The Metropolitan Police are investigating as a hate crime an attack on a bus travelling down Oxford Street yesterday carrying a group of Jewish teenagers celebrating Chanukah.

The attack was filmed by passengers on the bus and appeared to show a group of men hitting the vehicle with their hands and then their shoes, spitting on it, trying to break windows and performing Hitler salutes.

The assailants were told that the passengers are Jewish and then hurled antisemitic insults and slogans.

The men appear to be of Middle Eastern heritage and hitting an object of antipathy with one’s shoes is common in that region.

The teenagers were on their way to a candle lighting ceremony in central London to celebrate Chanukah.

Campaign Against Antisemitism and others publicised the video and called on the police to investigate. We are also in contact with the victims.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “These are shocking images of an abhorrent attack on a bus carrying Jewish passengers at the heart of London during the festival of Chanukah. We are in contact with the victims. Police must investigate and identify suspects.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A woman in Swindon was reported to the police after neighbours saw a swastika flag hanging in her bedroom window.

One local resident said that “You couldn’t miss the flag,” adding: “It’s vile and this is such a nice area which makes it even more shocking. We’re all disgusted. That symbol means nothing but hate and evil. Why would anyone want to have it hanging on display for everyone to see through the window?”

When asked about the flag, the homeowner reportedly only said that she had “lots of flags in my home.” It was also alleged that her stepdad Derek, when told that the swastika was a racist symbol, said: “So? You want to mind your own business.”

Wiltshire Police said: “We responded to a call from a member of the public on Friday evening, who reported having seen what appeared to be a Nazi flag hung inside a room of an address in Lower Stratton, Swindon.

“Our officers attended the address that evening and gave strong words of advice to the person living there to advise that possession of the flag was not illegal, but that if it can be viewed from a public area, this could be considered a racially aggravated public order offence. The person agreed to remove it from public view.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism: “It is sickening to think that there are still people in Britain who take pleasure in hanging giant Nazi banners in their homes. This person even apparently had the audacity to display the flag for anyone looking from outside to see. She vastly underestimated the common decency of her neighbours. If it happens again, the police must issue more than just warnings.”

Hundreds of residents of the Pennsylvania town of Lancaster turned out to support the town’s Jewish community after a chanukiah in the town-centre was vandalised

The custom built steel chanukiah, which was designed by Mark Joshua Lewin, was damaged just hours after its unveiling in Penn Square.

On Sunday, the first night of Chanukah, hundreds of residents came out to support the city’s Jewish community. Messages of support and concern were also posted on social media and around the town.

A message board outside a Quaker hall read: “We stand with our Jewish neighbours: there is no room for hate in Lancaster County.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Combat Antisemitism

Antisemitic flyers alleging that the COVID-19 pandemic has been masterminded by Jews were distributed to Beverly Hills homes. 

The flyers were found yesterday, shortly before the Jewish community ushered in the first night of Chanukah. Written at the top reads “Every single aspect of the COVID agenda is Jewish” alongside the domain “goyim.tv”, a website affiliated with the “Goyim Defence League”, a group whose membership reportedly contains several neo-Nazis and is understood to be led by Jon Minadeo II. The group is responsible for stunts such as visiting a Chabad centre to claim that “these Jewish terrorists” were behind 9/11, and hanging a banner on a Los Angeles overpass reading “Honk if you know the Jews want a race war.” Earlier this year, Mr Minadeo II created t-shirts carrying antisemitic slogans such as the Holocaust was “a hoax”. Most recently, they hung a banner from a bridge in Austin, Texas that read “Vax the Jews”.

The Beverly Hills Police Department released a statement in which it labelled the event a “hate incident” and confirmed that an investigation was underway. The police received a call from a resident shortly after 18:00 yesterday who reported “a flyer containing hate speech.” After undertaking a search, police discovered that more flyers of the same design, enclosed inside plastic bags of rice in order to anchor them, had been distributed across other homes nearby.

The flyer was described as a single eight-and-a-half-inch by eleven-inch sheet of paper that contained “propaganda style hate speech related to the COVID pandemic and the Jewish people.”

Singer Pat Boone said that “There is no rational reason for this kind of prejudice or bigotry. It is not founded on anything that makes any sense at all,” while Beverly Hills Mayor Robert Wunderlich reportedly said: “All too often Beverly Hills has been a target for various sorts of hate crimes and we won’t tolerate it.” 

Anyone with information regarding the incident was urged to call the police at 310-550-4951.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

One of the Jewish cemeteries in Belgrade, Serbia was vandalised on Wednesday night when an axe was thrown through its chapel window.

A spokesperson for the Jewish Community of Belgrade said that the vandalism had caused serious material damage, adding that “severe physical injuries or even death” could have occurred had the chapel been occupied at the time. “This act reminds us of Kristallnacht,” they added.

On Thursday, European Jewish Association Chairman Rabbi Menachem Margolin called upon Serbia’s Minister of Internal Affairs to carry out a full investigation. Rabbi Margolin said: “It is clear that whoever was responsible has no respect for the dead, never mind the living. We extend our support to our Jewish brothers and sisters in Belgrade and Serbia as a whole, who must be reeling at this attack, and feeling vulnerable.

“I have written to Serbian minister [sic] of Internal Affairs asking for a robust response to the attack, as well as a full throated condemnation, lest the antisemites that carried out this act believe that it is now open season on Jewish buildings in Serbia.”

It was also reported that Serbia’s Jewish community has faced other incidents of hostility recently, which included a campaign of repeated, antisemitic harassment against a well-known Jewish epidemiologist that involved comparisons made between him and Josef Mengele, and the infamous Nazi doctor. Demonstrations were also reportedly made outside of the epidemiologist’s home, whereby demonstrators wore yellow Stars of David.

Threats of a second Holocaust, as well as Nazi symbols, antisemitic emails, have also been made against the Community’s Facebook page.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Chabad Serbia

A far-right Italian lawmaker has apologised for referring to a Holocaust survivor by the tattoo number that was forced upon her as a teenager in Auschwitz concentration camp.

Liliana Segre, who received the tattoo when she was thirteen years old, has been an outspoken supporter of COVID-19 health measures. It was on this point that Fabio Meroni, a member of the city council of Lissone who represents the far-right party Northern League, criticised her in a Facebook post, whereupon he referred to her using the number of her tattoo, stating: “All that was missing [in the vaccine debate] was…75190.”

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

The far-right figure was condemned for his comments by both political and religious figures alike. Lissone councilors from the center-left Partito Democratico urged Mr Meroni to apologise, stating that equating the process of vaccination with Nazim was “vulgar” and would “offend all people with historical awareness and a sense of humanity.”

Mr Meroni responded by saying that he used “that number instead of her name to avoid getting banned from Facebook.” 

Walker Meghnagi, President of Milan’s Jewish community, said that it was “intolerable” for a public figure to use such “vile terms” against “those who have suffered the horror of the racial laws on their own skin.”

After receiving substantial backlash for his comments, Mr Meroni wrote that “in this climate of hatred, unfortunately, I too got involved and I tried to express my thoughts in a totally wrong way,” later adding: “I want to apologise to Senator Liliana Segre, it was not my intention in any way to offend you and if one day I will have the honor of being able to speak to you, I will personally explain my thoughts.”

The initial post has since been removed from Facebook. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A Jewish child was attacked by a local gang in Stamford Hill.

The twelve-year-old victim was grabbed by the neck and kicked.

The gang is believed to be associated with the nearby Webb Estate and is accused of harassing Jewish residents for years.

The attack took place at 18:05 on 18th November on Leadale Road and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 8336 18/11/2021.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A Jewish child was threatened with a knife in Stamford Hill yesterday.

The twelve-year-old victim was riding his bicycle to school and was accosted by a 65-year-old man who said to him: “I will take out a knife to you, if you pass by again.”

The incident took place at 08:05 on 24th November on Leadale Road and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 310 17/11/2021.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Swastikas that were spray-painted on a road in Lehigh Acres, Florida remained there for weeks before being removed, it has been reported

The Nazi symbols are understood to have been painted over on Friday, though not before being discovered by local residents.

One resident stated that what bothered him the most was “that someone with that sort of attitude would even be in this area.” 

It was also pointed out that the symbols were “down the road” from one of the local school bus stops.

Gerald Reisdorf, another member of the community, said: “I guess they maybe want to send a message. ‘What message?’ I don’t know. You know, to me, it’s childish.

“I’m old enough to know what the second world war is about… all of that stuff, you know. And I thought that was behind us.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Antisemitic flyers were found at a church in Westfield, New Jersey.

The flyers at the Holy Trinity Roman Catholic Church reportedly threatened harm.

Ethan Prosnit, the senior rabbi at Temple Emanu-El of Westfield, said: “The Westfield Clergy Association met and discussed the flyers and I thank my clergy partners who brought the antisemitic literature to the authorities.

“I am proud to be in a community where my faith partners take antisemitism seriously and where we work together to make our town a place that honours diversity.”

Swastikas have been found in public spaces in Westfield in the past.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Google

Argentina has strongly condemned the nomination by Iran of Ahmad Vahidi to be the new interior minister.

Mr Vahidi is a former head of Quds, the paramilitary wing of Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard. In that role, Mr Vahidi is a leading suspect in the planning of the 1994 terrorist attack on the AMIA Jewish community centre in Buenos Aires in which 85 died and hundreds more were seriously wounded.

Argentina’s Foreign Ministry described the news as “an affront to Argentine justice and to the victims of the brutal terrorist attack.” The Foreign Ministry also reiterated that Mr Vahidi was wanted by the Argentine courts which considered him to be “a key participant in the decision-making and planning” of the AMIA attack.

Mr Vahidi is one of four Iranians who – since 2007 – have been the subject of an Interpol Red Alert for their alleged role in the 1994 bombing. Iran denies any involvement in the attack and refuses to allow its officials to be investigated. 

If Mr Vahidi’s nomination by Iran’s new President Ebrahim Raisi is confirmed by parliament, this will be his second Cabinet post. He was Defence Minister from 2009 to 2013 and he has also served as chancellor of the Supreme University of National Defence.

The Foreign Ministry statement added: “The Argentine government once more requires the government of the Islamic Republic of Iran to co-operate fully with the Argentine courts, permitting the persons accused of participating in the attack against AMIA to be tried.”

America’s Simon Wiesenthal Centre also expressed criticism of the appointment, describing it as “an insult to Argentina” and “a blow to the families” of the victims.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

The Federation of the Jewish Communities of the Czech Republic has reported a rise in antisemitism, though still believed that antisemitism was at a relatively low level compared with other European countries and remained safe for Jews.

In its annual report, the Federation said that 2020 had seen 874 antisemitic incidents compared with around 690 the previous year. Some 98 percent, however, took place online and included conspiracy theories and antisemitic groups and individuals who blamed Jews for the pandemic and claimed that vaccination served Jewish financial interests.

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

While noting that the vast majority of anti-Jewish hatred was online, it said that in 2020 there had been one physical attack, one attack on Jewish property, and six incidents involving antisemitic threats, harassment and verbal insults.

The report stated that its “analysis of violent antisemitic attacks and the profiles of their perpetrators” confirmed that “a violent act” was invariably preceded by “expressions of hatred vented on the internet, especially on social media.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A teacher has resigned following a controversy at a New Jersey primary school after a student assignment about Adolf Hitler was criticised as glorifying the Nazi leader and diminishing the Holocaust.

The row blew up when a pupil from Maugham Elementary School in Tenafly allegedly dressed up as Hitler where the images were then reportedly shared on social media. Text from the class project was also said to have been shared. Writing in the first person from the perspective of Hitler, the pupil wrote: “I was very popular and many people followed me until I died. My belif [sic] in antisemitism drove me to kill more than 6 million Jews.

The backlash began soon after the Facebook post by Lori Birk who said that “the assignment” had been sent to her by a friend with a child at the school who was concerned that the photo and text had been prominently displayed in “a school hallway.

On her post, which has been removed, Ms Birk wrote that it was “ignorance, antisemitism and hatred taught at a fifth grade level,” adding: “Shame on the parents who helped their child dress as Hitler and the teacher who has approved such hatred.”

In a joint statement with the school board, Tenafly Public Schools Superintendent Shauna DeMarco explained that the project had been to “look at historical figures who personified good and evil” and in that context, it was “unfair to judge any student or teacher.

Ms DeMarco also noted that the teacher involved “happens to be Jewish” and had “asked students to speak from the perspective of one of these individuals.” People seeing the students’ projects “displayed in the school” did not understand the project, “resulting in justifiable concerns.

Following its investigation, the school board voted to accept the resignation of the unnamed teacher and reinstated the school Principal Jennifer Ferrara. School board President Jocelyn Schwarz said the administration would work with Ms Ferrara to “foster a safe learning environment.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.