confirmed that he would refer Mr Nelson’s absurdly lenient sentence for antisemitic harassment to the Court of Appeal. Alex Chalk QC MP agreed that “the behaviour of Mr Nelson was truly appalling,” and expressed his gratitude that Campaign Against Antisemitism brought this case to his attention.

In handing down the judgement which quashed that of Southwark Crown Court and was made on behalf of himself, Mr Justice Goss and Her Honour Judge Deborah Taylor, Lord Justice Stuart-Smith stated that the “chilling effect on both the lives and the livelihood of Mr Kern and Ms Bell [of Mr Nelson’s actions] are clear to see.”

He further emphasised that the harassment suffered by Mr Kern was “some of the worst kind imaginable,” having earlier stated that abusing him with descriptions of obscene sexual fantasies involving Hitler is “about as low as it can get” and the “most despicable of all in a crowded field.”

The impact of the abuse directed at Mr Kern, which included that “another Holocaust would be too good,” was described as something which could “barely be imagined” given that Mr Kern had lost members of his family in the Holocaust.

The Judges also made clear that “keyboard warriors” may think that they are just “spewing” words, but for the person who receives such messages, it might put them in fear of their lives, and to think otherwise would be a “blinkered perspective.” Indeed, as Her Honour Judge Taylor pointed out during the proceedings, the names of the handles of some of the social media accounts were in themselves threatening on their own.

Lord Justice Stuart-Smith further agreed with Campaign Against Antisemitism that Mr Nelson had shown “complete disregard” for the suspended sentences previously imposed upon him. He noted that Mr Nelson’s existing suspended sentences, which he breached, were required to be taken into consideration by the lower court, Southwark Crown Court, unless thought to be unjust in the circumstances. If it was the latter, Judge Charles Gratwicke of the lower court was required to make clear his reasons, which he failed to do. Accordingly, the first and second suspended sentences that had been breached were to be reactivated, and the Court of Appeal has ordered that those sentences are therefore to be served concurrently with the current, new custodial sentence. It was further emphasised that Mr Nelson had continued to abuse Mr Kern whilst he was on bail from being charged.

Whilst providing a degree of mitigation, the medical evidence advanced as to Mr Nelson’s mental health had limitations, given that it was on the basis of one zoom consultation that he had with a doctor, and the doctor had not corroborated Mr Nelson’s accounts nor did the doctor prepare the evidence for explicit use at court.

Mr Nelson’s case was the culmination of first-of-its-kind litigation by Campaign Against Antisemitism to unmask an anonymous antisemitic online troll. He pleaded guilty at Peterborough Crown Court in January to racially aggravated harassment under section 31(1)(b) of the Crime and Disorder Act 1998 and with sending an electronic communication with intent to cause distress or anxiety under 1(1)(a) of the Malicious Communications Act 1988, after he repeatedly sent abusive antisemitic e-mails and messages to Mr Kern and hateful messages to Ms Bell, and harassing a staff member at the Board of Deputies, a Jewish charity, over the telephone.

Mr Kern contacted Campaign Against Antisemitism, which funded a case on his behalf led by Mark Lewis, the esteemed lawyer who is also an Honorary Patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

The abusive communications came from accounts that Mr Nelson had worked hard to make anonymous. Victims of abuse from anonymous accounts usually have nowhere to go, because only rarely will the police track down the sender, and the cost of private action is usually beyond victims’ means.

However, a new legal initiative devised by Campaign Against Antisemitism together with counsel breaks through that barrier. It has enabled us to identify the anonymous troll by obtaining a special kind of court order which has its origins in the pharmaceutical industry and has never before been used to unmask an anonymous abuser sending antisemitic messages. The court order requires an internet service provider to disclose details of the owner of an online account so that legal proceedings can be issued.

We used this legal device to identify Mr Nelson and criminal proceedings were commenced, leading to him pleading guilty. Mr Nelson had called for another Holocaust, called Mr Kern “Shylock”, spoke of Jews being used for gun practice, called Jewish women whores, shared obscene sexual fantasies involving Hitler, and glorified the proscribed genocidal antisemitic terror group, Hamas.

Mr Nelson, who lives in Cambridgeshire and was a vigorous supporter of Jeremy Corbyn, also previously sent abusive messages to two Jewish women Labour MPs, branding one a “vile useless c***” and the other a “traitor” who should “end yourself”. At the end of 2018 he pleaded guilty to the same charge and was given a twenty-week suspended sentence for twelve months and ordered to complete 160 hours unpaid work. In 2020, he pleaded guilty to three charges of sending communications of an offensive nature to two other Labour MPs, one of whom is Jewish and the other is an active campaigner against antisemitism. In addition to the charges that Mr Nelson pleaded guilty to today in relation to Mr Kern and Ms Bell, Mr Nelson also pleaded guilty to harassing a member of staff at the Board of Deputies over the telephone.

He had committed the offences whilst apparently already subject to a suspended sentence for other antisemitic offences. This would appear to demonstrate his contempt for the supposedly deterrent suspended sentences that he had already been handed. Nonetheless, instead of going directly to prison, Mr Nelson was instead ordered by Southwark Crown Court to undertake just 30 days of rehabilitation activity and 220 hours of unpaid community service. He must also pay a modest victim surcharge and is subject to a restraining order. This sentence has now been quashed by the Court of Appeal and replaced with a custodial sentence.

In considering the new sentence, the Court of Appeal calculated that the charges should have led to a custodial sentence of 29 months if each were considered on its own and added cumulatively. However, this was reduced to 24 months after adjustment for the “totality” principle, which sets out that when sentencing for more than a single offence, courts should pass a total sentence which reflects all offending behaviour and is just and proportionate. Given Mr Nelson’s recent good conduct, the Court ultimately landed on eighteen months for the final prison term.

In a statement, one of Mr Nelson’s victims, Lee Kern said: “I experienced years of antisemitic abuse from Nicholas Nelson. Despite being found guilty of such crimes for the third time, Nelson was spared jail. However, during today’s review by the Court of Appeal, that lenient decision has been overturned. Mr Nelson’s harassment, which included calls for another Holocaust and perverted sexual fantasies involving Adolf Hitler, started anonymously. With the help of Campaign Against Antisemitism and the lawyer, Mark Lewis, we exposed Mr Nelson’s identity and kickstarted a prosecution, which has now reached an appropriate conclusion.”

In a statement, Joanne Bell, another victim, said: “I am delighted to see that justice has finally been done. Nicholas Nelson subjected so many people to antisemitic, hateful and specifically misogynistic abuse over a sustained period of many years without the judicial system seemingly taking it seriously. I hope that this sends a message to antisemites and racists everywhere that anonymous abuse of any kind, whether digital or in person, will not be tolerated and — now, finally — meaningfully prosecuted.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Nicholas Nelson undertook a sustained online campaign of grotesque antisemitic harassment behind a cowardly mask of anonymity. Together with the esteemed solicitor Mark Lewis, we established a new legal precedent that allowed us to unmask Mr Nelson and bring about criminal charges, which should have resulted in an appropriate sentence for this repeat offender. Instead, Mr Nelson was all but let off, avoiding meaningful sanction for his racist abuse in a denial of justice that added to the ordeal of the victims.

“We are grateful that the Solicitor General agreed with us that the sentence was unduly lenient and referred the case to the Court of Appeal, which has now imposed the custodial sentence that Mr Nelson should have received months ago. This new sentence must send a message to lower court judges who still labour under the misconception that online abuse is secondary to other forms of harassment, and the case should warn other would-be online trolls that their anonymity can and will be lifted. We will do whatever it takes, however long it takes, to ensure that victims and the Jewish community have justice.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: JC

It has been reported that a disabled, elderly Jewish man and his family were abused on a London bus.

The man, who is wheelchair bound, was accompanied by his wife, son, grandchildren and carer when a woman reportedly shouted: “You think you own the bus, dirty Jews! I will punch you!”

The family was said to have been shocked to the point of tears.

The incident is believed to have occurred on a 253 bus from Euston to Leabridge at 18:40 on Sunday and was reported yesterday by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 3692 14/07/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Gang members have abused two visibly Jewish children, it has been reported.

The gang is believed to be associated with the nearby Webb Estate and is accused of harassing Jewish residents for years.

Two boys, eleven and seventeen, were walking to a nearby park with their bikes when members of the gang reportedly approached them and said: “Let’s get their bikes. Punch him in the face”. 

The boys managed to escape but claimed that these incidents occur on a daily basis.

The incident is believed to have occurred on 7th July in Springfield Park and was reported yesterday by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 3692 14/07/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A teenager who shared videos that promoted white supremacy has been convicted of terrorism offences.

Oliver Riley, eighteen, pleaded guilty at Westminster Magistrates’ Court on Monday after being accused of uploading videos with neo-Nazi content, contravening the Terrorism Act 2000. 

Mr Riley was convicted of three counts of possession of a document or record containing information of a kind likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism and of sending a message that was grossly offensive. 

He was also convicted of providing a service to others that enables them to obtain, read, listen to or look at such a publication and intended, or was reckless, as to whether an effect of his conduct would be a direct or indirect encouragement, preparation or instigation of acts of terrorism.

Oliver Wright, the Head of Counter Terrorism Policing South East, said: “Riley has recognised that he committed these offences by being in possession of videos which glorify terrorism and which promote white supremacy throughout.

“Some of the harmful content Riley had promotes the separation of races by violent means, along with some particularly hateful content being directed at the LGBTQ+ community.”

Mr Riley is set to be sentenced on 19th August at the Old Bailey.

Campaign Against Antisemitism closely monitors the far-right, which remains a dangerous threat to the Jewish community and other minority groups.

Jewish people in Stamford Hill have been racially abused by someone shouting “F*** Jews”.

The incident took place on Egerton Road on 11th July, and was reported by Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol. The alleged perpetrator has since been arrested by the Metropolitan Police for racially aggravated public order offences.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: 4619132/22.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is writing to the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) following the news that it has dropped charges against two of the four men originally suspected of involvement with the alleged antisemitic abuse shouted from a ‘Free Palestine’ convoy in North London in May 2021.

Mohammed Iftikhar Hanif, 27; Jawaad Hussain, 24; Asif Ali, 25; and Adil Mota, 26, all from Blackburn, appeared remotely at Wood Green Crown Court last November and pleaded not guilty to charges of using threatening, abusive or insulting words, or behaviour, with intent, likely to stir up racial hatred.

At a case management hearing last Friday, the charges against Mr Ali and Mota were dropped, but the CPS will continue with its case against Mr Hanif and Mr Hussain, 25, on the same charged.

The incident took place a stone’s throw from a synagogue in West Hampstead and continued into St John’s Wood. The convoy had previously and provocatively passed through other Jewish neighbourhoods as well, including Hendon and Golders Green.

The abuse was condemned by the Prime Minister and Home Secretary.

The solicitor representing Mr Mota, Ghafar Khan, said “We had advanced the innocence of Mr Mota from outset, he has stressed he is not antisemitic and has nothing against Jewish people.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “This was an extremely distressing incident. Jewish families told us at the time that they were sent running in fear as a convoy of cars drove through London flying the flag of the Palestinian Authority and shouting the most grotesque racist and misogynistic abuse. This incident, which attracted the attention of the Prime Minister and Home Secretary, is one of too few from May 2021 that have reached the courts. It is therefore vital that the right suspects are identified, appropriately charged and, if found guilty, sanctioned to the full extent of the law. We are continuing to monitor the case to hold the authorities to account and ensure that the Jewish community has justice. We have asked the CPS for an explanation.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A carving of a swastika has been discovered on a London Underground carriage.

The Nazi symbol was etched into the armrest of a carriage seat, reportedly on a train heading southbound on the Northern line.

The Twitter user tagged Transport for London, who in turn asked: “What time, direction of service, and location of carriage was this on please?”

The User responded with an image of the carriage number and wrote: “This was the carriage. Arrived at London Bridge (southbound) at 7:05 approx this morning. 2nd carriage (in direction of travel), left side of carriage, first seating section, middle seat, left hand arm rest.”

This is not the first time that antisemitic vandalism has been discovered on the London Underground. 

In February, a London Underground train carriage was reportedly taken out of service after the British Transport Police were alerted that a panel of the carriage was vandalised with the word “YIDS” and a Star of David.

A judge in Quebec has claimed that the prosecution during a trial of a man charged with stoking antisemitic hatred failed to establish a link between Nazi ideology and the murder of Jews in the Holocaust.

Gabriel Sohier Chaput, 35, was charged with one count of wilfully promoting hatred in connection with an article from 2017 on the neo-Nazi website The Daily Stormer that he admits to having written. The post referred to Jews as “our enemies”, included the claim that 2017 would be the year of “non-stop Nazism, everywhere”, as well as antisemitic images and slurs, and displayed photos of Adolf Hitler and other images associated with Nazism. 

Mr Sohier Chaput’s defence included the claim that The Daily Stormer was just a parody site and that the derogatory terms for Jews used throughout the article were added by an editor. Prosecutor Patrick Lafrenière contested this, saying that the site is by all accounts a serious one, and that the antisemitic slurs were entirely Mr Sohier Chaput’s own work.

Mr Sohier Chaput is a contributor to the far-right Daily Stormer.

Mr Lafrenière said that it was well-known that the publication is a far-right site and Nazism directly led to the murder of six million Jews, but Judge Manlio Del Negro accused Mr Lafrenière of failing to provide an expert witness to confirm this.

Sohier Chaput’s defence lawyer, Helene Poussard, claimed that he was trying to amuse his readers, telling the judge that “today, Nazism is used to describe everything. We mix the Holocaust with Nazism. It’s not because Jews were exterminated that it was part of the ideology.” Ms Poussard also claimed that Jews were slaughtered “to save money”.

Though the judge reprimanded Ms Poussard, he also blamed Mr Lafrenière for failing to complete the easy task of proving that The Daily Stormer was a far-right site and provide a historian to prove that Nazism was responsible for the murder of Jews.

Both parties agreed to return to court on 29th August to debate whether or not it is commonly known that The Daily Stormer is a far-right website and the Nazism led directly to the Holocaust.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout Canada, where a recent audit shows that antisemitic incidents have drastically increased.

A far-right extremist has been jailed for three years after pleading guilty to four offences at Manchester Crown Court.

Scott Mason, 36, was found with what the police describe as “step-by-step instructions on how to make home explosives” in the form of the infamous 1971 publication The Anarchist Cookbook. The police also said that Mr Mason holds far-right, antisemitic, racist and homophobic views.

Mr Mason was charged with possession of information of a kind likely to be useful to a terrorist, contrary to section 58 of the Terrorism Act 2000, as well as other offences.

Mason was charged with the possession of information of a kind likely to be useful to a terrorist, contrary to section 58 of the Terrorism Act 2000; possession of extreme pornography; perverting the course of justice via witness intimidation; and possession of an offensive weapon. He pleaded guilty to the terrorism offence in November 2021 and then, in January 2022, to the weapons offence, for which he received a sentence of three months at the magistrates’ court. The matter was then listed for trial before he pleaded guilty to the outstanding charges in April of this year.

Judge Alan Conrad QC told Mr Mason that he would have faced a four-and-a-half-year sentence if he had not pleaded guilty as early as he did.

Detective Superintendent at Counter Terrorism Policing South West, William Chatterton, said that Mr Mason’s sentencing “reaffirms our commitment to making sure those who pose a risk to our society will be pursued and prosecuted.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism closely monitors the far-right, which remains a dangerous threat to the Jewish community and other minority groups.

Image credit: Greater Manchester Police

Flyers have been left in driveways in Clermont, Florida, and doorsteps in Wichita, Kansas, both of which make inflammatory allegations about Jews.

The Florida flyers were delivered in plastic bags weighed down with rocks and reportedly feature Nazi symbolism, including the Wolfsangel, which was used by various Wehrmacht and SS units fighting for the Nazis during the Second World War, and the Doppelete Sigrune, the logo of the SS.

The Wichita flyers were found in plastic bags, weighted down with sand.

Rabbi Michael Davis, of the Wichita-based Congregation Emanu-El, said that the flyers “[blame] Jews for COVID and for anti-COVID activities, as well as some of the nonsense about paedophilia. The problem is that these conspiracy theories often times lead to violence and that is what is concerning.”

These are just the latest incidents in a string of similar reports in recent months. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the United States.

A group of protestors have been filmed gathering outside a series of kosher establishments in Thornhill, Ontario chanting “From the river to the sea” while waving Palestinian Authority flags.

The chant of “From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free” only makes sense as a call for the destruction of the world’s only Jewish state — and its replacement with a State of Palestine — and is thus an attempt to deny Jews, uniquely, the right to self-determination, which is a breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

In another video, a protestor shouts, “Shabbat Shalom b****es” while waving her middle finger at store owners.

The MP for Thornhill, Melissa Lantsman, took to Twitter to decry the protestors.

Ms Lantsman wrote that “This is NOT anti-Zionism – it’s a blatant act of #antisemitic hate which must be condemned by everyone.” She further tweeted: “You don’t come to a Jewish neighbourhood and yell antisemitic tropes if it isn’t about hating Jews.”

A video recorded by the co-Director of the group Canadian Defenders for Human Rights (CD4HR), Aliya Hasan, presenting events from the protestors’ perspective, showed the group confronting the Israeli store owner, only for one of the protestors to be overheard demanding of the store owner if he thinks that he is “One of G-d’s chosen people”.

Ms Hasan has often been criticised for her online posts relating to the alleged influence of Jews and “Zionists” on politics. This includes one notable post featuring an octopus with a Star of David symbol and a letter “Z” (for Zionist) on its head and its tentacles wrapped around the Capitol building. Each tentacle bore the initials of a Jewish organisation. The caption read: “Dear Americans, Sorry to break it to you, but America is under occupation and Biden and the Democrats won’t change that. Sincerely, The rest of the sane world.”

Ms Hasan has also shared a well-known piece by the inflammatory cartoonist, Carlos Latuff, which appears to compare Israel’s policies to those of the Nazis. According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

A recent audit shows that antisemitic incidents in Canada have drastically increased. Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on antisemitic incidents throughout Canada.

Statistics published by the Federation of Jewish Communities in the Czech Republic (FZO) show that antisemitism has dramatically increased in the country.

According to the data, there were 1,128 antisemitic incidents in 2021, representing a 29 percent increase on the year before.

98 percent of those incidents took place online, including threats of violence as well as approval or justifications of incitement to violence. 

The FZO said that the far-right is responsible for large numbers of these incidents, stating: “For the first time ever, the number of such registered incidents exceeded the category that includes incidents without a clear ideological background.”

With antisemitism increasing worldwide, Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on antisemitic incidents everywhere, including the Czech Republic.

A home in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, has been vandalised with swastika graffiti.

The perpetrators sprayed the swastikas on a garage door which had a Ukrainian flag with the words “I stand with Ukraine” on it.

Also sprayed on the door was the word “Azov”, a reference to the Ukrainian military battalion that is known to have harboured members with far-right sympathies in its ranks, and the Azov symbol.

This graffiti alludes to Russian Government propaganda that erroneously describes the Government of Ukraine – which has several members who have a Jewish background and ancestry – as being full of “Nazis” and that the country supposedly requires “denazification”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the United States.

Residents of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, have expressed their alarm after finding flyers on their lawns produced by a white supremacist group known for their inflammatory statements about Jews.

The flyers apparently bear labels naming a New England based group associated with the Nationalist Social Club as those responsible.

Though confined to small, self-organising chapters mostly inside the United States, the Nationalist Social Club is known for spreading white supremacism. The group maintains an overtly military theme, with its members regarding themselves as combatants against a “Jewish-controlled” social and political system that aims at “white genocide”.

Members of the group marched through Boston during a recent St Patrick’s Day parade wearing items featuring neo-Nazi symbolism.

Sergeant Nick Small from the Portsmouth Police said: “I understand [the flyers] are unnerving people, but right now we are just telling people to throw them away.”

Portsmouth resident Kelly Weinstein, who is Jewish, said that “I fear these groups are upping the ante. I would like to think they are just trying to recruit members, but part of me thinks this is not a random distribution.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the United States.

A report has shown that antisemitic hate crimes in California have reached their highest level in a decade.

According to data compiled by the Office of the California Attorney General, Rob Bonta, there were 152 antisemitic incidents in 2021, marking an increase of 32.2 percent on the year before.

Incidents included the words “death to Israel” graffitied outside a Chabad preschool, and graffiti on a Jewish-owned cafe in St Francisco’s Mission District that said “Zionist pigz” and “Racist pigz”. 

Mr Bonta said: “Today’s report undeniably shows that the epidemic of hate we saw spurred on during the pandemic remains a clear and present threat. In fact, reported hate crime has reached a level we haven’t seen in California since the aftermath of the terrorist attacks of September 11th”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the United States.

A Christian group in the United States has used its General Assembly to pass a resolution that compares Israel with Nazis.

The Presbyterian Church of the United States of America, which is the largest Presbyterian denomination in the United States with nearly nine thousand congregations and almost two million members, made comparisons between Israel and the Nazis when it voted overwhelmingly to accuse Israel of apartheid.

In its resolution, the Church said: “After World War II when the horror of the Nazi Holocaust was revealed, Jews around the world said ‘never again, Christians too vowed that never again would they be silent if a government passed laws establishing and maintaining the domination by one ethnic group over another ethnic group through systematic separation, oppression and denial of basic human rights.

“Silence in the face of evil was wrong then, and it is wrong now.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

A far-right leader and media personality with a large online following has used his platform to argue that Jews should not be allowed in politics.

Nick Fuentes, the founder of the America First Political Action Committee, which has been described as a gathering of “overt and public white nationalists”, and who also leads the Groyper Army of far-right internet trolls, made the claims on his website’s livestream. 

The thrust of Mr Fuentes’ claims is that there is a malign Jewish influence on American politics. At one point, Mr Fuentes said that “Jewish people can be here [in America], but they can’t make our laws” and should not be allowed to hold public office.

This is because, Mr Fuentes said, “We need a government of Christians. We need a conservative movement, a nationalist movement, led by Christians that obey the Bible and obey God and serve Jesus Christ…You’re never going to convince me that we need people in government that don’t serve Jesus Christ, the Son of God [i.e. Jewish people].”

Mr Fuentes also said: “If Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a Jewish woman, didn’t die last year, so that Amy Coney Barrett, a Catholic woman, could be appointed to the bench, we would still have Roe v. Wade. Now you tell me that this is a Judeo-Christian country…You tell me that it doesn’t matter that we have a lot of Jewish people in government.”

Video footage appears to show Mr Fuentes denying the Holocaust and has he often been accused of using antisemitic language and tropes.

According to the FBI, over 60 percent of hate crimes against a religious minority are motivated by antisemitism. Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on antisemitic incidents throughout the United States.

A trial has begun for a man accused of creating the website “Radio Aryan”, later named “Radio Albion”, in order to upload antisemitic and racist podcasts.

James Allchurch, 50 from Pembrokeshire, appeared at Swansea Crown Court yesterday. He is accused of fifteen counts of distributing a sound recording stirring up racial hatred.

The charges allege that Mr Allchurch distributed recordings that included the titles “Rivers Of Blood”, “Banned In The UK”, “The Leftist Supremacist Mindset”, and “The Usual Suspects”. The alleged offenses were said to have taken place in Gelli, a village in south Wales.

In previous hearings, the defendant requested he be referred to as “Sven Longshanks”, his podcasting name which is apparently taken from King Edward I, also known as Edward Longshanks, who expelled the Jews from England in 1290.

Prosecutor Ian Wright, referring to the podcasts in question, told the court that “These recordings are insulting or abusive and were distributed with intent to stir up racial hated,” labelling the recordings “highly racist and highly antisemitic in nature” as well as “white supremacist in nature”.

The court was played an audio clip in which Mr Allchurch reportedly introduced a song that said the world was better when Black people were enslaved and Jews were persecuted under Adolf Hitler as “one of his favourite tracks”.

Other recordings allegedly made reference to Jewish people controlling the media, banks and TV and film industries.

In a raid of his home, police reportedly discovered a notebook belonging to Mr Allchurch containing usernames and passwords which included entries such as “JewsAreTheEnemy”, “RaceWarMessiah” and reference to the numbers 14 and 88. 

1488 is likely a coded reference to the neo-Nazi fourteen-word oath: “We must secure the existence of our people and a future for white children”, a slogan initially devised by David Lane, a member of the white supremacist terrorist group “The Order” which was responsible for the murder of Jewish radio host Alan Berg. The number 88 refers to the eighth letter of the alphabet, H, and is intended as a code for “Heil Hitler.”

The trial continues.

A new report has been published which shows that there were 2,738 antisemitic incidents recorded in 2021, marking a 40 percent increase from the year before.

According to the report from the Department for Research and Information on Antisemitism (RIAS), a Berlin-based monitoring institute, large numbers of these incidents can be traced to Islamist reactions to Israel’s war with the genocidal antisemitic terror group Hamas in May 2021.

RIAS’ report mentioned Israel 147 times in their 68-page report, with far-right extremists only being responsible for only seventeen percent of the recorded incidents.

RIAS researcher, Daniel Poensgen, said that “In view of the corona pandemic and the Arab-Israeli conflict, opportunity structures emerged in which people considered it legitimate to articulate their antisemitic attitudes even more openly and to attack Jews and show hostility toward Jews.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on antisemitic incidents in Germany, which have risen considerably.

The Luxembourg-based charity, Research and Information on Antisemitism in Luxembourg (RIAL), has reported new statistics showing that antisemitic incidents have risen by 64 percent in the last year.

The group recorded 80 antisemitic incidents in 2021, including harassment, damage to Jewish cemeteries, and online abuse. The total recorded the previous year was 64, with cases doubling since 2019 and 30 reports received in 2022 so far.

RIAL said that some of these incidents were based on coronavirus conspiracy theories, with some comparing the government’s response to the pandemic to the Nazis and the Holocaust, while others turned to antisemitism to explain or justify Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

There are approximately 1,200 Jews in Luxembourg, making up under 0.19% of a total population of over 645,000.

A 101-year-old man who served as an SS guard has been jailed for five years in Germany. 

‘SS’, the abbreviation of Schutzstaffel, was the leading paramilitary organisation under Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party.

The unnamed man, who was convicted of 3,518 counts of accessory to murder at Sachsenhausen concentration camp, denied his role as an SS guard and insisted that he had been a farm labourer during the time period in question.

The trial at Brandenburg’s Landgericht Neuruppin court lasted nine months, partially owing to the fact that the defendant was only able to attend sessions for a maximum of two-and-a-half hours each day due to his age. 

Judge Udo Lechtermann said: “The court has come to the conclusion that, contrary to what you claim, you worked in the concentration camp as a guard for about three years. 

“You willingly supported this mass extermination with your activity.”

In March, Dr Efraim Zuroff, the Chief Nazi Hunter at the Simon Wiesenthal Center, appeared on Podcast Against Antisemitism where he discussed the trial, calling it “an important reminder of the terror of the camp”.

He added: “Every generation needs its own reminders and the passage of time in no way diminishes the guilt of the killers.

“What people have to remember is today they look old and frail but when they committed these crimes they were young people full of energy and they devoted all their energy to murder innocent men, women and children simply because they were Jews or other enemies of the Reich.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has submitted a complaint to the Bar Standards Board (BSB) after a prominent QC posted an inflammatory tweet online.

Jessica Simor QC, a human rights barrister with a large following on Twitter, last week tweeted an extract from a new law relating to immigration, along with the comment: “Heinous. Just like the Rwanda policy. Utterly heinous, heartless, cruel, appalling. And Raab, the son of a Czech Jewish refugee – astonishing he has no sensitivity to this. I hope, no Jew will stay silent on this. #grim”.

In response, we tweeted: “It is racist to observe the ethnic heritage of a politician whose policy you disagree with and extrapolate that everyone in that ethnic group is somehow accountable for his conduct and required to actively oppose it. We are filing a complaint with your regulator.”

Ms Simor then claimed that she had deleted the tweet because she “got a text from someone asking”, but insisted that she stood by it insofar as she had “expressed what I wanted to say.”

In a private e-mail to the barrister, we invited her to publish a statement of apology, recognising the danger of her choice of words. Such an apology would have made a complaint to her regulator unnecessary. Instead of taking the opportunity to inform her significant following of how to recognise and grow from one’s mistakes, she continued to defend herself in a series of further tweets and petulantly published our letter, ludicrously describing it as “threatening” and portraying it as case of “Jews bullying Jews who don’t meet their test.”

The “test” was left unspecified, but a subsequent review of Ms Simor’s Twitter activity gives reason for concern. For example, despite her many tweets on antisemitism in politics, she does not appear to have condemned it in Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour Party. In fact, she repeatedly accused the Conservatives of “smearing” the Labour Party by raising the issue. At one point, she even criticised The Telegraph for reporting on large numbers of Jewish people saying that they intended to leave the country if Mr Corbyn had been elected.

She does not appear to have endorsed the International Definition of Antisemitism; indeed apparently her only tweet on the subject was to post an article criticising it.

According to the BSB Code of Conduct, barristers are required to act with integrity and not “discriminate unlawfully against, victimise or harass any other person on the grounds of race… religion or belief…”

A judge has today rejected an application to dismiss the case against two West Ham supporters charged with racially aggravated harassment of a visibly Jewish man on a Ryanair flight last year.

Lee Carey, 55, and Jak Bruce, 31, were arrested in connection with an incident on a flight to Eindhoven in November 2021 in which numerous West Ham supporters were videoed chanting an antisemitic song, apparently at a Hasidic passenger.

The group was filmed to be chanting “I’ve got a foreskin haven’t you, f***ing Jew”, as they flew to a match between their team and KRC Genk in Belgium.

Last month, the defendants sought to have the case dismissed, arguing that the court lacked jurisdiction under the Civil Aviation Act and therefore could not hear the case. 

Sitting at Chelmsford Crown Court, Judge Walker today rejected that application, but the matter of jurisdiction has yet to be resolved, with a further hearing due later this year.

West Ham confirmed last year that it had banned two supporters for life, although it is not known if those fans are the defendants in this case.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Jewish people have reportedly been harassed outside a Kosher supermarket in Stamford Hill.

It is alleged that they are a repeat offender who specifically targets Jews.

The incident took place on Craven Hill Road on 22nd June, and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD2783 22/06/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2021 showed that over two thirds of British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

Swastikas have been drawn on signs owned by Hackney Council preventing vehicles from waiting or loading goods in the area.

The signs are located outside the Jewish Mother and Baby Home, a centre for mothers with babies to recuperate after birth, on Fairholt Road, N16.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD7249 23/06/22.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Four members of a neo-Nazi gang who shared antisemitic material with each other via the social media platform Telegram have been jailed for a total of 31 years.

The group was convicted under anti-terrorism and firearms legislation in March following a two-month trial.

Concerns had previously been raised over the alleged increase in neo-Nazi content on Telegram. Last year, the far-right group Patriotic Alternative was found to have created neo-Nazi channels dedicated to sharing vile messages, antisemitic conspiracy theories, and images glorifying Hitler.

Samuel Whibley, 29, Daniel Wright, 30, Liam Hall, 31, and Mr Hall’s girlfriend Stacey Salmon, 29, were convicted of fifteen offences, including counts relating to the encouragement of terrorism and the publication and dissemination of materials related to it, as well as firearms offences.

The jury at Sheffield Crown Court heard that all four defendants shared antisemitic videos, memes, and images, including material celebrating Adolf Hitler and the Nazis. Ms Hall confessed to finding material online in which Jews were alleged to control the media and banks, as well as to watching videos made by neo-Nazis in an attempt to see “both sides of the argument” about Hitler.

The court heard that the group communicated with each other using a public Telegram channel set up by Mr Whibley under the name Oaken Hearth. This was, jurors heard, used as “a gathering place for British white nationalists.” Mr Whibley then audited prospective members, who had to prove they were white by taking a selfie before answering questions about their involvement in neo-Nazi groups.

Mr White joined the chat using the name “Gott Mit Uns”, words found on the belts of Nazi soldiers during the Second World War.

The group also shared racist material aimed at Black people, while Mr Whibley reportedly praised Christchurch mosque shooter Brenton Tarrant, Norwegian neo-Nazi terrorist Anders Breivik, and Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh.

During the trial, jurors heard that a partially constructed 3D-printed gun was found at Mr Hall’s and Ms Salmon’s home in Keighley, with experts assessing that, once completed, the gun could prove lethal. Other weapons and guides were also reportedly recovered from the gang.

Mr Wright was found guilty of seven offences, including an offence of manufacturing a firearm, and was jailed for twelve years. Mr Hall was found guilty of manufacturing a firearm and possessing a firearm, and was jailed for six years, while Ms Salmon was convicted of possessing a firearm and was jailed for three years. Mr Whibley was found guilty of eight terrorism offences, including the encouragement of terrorism and the dissemination of a terrorist publication, and was jailed for ten years.

Campaign Against Antisemitism closely monitors the far-right, which remains a dangerous threat to the Jewish community and other minority groups.

Image credit: Counter Terrorism Policing Northeast

A police officer from Cleveland, Ohio, who won an “Officer of the Year” award in 2019, as well as a medal for his service, is apparently being investigated for posting tweets with inflammatory comments about Jewish people prior to his employment by the force.

It is alleged that, between 2011 and 2015, Ismail Quran shared a post that said “Let me salute to Hitler the great,”and tweeted that “Jews run the world lol Facts!” Our owner is Jew [sic],” and “F**k the @ Jews #freepalestine”.

Mr Quran has reportedly been given desk duty and is currently having no contact with the public.

The Cleveland Division of Police Union President, Jeff Follmer, defended Mr Quran, saying: “These tweets are from over a decade ago. He is an amazing police officer…He is an asset to the Cleveland community that he serves.”

The watchdog that initially made Mr Quran’s posts public, Canary Mission, said in a press release: “While we are aware that the dates of Quran’s posts are a few years old, the extreme nature of these hateful posts after he begun his police training, and the fact he is an active police officer is very alarming. They were posted after he had already taken an exam required to become a police officer. As in, he already knew he wanted to become a policeman. Quran was still tweeting things like ‘Scumbag Yahoodi [Jew]’.”

According to the FBI, over 60 percent of hate crimes against a religious minority are motivated by antisemitism. Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on antisemitic incidents throughout the United States.

Police in Monsey, New York, say that they have found several instances of swastika graffiti in a local synagogue.

The swastikas were found at Sanzer Shul drawn behind a coat rack, under a metal counter where coffee is made, drawn on the wall and scratched into a computer screen.

Police have said that they do not know when the act was committed, and the investigation is ongoing.

The heavily-Jewish town of Monsey has not been free from antisemitic incidents in the past. On 28th December 2019, on the seventh night of the Jewish holiday of Chanukah, a masked man wielding a knife wounded five and killed one person. The suspect was named as Grafton E. Thomas, but a federal judge ruled that he was incompetent to stand trial on the federal charges on account of his long history of mental illness, including paranoid schizophrenia.

According to the FBI, over 60 percent of hate crimes against a religious minority are motivated by antisemitism. Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on antisemitic incidents throughout the United States.

Members of the Jewish community in Victoria, British Columbia have expressed their concerns after a Muslim preacher has been found delivering inflammatory sermons.

The leader of the Muslim Youth of Victoria, Younus Kathrada, was found to have called upon Allah to “bring annihilation upon the plundering Jews” and for victory over “those criminal, plundering Jews”.

This is not the first time that Mr Kathrada has been criticised for making such statements, which date back to 2004, and the local Muslim community has been quick to denounce him.

In November 2020, Mr Kathrada called Jews “brothers of monkeys and khanzeer [pigs]” and called on Allah to “tear them apart”.

In August 2021, Mr Kathrada described Jews as “enemies” who were attempting to “spend mountains of gold to drive [Muslims] away from Islam”.

The Chief Executive Officer of B’nai Brith Canada, Michael Mostyn, said that “It is important that this extremist hatemonger is being vigorously investigated after this latest hate incident, It’s appalling that such noxious hate speech against Jews is allowed to continue in Canada, and we hope Kathrada will now face criminal charges.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Police in Canada have raided the homes of individuals suspected of being members of the paramilitary neo-Nazi group, Atomwaffen Division.

It was reported that more than 60 officers from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police took part in the operation on rural homes south-west of Quebec City.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) Corporal Charles Poirier said that “It’s a far-right affiliated group, which could be described as having neo-Nazi allegiance.”

RCMP also tweeted: “Searches underway in St-Ferdinand and Plessisville. Investigation targeting individuals with suspected ties to the Atomwaffen Division terrorist group. All measures are in place to ensure the safety of the public and our police officers.”

The Canadian Public Safety Department listed the organisation as a terrorist group last year.

Atomwaffen Division is a paramilitary neo-Nazi group that trains its members in the use of firearms and reportedly seeks to ignite a race war in the United States.

In January 2022, Atomwaffen Division leader, Kaleb Cole, was sentenced to seven years in prison in connection with a plot to target journalists and activists.

Last year, the UK proscribed Atomwaffen Division as a terrorist organisation.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on antisemitic incidents throughout Canada which have drastically increased.

A Member of Parliament in Canada has expressed her concern after groups of people shouted “stop killing Palestinians” at visibly Jewish parents during her daughter’s high school graduation ceremony at Canada’s Wonderland, an amusement park in Toronto.

Ya’ara Saks, MP for York Centre in Toronto, took to Twitter to write that “This is so wrong. It’s collectively blaming Jess for a foreign conflict. It’s hate, it’s antisemitism, it’s dangerous, and it needs to stop.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the State of Israel” is an example of antisemitism.

A recent audit shows that antisemitic incidents in Canada have drastically increased. Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on antisemitic incidents throughout Canada.

A Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP) protester is facing hate crime charges for allegedly assaulting Jewish students.

The incident was said to have taken place at the Hillel Centre at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign campus.

Sayed A. Quraishi, 23, will be charged with violent hate crime for reportedly throwing rocks at the students during the SJP protest at the campus on 18th April.

Protesters said that they were responding to the actions of the Israeli police at the Al-Aqsa Mosque compound in Jerusalem a few days earlier.

Mr Quraishi faces a penalty of up to five years in prison.

According to the University’s campus police team, about 75 protestors gathered outside the Hillel centre and gave speeches, while Jewish students and Hillel staff staged a counter-protest nearby.

It is reported that there is video footage of Mr Qaraishi throwing a stone at the counter-protestors.

The Hillel’s Executive Director, Erez Cohen, said that “When people come to the Jewish centre to yell against Israel, they’re creating an equation between any Jewish person and the State of Israel. That’s singling out an entire community based on a country that’s miles away.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the State of Israel” is an example of antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Germany’s High Court has ruled that the Judensau sculpture relief on the side of a church in Wittenberg must not be removed.

The sculpture, which represents Jews suckling on a sow while a rabbi lifts its tail, is widely regarded as emblematic of German Medieval Jew-hatred, and an inspiration for subsequent antisemitism running from the writings and teachings of Protestant Reformation leader Martin Luther to the Nazis.

Martin Luther in fact preached from this church and wrote about the sculpture in his 1543 book Vom Schem Hamphoras und vom Geslecht Christi (Of the Unknowable Name and the Generations of Christ), which compares Jews to the devil. The Nazis used Luther’s work to promote their own genocidal antisemitism.

The case was brought by Michael Duellmann, who is Jewish. Mr Duellmann decried the sculpture’s historical effect, saying that the sculpture is “a defamation of and insult to the Jewish people.” Mr Duellmann did not argue for the destruction of the sculpture, however, saying that it should instead be moved to the nearby Luther House Museum.

Mr Duellman brought the case to local courts in Dessau in 2019, and Naumberg in 2020, losing both times.

Following the legal battles, church leaders have promised to do more to distance current church teachings and practice from the sculpture and to provide more context around it.

Antisemitic incidents in Germany have increased considerably. Campaign Against Antisemitism is reports on antisemitic incidents in Germany.

A poster calling for the destruction of Israel was found outside of Golders Green station this week.

The poster had the words “Israel = ISIS” written on it. Below, it said “Restore Palestine” and “Cancel Israel”.

At the bottom of the poster, it said: “The Bible was written a long time ago.”

Golders Green is a neighbourhood renowned for its large Jewish population. According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the State of Israel” and “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour)” are both examples of antisemitism. 

It has been reported that a gang in North London is responsible for two separate attacks on visibly Jewish children. 

The gang is believed to be associated with the Webb Estate and is accused of harassing Jewish residents for years.

At 20:39 on 9th June, an eleven-year-old boy on a bicycle was chased by three male teenagers. Video footage appears to show one of the teenagers, also on a bicycle, cornering the boy in an attempt to prevent him from escaping. The suspect reportedly told the boy to get off of his bike before the boy shouted for help, prompting the suspect to flee. 

In a separate incident that occurred at 17:10 on 13th June, a nine-year-old boy was walking down the street when teenagers reportedly threw a metal box at his leg, severely bruising it. Video footage of the reported incident shows a boy trying to walk away but grabs his leg and falls to the ground.

Both incidents took place on Old Hill Street in Stamford Hill and were reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information on either incident, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number 4616258/22 in relation to the incident on 9th June and 287214/06/22 in relation to the incident on 13th June.

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Reports have surfaced that a roundabout has been removed from a children’s playground in a suburb of Norwich after it had been covered with swastika graffiti.

The roundabout at Fitzmaurice Park in Thorpe St Andrew has been removed after authorities were made aware of the vandalism, which seems to have been effected using marker pens.

A statement posted to Facebook by a spokesperson for Thorpe St Andrew Town Council said: “This kind of behaviour is a tremendous strain on both our working hours and the public funds which sustain open spaces and is the sort of thing we regularly deal with behind closed doors, so please bear with us whilst we make good.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image: Thorpe St Andrew City Council

South Yorkshire Police have denied that an arson attack on a Jewish cemetery in Doncaster was an antisemitic hate crime, classifying it as an example of anti-social behaviour instead.

The police responded to a call from the South Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service at about 14:50 on 11th June reporting a fire at Rose Hill Crematorium on Cantley Lane, Doncaster. Recognising that the fire was started deliberately, the police are treating it as an act of anti-social behaviour rather than motivated by antisemitism.

Formal synagogue services there stopped in the 1970s, and there has not been a funeral held at Rose Hill since 2006.

Rabbi Yonosan Golomb of the United Synagogue Sheffield said: “The fire, if an antisemitic arson attack, is an indication of to what level such people will sink in desecrating the resting place of the deceased.”

A member of the community told Campaign Against Antisemitism that he was perplexed by the police forces decision.

A spokesperson for South Yorkshire Police said: “Enquiries are ongoing at this time. If anybody has any information which could assist enquiries, or was in the vicinity of the crematorium or cemetery at the time and saw or heard anything suspicious, this can be passed to officers by calling 101, quoting incident 604 of 11 June.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A former Assistant Police Chief in Kent, Washington, who faced disciplinary measures for displaying Nazi symbols on his door and making jokes about the Holocaust, will receive a $1.5 million payout by the local authority to ensure his resignation.

Derek Kammerzell had posted the insignia of an Obergruppenführer (a senior ranking Nazi SS Officer) on his office door. A complaint was made about this, and the investigation into his conduct that followed found that Mr Kammerzell had also shaved his facial hair into a moustache resembling that of Adolf Hitler, performed what was reportedly a Nazi salute, and made jokes about the Holocaust.

Mr Kammerzell’s original penalty was a two-week suspension without pay.

Following a backlash against the weakness of the sanction, Mr Kammerzell was put on administrative leave and asked to resign.

The city was, however, unable to fire him because this would violate the principle of “double jeopardy”. If Mr Kammerzell resigned, the city would have had to have made a substantial payout. Although it was reported that Mr Kammerzell originally asked for over $3 million, in the end he received around half that amount.

In a statement, a spokesperson for the City of Kent said: “While this is a substantial sum, we strongly believe that settling this matter will be a substantial step towards meeting our commitment to the community and continuing with the excellent work the police department is doing.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

It has been reported that a sixteen-year-old Jewish boy was chased by three schoolboys in North London.

The victim was riding his bicycle on the way to his local synagogue when he was allegedly chased by three boys wearing Gladesmore School uniforms who were shouting “Let’s catch him!”

The incident took place on the corner of Crowland Road and Elm Park at 08:17 on Friday and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 7088 12/6/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

It has been reported that a man has been arrested after he hurled verbal abuse at Jewish people in North London.

Video footage shows a man yelling in a Jewish-owned pizza restaurant in which he appears to shout: “What, you don’t speak English?”

The man is also reported to have yelled: “You Jews are evil, I will break into your houses”.

Additional videos appear to show the same man later that night yelling at people on a quiet residential street, and subsequently being arrested.

The incident was reported yesterday by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 7906 12/06/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

It has been reported that a brick was thrown from a third-floor window at a Jewish father and his children.

The victim was standing on the corner of Seven Sisters Road and Eade Road in Stamford Hill with his two children, three and six, when the brick was reportedly thrown, missing them by centimetres. 

The incident took place at 15:55 on Sunday and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 5200 12/06/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Google

An image showing an antisemitic caricature of a Jew beside the words “Shoot a Jew in the head” is being investigated by the Hate Crimes Division of Toronto Police.

The antisemitic graffiti depicting a figure with sidelocks and a Star of David inside a gun’s crosshairs was found near Toronto’s York University.

In a statement, the University condemned the image and said it was “working closely with law enforcement” to find the perpetrators of this “hateful antisemitic act.”

It also said support was available to students and that “direct outreach” was being offered to Jewish student groups.

A York University graduate student, Garrett Ryan, told a local news outlet that antisemitic graffiti was “not a surprising thing” in the area but it was “frightening” that people were inciting “violence.”

According to data compiled by B’nai B’rith Canada, antisemitic hate crimes in the country have reached record levels for six consecutive years.

A recent audit by the group found that there were 2,799 antisemitic hate crimes that year, including assaults, synagogue vandalism, and swastika graffiti in schools. 

In May, B’nai B’rith Canada urged the Canadian government to report on its progress in fulfilling its promise – made last year at the Malmo International Forum on Holocaust Remembrance and Combating Antisemitism – to fight antisemitism throughout Canada.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

Image credit: Twitter via The Algemeiner

It has been reported that a man on the London Underground yelled that “the war in Ukraine is because of the Jews.”

In addition, he was also alleged to have said that “Jews control the world and the banks, they have the money.”

The suspect is believed to have boarded the Victoria Line train heading southbound at Seven Sisters and yelled the abuse in the presence of a visibly Jewish man who later stated that he felt threatened, intimidated and scared.

The incident took place at 10:16 on 1st June and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CRIS 2814358/22.

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

“Hateful, antisemitic vandalism” has hit the Maryland area in recent weeks.

In the latest incident, a swastika and antisemitic graffiti were spray-painted at a disused, historic, train station in Garrett Park.

One week earlier, similar messages and fliers were posted at a bus stop next to a synagogue in nearby Silver Spring.

Images tweeted by the Jewish Federation showed swastikas with words such as “White power.”

Gil Preuss, Chief Executive of the Jewish Federation of Greater Washington, said in a news release that “as antisemitism continues to rise” across the United States, the Federation and the Jewish community would “stand strong and resilient in the face of hatred in all forms.”

He added that the Federation continued to work with its “security team” and local police to monitor incidents and “keep our community safe.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

A report published by Germany’s Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution shows that there has been a 29 percent increase in antisemitic incidents in 2021, compared to a year earlier.

The report shows that 3,027 antisemitic incidents were recorded in 2021. This is up from 2,351 in 2020.

Although the overwhelming majority of the incidents were reported as being related to far-right extremism, there are indications that antisemitic attacks motivated by Islamism are also increasing.

Many of the crimes are to do with the publication of hate speech that is banned in Germany, such as Holocaust denial, but there were also examples of attacks on individuals and Jewish religious institutions.

The number of incidents increased during the conflict between the genocidal antisemitic terror group Hamas and Israel in May 2021, as well as coronavirus conspiracy theories.

However, the Director of the Berlin-based Research and Information Centre on Antisemitism (RIAS), Benjamin Steinetz, warned that there is a “dark field of antisemitic incidents” that are not reported and thus not represented in government statistics. Mr Steinetz said: “We have to assume that…recorded incidents are only the tip of the iceberg.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Graffiti associating Zionists and Nazis has been found at the Mount Zion Holocaust Museum in Jerusalem.

The graffiti, which was written with a metal marker on a garbage can, wall, water fountain, tombstone, and baby-nappy-changing station, included the phrases “Zionists = Nazis”, “Zionists are responsible for the Holocaust”, and “Cursed Zionists, your end is near”.

The phrase “Zionists are responsible for the Holocaust” was seen scrawled on a tombstone commemorating the 50,000 Jewish Holocaust victims at the Bergen-Belsen death camp.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Israel Police

A Jewish man in France was reportedly beaten and called a “dirty Jew” while campaigning as part of the French legislative elections.

Liron Rozenhaft, 41, was putting up campaign posters for his wife, Audrey, who is running for a legislative seat for the Republicans in Strasbourg when two men approached him.

Upon noticing Ms Rozenhaft’s name on the poster, the two men are alleged to have called Mr Rozenhaft a “dirty Jew”, pulled down the posters, and followed him to other locations on a scooter, accompanied by several other men.

Ms Rozenhaft took to Facebook to claim that her husband had been beaten and left unconscious. Other accounts said that Mr Rozenhaft suffered minor injuries, including a concussion.

Local police are investigating the incident.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Two men, aged twenty and 21, have been charged with painting antisemitic and homophobic graffiti on a church in Greymouth, New Zealand.

The words “synagog [sic] of satan” were sprayed under a Star of David, alongside the words “Christ is risen” next to a Russian Orthodox cross, and “Leviticus 20:13”, a reference to a Biblical verse that is often used to give discrimination against homosexuals a religious justification.

The “Pink Church”, officially known as Gloria of Greymouth but which used to be known as St Peter’s Anglican Church, was designed by Jewish poet and artist Sam Duckor-Jones as a “queer place of worship” and an “immersive sculpture” in the former mining town.

In an Instagram post, the Church stated that “The Greymouth community responded beautifully, with love, support & outrage,” adding that “The Greymouth police moved quickly, taking this act of hate seriously.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Tony Greenstein has surrendered what remains of his claim against Campaign Against Antisemitism for calling him a “notorious antisemite”. Having humiliatingly lost his libel claim and been bankrupted in the process, he seems to have held onto one belief throughout: that he cost us a fortune.

When a supporter of Campaign Against Antisemitism was raising money for our work among her family and friends, Mr Greenstein found the fundraiser and donated £1, enabling him to leave a message on the fundraising page saying: “I can’t imagine what prompted this [fundraising request]!! Surely Israel’s Ministry of Strategic Affairs isn’t running out of money! No matter I’ve cost you bastards £200K…I think we can plan some more ambushes.”

The fantasy that his failed defamation lawsuit against us had damaged us financially was the silver lining in Mr Greenstein’s black cloud of legal failure. We can now reveal to him, however, that as soon as he filed his initial claim against us in 2018, we contacted our insurers, Hiscox, who covered our costs in full. This previously undisclosed information brings any fantasy to an end.

After the Supreme Court spurned his attempt to appeal rulings against him, Tony Greenstein has now filed a Notice of Discontinuance in the High Court, bringing a humiliating end to his failed defamation case against Campaign Against Antisemitism for calling him a “notorious antisemite”.

An expelled member of the Labour Party and founder of Palestine Solidarity Campaign, Mr Greenstein has long sought to have Campaign Against Antisemitism struck off the register of charities, and in 2018 he brought a case against us alleging that we had libelled him when we described him as a “notorious antisemite” in 2017.

In 2020, his legal action humiliatingly backfired, as the High Court ruled that it was permissible for us to describe him as such.

We applied to strike out Mr Greenstein’s case because it had no hope of success at a full hearing and should not proceed, and the court agreed to dismiss the entirety of his libel claim, leaving only other minor aspects of the case to be determined at a later hearing. The judgment was significant not just for its ruling but also because it referenced the International Definition of Antisemitism in coming to its decision.

In 2021, three Lord and Lady Justices sitting at the Court of Appeal dismissed Mr Greenstein’s appeal of the High Court ruling, deciding in favour of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Later that year, we had Mr Greenstein declared bankrupt for failing to pay our legal costs, as the court had ordered him to do. We then alerted the Charity Commission, which removed him as a trustee of The Brighton Trust, formerly known as the “Trust 4 Unpopular Causes”, as bankrupts are not permitted to serve as charity trustees.

Mr Greenstein’s failed case has affirmed our entitlement to call him a ‘notorious antisemite’ and set an important legal precedent in the fight against antisemitism, while his hope of having at least damaged us financially is also utterly dashed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism was represented by Adam Speker QC, instructed by solicitors Keith Mathieson and Alex Wilson of RPC, and advised pro bono by solicitor Dr Mark Lewis who is an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism. We were represented by Karl Anderson in the insolvency proceedings.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The humiliating failure of Tony Greenstein’s defamation case against us has affirmed our entitlement to call him a ‘notorious antisemite’ and set an important legal precedent in the fight against antisemitism. It seems that only Mr Greenstein is surprised that the High Court and Court of Appeal sided with us in recognising our right to identify and call out those we consider to be antisemites.

“We can also now reveal that from the outset of Mr Greenstein’s claim against us, we have been steadfastly supported by our insurers, thwartings his rather contemptible attempt to drain our charity’s funds and dashing his abject search for consolation in the fantasy that he had cost us a fortune in legal fees. Our legal team and insurers performed perfectly, so the outcome of Mr Greenstein’s legal misadventure is that the courts have confirmed that we can legitimately label him a ‘notorious antisemite’. Not only that, but having sought to have our charity struck off the Register of Charities, due to his bankruptcy as a result of this case it is now he who has been disqualified from being a trustee.”

Swastika graffiti has been found at a school in the Evanston and Skokie 65 school district in Illinois.

A staff member at Nichols Middle School discovered the swastikas, alongside other undisclosed racist messages, written on stalls in two bathrooms.

The bathrooms in question were then closed and Evanston Police Department was contacted to help with the investigation.

Superintendent Devon Horton said: “We are reminded once again that antisemitism, racism and white supremacy are alive and well within our community.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Two men in France’s north-eastern Alsace region were arrested after police raided the home of alleged neo-Nazis and found a large cache of weapons and ammunition.

They found 23 illegal weapons, eighteen legal weapons and 120,000 rounds of ammunition, as well as Kalashnikovs, magazines and more than 35 kilograms of explosives.

Prosecutor Edwige Roux-Morizot said during a press conference that two of the four men arrested on 31st May had been indicted for arms trafficking and put in prison. They face ten years in jail.

Two other men are free but under judicial supervision, while a further individual was released without charge.

Mr Roux-Morizot said that the men were not believed to be planning an attack, but with the large weapons cache there was a fear that they could “take action.” Police were monitoring their computer data, he said.

The raid also yielded three machines for making ammunition, a machine to heat casings, two silencers, a banknote counter and more than 25,000 euros in banknotes.

Judicial police chief Lieutenant-Colonel Yann Wanson said that the haul was “intended” for “war,” adding that one of the suspects had trained as a sniper.

Mr Roux-Morizot said that the suspects were aged between 45 and 53 and had jobs. Their alleged neo-Nazi affiliation was reportedly confirmed by the literature found among their belongings.

According to a report published by the French Jewish community’s main watchdog, antisemitic incidents in France have skyrocketed. Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on antisemitic incidents in France.

Police in the Alsace region of France have reportedly arrested four neo-Nazis on weapons charges.

The haul reportedly included forty-one guns, twenty-three of which were illegal. Also found was the equivalent of at least 120,000 bullet cartridges. Approximately 200 police officers were involved in the arrest of the four men, aged 45 to 53.

French intelligence services also believe that the men had taken part in a “Jew hunt” where they sought out Jewish people to attack during a football match in Strasbourg.

The four men face ten years in prison for amassing a vast amount of weaponry, as well as antisemitic and Holocaust-denial literature found in their belongings, though investigators are not yet able to say whether the men had planned a large-scale attack.

According to a report published by the French Jewish community’s main watchdog, the Jewish Community Security Service, antisemitic incidents in France skyrocketed by 75% in 2021.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

An 18-year-old from Port Richmond, Staten Island, has been arrested for assaulting a visibly Jewish man, it has been reported.

The attack was allegedly carried out by Logan Jones, in addition to five others, on 1st April at around 20:00.

Mr Jones faces assault and hate crime charges after the 21-year-old man was reportedly walking to his local synagogue to attend a Sabbath service with his wife. The victim was said to be wearing traditional Hasidic clothing at the time.

Mr Jones is alleged to be one of six people who took part in the assault, reportedly punching the victim in the face before two others began kicking him.

The victim reportedly tried to avoid the attack by sliding underneath a parked truck, and suffered head injuries, a cheek abrasion, and bruising to his face and mouth.

Mr Jones has been charged with third-degree assault as a hate crime, third-degree assault, third-degree menacing as a hate crime, third-degree menacing, third-degree attempted assault as a hate crime, third-degree attempted assault, and second-degree harassment.

His bail was set at $30,000 and he was ordered to return to court on 24th June.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Alex Davies, 27, has been sentenced today to eight and-a-half years after he was convicted last month of membership of the neo-Nazi terrorist group, National Action.

Mr Davies, of Swansea, was found guilty last month by a jury at Winchester Crown Court of being a member of the proscribed group, which he founded in 2013, between 17th December 2016 and 27th September 2017.

National Action was proscribed by the British Government following repeated calls by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others.

Following the ban, Mr Davies was involved in the development of a “continuity” organisation, designed to continue the work of the banned group and initially called the Southern Activist Network, later renamed NS131. That group was also banned as an alias of National Action nine months after the proscription of its predecessor organisation.

During the trial, Mr Davies explained his ideology, saying that “If we were to take power, our aim is to have an overwhelmingly white Britain as it more or less has been for centuries. It’s only in the past 50/60/70 years we have had mass immigration. It would be to return to the status quo of before the Second World War.” He was asked if he would repatriate Jewish families with British heritage dating back centuries and replied: “Yes, that’s how repatriation would work.”

The court also heard that he was photographed in 2016 performing a Nazi salute in the Buchenwald death camp execution chamber, and said that he did not believe that the Holocaust occurred. He said that he felt “badly” about the photograph, and, regarding the Holocaust, insisted: “I do not believe there was a systematic extermination of Jews. I can’t be a national socialist if the Holocaust occurred, I cannot support an ideology that supports genocide. I have the same moral compass as anyone else, I believe murder is wrong and I cannot support something that engaged in systematic genocide of people because they are Jewish.”

The jury heard that Mr Davies contacted prospective members on the secure messaging platform Wire, explaining that the group had a “revolutionary Nationalist Socialist ideology”, but needed to “be able to ‘swim’ among the general population without trouble.”

Prosecutor Barnaby Jameson told Winchester Crown Court that National Action was banned after it “terrorised” towns including Liverpool, Newcastle, York, Swansea and Darlington, during which its members could be heard “screaming Nazi-era proclamations through megaphones”, including one occasion in York where Mr Davies reportedly spoke in front of a banner that read “Refugees not welcome: Hitler was right.”

Sentencing Mr Davies today at the Old Bailey in London, Judge Mark Dennis QC said: “You are an intelligent and educated young man but you have held, over a period of many years, warped and shocking prejudices.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Alex Davies is the epitome of a youth wasted, devoted as it was to ignorance and malice. The ban on National Action, secured after calls from Campaign Against Antisemitism and others, was the first step, and convictions of its members are the second. Firm custodial sentences such as these are the third. The message is clear: neo-Nazis have no place in British society.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism closely monitors the far-right, which remains a dangerous threat to the Jewish community and other minority groups.

Image credit: Counter Terrorism Policing

Jewish community leaders in the Greater Washington area have expressed their shock and outrage after flyers with swastikas on them and references to the Holocaust were posted at a bus stop opposite a synagogue.

One flyer features a swastika in the centre of the page and the words “Love Your Race” above it and a link to the neo-Nazi website, American Futurist. 

The other shows a skeleton whose skull resembles the Totenkopf (“Death’s Head”) insignia found on Nazi SS uniforms, which the skeleton is itself wearing. The headline to this flyer reads “6 million kikes?”, and the skeleton is replying with a speech bubble and the words “Is that a challenge?” followed by a swastika. Beneath this are the words “We wish!” followed by a link to the neo-Nazi website Aryan Freedom Network.

The Jewish Federation of Greater Washington tweeted: “We are deeply disturbed by the appearance of a swastika in the Kemp Mill neighbourhood of Silver Spring, MD, a centre of Montgomery County’s Orthodox Jewish community. This antisemitic and hateful symbol has no place in our society.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A neo-Nazi has been jailed for three years for continuing to be a member of the far-right terror group National Action after they had been named as a proscribed organisation.

David Musins, 36, pleaded guilty to belonging to National Action, contrary to section 11 of the Terrorism Act 2000. He is one of at least 25 members to have received custodial sentences since the group was banned in December 2016.

National Action was proscribed by the British Government following repeated calls by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others.

Mr Musins’s online activity dating back to early 2016 saw him engage with the fascist Iron March forum, publishing posts that demonstrated an interest in National Socialism.

Soon after, Mr Musins took part in a National Action meeting in London, a training camp organised by the far-right group, Legion, which combined combat training with lessons in neo-Nazi ideology. Later, Mr Musins went to a National Action rally in Darlington alongside other groups like the Scottish Defence League and the North-West Infidels.

When officers from the Metropolitan Police raided Mr Musin’s address in late 2017, they found clothing and spraypaint which connected him to National Action, and a USB stick that contained a digital journal with information about his time at the Legion training camp, and pictures of Mr Musins alongside others giving a Nazi salute.

Sentencing Mr Musins at the Old Bailey on 27th May to three years’ imprisonment with an extended period on licence of twelve months, Judge Anthony Leonard QC said: “That you left the group voluntarily is particularly significant, but it cannot expunge your earlier behaviour, which is abhorrent.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism closely monitors the far-right, which remains a dangerous threat to the Jewish community and other minority groups.

A white supremacist and Nazi sympathiser who reportedly carried a photograph of himself with a “Hitler moustache” and haircut, has been convicted in a Washington D.C. federal court for his part in the Capitol riots of 6th January 2020.

Timothy Hale-Cusanelli worked at a naval weapons station in New Jersey and served as an Army reservist before his arrest for storming the Capitol. He was caught on camera shouting profanities at police.

Evidence included text messages sent by Mr Hale-Cusanelli allegedly containing antisemitic, racist and homophobic slurs, and suggestions of how the 2020 election results could be overturned.

Jurors also saw a video of him appearing to attempt to wave other rioters inside the Capitol through a skylight and heard a post-riot conversation secretly recorded by a roommate at the naval base, who reported him to the Naval Criminal Investigation Service.

His mobile phone reportedly held photos of him with a Hitler-style moustache and haircut, but Judge Trevor McFadden barred prosecutors from using the photos as evidence.

Mr Hale-Cusanelli, who identifies as “half-Jewish and half-Puerto Rican”, was described by his lawyer as someone who made “extreme statements to get attention.”

One juror told a local TV channel hat he was troubled by Mr Hale-Cusanelli’s use of antisemitic slurs, given his testimony that he was “half-Jewish”.

Mr Hale-Cusanelli is due for sentencing in September.

According to the FBI, over 60 percent of hate crimes against a religious minority are motivated by antisemitism. Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on antisemitic incidents throughout the United States.

image credit: United States Department of Justice

An Uber Eats delivery driver may be facing hate crimes charges after he allegedly threatened Jewish students at a Toronto-based school.

Kyle McLeod, 21, is accused of cycling through Yeshiva Gedolah and confronting students with the claim that he would “kill 30 Jews today”. When the yeshiva’s cook asked Mr McLeod to leave, Mr McLeod is alleged to have assaulted him.

The cook then detained Mr McLeod and waited for the police to arrive, when it was apparently discovered that Mr McLeod was armed with a knife.

Director of Policy at the Toronto-based Friends of Simon Wiesenthal Centre, Jaime Kirzner-Roberts, said: “It is extremely troubling that a man with a weapon violently threatened people at a yeshiva and, even more disturbingly, yelled that he wanted to kill Jews. Such an attack comes on the heels of the Toronto Police Service’s most recent annual hate crime report that once again showed the city’s Jewish community as the most targeted group.”

“Antisemitism has absolutely no place in our city,” tweeted Toronto Mayor John Tory.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.