A man who believed that the government is controlled by a “Jewish elite” has been jailed for six-and-a-half years on terror charges.

At the Birmingham Crown Court trial last year, Oliver Lewin, 38, from Coalville, Leicestershire, was found guilty of preparing terrorist acts.

The verdict came despite Mr Lewin’s denial that he was planning on carrying out reconnaissance of potential targets, buying equipment, creating hideouts, and attempting to recruit others.

The defendant’s targets included transmitter masts and transport infrastructure.

Mr Lewin was said to have posted messages in a channel on the social media platform Telegram, which had been infiltrated by police officers, where he issued a “call to arms” and suggested “fire-bombing” sheds in the Sutton Coldfield of Birmingham.

During the trial last year, prosecutor Annabel Darlow KC said: “That is one of the UK’s most important transmission sites and is in fact the main broadcasting site for the Birmingham and West Midlands area, supporting TV and radio broadcasting services for many millions of users.”

Ms Darlow added that “Mr Lewin, in fact, stated his goal was to topple the British government. He believed that it was dominated by a Jewish elite who took orders from Israel…He saw the spread of coronavirus across the world as triggering what he termed the emergence of a Chinese Communist system.”

Mr Lewin reportedly admitted that he had purchased equipment, however, he allegedly told officers that he had no intention of carrying out an attack, arguing that he was just a “fantasist” engaging in “role play”.

According to the prosecution, Mr Lewin additionally said that he believed “white people across Europe were being systematically killed by the vaccine” in a “planned genocide”.

During a search of Mr Lewin’s address, police discovered an uncompleted manual, entitled “Civilian Resistance Operations Manual”. 

In the manual, Mr Lewin wrote: “What we can be certain of is that we are seeing the emergence of a Chinese Communist system that is ever accelerating with rapidity. We are not a Communist country and should fight with everything we have to prevent it.”

After the trial, West Midlands Head of Counter Terrorism policing Detective Chief Superintendent Mark Payne, said: “Lewin claimed he was a fantasist but it is clear he took the steps to carry out reconnaissance of targets to attack, bought equipment and tools, dug hide-outs and tried to recruit and train others. 

“He wanted to advance a political cause by damaging property and wiping out media organisations. Extremists use this kind of ideology to create discord, distrust and fear among our communities and we strive to counter this.”

Last year, a study found that about half of all references to the Holocaust on the encrypted messaging service, Telegram, either distort the facts about the genocide of the Jewish people, or deny that it happened at all.

Campaign Against Antisemitism closely monitors the far-right, which remains a dangerous threat to the Jewish community and other minority groups.

Image credit: West Midlands Police

A TikTok user whose videos involve him performing pranks on members of the public has reportedly been arrested for “assaulting a member of the Jewish community”.

The user, whose real name is Bacari Ogarro but goes by the online name ‘Mizzy’, appeared to confirm on his Instagram account that he had been arrested by posting an image of the police statement, adding that he had been held for 36 hours by police for a video involving an identifiably Jewish boy last year.

According to the police statement, the arrest was “a result of the Shomrim notifying police and sharing footage of the assault which has been circulated on social media.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over five hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than five times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Video footage on Twitter appears to show a Jewish mother and her children, one of whom is believed to be a three-year-old, being yelled at on a London bus.

In the extended footage seen by Campaign Against Antisemitism, a man appears to shout: “It’s not your religion, it’s the Black Hebrews’. You keep it from them.”

A woman can be heard calling to the driver “Can you open the door please?” while the man continues yelling next to the identifiably Jewish children.

The alleged incident occurred on the 67 bus and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CHS 28280 19/01/23

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over five hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than five times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A Jewish man was reportedly abused on his way home from attending a synagogue last night when someone allegedly yelled at him: “You Jews have money.”

The alleged incident occurred in Clapton Common and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CHS 25206 19/01/23

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over five hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than five times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

It was reported that occupants of a black car yelled “Heil Hitler” at Jewish pedestrians in North London. 

Children were believed to have been present at the time.

The alleged incident occurred in Clapton Common and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: 4600863/23

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over five hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than five times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

CCTV footage released online appears to show a man spraying a liquid onto a Jewish mother and child.

In the footage, a woman can be seen pushing a small child in a pram whilst speaking on the phone. 

On the left of the screen, it then appears that a man wearing a baseball cap walks past the woman and sprays her with a liquid from a can in his hand. 

The woman can then be seen to have stopped walking in order to turn around and look at the man. 

The alleged incident occurred in Stamford Hill and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol, who has said that the man threw beer over the mother and child.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 720 06/01/23

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A Jewish family has reportedly been on the receiving end of targeted harassment by gang members in Stamford Hill.

The gang is believed to be associated with the nearby Webb Estate and is accused of harassing Jewish residents for years.

The alleged incident occurred in Stamford Hill and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 4151 09/01/23

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A man reportedly entered a synagogue and school in Stamford Hill and yelled: “I am going to blow the place up.”

A suspect was shortly arrested thereafter.

The alleged incident occurred in Stamford Hill and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 4645 10/01/23

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A conspiracy theorist who admitted defacing seventeen bus stops in London with graffiti, including the words “Jews and gays are aliens”, has been cleared of stirring up racial hatred.

Nicholas Lalchan, 47, from Edmonton, London, used a black marker pen to deface the bus stops, causing £100 of damage each time.

When he was charged, Mr Lalchan, who is Canadian, allegedly said: “New world order. The fourth Reich. We will see.”

Mr Lalchan was convicted of stirring up racial hatred by a jury at Aldersgate House Nightingale Court in central London in September 2021, having admitted possessing a marker pen with intent to cause criminal damage and being convicted of doing so with racial or religious motivation, which he had denied.

When police searched his home, they reportedly found leaflets, marker pens, maps of bus routes and a USB stick containing pictures that referenced Jewish people and conspiracy theories.

Judge Gerard Pounder told Mr Lalchan: “All it takes is for a small Jewish child to see this, and for them to get very upset. You were deliberately hostile and you aimed it at a specific group of people, whether that be gay people, a Jewish priest [sic] or Jewish people.”

Mr Lalchan’s lawyers then appealed against his conviction for stirring up racial hatred.

In the most recent trial, Prosecutor David Patience told the court: “It is not in dispute that Mr Lalchan wrote the graffiti on the bus stops. He admitted that in the witness box. That written material was clearly threatening, abusive or insulting. 

“The most obvious example I suggest is the phrase ‘Jews and gays are grey aliens’…Hatred of Jews is part and parcel of his belief system in relation to the new world order.”

According to Mr Patience, antisemitic cartoons had been founded downloaded on Mr Lalchan’s computer.

“The graffiti differed slightly from bus stop. It referred, the prosecution say, to bizarre conspiracy theories,” Mr Patience said, adding that the graffiti “encouraged people to search on YouTube and Google to find out about [the theories].”

The graffiti reportedly included references to “the Rothchild Trillions”, “Talmud quote” and “child rape assembly line”, as well as: “Beware malevolent aliens e.g. Jews and gays.”

Mr Patience added that “This graffiti was daubed on bus stops in areas of north west London, which the prosecution suggest have large Jewish communities, such as Edgware, Hendon, Finchley. It was seen by Jewish people, and others, who were distressed by what they saw and reported it to the police.”

Kerry Moore, defending, said that Mr Lalchan “puts Jews and gays together. That is not an ethnic group. Gays are not an ethnic group.”

Mr Lalchan told the court that “We’re in the trap and they’re closing the lid. They’re in control of the finances, in control of Facebook, the media…As a Christian, Jesus Christ is my messiah so I’m trying to get people who don’t believe in God.”

He added that the New World Order is “a socialist, communist kind of thing” which is “in control of the world’s economy, control the money, and control the people.”

Mr Moore said “If it was truly [Mr Lalchan’s] motivation to combat and deal with a new world order to convert people to Christianity then his intention was not to stir up racial hatred,” adding that “’His obsession is religious, not racial.”

The jury failed to reach a verdict against him on the charge of racially or religiously aggravated criminal damage, and so the count was dropped by the prosecution.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

CCTV footage appears to show a man trying to punch a Jewish woman.

The suspect reportedly asked the woman “Are you Jewish?” before allegedly attempting to hit her.

It is understood that the suspect has been arrested.

The alleged incident occurred in the Grodzinski bakery in Stamford Hill and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: 4600142/23

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A man reportedly claimed to be in possession of a gun after allegedly ranting about Jews.

The alleged incident occurred in Stamford Hill and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

According to Shomrim, the suspect yelled “Jews don’t give me a job, I have a gun,” before robbing a nearby shop’s cash register. 

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 3129 03/01/23

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A Jewish father and child were both reported to have been physically assaulted by a man in Stamford Hill.

The Jewish father was walking with his one-year-old child and his wife, who is eight months pregnant, when his child stopped walking in the middle of the street.

A passer-by, described as a Black male with short hair and a green jacket, allegedly then pushed the child and yelled: “Move on f***ing Jew, I will stab and kill you.”

The child’s father then stepped in, telling the suspect to leave his child alone. The suspect reportedly then pulled out a lighter and used the metal component to cut the man’s neck and hand. 

The alleged incident occurred on Olinda Road in Stamford Hill at 15:10 on 24th December and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 1544 25/12/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A van driver reportedly abused a Jewish man and threw stones at his face following a disagreement over parking.

The van driver then allegedly yelled: “You Jewish people you think you can park where you want.”

The alleged incident occurred on the corner of Cazenove Road and Fountayne Road in Stamford Hill and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 3899 20/12/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Google

A man in Wigan was jailed on Wednesday after posting antisemitic content.

Stuart Sutton, 45, who was brought to the attention of Counter Terrorism Policing North West (CTPNW) by CST, posted antisemitic and racist material over an eight-month period in 2021. 

CPTNW conducted a search of his home on 2nd February of this year, arresting him shortly thereafter. 

Mr Sutton has been sentenced to two years in prison, reduced to sixteen months owing to his early guilty plea.

Detective Superintendent Andy Meeks, of the CTPNW Investigation Department, said that “We would always encourage people to report acts of racial hatred whether that’s in person or online,” while Amanda Bomsztyk, CST’s Northern Regional Director, said that “It is important that such extreme Jew-hatred and racism leads to arrest and imprisonment.”

A woman was reportedly harassed on the London Underground by two men, one of whom is believed to have made sexual advances.

The woman was travelling on the Piccadilly line from Arsenal to Kings Cross at 14:00 on 14th December when one of the men allegedly said: “We hate the Jews.”

It is understood that the woman then confronted the man, whereupon the man was purported to have made sexual advances toward her.

When the woman refused his alleged advances, both men then reportedly “attacked” her with an “array of racism and taunting”. 

According to the woman, she was then chased off of the carriage by the men, and later stated that “not one person stuck up for me on that train.”

A man who reportedly believes that the government is controlled by a “Jewish elite” was convicted of terror charges on Monday.

Oliver Lewin, 38, from Coalville, Leicestershire, pleaded not guilty to a charge of preparing terrorist acts at Birmingham Crown Court last month.

However, despite Mr Lewin’s denial that he was planning on carrying out reconnaissance of potential targets, buying equipment, creating hideouts, and attempting to recruit others, he has been found guilty of plotting to topple the Government.

The defendant’s targets included transmitter masts and transport infrastructure.

Mr Lewin was said to have posted messages in a channel on the social media platform Telegram, which had been infiltrated by police officers, where he issued a “call to arms” and suggested “fire-bombing” sheds in the Sutton Coldfield of Birmingham.

During the trial last month, prosecutor Annabel Darlow KC said: “That is one of the UK’s most important transmission sites and is in fact the main broadcasting site for the Birmingham and West Midlands area, supporting TV and radio broadcasting services for many millions of users.”

Ms Darlow added that “Mr Lewin, in fact, stated his goal was to topple the British government. He believed that it was dominated by a Jewish elite who took orders from Israel…He saw the spread of coronavirus across the world as triggering what he termed the emergence of a Chinese Communist system.”

Mr Lewin reportedly admitted that he had purchased equipment, however, he allegedly told officers that he had no intention of carrying out an attack, arguing that he was just a “fantasist” engaging in “role play”.

According to the prosecution, Mr Lewin additionally said that he believed “white people across Europe were being systematically killed by the vaccine” in a “planned genocide”.

During a search of Mr Lewin’s address, police discovered an uncompleted manual, entitled “Civilian Resistance Operations Manual”. 

In the manual, Mr Lewin wrote: “What we can be certain of is that we are seeing the emergence of a Chinese Communist system that is ever accelerating with rapidity. We are not a Communist country and should fight with everything we have to prevent it.”

After the trial, West Midlands Head of Counter Terrorism policing Detective Chief Superintendent Mark Payne, said: “Lewin claimed he was a fantasist but it is clear he took the steps to carry out reconnaissance of targets to attack, bought equipment and tools, dug hide-outs and tried to recruit and train others. 

“He wanted to advance a political cause by damaging property and wiping out media organisations. Extremists use this kind of ideology to create discord, distrust and fear among our communities and we strive to counter this.”

Earlier this year, a study found that about half of all references to the Holocaust on the encrypted messaging service, Telegram, either distort the facts about the genocide of the Jewish people, or deny that it happened at all.

Campaign Against Antisemitism closely monitors the far-right, which remains a dangerous threat to the Jewish community and other minority groups.

Image credit: West Midlands Police

An identifiably Jewish man returning from a synagogue was reportedly threatened by a man wielding a chain.

The alleged aggressor was said to have used the chain into forcing the Jewish man to walk with him.

It was reportedly only when pedestrians passed by to offer help that the aggressor fled the scene.

The incident, seemingly captured on video, took place in Stamford Hill at 23:55 on 9th December and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: 6554 13/12

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A man has reportedly shouted “I’m Adolf Hitler and I will kill the Jews” at a thirteen-year-old Jewish girl in North London.

The man was also alleged to have made a gun-like gesture with his umbrella.

The incident occurred on the 253 bus in Clapton Common near Stamford Hill and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 2596 20/12/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A Jewish family was harassed on a London bus when a man told them to “Go back to Stamford Hill.”

The man who reportedly accosted the mother, fourteen-year-old girl and baby is said to be a white man of Irish descent.

He was also alleged to have said “You’re only here because of the Irish,” before reportedly getting close to the fourteen-year-old and saying “I love you”.

According to the woman, who is understood to be distraught following the incident, the bus driver did not intervene despite fellow passengers shouting to him to stop the bus. 

The incident took place after the family boarded the 67 bus at the Brampton Park stop at 14:00 on 7th December and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 7909 10/12/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A notorious French Holocaust denier living in Britain has denied his consent to being extradited to France, following his recent arrest by Police Scotland officers in Anstruther.

The arrest of Vincent Reynouard, 53, came after he spent two years on the run.

Mr Reynouard was sentenced to jail for four months on 25th November 2020 by a court in Paris and again in January 2021 for six months, in addition to fines. His latest conviction is in relation to a series of antisemitic postings on Facebook and Twitter and a 2018 YouTube video for which fellow French Holocaust denier, Hervé Ryssen (also known as Hervé Lalin), received a seventeen-month-jail term earlier that year.

However, Mr Reynouard fled the country before serving his sentence and settled in the UK, where he reportedly worked as a private tutor teaching children mathematics, physics and chemistry. Private tutors are not required to undergo background checks.

According to far-right activist Fabrice Jérôme Bourbon — who was himself convicted in December 2021 in connection with denial of war crimes and defending Hervé Ryssen and fined €8,000 — Mr Reynouard was visited by local police and Interpol on 25th October 2021.

Mr Bourbon elaborated in his far-right weekly magazine, Rivarol, claiming that police and Interpol visited Mr Reynouard’s flat at the time, believed to be in Kent, at around 16:00 in order to apprehend him and potentially initiate extradition proceedings. Mr Reynouard allegedly concealed his identity and fled the scene, remaining at large.

In November, he was finally arrested near Edinburgh. In the intervening months, Campaign Against Antisemitism has been cooperating with French Jewish groups seeking Mr Reynouard’s extradition to France. Along with Lord Austin, an Honorary Patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism, we have corresponded with police forces and prosecutors in the UK and Interpol in an effort to locate Mr Reynouard and bring him to justice. We are delighted that he has finally been caught.

Scottish police reportedly arrested him at an address near the Scottish capital, where he was apparently living under a false identity. He was brought before a judge on the same day and refused extradition to France.

Earlier this week, Mr Reynouard’s lawyer again told the court that the defendant “does not consent to extradition to France.”

He added: “I was instructed at about 18:00 last night and I do require some time to consider the matter. There is a matter that is, I think, of legal significance that I need more time to consider.”

This pronouncement arrives after it emerged that Mr Reynouard wrote that he expects to spend “five years or more” in a French prison, should the extradition request be successful. 

In his letter to Rivarol, Mr Reynouard appealed to his supporters — whom, it has been reported, had been sending him donations whilst he was on the run — for pens, paper and various stationary so that he may write his memoirs, which he proposed be published by the far-right magazine.

“These memoirs are part of my revisionist mission, a mission which consists in giving answers to others,” he said. “Hence my desire to hide nothing, including the events that argue against me. Indeed, a true story is much richer in lessons than a pro domo plea or—worse—than a novel built for its own advantage.”

On his arrest, he wrote: “Why this decision? Because after my arrest, four days ago, by the Scottish authorities, I have no illusions: the French authorities who, on June 25, 2021, issued a European arrest warrant against me, will obtain my extradition. Back in France, I will serve several prison sentences for ‘disputing crimes against humanity’.

“In total, these sentences exceed 24 months (29 months to be exact). There will undoubtedly be other convictions for the same reason, because since my exile in Great Britain, in June 2015, I have published many revisionist videos likely to fall under the Gayssot law. Several are not time-barred, either having been published less than a year ago or already being sued. Therefore, I expect to stay in prison for five years or more.”

Last month, Mr Reynouard appeared in court where it was heard that he had been granted legal aid. He will be back in court next month, with a full extradition hearing scheduled for February.

Mr Reynouard faces a sentence of almost two years in a French prison, in addition to any further sentence in relation to other ongoing proceedings.

The Office Central de Lutte Contre les Crimes Contre l’Humanité, les Génocides et les Crimes de Guerre (OCLCH) — the arm of the French gendarmerie that specialises in hate crime and war crimes — has been leading the investigation.

Mr Reynouard’s first Holocaust denial conviction was in 1991 for distributing leaflets denying the existence of the gas chambers at concentration camps. Holocaust denial has been a criminal offence in France since 1990. He has been convicted on numerous occasions and his subsequent sentences include multiple prison terms and a €10,000 fine.

Mr Reynouard is alleged to have ties to Catholic fundamentalist groups that deny the Holocaust. In a recent analysis of the French far-right, the newspaper Liberation claimed that Mr Reynouard and Mr Ryssen are key members of a network of propagandists dedicated to the denial and distortion of the Holocaust.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Vincent Reynouard is a despicable Holocaust denier who has repeatedly been convicted by French courts. For him to have evaded justice, only to settle in the UK as a private tutor teaching children, is intolerable, which is why we worked with French Jewish organisations to secure his extradition so that he faces the consequences of his abhorrent incitement. We are pleased that, after months of investigations and, along with Lord Austin, correspondence with police and the criminal justice authorities, he has now finally been caught. We will continue to do everything within our power to ensure that he is extradited and serves his sentence in France.”

A visibly Jewish woman has reportedly been verbally and physically assaulted in North London. 

A man is alleged to have shouted at the woman, calling her a “dirty Jew”. 

He then reportedly ripped her shopping bag away from her, causing the contents of the bag to spill out onto the street, laughing as he did so.

The incident reportedly occurred on Reizel Close in Stamford Hill.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 2496 07/12/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Google

An Essex family has appeared in court on charges of stirring up racial hatred through the dissemination of far-right songs.

Robert Talland, 56, an accused neo-Nazi music producer, and his daughter, Rosie Talland, 30, and son, Stephen Talland, 33, are all charged with conspiracy to incite racial hatred through the distribution of sound recordings between 1st January 2019 and 10th October 2020.

Rosie and Stephen allegedly performed in the band Embers of an Empire and were said to be involved with the Rampage Productions record label, which reportedly caters to the neo-Nazi music scene.

One of the charges involves the distribution of a song by Embers of an Empire.

A second charge sees the siblings accused of inciting racial hatred over songs performed at a club in Leeds on 21st October 2021.

Robert Talland faces several charges, one of which accuses him of possession of the songs “Flame of the gods” by Mistreat and “Decase of defiance” by Squadron, a band who appear to have utilised Nazi iconography during their live performances. The songs are allegedly threatening, abusive or insulting and intended to stir up racial hatred.

He faces two further charges of disseminating a terrorist publication.

At the preliminary hearing, during which the Talland family did not enter any pleas, Mr Justice Sweeney informed the defendants of their bail conditions, which included a ban from partaking in music events commemorating Ian Stuart Donaldson, the late singer of the far-right band Skrewdriver. 

The family is also prohibited from having involvement with Rampage Productions or the far-right group Blood & Honour, who are believed to be active in working with musicians whose lyrics promote white supremacy.

Campaign Against Antisemitism closely monitors the far-right, which remains a dangerous threat to the Jewish community and other minority groups.

Lufthansa is reportedly paying £16,000 to each Jewish passenger who was barred from boarding one of its flights earlier this year.

The airline had previously apologised after apparently barring all visibly Jewish passengers from a flight due to a mask dispute with a few passengers who happened to be Jewish.

It was reported that there was a dispute between staff managing the boarding of flight LH1334 from Frankfurt to Budapest on 4th May and some visibly Jewish passengers, reportedly over the wearing of masks. The pilot then apparently decided that no visibly Jewish passengers were to be allowed on to the flight, regardless of whether they were part of the same group or were prepared to wear a mask.

A video was recorded appearing to show a member of the airline’s ground staff explaining to a passenger that he was being prevented from boarding because he was Jewish.

The Jewish passengers were predominantly American and many had flown from New York in order to visit the grave of a Hasidic rabbi. Around 100 passengers were affected.

The German airline apologised and said that it was investigating the incident, which has caused an uproar in the Jewish world.

In a statement, the airline said: “Although we are not commenting on the details, we can confirm that Lufthansa endeavors to settle the claims with all of the passengers denied boarding on 4th May, 2022.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism in Germany, which have increased considerably.

A Jewish man was threatened outside JW3, a Jewish cultural centre in London, last week.

The incident occurred at around 22:00 on 27th November when the man, who was wearing a kippah (skullcap) at the time, was approached by a group of three, all wearing hoods.

The man was talking to his friends when the group walked past and one member yelled “Free Palestine” at him.

A verbal exchange took place between the two groups, culminating in one of the aggressors telling the man: “You better watch yourself, boy.”

Image credit: Google

An elderly Jewish man was reportedly assaulted in Leeds in what the police are deeming a possible hate crime.

West Yorkshire Police have stated that at approximately 18:55 on 26th October, a cyclist travelling in the wrong direction without lights swore and threatened a man in his seventies following an altercation.

A security guard from a nearby Aldi intervened and the suspect left the scene, only to return a short moment later.

The incident happened on Stanningley Road, in Bramley.

Anyone with relevant information is asked to call PC 1918 Keany at Elland Road on 101, quoting crime reference 13220591822.

Image credit: West Yorkshire Police

A man has been arrested after he yelled pro-Nazi sentiments whilst performing Nazi salutes in a Seattle airport.

The man, reported to be Nicholas Edward Letney, can be seen in video footage yelling “Seig Heil…race war” to shocked onlookers.

“The Jews got what they deserved,” the man can be heard shouting. “You’re a f***ing alien. An alien and a reptilian.”

In separate footage which shows the man getting arrested, he appears to yell: “You ever heard of the First Amendment? You violated that ‘cause I’m a Nazi.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the United States.

A man has been sentenced after yelling “I’ll blow you up, you f***ing Jew” to a Jewish man earlier this year.

Earlier this month, Paul Daniel Newman, 57, was found guilty at Stratford Magistrates Court of racially or religiously aggravated disorderly behaviour as well as causing fear or provocation of violence.

At this week’s sentencing, Mr Newman of Ealing was handed 20 weeks imprisonment, suspended for 18 months.

He was also ordered to comply with 30 days rehabilitation activity requirement and six months in an alcohol treatment programme. 

In addition, he must also pay £625 prosecution costs and £154 victim surcharge.

Varinder Hayre, CPS District Crown Prosecutor and London North Hate Crime lead, said: “London is a diverse City and it is completely unacceptable for the Jewish community to be subjected to this kind of antisemitic hatred. Hate crime will not be tolerated and will be prosecuted robustly. 

“I’d also like to thank the Metropolitan Police for their diligence in helping to ensure justice for the victim and providing victim support.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The Home Secretary, Suella Braverman, has expressed concern after Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) dropped all charges against the remaining suspects in a notorious convoy that drove through London in May 2021.

As fighting flared in Gaza, a convoy waving the flag of the Palestinian Authority set off from the north of England, heading into London. Men in one of the cars shouted from a megaphone: “F*** the Jews…f*** all of them. F*** their mothers, f*** their daughters, and show your support for Palestine.” The speaker went on to call listeners to “Rape their [the Jews’] daughters”. The incident took place a very short distance from a synagogue and was condemned by the Prime Minister and Home Secretary.

The car was part of a convoy of some 200 cars displaying Palestinian Authority flags which started in Bradford, passing through Sheffield and Leicester down the M1 motorway before veering into Hendon and Golders Green, two North London neighbourhoods with large Jewish populations. According to witnesses, convoy participants shouted abuse at Jewish passersby, including: “Free Palestine! Go back to Poland”.

Ms Braverman said to the Home Affairs Select Committee hearing that, on the issue of tackling antisemitic hate crime, “enforcing against it is, in some regards, not sufficiently done,” adding: “I do share your concern.”

The Home Secretary said that she wanted to “take this issue away” but added that she would “not commit to a full review” as there were “many, many reviews going on at the home office and all for important reasons.”

In light of the dropped charges, Campaign Against Antisemitism has demanded that the Director of Public Prosecutions, Max Hill KC, “immediately explain this decision or resign” and is exploring its legal options.

The astounding news of the dropped charges against Mohammed Iftikhar Hanif, 27, and Jawaad Hussain, 24, comes four months after the announcement in July by the CPS that it had dropped charges against Asif Ali, 25, and Adil Mota, 26, who had also until then been suspected of being involved. 

This now means that all charges against the four original suspects have been dropped.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over five hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than five times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The Director General of MI5, the counter-intelligence and security agency, has warned of far-right extremists utilising 3D-printed guns.

Ken McCallum spoke of a danger of violence, adding that teenagers as young as thirteen are being recruited amid a “confused soup of hate” online spread by “right-wing extremist influencers”.

He added that MI5 had expressed concern over the far-right’s intent to procure “firearms in particular, whether illegally obtained, homemade or 3D-printed”.

“From the comfort of their bedrooms, individuals are easily able to access right-wing extremist spaces, network with each other and move towards a radical mindset,” he said. “Often weapons are sought for their own sake, well in advance of any specific targeting intent developing, making for difficult risk management judgments and forcing early intervention.”

Last year, a teenage neo-Nazi was jailed for eleven years after using the social media platform Telegram in his plan to kill his former friend, who is Asian, for allegedly sleeping with white women. The Old Bailey heard that Matthew Cronjager had attempted to obtain a 3D-printed gun or a sawn-off shotgun to commit the murder. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism closely monitors the far-right, which remains a dangerous threat to the Jewish community and other minority groups.

A notorious French Holocaust denier living in Britain appeared today in Edinburgh Sheriff Court, following his arrest by Police Scotland officers in Anstruther last week.

The arrest of Vincent Reynouard, 53, came after he spent two years on the run.

Mr Reynouard was sentenced to jail for four months on 25th November 2020 by a court in Paris and again in January 2021 for six months, in addition to fines. His latest conviction is in relation to a series of antisemitic postings on Facebook and Twitter and a 2018 YouTube video for which fellow French Holocaust denier, Hervé Ryssen (also known as Hervé Lalin), received a seventeen-month-jail term earlier that year.

However, Mr Reynouard fled the country before serving his sentence and settled in the UK, where he reportedly worked as a private tutor teaching children mathematics, physics and chemistry. Private tutors are not required to undergo background checks.

According to far-right activist Fabrice Jérôme Bourbon — who was himself convicted in December 2021 in connection with denial of war crimes and defending Hervé Ryssen and fined €8,000 — Mr Reynouard was visited by local police and Interpol on 25th October 2021.

Mr Bourbon elaborated in his far-right weekly magazine, Rivarol, claiming that police and Interpol visited Mr Reynouard’s flat at the time, believed to be in Kent, at around 16:00 in order to apprehend him and potentially initiate extradition proceedings. Mr Reynouard allegedly concealed his identity and fled the scene, remaining at large.

Last week, he was finally arrested near Edinburgh. In the intervening months, Campaign Against Antisemitism has been cooperating with French Jewish groups seeking Mr Reynouard’s extradition to France. Along with Lord Austin, an Honorary Patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism, we have corresponded with police forces and prosecutors in the UK and Interpol in an effort to locate Mr Reynouard and bring him to justice. We are delighted that he has finally been caught.

Scottish police reportedly arrested him at an address near the Scottish capital, where he was apparently living under a false identity. He was brought before a judge on the same day and refused extradition to France.

Today the court heard that Mr Reynouard has been granted legal aid. He will be back in court next month, with a full extradition hearing scheduled for February.

Mr Reynouard faces a sentence of almost two years in a French prison, in addition to any further sentence in relation to other ongoing proceedings.

The Office Central de Lutte Contre les Crimes Contre l’Humanité, les Génocides et les Crimes de Guerre (OCLCH) — the arm of the French gendarmerie that specialises in hate crime and war crimes — has been leading the investigation.

Mr Reynouard’s first Holocaust denial conviction was in 1991 for distributing leaflets denying the existence of the gas chambers at concentration camps. Holocaust denial has been a criminal offence in France since 1990. He has been convicted on numerous occasions and his subsequent sentences include multiple prison terms and a €10,000 fine.

Mr Reynouard is alleged to have ties to Catholic fundamentalist groups that deny the Holocaust. In a recent analysis of the French far-right, the newspaper Liberation claimed that Mr Reynouard and Mr Ryssen are key members of a network of propagandists dedicated to the denial and distortion of the Holocaust.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Vincent Reynouard is a despicable Holocaust denier who has repeatedly been convicted by French courts. For him to have evaded justice, only to settle in the UK as a private tutor teaching children, is intolerable, which is why we worked with French Jewish organisations to secure his extradition so that he faces the consequences of his abhorrent incitement. We are pleased that, after months of investigations and, along with Lord Austin, correspondence with police and the criminal justice authorities, he has now finally been caught. We will continue to do everything within our power to ensure that he is extradited and serves his sentence in France.”

A woman reportedly shouted antisemitic vitriol after coming across a house that she believed to be adorned with a Star of David.

However, the Kensal Rise house was in fact decorated with Christmas ornaments which the woman mistook for a Jewish symbol.

The woman reportedly yelled: “Oh my g-d, look, they’re Jews. Er, “f***ing Jew bastards.”

Footage of the incident was posted to the social media platform Nextdoor by one of the residents of the house.

“My son heard this from his room and it was caught on my Nest doorbell last night,” the resident said. “What they were looking at was an old rustic star Christmas decoration I have never taken down which evoked this antisemitic abuse.

“I’m not Jewish but we can all agree this is hate speech and is appalling.”

Another Nextdoor user said: “Regardless of whether you’re Jewish or not. It’s despicable! It makes me very concerned for my lovely Jewish friends, who are nothing but kind and giving.”

A brick was reportedly thrown through the window of a Stamford Hill synagogue during evening prayers.

The incident occurred on Cazenove Road in Stamford Hill.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: 4632068/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Jewish girls have reportedly been attacked on their way home from school.

There are believed to have been two assailants behind the alleged attack who were also reported to have screamed “Jew” at the girls. 

The incident occurred on Amhurst Park in Stamford Hill.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: 4632070/20

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Google

A man who reportedly believes that the government is controlled by a “Jewish elite” has appeared in court on terror charges.

Oliver Lewin, 38, from Coalville, Leicestershire, pleaded not guilty plea to a charge of preparing terrorist acts.

Mr Lewin is accused of carrying out reconnaissance of potential targets, buying equipment, creating hideouts, and attempting to recruit others, Birmingham Crown Court heard earlier today.

The defendant’s alleged targets included transmitter masts and transport infrastructure.

Prosecutor Annabel Darlow KC said: “By 2021, Oliver Lewin was deeply opposed to the government of the United Kingdom. Mr Lewin, in fact, stated his goal was to topple the British government. He believed that it was dominated by a Jewish elite who took orders from Israel.”

She added that “By 2021 he had determined on the use of action to achieve his aim of destabilising the Government. His chosen method of attack was to target communication systems and transport infrastructure.”

Mr Lewin was said to have posted messages in a channel on the social media platform Telegram, which had been infiltrated by police officers, where he issued a “call to arms” and suggested “fire-bombing” sheds in the Sutton Coldfield of Birmingham.

“That is one of the UK’s most important transmission sites and is in fact the main broadcasting site for the Birmingham and West Midlands area, supporting TV and radio broadcasting services for many millions of users,” Ms Darlow said.

Mr Lewin reportedly admitted that he had purchased equipment, however, he allegedly told officers that he had no intention of carrying out an attack, arguing that he was just a “fantasist” engaging in “role play”.

According to the prosecution, Mr Lewin additionally said that he believed “white people across Europe were being systematically killed by the vaccine” in a “planned genocide”.

Earlier this year, a study found that about half of all references to the Holocaust on the encrypted messaging service, Telegram, either distort the facts about the genocide of the Jewish people, or deny that it happened at all.

Campaign Against Antisemitism closely monitors the far-right, which remains a dangerous threat to the Jewish community and other minority groups.

Image credit: Google

A Belgian court has refused to extradite a radical imam who fled France to escape deportation.

Hassan Iquioussen, an imam with a history of making inflammatory comments about Jews, was arrested in Belgium in September pursuant to a European arrest warrant that was issued after he went on the run in the wake of a court ruling in France permitting the French Government to deport him.

This week, a Belgian court upheld a ruling dismissing a request from France for Mr Iquioussen’s extradition.

The decision is the latest episode in the saga of Mr Iquioussen’s deportation. Previously, the French authorities struggled to persuade French courts to permit them to deport the imam. The French Government even vowed to change the law in order to be able to deport him, but that became no longer necessary after a decision from France’s Conseil d’Etat, the supreme court for administrative justice, which overturned a previous ruling that suspended Mr Iquioussen’s deportation order.

That final decision rejected the claims of Mr Iquioussen’s defence that deporting the imam to Morocco would not be a disproportionate interference with his right to lead a normal previous and family life.

Interior Minister Gérald Darmanin, who has previously said that Mr Iquioussen is an enemy of France who had “no place” in the country, hailed the decision as “a big victory for the Republic,” adding of the imam: “He will be deported from national soil.”

The imam then fled France and was found in Belgium, where he currently remains.

Mr Iquioussen is a Moroccan citizen who has lived in France all his life but who has become a symbol of President Emmanuel Macron’s battle against Islamism, whom the President accuses of rejecting French laws and values. He did not take up French citizenship at a younger age and his attempts to do so since then have failed.

During the court hearings, prosecutors highlighted statements allegedly made by Mr Iquioussen in 2003 and 2004 in which he described Jews as “miserly usurers” and claimed that Zionists had “connived with Hitler…to push Jews to leave Germany”. He also reportedly said: “The Zionists said…there has to be someone in Europe who does bad things to Jews so that they…will leave [for Israel].” They also noted a conference in 2012 at which Mr Iquioussen allegedly described terrorist attacks in the West as “pseudo-attacks whose objective is to frighten non-Muslims so that they are afraid of Islam and of Muslims,” and claimed that he has also publicly denied the 1915 Armenian genocide and pointed to allegedly misogynistic comments.

In a post on Facebook, Mr Iquioussen “strongly contested” the allegations that he had used “discriminatory or violent language.” His supporters argue that the comments cited in the case were dated and taken out of context, and pointed to other statements by the imam, such as: “We have never had, and have, nothing against Jews because Islam is a religion based on justice.”

Mr Iquioussen had said that he was considering an appeal to the European Court of Human Rights, before fleeing the jurisdiction.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism in France, Belgium and throughout Europe.

A heavily pregnant Jewish woman has reportedly been abused in a taxi.

The incident occurred after the woman called a minicab service to collect her from Homerton University Hospital. 

Upon getting in the cab, the driver allegedly said to the woman: “This is the last time I am taking Jews as you kill Muslims in Israel.”

 If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 8112 15/11/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A war memorial has been desecrated with a swastika and a neo-Nazi flag in North Wales.

Police are now investigating after the war memorial in Flintshire war was vandalised on Remembrance Sunday.

Inspector Iwan Jones called the incident a “distressing and distasteful hate crime,” adding “We will do all we can to identify those responsible.”

Buckley Councillor David Ellis said: “Last night the memorial was desecrated with a nazi slogan this is the ultimate mark of disrespect to those who gave everything. There is CCTV around the area and it will be checked by the Police.

“A big thank you to Steve Blackwell of Blackwell Memorials for his help and assistance in removing the Nazi slogan and Mark Edwards of Streetscene for his quick action.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism closely monitors the far-right, which remains a dangerous threat to the Jewish community and other minority groups.

A notorious French Holocaust denier living in Britain, who was convicted by the French courts last year, has been arrested near Edinburgh after spending two years on the run.

Vincent Reynouard, 53, was sentenced to jail for four months on 25th November 2020 by a court in Paris and again in January 2021 for six months, in addition to fines. His latest conviction is in relation to a series of antisemitic postings on Facebook and Twitter and a 2018 YouTube video for which fellow French Holocaust denier, Hervé Ryssen (also known as Hervé Lalin), received a seventeen-month-jail term earlier that year.

However, Mr Reynouard fled the country before serving his sentence and settled in the UK, where he reportedly worked as a private tutor teaching children mathematics, physics and chemistry. Private tutors are not required to undergo background checks.

According to far-right activist Fabrice Jérôme Bourbon — who was himself convicted in December 2021 in connection with denial of war crimes and defending Hervé Ryssen and fined €8,000 — Mr Reynouard was visited by local police and Interpol on 25th October 2021.

Mr Bourbon elaborated in his far-right weekly magazine, Rivarol, claiming that police and Interpol visited Mr Reynouard’s flat at the time, believed to be in Kent, at around 16:00 in order to apprehend him and potentially initiate extradition proceedings. Mr Reynouard allegedly concealed his identity and fled the scene, remaining at large.

On 11th November 2022, he was finally arrested in Fife, near Edinburgh. In the intervening months, Campaign Against Antisemitism has been cooperating with French Jewish groups seeking Mr Reynouard’s extradition to France. Along with Lord Austin, an Honorary Patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism, we have corresponded with police forces and prosecutors in the UK and Interpol in an effort to locate Mr Reynouard and bring him to justice. We are delighted that he has finally been caught.

Scottish police reportedly arrested him in his hotel room in the Scottish capital, where he was apparently living under a false identity. He was brought before a judge on the same day and refused extradition to France. He is being held pending a further hearing. French authorities are anxious to ensure his return to France to serve his sentence.

Mr Reynouard faces a sentence of almost two years in a French prison, in addition to any further sentence in relation to other ongoing proceedings.

The Office Central de Lutte Contre les Crimes Contre l’Humanité, les Génocides et les Crimes de Guerre (OCLCH) — the arm of the French gendarmerie that specialises in hate crime and war crimes — has been leading the investigation.

General Jean-Philippe Reiland of the OCLCH said: “Vincent Reynouard was able to be arrested thanks to a huge effort of international cooperation, and in particular thanks to our British counterparts. Despite the legal difficulties that may exist, the Office will not let go of the ideologues who propagate hatred, wherever they are,”

Mr Reynouard’s first Holocaust denial conviction was in 1991 for distributing leaflets denying the existence of the gas chambers at concentration camps. Holocaust denial has been a criminal offence in France since 1990. He has been convicted on numerous occasions and his subsequent sentences include multiple prison terms and a €10,000 fine.

Mr Reynouard is alleged to have ties to Catholic fundamentalist groups that deny the Holocaust. In a recent analysis of the French far-right, the newspaper Liberation claimed that Mr Reynouard and Mr Ryssen are key members of a network of propagandists dedicated to the denial and distortion of the Holocaust.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Vincent Reynouard is a despicable Holocaust denier who has repeatedly been convicted by French courts. For him to have evaded justice, only to settle in the UK as a private tutor teaching children, is intolerable, which is why we worked with French Jewish organisations to secure his extradition so that he faces the consequences of his abhorrent incitement. We are pleased that, after months of investigations and, along with Lord Austin, correspondence with police and the criminal justice authorities, he has now finally been caught. We will continue to do everything within our power to ensure that he is extradited and serves his sentence in France.”

Abdullah Qureshi has been found guilty of the reinstated racially/religiously aggravated charges that the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) initially dropped, before intervention by Campaign Against Antisemitism and other groups.

On 7th April, Mr Qureshi, 28, from Dewsbury in West Yorkshire, pleaded guilty at Thames Magistrates’ Court to two counts of assault by beating and one count of grievous bodily harm with intent. The charges related to a series of assaults on 18th August 2021 in Stamford Hill in which five religious Jews in the North London neighbourhood were violently attacked.

In one incident at 18:41 on the day of the attacks last August, an Orthodox Jewish man was struck in the face with what appeared to be a bottle. In another at 19:10, a child was slapped on the back of the head, and in yet another at 20:30, a 64-year-old victim was struck and left unconscious on the ground, suffering facial injuries and a broken ankle. Two further incidents were also alleged.

The incidents received significant media attention at the time, and the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, condemned “this appalling attack,” adding: “Let me be clear, racist abuse and hate crime, including antisemitism, have absolutely no place in our city.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism then revealed that the CPS had dropped the racially/religiously aggravated element of those charges as part of a plea deal with Mr Qureshi. After we, Shomrim, CST and other communal organisations made representations to the CPS, it agreed to reinstate the aggravated elements, but Mr Qureshi appeared in court to resist the reinstatement of the aggravated element.

In August, Stratford Magistrates’ Court agreed to reinstate the racially/religiously aggravated element to the charges against Mr Qureshi, and, at a further hearing at Thames Magistrates’ Court, he pleaded not guilty.

At today’s trial at Stratford Magistrates’ Court, Mr Qureshi did not have legal representation, having previously dismissed his lawyer prior to pleading not guilty over the summer. The court heard how the victim of the GBH assault broke four bones in his foot in the incident, requiring three screws and a wire to be inserted and leaving him in severe pain physically and mentally. He had dizzy spells lasting for two weeks and said that he was told that he may have PTSD. He told the court of his trauma, revealing that “I’m not the same confident person I used to be,” that he is now “scared and every noise makes me jump” and that he feels that he is “still traumatised.”

A second victim described the incident as leaving him “shocked and traumatised”. A teacher, he recounted that he could not teach for several days after the incident and that he is also worried that the children in his school could be attacked in the neighbourhood as well. “I came here today,” he explained, “so that this doesn’t happen again to other people of my community.”

Both victims testified behind a screen so that Mr Qureshi could not see them.

A third victim, who was fourteen at the time of the attack and is now sixteen, chose to submit a statement to the court, which was read out, rather than attending in person because, he explained, “If I go to court and he [Mr Qureshi] sees me again afterwards he may do something to me again.”

District Crown Prosecutor Varinder Hayre accused Mr Qureshi of being motivated by hostility towards Jewish people, exhibiting screenshots on his phone that were uncovered by police, one of which, described as a “Dua [Islamic prayer] for protection from your enemy,” said: “Oh Allah, we ask you to restrain them by their necks and we seek refuge from you in their evil.” Mr Qureshi denied that this was a reference to Jewish people but rather to evil spirits, and that in any event it was not his message but rather had been sent to him.

The court also saw previously unseen footage taken from a kosher grocery store a few hours before the attacks, where Mr Qureshi appeared to engage in a dispute with the workers in the shop who accused him of trying to steal water and attempted to retrieve it from him. The prosecutor argued that Mr Qureshi did not attack those workers because they were not Jewish. Mr Qureshi claimed that the incident made him angry and he lashed out at random people on the street afterwards, all of whom coincidentally happened to be Jewish. He insisted that he had not meant to cause harm.

The prosecutor also argued that Mr Qureshi had travelled from Dewsbury to London in order to commit attacks in a Jewish neighbourhood, but Mr Qureshi claimed that he was merely visiting family in the capital for a week and spent two nights in Stamford Hill for sightseeing and shopping.

The court heard that Mr Qureshi had been calm and relaxed at the local hostel where he stayed for two nights after the incident, with the prosecution arguing that he did not attack anyone there because they were not Jewish.

Despite pleading guilty to the assaults previously, Mr Qureshi also now denied hitting the minor, but the presiding magistrate, John Law, dismissed that assertion. Mr Qureshi also tried to downplay the severity of the other assaults, for example saying that the victim who severely injured his foot had simply fallen over himself during the encounter rather than Mr Qureshi having directly caused the harm.

Throughout the hearing, Mr Qureshi appeared bored and drew spirals on the papers before him. He insisted that “I’ve got nothing against Jewish people” even as the prosecutor claimed that “You think Jewish people are evil,” “You were seeking revenge on Jewish people,” and “You were motivated by hostility toward Jewish people.”

Mr Qureshi was found guilty of the racially/religiously aggravated element on all three counts. The judge rejected his denial that he hit the minor and his claim that he barely touched the GBH victim, observing that the footage indicated that it was “a very hard punch.” He also rejected Mr Qureshi’s claim that he was walking around “simply for the purpose of buying food,” noting that one can see from the CCTV footage that Mr Qureshi was “clearly deviating from his path to attack the victims.” In sum, the judge declared: “I find the evidence he gave today unconvincing.”

Mr Qureshi was released on the same bail conditions as prior to the hearing, namely that he not enter N16 and that he reside at his Yorkshire address. A pre-sentence report is now to be prepared, and sentencing is due to be held at Snaresbrook Crown Court in December.

We would like to thank the Metropolitan Police Service’s DCI Yasmin Lalaniand, who oversaw the case, and District Crown Prosecutor Varinder Hayre of the CPS for bringing about the verdict today in court.

DCI Yasmin Lalani said: “I have made my position clear: I will not tolerate hate crime of any form anywhere in London. The Metropolitan Police Service has a zero tolerance policy for hate crime. We want to build safe and strong communities where people say no to hate crime.

“Do not come to Stamford Hill to commit any crime against our community. We will hold you to account. I would like to extend my sincere thanks to Varinder Hayre who has worked relentlessly on this with us every step of the way to achieve this excellent outcome for our victims and our community.”

Ms Hayre said: “The assaults Abdullah Qureshi carried out were entirely unprovoked and based solely on his religious hatred. Mr Lipschitz, continues to suffer pain and dizziness several months after the attack, and the fourteen-year-old boy was traumatised by the incident and remains fearful when he is in the street.

“We had a strong case and I’m pleased the court agreed. The random nature of these attacks also caused fear more widely across this close-knit community, given it was clear that the attacks were religiously motivated.

“This type of hate crime, against any community, will be robustly prosecuted. The charges chosen by the CPS allow the court to increase the sentence to reflect the religious hatred that motivated these attacks.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We are very satisfied that Abdullah Qureshi has been found guilty of the racially aggravated elements of his assaults. This verdict begins to redress the serious harm caused to his victims and we expect the court to impose a sentence appropriate to the severity of his awful crimes.

“Today’s verdict also vindicates efforts made by Campaign Against Antisemitism, Shomrim, CST and others to pressure the Crown Prosecution Service into reinstating the aggravated charges after they were initially dropped. The CPS claimed that it did not have sufficient evidence to make out the antisemitic element of the crimes, but we disagreed and the court has now in effect found that we were right to do so. We are grateful to the CPS for making the case forcefully in court today and bringing about this outcome. The CPS must now recognise that victims of antisemitic crimes cannot be made to accept deficient legal outcomes, and perpetrators are on notice that we will not stop until Jewish victims have justice.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over five hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than five times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

An architect has been banned from practicing his trade for at least two years after reportedly performing a Nazi salute and making antisemitic comments.

The Architect Registration Board (ARB) made the decision to ban Justin Rooney after it found him guilty of “unacceptable professional conduct”. 

The ARB’s investigation concerns complaints made by Mr Rooney’s fellow staff members during his time at GRID Architects Ltd, London (GRID) in November 2021, where he was hired as a temporary architect. 

In one incident that occurred on Mr Rooney’s last day at GRID, during an interview arranged to discuss his conduct at work, he reportedly said that he was antisemitic and that “he hadn’t realised” he had “joined a practice of f****** Jews” and that he had been placed within the office “with f****** Jewish freaks”.

Leaving the office, Mr Rooney allegedly told a fellow member of staff: “F*** off, you Jewish c***” and “Die, Jewish c***.”

Mr Rooney was also accused of saying that there was a “need to be alert around Jewish people” as “they were likely to use and mistreat people” as well as expressing a desire for his children not to be taught by Jews.

Additionally, Mr Rooney wa said to have performed Nazi salutes on more than one occasion. 

While Mr Rooney did not attend the ARB Professional Conduct Committee’s (PCC) hearing, he submitted a letter in his defence in which he wrote: “I’ve been the subject of something of a targeted campaign by a certain section of the people in the architecture and construction industry for a few years now and this experience has made me quite intolerant. 

“Please note I am decidedly not a racist. How my tolerance has been worn down over the years culminating with my experience in GRID is not something I believe should be the source of a formal proceedings of a consumer protecting professional body as the ARB.”

The PCC has said that in two years, Mr Rooney can apply to become a registered architect again. However, he will have to “seek to demonstrate that is fit to be registered in the light of the concerns found established in these proceedings”.

In 2020, the ARB removed an architect following an investigation into his claims that Judaism is a “cult” and Jews should be banned from “important public office”.

Antisemitic graffiti invoking Holocaust denial discovered by a couple has now been removed from a wooden banister in Shropshire.

One section of graffiti read: “You’re going on a trip to a place called Auschwitz. Turns the ovens: high. Burn the Jew swine.”

To its right, the phrase “The Holocaust never happened” alongside a homophobic slur was scrawled.

However, it was only once that it was spotted by the couple, who discovered it while on a walk and then alerted Bridgnorth Town Council and Shropshire County Council, that action was taken.

The couple stated that in their 32 years of living in the area, it was the first time they had witnessed antisemitic graffiti.

Shortly thereafter, they were contacted by Bridgnorth Town Council to inform them that the graffiti had been removed.

Image credit: Mark Michaels

A suspect has been arrested following reported attacks on visibly Jewish men.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 4450 28/10/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A Jewish child has been left with cuts, bruises and torn clothing after being knocked off of his bike on Forburg Road in Stamford Hill.

The man alleged to have knocked the child off was reportedly also shouting obscenities. 

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 4267 04/11/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Google

A spate of incidents has seen visibly Jewish men physically assaulted in Stamford Hill, most of them seemingly occurring on the same day.

On 28th October, outside Sainsbury’s in Stamford Hill, a man reportedly assaulted a visibly Jewish man and tried to knock off his hat. Failing, he then yelled: “I tried but didn’t manage.”

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 4548 28/10/22

In an incident on Durlston Road, a man on a bicycle reportedly attacked a visibly Jewish man and knocked his hat off. This reference number is: CAD 4663 28/10/22

In yet another incident that day, a man on a bicycle again assaulted a Jewish man in Clapton Common, knocking his hat off and punching him. This reference number is: CAD 4766 28/10/22 

It was also reported that a Jewish man, also in Clapton Common, was assaulted to the point of having a bloody eye. This reference number is: 4630257/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A firework was reportedly thrown out of a passing vehicle at a Jewish man. 

The incident occurred on Lordship Road in the North London area of Stamford Hill.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 3145 01/11/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A Jewish mother and baby were verbally abused on a bus on Tottenham High Road in North London.

The reported incident occurred on the 243 bus when a woman reportedly yelled: “I don’t know why Jews were saved from the war, I hate Jews.”

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 2012 1/11/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A Jewish man was verbally abused in the north London area of Stamford Hill by a man reported to be violent.

The incident occurred near St Andrew’s Mews when the suspect allegedly yelled: “You Jews, you think you own the world.”

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 2593 1/11/22

Following this, a witness, who was also Jewish, was reportedly punched in the chest. This reference number is: CRIS 4630279/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Google

The man arrested for attacking the husband of US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is a conspiracy theorist who had posted online that Jews were to blame for the war in Ukraine, according to reports.

David DePape, who was arrested by San Francisco police for allegedly breaking into the Pelosis’ home and attacking Paul Pelosi with a hammer, was said to be actively engaged online with conspiracy theories.

As well as theories relating to Ms Pelosi, who has been the focus of online hate by supporters of former US president Donald Trump, Mr DePape was believed to be an administrator of “DaJewbs,” a website devoted to antisemitism, including Holocaust denial.

Many recent items accuse Jews of being behind Russia’s war against Ukraine. One post, which featured an antisemitic caricature, read: “Bomb the country into s*** so the residents leave” then “buy the land up for cheap” adding: “That’s some pretty sick Jewing going on.”

On the following day, an item stated: “The more Ukrainians die needlessly the cheaper the land will be for Jews to buy up.”

The website also carried “reports” about Ye, the rapper formerly known as Kayne West, who has made antisemitic comments.

Additionally, CNN reported that Mr DePapa’s Facebook page, which is no longer available, contained transphobic content and theories about COVID-19 vaccines.

Mr DePape, whom police said would be charged with attempted homicide, joins a number of alleged perpetrators of attacks fuelled by conspiracy theories that are spread online.

These include the alleged killer of ten in Buffalo, New York in May, who attributed his murderous violence to the “Great Replacement Theory” which posits that Jews are behind an effort to replace White people with immigrants and People of Colour, while the alleged perpetrator of a shooting at an LGBTQ+ bar in Slovakia also claimed Jews were to blame for his grievance and should be “murdered.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the United States.

A man has been convicted of public order offences after yelling “I’ll blow you up, you f****** Jew” to a Jewish man earlier this year.

Paul Daniel Newman was reportedly found guilty at Stratford Magistrates Court of racially or religiously aggravated disorderly behaviour as well as causing fear or provocation of violence.

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A London library has been found hosting a bishop who previously claimed that only 200,000 Jews died during Holocaust. 

Bishop Richard Williamson has a reported history of Holocaust denial which has seen him convicted of Holocaust denial in Germany.

Among various claims surrounding Jewish people and the Holocaust, he has previously said that he believes that “the historical evidence is hugely against six million Jews having been deliberately gassed in gas chambers,” and that “there were no gas chambers.”

It has now been reported that Bishop Williamson has been delivering sermons about Jewish people in South London’s Earlsfield Library, during which he allegedly accused Jewish people of killing Jesus and conspiring to undermine the Catholic Church.

The accusation of “Deicide” – the belief that the Jews are collectively responsible for the death of Jesus Christ – is part of the classic repertoire of antisemitism, and has led to innumerable acts of violence against and mendacious claims about Jews for centuries. 

It was also reported that he blamed Jewish people for the orchestration of the COVID-19 pandemic and that after one of the services, attendants discussed the far-right group Patriotic Alternative.

Upon being informed of the bishop’s reported sentiments by the JC, the Library labelled them “disgraceful and unacceptable” and said: “We have terminated all the group’s bookings with immediate effect.”

Germany’s Federal authorities have disclosed that 1,555 antisemitic incidents – including 55 classified as “violent” –  were reported in 2022, according to data gathered by the Federal Criminal Police.

While the figure, revealing an average of five antisemitic incidents each day during 2022, is significantly lower than the total of 3,028 antisemitic incidents recorded in 2021, the 2021 numbers were a third higher than 2020 and inflated by more than 1,000 incidents occurring during the conflict between Israel and the genocidal antisemitic terrorist group Hamas.

Following the publication of last year’s statistics, the Head of Germany’s domestic intelligence service (BfV), Thomas Haldenwang, warned that the reported incidents were only the “tip of the iceberg.”

The 2022 data reveals the 1,500 antisemitic incidents not classified as “violent” included incitement to hatred and displaying the symbols of proscribed far-right and neo-Nazi organisations. Some 936 suspects have been identified, but no arrest warrants have been issued.

The Federal Criminal Police Office pointed out that the figures released on Wednesday were “provisional.” According to a major German news outlet, the numbers for the first quarter of this year have already been revised upwards, from an original figure of 459 antisemitic crimes recorded to a new total of 683.

Petra Pau, the Vice-President of the Bundestag, Germany’s parliament, expressed frustration with the data-gathering process, saying: “In view of the general increase in antisemitism, I would wish for the correct recording to be carried out more quickly.”

Ms Pau said that “only then” could politicians and the authorities “recognise threatening developments in a timely manner.”

A statement from the Central Council of German Jews said that it was disturbed by the data with council President, Josef Schuster, noting that “in times of crisis, Jews often have to serve as scapegoats.”

Mr Schuster also referenced controversies involving antisemitism in the German art world, observing that there had been “a paradigm shift” that had led to antisemitic tropes being seen more often. He said that “classic antisemitic images” as well as anti-Zionist imagery helped to “legitimise antisemitic violence” in Germany.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism in Germany, which have increased considerably.

John Daly, a Jewish man who was forced into joining a neo-Nazi gang in Florida, appeared on the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism where he recounted the terrifying ordeal of his time in the gang and the devastating repercussions of what happened once his fellow gang-members discovered his Jewish identity.

Mr Daly, the subject of the documentary Escape from Room 18 which tells the fascinating story of his time in the gang, was part of an anti-racist skinhead gang in his youth. However, the Aryan Youth Force, a close-by neo-Nazi gang, took over and absorbed the non-racist members into their own, quickly letting them know that any attempt to leave would end in violence, or worse.

“One day there was a knock on my door, and there were three neo-Nazi skinheads standing outside,” Mr Daly said. “I thought, being Jewish, that initially, it was an attack.”

Fearing for the safety of his family inside, Mr Daly chose to go with the gang members. 

Recalling his first encounter with the gang members, he said: “I got in the car and we drove off, and each [gang member] told me a story of someone who used to be involved and quit hanging out and was mysteriously shot, or mysteriously run over, or mysteriously caught on fire.

“I understood what they were saying without saying it. The driver reached over the back [of the seat], put his hand towards mine and said ‘welcome aboard’. 

“I said thanks, and I didn’t know I was shaking the hands of the guy that later on was going to try and murder me.”

Mr Daly remained a member of the white supremacist gang for six months before they discovered his Jewish identity. Shortly thereafter, he was ordered to an officers’ meeting. Upon arriving, he felt that the others were behaving differently around him. 

The gang ordered Mr Daly to accompany them to the beach, where he was then attacked.

“We got down to the sea. Once [there], one guy punched me behind my right ear. When I turned to face him, somebody shouted out ‘now!’ and the other six jumped on me. And so I had six guys punching and kicking me at the same time. I was kicked in and out of consciousness numerous times.”

They then dragged Mr Daly into the sea, where they attempted to drown him. Convinced he was dead, they left. Miraculously, he survived. 

Following the incident, he stayed for a time in hospital before taking those responsible to court whereupon they were convicted. 

“Every time I’d go to court, I had a bodyguard with me, an undercover policeman. I knew my life was in danger, but I felt like it was the right thing to do so I stood up and did it.”

Throughout the interview, Mr Daly touched upon a variety of other issues which included what his life has been like after the attempted murder, visiting Auschwitz concentration camp with a fellow ex-gang member, and how his life has been impacted by his three brain surgeries, all of which he was awake for.

This podcast can be listened to here, or watched here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox.

Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, television personality Robert Rinder, writer Eve Barlow, Grammy-Award-winning singer-songwriter Autumn Rowe, and actor Eddie Marsan.

A Jewish man has revealed to the JC how he was subjected to antisemitic abuse by a pastor at a residential school.

Mike Bralowski said that during the mid-1950s, he spent this time in Essex’s Hutton Residential School “terrified” after regularly being subjected to “kill the Jew-boy” chants from staff and students.

He was also subjected to beatings by the headteacher, who reportedly told him that he was a “worthless Jew”. 

Mr Bralowski, who was the only Jewish child in his house, described the racial abuse as “frightening”.

“On Sundays, we all had to attend church on school grounds where Pastor North was in charge,” he said. “At Easter he made me stand in front of the congregation and admit that I was personally responsible for the death of Jesus, which earned me yet another bad beating and another night of absolute terror as the chants went on and on.

“Other students and staff including Pastor North also subjected me to extensive sexual abuse. I eventually ran away back to my parents but they phoned the school, demanding they take me back.”

In 2020, when Mr Bralowski would report the abuse to Islington Council, which referred him to the school as a child, he was told that he was ineligible for the council’s scheme which compensates people who survived abuse between 1966 and 1995, owing to the fact that he attended the school prior to that period, a move that was labelled “unjust” by Islington Survivors Network. 

A spokesperson for the Diocese of Chelmsford said: “We looked into this case and offered support when the issue was raised with us in 2019. The priest concerned, now deceased, was employed by the local authority to run Hutton Residential School, and we provided details of a survivor network which includes a redress scheme for survivors of abuse at this school.”

However, according to the spokesperson, “The priest concerned never held a Church of England appointment in the Diocese of Chelmsford or any authority from the Bishop of Chelmsford to exercise ministry in the Diocese.

“We are aware of the courage it takes for survivors of abuse to come forward and share their story. The cases of abuse perpetrated by clergy and others in the Church of England over many years are a cause of great shame and we are committed to supporting anyone who has suffered abuse.”

A spokesperson for the council said: “We’re deeply sorry for the council’s past failure to protect vulnerable children in its children’s homes, which was the worst chapter in this council’s history.”

A neo-Nazi has been given a three-year prison sentence after it was revealed that he had posted racist material to VK, the Russian social media platform. 

David Hutchinson, 61 from Sutton, pleaded guilty to seven offences of publishing racist material, contrary to Section 19 of the Public Order Act 1986, between December 2020 and October 2021. 

Mr Hutchinson’s social media profile reportedly included a reference to the numbers 1488, which is often used as a coded reference to the neo-Nazi fourteen-word oath: “We must secure the existence of our people and a future for white children”, a slogan initially devised by David Lane, a member of the white supremacist terrorist group “The Order” which was responsible for the murder of Jewish radio host Alan Berg. The number 88 refers to the eighth letter of the alphabet, H, and is intended as a code for “Heil Hitler.”

Additionally, Mr Hutchinson wrote in an online chatroom that he was “waiting for my white race to wake up and fight back”, suggesting he is “looking for 40 men” and is “trying to organise whites”.

In an apparent call to action, he added: “I love being a racist and I want to get in with people who say ‘f*** the system’ and ain’t frightened to fight for a good cause.”

Following the sentencing at Kingston Crown Court, Nick Price, Head of the Crown Prosecution Service’s Counter Terrorism Division, said: “Over a ten-month period David Hutchinson persistently posted these derogatory racist memes on a social media site which he believed consisted of like-minded people.

“His comments went beyond free speech and demonstrated hostility to several racial groups. By his pleas he has accepted they were intended to stir up hatred against those groups. Hate crimes have a corrosive effect on society and we will always prosecute where there is sufficient evidence to do so.”

Tell MAMA Director Iman Atta said: “We welcome the conviction of 61-year-old neo-Nazi David Hutchinson. They dreamed of turning their vicious, asinine racist views towards Muslim, Jewish, and Black communities online into violence on our streets. Our investigation found extreme racism and homophobia on their VK account.”

Last year, it emerged that VK was reportedly rife with antisemitism, where some examples of the alleged content included offensive caricatures that evoke classic antisemitic tropes of Jews with exaggerated facial features, as well as portraying Jews in positions of power over the media.

Campaign Against Antisemitism closely monitors the far-right, which remains a dangerous threat to the Jewish community and other minority groups.

Image credit: Metropolitan Police

It has been reported that an online safeguarding course that was delivered nationwide falsely claimed that Jewish people practiced female genital mutilation. 

According to Israeli Maariv, the false information was flagged by a dental assistant, who was asked to take the course run by the healthcare group Bupa.

The assistant said: “As part of the course, we learned about signs of abuse, and it was written that Jews circumcise girls – a fact that is not true and even antisemitic.

“I was shocked and posted it on the Jewish Britain Facebook group.”

According to Bupa, the course “was prepared by a third party and was not reviewed by us.” 

“We have now instructed that this offensive content be taken down,” Bupa added. “We apologise to those who were harmed by this.”

A fifteen-year-old boy has been arrested after the Ilkley War Memorial was vandalised twice in one week.

Police found pink swastikas painted on the memorial on 16th October and again on 19th October.

The teenager was arrested on suspicion of criminal damage, with both incidents in the West Yorkshire town being treated as racially aggravated hate crimes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over five hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than five times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Police are investigating after a Jewish teenager was reportedly racially abused in Stamford Hill.

The incident took place outside of Sainsbury’s where the suspect reportedly yelled at the teenager: “You are a racist Jew bitch…f****** Jew.”

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: 4627238/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The Spanish Guardia Civil (Civil Guard) has arrested three neo-Nazis on suspicion of committing antisemitic hate crimes.

The three – two men and a woman aged between 36 and 42 – have been charged with seven hate crimes and are thought to be behind a campaign of vandalism that targeted the Burgos village of Castrillo Mota de Judíos and sites of  Jewish significance in Madrid.

During searches of the three suspects’ Madrid homes, the Guardia Civil found tasers and air pistols as well as books extolling Nazism and material such as pamphlets emblazoned with swastikas and Hitler’s face.

The three, who are believed to be part of a right-wing extremist group, have been charged with multiple acts of vandalism in the town of Castrillo Mota de Judíos, including antisemitic and neo-fascist graffiti, setting fire to rubbish containers and trying to burn an Israeli flag.

Until 2015, the town which has a population of just 50, was known as Castrillo Mota de Judíos which translates roughly as  “Kill Jews village” or “Fort Kill The Jews.” The town now promotes its historical connection with the Jewish community resulting in frequent acts of vandalism and antisemitic hate perpetrated by neo-Nazi gangs. The Guardia Civil said this “climate of violence” was threatening and had sparked “feelings of insecurity and fear” in the inhabitants.  

The trio’s alleged campaign of antisemitic vandalism and criminal damage – which reportedly included the Jewish areas of two Madrid cemeteries – began in December 2021 with antisemitic graffiti targeting the Mayor of Burgos, Alderman Lorenzo Rodríguez, saying he had “sold out to the murderous Jew.”

The activities of the right-wing group were already being monitored before the campaign had started.

Following incidents of antisemitic vandalism including at a synagogue and in the Madrid cemeteries, authorities deployed surveillance equipment and discovered that the graffiti had the same perpetrator. This led to the arrest of the three.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism worldwide.

Following a deadly shooting at an LGBTQ+ bar in Bratislava on Wednesday, details of the suspect’s antisemitic manifesto have emerged.

The suspected gunman, who police have said was found dead on Thursday morning, opened fire outside the bar, killing two and wounding one.  

While police have said they are trying to determine the motive of the assailant, local media are reporting that the shooter held white supremacist, antisemitic and LGBTQ+ phobic views. Additionally, police are reportedly investigating the possibility that the weapon used in the incident belonged to the gunman’s father, said to be a former candidate for a far-right party.

The suspect is alleged to have tweeted a lengthy manifesto prior to the attack, in which he spewed hate for Jews and LGBTQ+ people, alongside the hashtag “#hatecrime”. 

The manifesto, in which the suspect reportedly called for the “total eradication of all Jews”, is said to have been adorned with the Nazi sonnedrad, or sun wheel, symbol. 

The document was said to have “contained a stream of racist and antisemitic rhetoric” and the suspect reportedly praised white supremacist terrorists Brenton Tarrant and Anders Behring Breivik as “heroes and role models”.  

Local groups have organised a march this evening to honour the victims and to stand against hatred towards members of the LGBTQ+ community.

Eduard Heger, the Prime Minister of Slovakia, made a statement in which he said: “It is unacceptable that anyone should fear for their life because of the way they live,” adding: “No form of extremism is allowed.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism closely monitors the far-right, which remains a dangerous threat to the Jewish community and other minority groups.

Holger Winterstein, a member of the far-right Alternative für Deutschland (Alternative for Germany) Party – known by its German acronym AfD – has been accused of ‘dancing’ on the country’s Holocaust memorial.

Ron Prosor, Israel’s ambassador to Germany, tweeted a photograph of Mr Winterstein on the Memorial, labelling the action ‘shameful’.

Mr Prosor said: “Mr. Winterstein, everyone is watching you dance while you bring shame on yourself and your party. Enjoy your shameful minute of fame because your name will soon be forgotten.

“The sanctified souls commemorated at the memorial will never be forgotten.”

AfD described Mr Winterstein’s behaviour as “extremely disrespectful.”

In the image posted on social media, Mr Winterstein was seen standing with outstretched arms and with one foot slightly raised on one of the stone slabs that form the memorial in Berlin for the six million Jews murdered by the Nazis.

Mr Winterstein is a representative of the party in Thuringia. In 2018, the party’s leader in the state, Bjoern Hoecke, said the Memorial was a “monument of shame” and called for Germany to perform a “180-degree turn” over how it remembered its past. A party tribunal rejected a bid to have him expelled.

Last year, a survey conducted by polling firm Forsa on behalf of the Central Council of Jews in Germany showed that almost a third (30%) of Germans agreed that Jews exploit German guilty over the Holocaust to “derive an advantage”. The figure rose to 59% of supporters of the AfD.

More than one in five (21%) respondents agreed with the suggestion that Israeli policies mirrored those of Nazi Germany, a direct reference to the International Definition of Antisemitism. This rose to 32% among AfD supporters.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism in Germany, which have increased considerably.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has joined with the Jewish News and the Jewish Chronicle to increase the reward to £30,000 for information leading to the conviction of any of the perpetrators of the appalling Oxford Street Chanukah attack last year, tripling the £10,000 reward offered by Campaign Against Antisemitism on Friday.

The call for information comes after the Jewish News revealed that the Metropolitan Police Service closed its investigation into last November’s high-profile attack, in which a group of identifiably Jewish young people celebrating the Jewish festival were racially abused and attacked by a group of men.

The incident was filmed by passengers on the bus and appeared to show a group of men hitting the vehicle with their hands and then their shoes, spitting on it, trying to break windows and performing Nazi salutes.

The men appeared to be of Middle Eastern heritage and hitting an object of antipathy with one’s shoes is common in that region.

The teenagers were on their way to a candle lighting ceremony in central London to celebrate Chanukah.

If you have any information relating to the attack, please contact [email protected] or call us on 0330 822 0321, either with an anonymous tip or leaving your contact details if you wish to be eligible for the reward.

The reward will be payable upon Campaign Against Antisemitism following the conviction of one or more of the perpetrators based on information provided to us by you. If you contact the police directly and do not also contact us, you may be ineligible for the reward, given that we may be unable to contact you or determine that it was your information that led to the conviction. The reward is subject to our terms.

At the time of the attack, Campaign Against Antisemitism and others publicised the video footage and called on the police to investigate, and we were also in contact with the victims.

The police confirmed last year that they were treating the incident as a hate crime, but they closed the investigation in July after making no arrests. This was despite footage of the racist attack going viral on social media, leading large numbers of people to see the assailants’ faces.

In a statement, the Metropolitan Police Service said: “On 29th November 2021, officers responded to calls about antisemitic abuse being directed at passengers on a private bus in Oxford Street by a group on the pavement outside. The bus left the scene of the incident to avoid further confrontation and officers met it nearby. The suspects had also left the area and could not be located.

“Video footage of the incident was shared on social media and we issued an appeal for anyone who recognised those involved to come forward. Two further appeals were issued which included photographs to help with identification.

“The only names provided in response to those appeals have been eliminated from our enquiries. The identity of those involved is still unknown. A decision was taken in July to close the case.

“Hate crime of any kind is unacceptable. Should new information come to light that provides a realistic line of enquiry, we will of course be willing to carry out further investigation.”

Last week, Campaign Against Antisemitism announced a reward for information that leads to the conviction of any of the perpetrators in the attack, and that reward has now been tripled to £30,000.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Shocking footage of an abhorrent attack on a bus carrying Jewish passengers at the heart of London during the festival of Chanukah last year was widely broadcast on social media and on the news. Despite the video going viral and all the resources at its disposal, the Metropolitan Police Service failed to make any arrests and quietly closed the investigation in July.

“If even high-profile hate crimes such as these are not solved and the perpetrators brought to justice, what hope do the many other antisemitic crimes against Jews have of being satisfactorily investigated? Indeed, the revelation that the investigation was closed comes at the same time as the Home Office has announced that last year police forces recorded the highest number of antisemitic crimes yet.

“Together with the Jewish Chronicle and the Jewish News, we are offering a £30,000 reward for information leading to the conviction of any of the perpetrators of this heinous attack. Only then will antisemites understand that abusing Jewish people is not without cost.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over five hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than five times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A neo-Nazi terrorist is to be released early from prison, according to reports.

In June 2020, a woman who entered a “Miss Hitler” beauty pageant in order to attract new members to the neo-Nazi terrorist group National Action was found guilty of membership in the proscribed organisation and sentenced to three years in prison.

Alice Cutter used the name “Buchenwald Princess” to enter the online ‘National Action Miss Hitler 2016’ contest in June 2016, weeks after her now ex-partner, Mark Jones, visited the execution room of the Buchenwald concentration camp.

Ms Cutter was described in the trial as a “central spoke” of the banned group, exchanging hundreds of messages, including racist and antisemitic material, attending meetings with group leaders despite the ban, posing for a Nazi salute outside Leeds Town Hall in 2016 and attending a demonstration in York in May 2016. She had also joked about gassing synagogues and using a Jew’s head as a football.

Mr Jones was sentenced to five-and-a-half years, as the judge said he had played “a significant role in the continuation of the organisation” after its proscription by the British Government following pressure by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Also sentenced were Garry Jack, 24, who reportedly self-identified as a Nazi and was given four-and-a-half years in prison while Connor Scothern, nineteen, who was apparently a practicing Muslim and activist with the extremist anti-fascist group, Antifa, before joining National Action, was given a sentence of eighteen months in prison.

Another defendant, Daniel Ward, 28, pleaded guilty to being a member of National Action last year. He was jailed for three years.

According to police, the group was preparing weapons for a “race war”.

Speaking on the decision to release Ms Cutter early, a spokesperson for the Parole Board said: “A panel will carefully examine a huge range of evidence, including details of the original crime, and any evidence of behaviour change, as well as explore the harm done and impact the crime has had on the victims.” 

“Protecting the public is our number one priority,” they added.

Image credit: West Midlands Police

Antisemitic graffiti is reported to have been discovered on Yom Kippur, the holiest day in the Jewish calendar, in both New York City and Weston, Florida.

Boxes containing newspapers from Jewish publications were found defaced with swastikas. The boxes were located in a Jewish area of the borough of Queens.

Daniel Rosenthal, Assemblymember for the 27th AD, stated on Twitter: “We must be able to feel safe in our neighborhoods. We must do more. The continued rise of antisemitism is unsustainable and unacceptable.”

In the Florida city of Weston, officials are investigating antisemitic graffiti found on a pavement near Hunter’s Pointe in the Weston Hills community.

In a statement on social media, Weston Mayor Margaret Brown said: “Antisemitism in any form is not welcome here.”

Mayor Brown added: “No person, no matter their religion, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, or background, should ever wake up to see their community desecrated.”

The local Sheriff’s Office in Broward is investigating the incident.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the United States.

Police in the German city of Hanover are investigating after a synagogue’s stained-glass window was damaged on Yom Kippur.

The window in the women’s gallery was reportedly damaged by a stone at around 19:00, close to the conclusion of the Yom Kippur service.

There were no injuries among the 150 congregants.

A police spokesperson confirmed that the window had been damaged but said that the cause had “not yet been clarified.”

The congregation’s Chairman Michael Fürst said that the perpetrator “must have entered the synagogue grounds”.

Mr Fürst added that he was “deeply shocked” by the incident.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism in Germany, which have increased considerably.

The Metropolitan Police Service has closed its investigation into the appalling Oxford Street Chanukah attack last year, in which a group of identifiably Jewish young people celebrating the Jewish festival were racially abused and attacked by a group of men.

The incident was filmed by passengers on the bus and appeared to show a group of men hitting the vehicle with their hands and then their shoes, spitting on it, trying to break windows and performing Nazi salutes.

The men appeared to be of Middle Eastern heritage and hitting an object of antipathy with one’s shoes is common in that region.

The teenagers were on their way to a candle lighting ceremony in central London to celebrate Chanukah.

Campaign Against Antisemitism and others publicised the video footage and called on the police to investigate, and we were also in contact with the victims.

The police confirmed last year that they were treating the incident as a hate crime, but it has now been revealed that they closed the investigation in July after making no arrests. This was despite footage of the racist attack going viral on social media, leading large numbers of people to see the assailants’ faces.

In a statement, the Metropolitan Police Service said: “On 29th November 2021, officers responded to calls about antisemitic abuse being directed at passengers on a private bus in Oxford Street by a group on the pavement outside. The bus left the scene of the incident to avoid further confrontation and officers met it nearby. The suspects had also left the area and could not be located.

“Video footage of the incident was shared on social media and we issued an appeal for anyone who recognised those involved to come forward. Two further appeals were issued which included photographs to help with identification.

“The only names provided in response to those appeals have been eliminated from our enquiries. The identity of those involved is still unknown. A decision was taken in July to close the case.

“Hate crime of any kind is unacceptable. Should new information come to light that provides a realistic line of enquiry, we will of course be willing to carry out further investigation.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism is now offering a reward of £10,000 for information that leads to the conviction of any of the perpetrators in the attack.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Shocking footage of an abhorrent attack on a bus carrying Jewish passengers at the heart of London during the festival of Chanukah last year was widely broadcast on social media and on the news. Despite the video going viral and all the resources at its disposal, the Metropolitan Police Service failed to make any arrests and quietly closed the investigation in July.

“If even high-profile hate crimes such as these are not solved and the perpetrators brought to justice, what hope do the many other antisemitic crimes against Jews have of being satisfactorily investigated? Indeed, the revelation that the investigation was closed comes at the same time as the Home Office has announced that last year police forces recorded the highest number of antisemitic crimes yet.

“We are offering a £10,000 reward for information leading to the conviction of any of the perpetrators of this heinous attack. Only then will antisemites understand that abusing Jewish people is not without cost.”

If you have any information relating to the attack, please contact [email protected] or call us on 0330 822 0321, either with an anonymous tip or leaving your contact details if you wish to be eligible for the reward.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over five hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than five times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

An analysis by Campaign Against Antisemitism of new Home Office statistics released this week shows that Jews are more than five times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group, as figures reach record numbers.

Police forces across the country record hate crimes against Jews as religious hate crimes, and these records show that in the year 2021/22, 1,919 hate crimes were committed against Jews, making Jews the target in 23% – more than one in five – of the total number of religious hate crimes.

These figures mean that there is an average of over five hate crimes directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales. Hate crimes against Jews are also still widely believed to be under-reported, and also do not reflect the extent of antisemitic material and abuse on social media.

However, when one accounts for the miniscule size of the Jewish population, it emerges that Jews are statistically more than five times more likely to be the targets of hate crimes than any other religious group, with some 730 hate crimes per 100,000 of the Jewish population in 2021/22.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “For yet another year, Home Office figures show that Jews are far more likely to be victims of hate crimes than any other religious group. Contrast this with the pitiful number of prosecutions for antisemitic hate crimes, and it throws into high relief the failure of the Crown Prosecution Service to take proportionate action against racism directed at the Jewish community. With England and Wales’ minuscule Jewish community suffering an average of more than five hate crimes every single day, identifying, prosecuting and punishing perpetrators is absolutely urgent.”

Merseyside police are looking to speak with a man in connection with a reported antisemitic hate crime.

The reported crime in question took place in a Southport pub on 21st September when the suspect hurled antisemitic slurs towards a man in his fifties. 

The victim was said to have been “extremely distressed” following the incident. 

Detective Inspector Matthew Kerr said: “We will not stand by and let people be subject to such disgraceful comments because of others perceptions. Hate crime will simply not be tolerated in our community and we are working hard to find the person responsible and bring them to justice.

“If you were in the pub on Lord Street, near to Albert Road on Wednesday evening, 21st September and recognise this man or if these images remind you of anything you saw that night then please let us know.

“Also if you have any similar images captured on your mobile phone, CCTV or other devices from that evening then please review it and tell us if you see anything.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over five hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than five times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Merseyside police

Antisemitic graffiti has been found in Greater Manchester’s Drinkwater Park.

Images posted online show several swastikas spray-painted alongside the letters ‘SS’, the abbreviation of Schutzstaffel, which was the leading paramilitary organisation under Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party.

According to CST, swift removal of the vandalism was arranged. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism closely monitors the far-right, which remains a dangerous threat to the Jewish community and other minority groups.

CCTV footage has been released of the suspect believed to be responsible for a series of Jewish-owned shops being smashed in Stamford Hill.

Last month, a series of Jewish-owned shops had their windows smashed in Stamford Hill on at least two separate occasions, which we understand caused £25,000 worth of damage.

The incidents were reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 4620417/22 or CAD 8616 02/08/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A barrister has been handed a £500 fine over tweets written from an anonymous Twitter account containing inflammatory remarks about antisemitism.

Daniel Bennett resigned from Doughty Street Chambers after he was found to have been responsible for “inappropriate and offensive” messages about antisemitism sent between September 2018 and June 2019 and directed at his colleague and fellow barrister, Adam Wagner, who is Jewish.

The Twitter account allegedly connected to Mr Bennett, which had some 4500 followers, described Mr Wagner, who had taken issue with how the Labour Party dealt with antisemitism allegations under the leadership of Jeremy Corbyn, as “a lying propagandist”, decried the stories about antisemitism as “fraudulent”, and claimed that antisemitism allegations were made up for “factional political gain”.

Mr Wagner said that the messages had caused him “considerable anxiety and unwelcome attention”.

Mr Bennett told the tribunal that the tweets “reflected his own strongly held views” but he “could and should have stopped them appearing”.

Although the Bar Standards Board, which regulates barristers, did not specify that Mr Bennett sent the tweets himself, it said that he “allowed” them to be sent and in doing so behaved in a way which was likely to diminish the trust and confidence in him and the profession.

Mr Bennett has 21 days to appeal the decision, but the ruling does not provide any context about his misconduct or say whether mitigation has been offered or accepted.

It has previously been reported that Mr Bennett has apologised for any offence caused.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

It has been reported that a Jewish primary school in Stamford Hill had to lock down and prevent its students from leaving in order to protect them from an apparent aggressor waiting outside.

A suspect captured on video appeared to be shouting a torrent of abuse towards the school that included yelling “You’re evil…the wasteland is where you’re from.”

The incident was reported on Monday by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 4055 12/09/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

It has been reported that two personalised vehicle registration plates incorporating Nazi references have been observed in Belgium.

One plate reportedly included the digits “HH-88”, alluding to the phrase “Heil Hitler”, “H” being the eighth letter of the alphabet.

Another had the phrase “1-RAS-88”, a reference to the phrase “Een ras”, meaning “one race”.

UNIA, the Centre for Equal Opportunities and Opposition to Racism in Belgium, observed that “it is highly unlikely that this choice of the plate was a coincidence, especially considering the €1,000 fee that the person paid for.”

The Department of Vehicles Registration (DIV) was reprotedly contacted by UNIA but declined to deregister the plates, apparently claiming that the “88” on the second plate referred to “the year the applicant was born” and that the owner assured them that there was no intention of racism nor was offence intended. UNIA was justifiably unpersuaded.

The Minister of Mobility reportedly responded to UNIA agreeing that the response was “schooling” but that “the current legislation does not allow the automatic cancellation of a licence plate already in circulation. If a plate is not on the DIV’s black list, there is currently little the authorities can do.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout Europe.

A European arrest warrant has been issued for a radical imam who has a history of making inflammatory comments about Jews, after the imam went on the run following a court ruling last week permitting the French Government to deport him.

Earlier this month, the Government vowed to change the law in order to be able to deport the imam, but this is no longer necessary after the decision from the Conseil d’Etat, the supreme court for administrative justice, which overturned a previous ruling that suspended Hassan Iquioussen’s deportation order.

The new decision rejected the claims of Mr Iquioussen’s defence that deporting the imam to Morocco would not be a disproportionate interference with his right to lead a normal previous and family life.

Interior Minister Gérald Darmanin, who has previously said that Mr Iquioussen is an enemy of France who had “no place” in the country, hailed the decision as “a big victory for the Republic,” adding of the imam: “He will be deported from national soil.”

Mr Iquioussen, 59, is a Moroccan citizen who has lived in France all his life but who has become a symbol of President Emmanuel Macron’s battle against Islamism, whom the President accuses of rejecting French laws and values. He did not take up French citizenship at a younger age and his attempts to do so since then have failed.

Morocco already delivered a laissez-passer to authorise his travel, which cleared the way for Mr Iquioussen’s expulsion “by force”, but the imam won an injunction halting his deportation at the Paris Administrative Court, which ruled that the expulsion was a “disproportionate infringement…of [Iquioussen’s] right to a private and family life.” Mr Iquioussen has five children and numerous grandchildren in France.

During the previous court hearing, prosecutors highlighted statements allegedly made by Mr Iquioussen in 2003 and 2004 in which he described Jews as “miserly usurers” and claimed that Zionists had “connived with Hitler…to push Jews to leave Germany”. He also reportedly said: “The Zionists said…there has to be someone in Europe who does bad things to Jews so that they…will leave [for Israel].” They also noted a conference in 2012 at which Mr Iquioussen allegedly described terrorist attacks in the West as “pseudo-attacks whose objective is to frighten non-Muslims so that they are afraid of Islam and of Muslims,” and claimed that he has also publicly denied the 1915 Armenian genocide and pointed to allegedly misogynistic comments.

In a post on Facebook, Mr Iquioussen “strongly contested” the allegations that he had used “discriminatory or violent language.” His supporters argue that the comments cited in the case were dated and taken out of context, and pointed to other statements by the imam, such as: “We have never had, and have, nothing against Jews because Islam is a religion based on justice.”

Following the latest decision, Mr Iquioussen’s says that he is considering an appeal to the European Court of Human Rights.

According to a report published by the French Jewish Community Security Service, antisemitic incidents in France have skyrocketed. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism in France and throughout Europe.

Researchers studying human remains that were discovered in a medieval well in Norwich have said that they are the bones of Jews who may have been murdered in an antisemitic massacre.

The DNA of these seventeen skeletons, first found in 2004, may now enable researchers, who published their findings in the journal Current Biology, to find out new information about the medical history of Jews in Europe. It may also allow historians to identify the victims of a pogrom written about by the contemporary writer, Ralph de Diceto. 

The account describes how, in February 1190, crusaders stopped in Norwich on their way to Jerusalem, and massacred “all the Jews who were found in their own houses.”

The bodies were first found eighteen years ago by a group of construction workers.

Using recent advances in genetics, the genomes of six of the bodies – who were mostly children at the time of their deaths – are being analysed. These samples are the oldest Jewish genomes to have ever been sequenced.

This may indicate that the origins of Ashkenazi Jews date back a few centuries earlier than the commonly-accepted account.

Once the researchers had established to whom the remains belonged, the local community organised a formal Jewish burial for them.

The research was co-authored by Professor Mark Thomas from University College London and the evolutionary geneticist, and Merit Researcher at London’s Natural History Museum, Ian Barnes.

Dr Barnes said: “When you study ancient DNA from people who’ve died hundreds to thousands of years ago, you don’t often get to work with a living community at the same time. It’s been really satisfying to work with this community on a story that’s so important to them.”

A court has ruled that the French Government can after all expel a radical imam with a history of making inflammatory comments about Jews.

Earlier this month, the Government vowed to change the law in order to be able to deport the imam, but this may now not be necessary after this decision from the Conseil d’Etat, the supreme court for administrative justice, which overturns a previous ruling that suspended Hassan Iquioussen’s deportation order.

The new decision rejected the claims of Mr Iquioussen’s defence that deporting the imam to Morocco would not be a disproportionate interference with his right to lead a normal previous and family life.

Interior Minister Gérald Darmanin, who has previously said that Mr Iquioussen is an enemy of France who had “no place” in the country, hailed the decision as “a big victory for the Republic,” adding of the imam: “He will be deported from national soil.”

Mr Iquioussen, 59, is a Moroccan citizen who has lived in France all his life and has become a symbol of President Emmanuel Macron’s battle against Islamism, whom the President accuses of rejecting French laws and values. He did not take up French citizenship at a younger age and his attempts to do so since then have failed.

Morocco already delivered a laissez-passer to authorise his travel, which cleared the way for Mr Iquioussen’s expulsion “by force”, but the imam won an injunction halting his deportation at the Paris Administrative Court, which ruled that the expulsion was a “disproportionate infringement…of [Iquioussen’s] right to a private and family life.” Mr Iquioussen has five children and numerous grandchildren in France.

During the previous court hearing, prosecutors highlighted statements allegedly made by Mr Iquioussen in 2003 and 2004 in which he described Jews as “miserly usurers” and claimed that Zionists had “connived with Hitler…to push Jews to leave Germany”. He also reportedly said: “The Zionists said…there has to be someone in Europe who does bad things to Jews so that they…will leave [for Israel].” They also noted a conference in 2012 at which Mr Iquioussen allegedly described terrorist attacks in the West as “pseudo-attacks whose objective is to frighten non-Muslims so that they are afraid of Islam and of Muslims,” and claimed that he has also publicly denied the 1915 Armenian genocide and pointed to allegedly misogynistic comments.

In a post on Facebook, Mr Iquioussen “strongly contested” the allegations that he had used “discriminatory or violent language.” His supporters argue that the comments cited in the case were dated and taken out of context, and pointed to other statements by the imam, such as: “We have never had, and have, nothing against Jews because Islam is a religion based on justice.”

Following the latest decision, Mr Iquioussen’s says that he is considering an appeal to the European Court of Human Rights.

According to a report published by the French Jewish Community Security Service, antisemitic incidents in France have skyrocketed. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism in France and throughout Europe.

Concerns have been raised that a mural in Westchester, New York, promoting Black Lives Matter (BLM), features the image of the antisemitic hate preacher, Louis Farrakhan.

The mural, located on Manhattan Avenue under the I-287 highway, includes a depiction of Mr Farrakhan, the leader of the Nation of Islam, speaking with an accusatory raised finger.

Mr Farrakhan has referred to Judaism as a “gutter religion”, seemed to imply that Jews are “evil” and “satanic” and encourage paedophilia and “sexual perversion”, blamed Jews for slavery and racist Jim Crow laws in the United States, described Adolf Hitler as a “great man” and said that Jews financed their own destruction in the Holocaust, claimed that Jews have a “stranglehold” on the US Congress using their “tentacles”, and accused Israelis and Zionists of being behind the 9/11 terrorist attacks on New York City. 

“I am not an antisemite,” Mr Farrakhan wrote in October 2018 in a tweet that he later deleted, “I’m anti-Termite”.

The Westchester Jewish Council released a statement saying that Mr Farrakhan is “one of the country’s most prominent antisemites. His long public history of anti-Jewish and other bigoted comments makes his inclusion in this project completely improper.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has previously called out the British chapter of Black Lives Matter after it claimed that “Zionism” had “gagged” Britain.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the United States.

A synagogue and a Jewish school in Stamford Hill have been vandalised.

A 50-year-old man is accused of drawing symbols in what appears to be marker pen on and around Bobov Synagogue on Egerton Road on 20th August.

When the alleged perpetrator was confronted by an identifiably Jewish man, he is reported to have said: “I will take you Jews to Africa and burn you all.”

The incident was reported on by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD4243 30/08/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Following the graphic reports of the murder of a French Jewish man by his Muslim roommate, authorities have already ruled out an antisemitic motive.

Eyal Haddad, 34, from the town of Longperrier, north-east of Paris, was reportedly murdered on 20th August.

The alleged perpetrator has been identified as Mohamed Dridi, 22, who is said to have used an axe to attack his victim before burning the victim’s face and attempting to bury the body.

In response to the news, Jewish groups asked that when the authorities investigate, they should do so by “considering the antisemitic character [of the allegations] and not dismissing it a priori” and “investigate and shed light on the true motives of [Mr Haddad’s] killer.”

The International Affairs Advisor to the European Parliament, Manel Msalmim tweeted: “It is not the first time that a Jew is murdered by his neighbour. We condemn this barbaric and criminal act and we call for justice for Eyal.”

However, on 30th August, it was reported that following authorities’ initial investigations, it has been decided that there was no antisemitic intent.

The authorities’ decision arrives despite the suspect allegedly turning himself in to the police and confessing that his motivation was because he was owed 100 euros and because the victim was Jewish.

There have also been claims in the French Jewish media that the suspect had made Islamist comments on social media in the days before the killing.

2022 has seen two other instances of Jewish people being killed in alleged antisemitic attacks.

In February, Jeremy Cohen, 31, was fatally wounded after being hit by a tram. At first, Mr Cohen’s death was treated as a traffic accident, until video footage released by the family appeared to show a group of men attacking Mr Cohen, prompting him to flee for safety without noticing the tram. He was then taken to hospital but did not survive his injuries.

Mr Cohen is believed to have been wearing his kippah, or skullcap, during the attack, and the family have now called upon the police to reopen the investigation into his death as they feel his visible Jewish identity played a role in his attackers’ motivation.

It was reportedly only when the family started asking questions, handing out fliers in post boxes throughout the neighbourhood and urging witnesses to come forward, that someone eventually came forward with the crucial video footage that showed that the victim was being attacked moments before his death.

In April, two men, reported to be aged 27 and 23, were charged with causing Mr Cohen’s death. However, the public prosecutor denied there was enough evidence to “establish the discriminatory nature of the attack.”

The next month, Rene Hadjaj, 90, was allegedly defenestrated from an apartment block in Lyon. Mr Hadjaj’s neighbour, 51, was arrested in connection with the event.

Police said that the incident related to an argument between the two and was not connected to the victim’s Jewish identity, and ruled out an antisemitic motive. This decision elicited outrage from parts of the French community.

A few days later, however, it was announced that the investigation was to be extended following new information that was discovered on social media arising from investigations carried out by concerned members of the Jewish community.

These incidents followed the well-publicised death of Sarah Halimi, a 65-year-old Jewish woman who was murdered by her Muslim neighbour, Kobili Traoré, 27, who tortured her before pushing her out of a window to her death.

Mr Traoré was said to have yelled “Allah Akbar,” “I killed the shaitan,” which is an Arabic word for ‘devil’ or ‘demon’, along with antisemitic vitriol. It took time for the police to recognise the antisemitic motive, but Mr Traoré was deemed unfit to stand trial because he was under the influence of drugs at the time. The judgement was highly controversial and let to protests around the world – including a rally outside the French embassy in London organised by Campaign Against Antisemitism – and a parliamentary inquiry.

However, in June 2021, it was announced that a French Parliamentary commission of inquiry would be established in order to investigate Ms Halimi’s death.

Ms Halimi’s death is a well-known case, but it is not the only instance of this kind. In 2018, 85-year-old Mireille Knoll, a Holocaust survivor, was stabbed eleven times during a botched robbery that also saw her body set alight in an effort by the perpetrators to burn her apartment. In this instance, the authorities did accept that there was an antisemitic motive and the perpetrators were jailed.

According to a report published by the French Jewish Community Security Service, antisemitic incidents in France have skyrocketed.

Abdullah Qureshi has pleaded not guilty to the reinstated racially/religiously aggravated charges that the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) initially dropped, before intervention by Campaign Against Antisemitism and other groups.

On 7th April, Mr Qureshi, 28, from Dewsbury in West Yorkshire, pleaded guilty at Thames Magistrates’ Court to one count of assault by beating and one count of grievous bodily harm with intent. The charges related to a series of assaults on 18th August 2021 in Stamford Hill in which five religious Jews in the North London neighbourhood were violently attacked.

In one incident at 18:41 on the day of the attacks last August, an Orthodox Jewish man was struck in the face with what appeared to be a bottle. In another at 19:10, a child was slapped on the back of the head, and in yet another at 20:30, a 64-year-old victim was struck and left unconscious on the ground, suffering facial injuries and a broken ankle. Two further incidents were also alleged.

The incidents received significant media attention at the time, and the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, condemned “this appalling attack,” adding: “Let me be clear, racist abuse and hate crime, including antisemitism, have absolutely no place in our city.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism then revealed that the CPS had dropped the racially/religiously aggravated element of those charges as part of a plea deal with Mr Qureshi. After we, Shomrim, CST and other communal organisations made representations to the CPS, it agreed to reinstate the aggravated elements, but Mr Qureshi appeared in court to resist the reinstatement of the aggravated element.

Earlier this month, Stratford Magistrates’ Court agreed to reinstate the racially/religiously aggravated element to the charges against Mr Qureshi.

Today’s plea hearing in relation to the three reinstated charges took place at Thames Magistrates’ Court, where Mr Qureshi pleaded not guilty. He did not have legal representation, having previously dismissed his lawyer.

The prosecution argued today that Mr Qureshi travelled from Dewsbury to Stamford Hill “to deliberately target the Jewish community” and “commit antisemitic assaults on Jewish victims,” describing the victims as “noticeable members of the Jewish community.”

Mr Qureshi questioned the extent of the victims’ injuries.

He has been given conditional bail, with an order not to enter N16. The judge initially considered maintaining the GPS tag but Mr Qureshi argued that he had observed his bail conditions and therefore that it was unnecessary, and the tag was removed.

The trial is scheduled to take place in November at Stratford Magistrates’ Court.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “While it is regrettable that it took an intervention by us and others to get us here, we are nonetheless pleased to see this case progressing and the CPS making the argument that these were racially motivated crimes. We will do whatever it takes to ensure that the victims of these violent crimes have justice.”

Efforts to encourage interfaith dialogue between Jews and Muslims have been denounced during the meeting of an anti-Israel organisation.

Speakers at a meeting of the anti-Israel group Palestinian Forum in Britain (PFB) have reportedly described attempts for Jews to enter into dialogue with Muslims as “faithwashing”.

The group held a meeting at an art gallery in London entitled “How interfaith groups are being used to normalise Israeli apartheid”.

Video footage of the meeting appears to show the Director of the news website Middle East Monitor, and the former Deputy Chairman of the Muslim Council of Britain, Daud Abdullah, saying that interfaith dialogue, which received the backing of “rich Jewish philanthropists” is used to “cover up the crimes committed against the Palestinian people” and soften the opinions of Muslims towards Israel.

James Thring, who has apparently been linked to the former Ku Klux Klan grand wizard David Duke and who spoke unchallenged about Holocaust denial at a Keep Talking event, claiming that no deaths were recorded at the Auschwitz concentration camp, also appeared at this meeting and said that Israeli policy is determined by how Jews “think they are the chosen people, they think they have the right to attack other people, to deceive other people, to rob other people.”

Fiyaz Mughal, the founder of Muslims Against Antisemitism and the interfaith network Faith Matters, told the JC that “Those who seek to smear, falsify and undermine interfaith work do not understand what binds our communities together, and their malicious attempt to politicise this must be rejected.”

Mr Mughal has spoken at Campaign Against Antisemitism’s events in the past and in May, he appeared on Podcast Against Antisemitism, which can be listened to here, or watched in its entirety here.

Rabbi David Mason of Muswell Hill synagogue said: “I’m proud we have built positive relationships with Muslim communities in my borough and across London…The idea that such positive interfaith work is a Zionist plot grotesquely misses the point of our achievements.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2021 showed that almost eight in ten British Jews consider the threat from Islamists to be very serious.

Authorities in the town of Hempstead, New York have found antisemitic graffiti outside the Town Hall.

The Hempstead Town Supervisor, Don Clavin, said that “These cowards come here and write that message on the Town of Hempstead sign welcoming residents. Well, I speak for everyone when I say, ‘No way we’re gonna allow it, we’re gonna hold you accountable and you’re a disgrace.’”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the United States.

An identifiably Jewish woman has reportedly been attacked in a New York subway station.

It was reported that the woman, who is apparently in her 40s, was approached by a man who went on to put his hands around her neck and choke her while making antisemitic comments.

The woman was apparently taken to Mt. Sinai hospital, where her injuries were treated.

The incident is now being investigated by the NYPD’s Hate Crimes Unit.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the United States.

Flyers claiming that “challenging Jewish privilege” is “social justice” were distributed to homes in Brighton and Hove recently.

The flyers utilise classic antisemitic tropes of power and control in asking why Jewish people “get special privilege when it comes to top universities?”

It goes on to state: “Challenging White Privilege and Jewish Privilege is not antisemitic. It is not defamatory. It does not insult anyone. It is social justice.”

The flyers also depict the yellow star containing the word German ‘Jude’, meaning ‘Jew’, that was forced upon Jewish people during the Holocaust and advertises the online domain of the Goyim Defense League (GDL).

The GDL is a hate group whose membership reportedly contains several neo-Nazis and is understood to be led by Jon Minadeo II, who created t-shirts carrying antisemitic slogans such as the Holocaust was “a hoax”. The GDL is responsible for stunts such as hanging a banner from a bridge in Austin, Texas that read “Vax the Jews” and driving around Los Angeles dressed as Nazis.

The group is divided into regional branches and regularly distributes antisemitic flyers across the United States. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism closely monitors the far-right, which remains a dangerous threat to the Jewish community and other minority groups.

A councillor representing the Democratic Unionist Party has condemned antisemitic graffiti found in his local park, and claimed to have spent an hour attempting to remove it.

Alderman Mark Baxter has branded the graffiti “vile and racist”. The graffiti included attempts to draw a swastika and was found in a children’s play area in Waringstown, County Down.

Mr Baxter said that he “did manage to get rid of the worst of it. I just can’t comprehend what goes through people’s heads.”

A spokesperson for Armagh City, Banbridge and Craigavon Borough Council said that the Council “strongly condemn[s] these acts of vandalism and anyone caught causing criminal damage to play park equipment will be reported to the PSNI [Police Service of Northern Ireland].

“The graffiti which recently appeared in Waringstown play park was cleaned and removed by council staff the morning after it was reported, an unfortunate incident which has now occurred twice at this spot.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The far-right group, Patriotic Alternative, hung a “White Lives Matter” banner over Clifford’s Tower in York earlier this week.

In 1190, a massacre of York’s 150 Jews took place after the community gathered there seeking refuge from the belligerent townspeople. The massacre at York was one of a series of antisemitic pogroms in England in 1189-90 which also included Norwich and Lincoln.

Video footage of the stunt depicts dramatic music and drone shots of the Tower as activists from the far-right group unfurl the banner. 

In the group’s Telegram, it wrote that it “narrowly avoided disaster and a mob of 40 Hasidic Jews”.

Patriotic Alternative is a UK-based group headed by the former leader of the youth wing of the BNP, Mark Collett. Mr Collett is reported to have dabbled in Holocaust denial, is regularly heard as a guest on the radio show of the former Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard, David Duke, and has described the Holocaust as “an instrument of white guilt”.

The group is known for its efforts to recruit youth to its white nationalist ideology. Previously, the far-right group published an online “alternative” home school curriculum condemned as “poison” and “hateful” and attempted to recruit children as young as twelve through livestreaming events on YouTube, according to The Times.

Campaign Against Antisemitism closely monitors the far-right, which remains a dangerous threat to the Jewish community and other minority groups.

A poster asking if antisemitism is “humane” was found on a Golders Green bus stop earlier this week.

Also written on the poster were the words “Israel = ISIS” and “Restore Palestine”.

In June, a near-identical poster was discovered, also in Golders Green. 

Golders Green is a neighbourhood renowned for its large Jewish population. According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the State of Israel” and “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour)” are both examples of antisemitism. 

A rabbi has alleged that he was kept on hold for hours by Toronto Police when he was trying to report multiple attempted break-ins at a Jewish community centre.

Rabbi Shmuel Neft, the Director of the Jewish Russian Community Centre (JRCC) in North Toronto, has claimed that on several recent occasions, video surveillance showed that an individual attempted to break into the centre. The suspect apparently managed to damage the building but was not successful in accessing it.

On a recent radio show, Rabbi Neft explained the series of events:

“So when we finally got a hold of the security footage that showed the incident, which was, by the way, the third of a series of incidents. Second break-in, but a third incident was involved with the same individual…So I found the footage. I was ready to hand it over to the police, and I called as soon as we were able to download it, I called 32 Division to the non-emergency hotline.

“And yes, like you said, I stayed on hold for just about two hours. I managed to pray in the afternoon services and evening services, as well as go out to dinner with a community member, all while on hold with the Toronto Police Service.”

He added: “The truth is that I never really reached them in a direct way… I pretty much gave up on the phone call and drove to 32 Division, which is not so far away, on Yonge Street, thinking that I would be able to get their attention in person. And I was basically told that the system that they have is that non-emergency reports go exclusively through the phone line, the hotline.

“I said, ‘you know, I was on hold for two hours.’

“‘Yeah, we know, you might be on hold for two hours, three hours, four hours.’

“‘So why is that?’ They said, ‘Well frankly we’re understaffed right now’ — which is mind blowing.”

“And so basically, yeah, 10:30 at night he said, ‘Get back on the phone, wait until they answer, and then you’ll be able to report the crime.’ And, that’s when I decided I’m going to take other measures in trying to get the attention of the police department.”

Rabbi Neft then observed: “By the way, I have to make mention that after all the noise we made, 32 Division was on the job, on ball. The detectives calling me almost daily updating me. I called, I have the lead detective’s personal cell phone number. We were in touch about things throughout the week… so they’ve been on the ball ever since we made a lot of noise.

“But like you said…we don’t take these things lightly… this is not just a community centre, it happens to be a synagogue. This is this is the heart of the local Jewish community.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout Canada, where a recent audit shows that antisemitic incidents have drastically increased.

The French Government has vowed to change the law in order to be able to expel a radical imam with a history of inflammatory comments about Jews.

Interior Minister Gérald Darmanin said that Hassan Iquioussen is an enemy of France who had “no place” in the country.

Mr Iquioussen, 59, is a Moroccan citizen who has lived in France all his life and has become a symbol of President Emmanuel Macron’s battle against Islamism, whom the President accuses of rejecting French laws and values. He did not take up French citizenship at a younger age and his attempts to do so since then have failed.

Morocco has reportedly delivered a laissez-passer to authorise his travel, which cleared the way for Mr Iquioussen’s expulsion “by force”, but the imam won an injunction halting his deportation at the Paris Administrative Court, which ruled that the expulsion was a “disproportionate infringement…of [Iquioussen’s] right to a private and family life.” Mr Iquioussen has five children and numerous grandchildren in France.

During last week’s court hearing, prosecutors highlighted statements allegedly made by Mr Iquioussen in 2003 and 2004 in which he described Jews as “miserly usurers” and claimed that Zionists had “connived with Hitler…to push Jews to leave Germany”. He also reportedly said: “The Zionists said…there has to be someone in Europe who does bad things to Jews so that they…will leave [for Israel].” They also noted a conference in 2012 at which Mr Iquioussen allegedly described terrorist attacks in the West as “pseudo-attacks whose objective is to frighten non-Muslims so that they are afraid of Islam and of Muslims,” and claimed that he has also publicly denied the 1915 Armenian genocide and pointed to allegedly misogynistic comments.

In a post on Facebook, Mr Iquioussen “strongly contested” the allegations that he had used “discriminatory or violent language.” His supporters argue that the comments cited in the case were dated and taken out of context, and pointed to other statements by the imam, such as: “We have never had, and have, nothing against Jews because Islam is a religion based on justice.”

Mr Darmanin has announced that the Government will appeal against the injunction at the State Council, France’s highest administrative court, and warned that if the appeal fails, he would change the law to allow for the deportation.

Confirming that intelligence agencies put Mr Iquioussen on a watchlist of allegedly dangerous radicals eighteen months ago, Mr Darmanin said: “This imam…uses antisemitic language. He denies equality between men and women. He denies genocides. He calls for terrorist attacks in France to be considered as conspiracies.” He added: “The enemies of the Republic have no place in the Republic.”

According to a report published by the French Jewish Community Security Service, antisemitic incidents in France have skyrocketed. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism in France and throughout Europe.

Charges have been issued in connection to antisemitic graffiti found on residential mailboxes last week in Pikesville, Maryland.

Benjamin Katz, 31, has been arrested by Baltimore County Police in connection with the graffiti, which reportedly resembled a large swastika with the word “Cox” spraypainted above, an apparent reference to Dan Cox, a politician who won a recent gubernatorial primary election.

Accordingly, police have determined the vandalism to be politically-motivated, but antisemitic graffiti found in Bethesda, also in Marlyand, is still under investigation.

The Montgomery County Police Department is looking into the “white power 1488” and swastikas found on the Bethesda Trolley Trail over the weekend, near Bradley Boulevard and Arlington Road.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the United States.

Two minors have been sentenced in Germany following a brutal assault on a Jewish man in Hamburg last year.

The court heard how the two unnamed brothers, aged seventeen and fifteen, approached a small demonstration against antisemitism and in support of Israel in the city in September 2021. The brothers, accompanied by a female friend, reportedly shouted “f**k Israel” and “Free Palestine” and insulted the demonstrators.

They then assaulted a 61-year-old demonstrator, leaving him with broken cheekbones, smashed glasses and a damaged eye, about which the victim now says: “I’m practically blind, I can only see light and dark in my right eye.”

The assailants fled the scene on rented scooters.

The brothers were charged with antisemitic incitement, and the elder was also charged with grievous bodily harm (GBH).

The elder brother received a sixteen-month suspended sentence, along with community service and anti-violence training, while the younger brother also received a community service order.

Stefan Hensel, Hamburg’s Antisemitism Commissioner, said: “This is a is a clear sign to all antisemitic violent criminals that their actions will not remain without consequences.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism in Germany, which have increased considerably.

Image credit: Jorge Franganillo

The Department of Justice has disclosed that a man from St Louis, Missouri, has admitted to threatening to blow up a local synagogue in 2021.

Cody Steven Rush, 30, made the declaration in US District Court on Monday.

Mr Rush said that he called the FBI on 5th November 2021 saying that he wanted to blow up the local Central Reform Congregation “when they open tomorrow,” because “he hates Jews”.

According to local media, Mr Rush called a second time and said that he hears voices. He reportedly has schizoaffective disorder and suffers from PTSD, anxiety, depression and social anxiety disorder. Referring to Jews, Mr Rush also said, “I hate them with rage.”

It is understood that, in a third call, Mr Rush provided his location, which was on the same street as the synagogue, and that in return calls from the authorities, he made further threats.

Mr Rush pleaded guilty to the use of a telephone to make a threat, and is due for sentencing in November, facing a maximum term of ten years in federal prison.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the United States.

A teenager has been sentenced to three years and seven months in a young offenders’ institute in what is the first conviction from the wave of antisemitic incidents in May 2021.

Rabbi Rafi Goodwin, who leads the Chigwell and Hainault Synagogue in Essex, was driving outside the synagogue on 16th May 2021 when two men walked in front of his car, forcing him to brake.

Chelmsford Crown Court heard on Friday that the men then attacked him and stole his mobile phone.

Leeds-born father of two Rabbi Goodwin, who is in his thirties, was brutally beaten, punched five times in the face until he fell to the floor and then hit on the head with a brick, sustaining head injuries, according to the police. The United Synagogue, the umbrella body to which Chigwell and Hainault Synagogue belongs, said that Rabbi Goodwin sustained injuries necessitating a stay in hospital so that he could be treated and assessed for concussion. A police statement issued soon after the incident added that he was treated for cuts to his head and eye.

Rabbi Goodwin’s children were in the car at the time and witnessed the gruesome attack.

Souraka Djabouri, 19, of Ilford, admitted religiously aggravated damage to Rabbi Goodwin’s vehicle and theft of a mobile phone, and was sentenced for grievous bodily harm without intent.

The second attacker, believed to have been 25 at the time of the attack, has not been identified.

Recorder Richard Conley told Mr Djabouri: “The reason for this behaviour was the fact you and your associate recognised Mr Goodwin was a member of the Jewish faith,” adding: “It’s nothing short of miraculous that Mr Goodwin didn’t sustain life-threatening or life-changing injuries.”

The court heard that Rabbi Goodwin has “fully recovered” from his physical injuries but has also become “hypervigilant about who’s around me” and “looking over my shoulder”.

Mr Djabouri reportedly showed a “genuine level of remorse,” the court heard.

The judge observed that the number of attacks on British Jews had become “increasingly and worryingly commonplace.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It has taken almost a year and a half, but finally one solitary person has been convicted and sentenced for an incident that formed part of the record-breaking wave of antisemitic crimes that took place in May 2021 – and he pleaded guilty. It is not at all reassuring that the number of other defendants facing hate crime charges in relation to incidents in that period can be counted on one hand. The police, CPS and courts all have a duty to help deliver justice to the Jewish community, and we will continue to hold them to account until they do.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2021 showed that over two thirds of British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

In an article in the Jewish News last week, Lionel Idan, the hate crime lead prosecutor for the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) claimed that the CPS takes antisemitic crime seriously. Our experience, however, has suggested otherwise.

In our response in this week’s Jewish News, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, Gideon Falter, argued that “most of the article sought to defend the CPS against the accusation levelled by 59 percent of British Jews in our most recent polling that his organisation fails to do enough to protect our community,” but that the examples and statistics that he cited failed to provide the reassurance that the CPS believed that they would.

To find out why, read the full article at https://www.jewishnews.co.uk/opinion-smoke-and-mirrors-from-the-cps-cannot-hide-the-truth/

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

If you need advice in relation to an antisemitic incident, please contact us in confidence at [email protected] or call +44 (0)330 822 0321.

A court has agreed to reinstate the racially/religiously aggravated element to charges against Abdullah Qureshi. The decision comes after Campaign Against Antisemitism and other groups applied pressure to the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), which had earlier dropped the hate element from the charges.

On 7th April, Mr Qureshi, 28, from Dewsbury in West Yorkshire, pleaded guilty at Thames Magistrates’ Court to one count of assault by beating and one count of grievous bodily harm with intent. The charges related to a series of assaults on 18th August 2021 in Stamford Hill in which five religious Jews in the North London neighbourhood were violently attacked.

Campaign Against Antisemitism then revealed that the CPS had dropped the racially/religiously aggravated element of those charges as part of a plea deal with Mr Qureshi. After we, Shomrim, CST and other communal organisations made representations to the CPS, it agreed to reinstate the aggravated elements, but Mr Qureshi appeared in court to resist the reinstatement of the aggravated element.

Explaining the reinstatement at court, the prosecutor said that these are “serious allegations” and that “the file was reviewed again and a decision was made to proceed with the offences.” However, counsel for Mr Qureshi argued that this submission should not be accepted, describing it as “ridiculous” and an “abuse of process”.

The CPS was instructed to provide its reasons in writing, with an opportunity for the defence to respond in writing, followed by a hearing in the summer.

That hearing took place today at Stratford Magistrates’ Court, where the court decided in favour of the reinstatement. There will now be a plea hearing later this month at Thames Magistrates’ Court.

In one incident at 18:41 on the day of the attacks last August, an Orthodox Jewish man was struck in the face with what appeared to be a bottle. In another at 19:10, a child was slapped on the back of the head, and in yet another at 20:30, a 64-year-old victim was struck and left unconscious on the ground, suffering facial injuries and a broken ankle. Two further incidents were also alleged.

The incidents received significant media attention at the time, and the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, condemned “this appalling attack,” adding: “Let me be clear, racist abuse and hate crime, including antisemitism, have absolutely no place in our city.”

More windows of Jewish-owned shops appear to have been smashed in Stamford Hill, just days after vandals attacked other Jewish-owned shops in the area, reportedly causing £25,000 worth of damage.

The incidents were reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 4620417/22 or CAD 8616 02/08/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A woman has reportedly used a rod as a weapon against, and also threw liquid over, two Jewish women in separate incidents, both occurring in Stamford Hill.

In the first incident, a Jewish woman was said to have been returning from a hospital visit when she was accosted at a bus stop on Seven Sisters road and was hit over the head by a female suspect brandishing a wooden stick who shouted: “I am doing it because you are a Jew.”

The suspect then reportedly threw a liquid over the victim. 

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: 4620417/22

In a second incident, occurring on Wargrave Avenue, the suspect allegedly assaulted a Jewish mother who was pushing her baby in a pram. 

The suspect reportedly brandished a stick and shouted “show me your baby” before spraying a liquid substance over the infant.  

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 363 29/07/22

The suspect has been described as being a physically imposing Black female of around 40 years who wore a turban.

Both incidents were reported on Friday by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

£25,000 worth of damage has been reported following attacks on Jewish-owned shops in Stamford Hill.

Images uploaded online appear to show shops boarded up after the windows of the buildings were smashed in.

The incident was reported on Sunday by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: 4620417/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A woman has been witnessed shouting “F*** you Jews, I will kill you” at identifiably Jewish people leaving a synagogue on Portland Avenue, Stamford Hill.

The incident occurred on 29th July and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 2480 01/08/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Hundreds of Jewish men and boys have been abused on their way home from attending prayers at their local synagogue, it has been reported.

A woman allegedly blocked the group’s path and shouted “Jews don’t belong on the pavement” and “f****** Jews”.

The incident is believed to have occurred on Friday night in the North London area of Stamford Hill and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 8214 31/07/22

Campaign Against Antisemitism works closely with Shomrim, with whom we have a data-sharing agreement.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.