Following the airing over the past week of the ‘Labour Files’ programme on Al Jazeera, Campaign Against Antisemitism has released a statement assessing the so-called documentary.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Those who managed to watch all the way through Al Jazeera’s rather boring propaganda trilogy, ‘Labour Files’, were presented with a parallel universe of the Labour Party’s antisemitism crisis.

“With the astonishing and insulting premise that ‘Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour Party was condemned for antisemitism [but] the Labour Files reveal they were the victims of distortions and misrepresentation’, the so-called documentary purports to show that antisemitism in Labour was a sham without speaking to any of the victims or leaders of the Jewish community or antisemitism experts. A viewer would barely know from the programme that the EHRC, an independent body established by a Labour Government, found that Labour was so racist that it broke the law, following an investigation in which we were the complainant.

“Relying on testimony from members of an antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, as well as figures with records of inflammatory views, the programme ludicrously tries to argue that there were significant fissures within the Jewish community on Mr Corbyn or the International Definition of Antisemitism. The programme also repeatedly insists that the facts plainly support claims that Labour antisemitism allegations were fraudulent, yet this is not borne out by the outcomes of any of the legal cases relating to the matter so far.

“Just as the Corbyn era ended with claims of a ‘hierarchy of racism’, so does Al Jazeera, with a repellent last-ditch assertion that there is a hierarchy of racism in Labour that privileges Jews, which is itself a form of antisemitism.

“The Labour Files has added next to nothing to the collective understanding of Labour’s antisemitism crisis. It is not real journalism, but rather the sort of propaganda that we have come to expect from a Qatari-owned media outlet with its own agenda and priorities.”

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected]

Rabbi Joseph Dweck, Senior Rabbi of the S&P Sephardi community, appeared on the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism where he spoke about his concerns surrounding antisemitism both here and abroad, and the importance of education on Jewish history. 

Rabbi Dweck has been a longstanding friend of CAA, having delivered speeches at many of our rallies and events.

During the podcast interview, he said that antisemitism “in the modern setting is almost always tied to Israel” which is “an easy target” when it comes to young people on social media.

“One does not condemn an entire people because of the [the Israeli government’s] behaviours,” he stated.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the State of Israel” is an example of antisemitism.

Speaking on the importance of having Jewish pride as a means of tackling antisemitism, the Senior Rabbi said: “The more proud one is, of who one is, the taller one stands, the more confident one is to be who one is in the world. That makes a huge difference.”

He continued: “If you’re strong and proud of who you are, you speak up, and you represent. That is something we have certainly seen.

“I’m very concerned about university students experiencing that…it is important for young people to not feel that every time they go outside they need to hide this aspect of their identity…[Jewish pride] will further encourage young people and generations coming to be able to represent the Jewish people and to speak in favour and strength and to be able to have absolutely zero tolerance for any kind of antisemitism.”

When asked about the differences between antisemitism in the United States and the United Kingdom, he noted that he “feels it more here” in London, noting that “the antisemitism here has a very anti-Zionistic colour.”

However, he stated there is a “tremendous rise in antisemitism” in the United States, which has given antisemites “license to be more vocal and present, and violent”. 

Some such antisemitic incidents in recent years included white supremacist shooting in synagogues, a Black Israelite shooting, the Islamist hostage incident in Colleyville, Texas, and persistent attacks on Hasidic Jews. 

Rabbi Dweck lamented that “it’s concerning to me in general” in areas that used to be “tranquil for Jewish people”. 

“Violence, hate speech against Jews is becoming more acceptable. There is a stronger feeling of allowance for people to do this and not have repercussions, and this really worries me,” he said.  

Rabbi Dweck additionally spoke about his own podcast, ‘Humans Being’ where he interviews, in his words, “thinkers, innovators, and creators from across society on the meaning and value of what they do”. 

He commented how he “wanted to speak to people in every area from a background of Jewish thought” and reaffirmed his believe that “Jewish thought, and Torah, is a framework of thought”. 

Leaving a message to the Jewish community for Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, Rabbi Dweck said that “although we may all feel a bit unstable, our people have survived for thousands of years, we will thrive and continue to do so.”

This podcast can be listened to here, or watched here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox.

Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, television personality Robert Rinder, writer Eve Barlow, Grammy-Award-winning singer-songwriter Autumn Rowe, and actor Eddie Marsan.

The Director General of the BBC attended a hearing at the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee on Tuesday, along with the Chair and the Chief Operating Officer, to take questions from MPs on a range of subjects relating to the public service broadcaster, including impartiality.

It was disappointing that, despite our past requests, the Committee did not ask about recent high-profile controversies relating to the BBC’s reportage on issues relating to antisemitism, such as the appalling Oxford Street coverage of last Chanukah, where the BBC baselessly tried to claim that Jewish victims of antisemitic abuse might themselves have made provocative racial remarks.

The Committee also did not explore other areas of BBC bias that have long concerned the community.

Worse still, Tim Davie, the Director General, did not address these issues himself at all. Instead, he insisted that the Corporation was “doing well” when it came to tackling bias and “doing a pretty good job” when it came to neutrality. He said: “We do have hundreds of thousands of hours of output…and overall, I think we are delivering well, I do think that and it’s important we’re proportional about this.”

Whatever Mr Davie thinks, polling that we conducted in 2020 for our Antisemitism Barometer  revealed that two thirds of British Jews were deeply concerned by the BBC’s coverage of matters of Jewish concern, and 55 percent by its handling of antisemitism complaints. It is likely that these figures would be even higher if polled today.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is disappointing that the Digital Culture Media and Sport Committee did not see fit to question Tim Davie on antisemitism, despite our repeated requests for the BBC to be held to account.

“Regardless, Mr Davie’s failure to address the BBC’s lamentable standing amongst British Jews is shameful. Judging issues by the number of complaints received, as Mr Davie does, is a wholly unjust metric for a minority as small as the Jewish community. His insistence that, ‘overall, I think we are delivering well,’ clashes profoundly with the experience of British Jews. Our polling has shown that two thirds of the Jewish community is deeply concerned by the BBC’s coverage of matters of Jewish concern, and a majority by its handling of antisemitism complaints, the process for which is notoriously demeaning and Kafkaesque. These are not figures that reflect satisfaction with the broadcaster’s supposed impartiality, and the BBC cannot claim to be upholding its obligation to be impartial as long as the Jewish community views our nation’s public service broadcaster as biased against Jews and the issues that they care about.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

Rabbi Menachem Margolin, the Chairman and founder of the European Jewish Association (EJA), an organisation that promotes and defends Jewish interests in Europe, a large part of which involves raising awareness of, and tackling, antisemitism, appeared on the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism where he spoke about the EJA’s first-of-its-kind index which polled the best European countries for Jews to live in.

When asked if he was surprised that the report ranked Italy and Hungary as the top two countries for Jews to live in, while Poland, Belgium and France came out bottom, he said that he was not.

“What is important is not what the media says” he said. “We have to concentrate on what is important for Jewish life.”

Rabbi Margolin said that in the case of Hungary, he noticed “a renaissance of Jewish life” taking place, noting the country’s growth of synagogues as an indicator.

Rabbi Margolin said that he hoped that world leaders would take notice of the findings and that they would back up any promises to enhance Jewish life with actions. 

“The action,” he explained, “is providing the Jewish communities the conditions they need to grow. They need security, they need freedom of religion, they need support, they need to see zero tolerance towards antisemitism, they need to see the government is really committed to combating antisemitism, they would like to see governments treat Israel in a fair way; not with double standards.”

Throughout the interview, Rabbi Margolin touched upon a variety of other issues which included the rise of antisemitism in the United States and his advice for tackling antisemitism.

The podcast with Rabbi Margolin can be listened to here, or watched here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox.

Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, television personality Robert Rinder, writer Eve Barlow, Grammy-Award-winning singer-songwriter Autumn Rowe, and actor Eddie Marsan.

Campaign Against Antisemitism can reveal that the inflammatory broadcaster and regular BBC contributor, Abdel Bari Atwan, believes that “massive Jewish institutions” try to silence him and others because they “believe they own the entire universe and control all the media.”

In an interview broadcast on the Beirut-based, Arabic-language Al-Mayadeen news channel on 14th April 2022 that has been unearthed by Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Online Monitoring and Investigations Unit, Mr Atwan complained of a campaign of as long as 25 years to silence him “led by Israeli security services, Mossad, Shabak and others.” At the time that the interview was broadcast, the JC was urging YouTube to remove a video of Mr Atwan where he reportedly “railed against ‘Jewish Israeli lobbies’ in Parliament, calling the terrorists who killed Israelis ‘martyrs’ and describing their actions as ‘a legitimate right’.” The JC also reported at the time that Mr Atwan characterised the shooting of three Israelis in Tel Aviv as a “miracle” and described the terrorist as a “hero” and those fleeing for their lives were, he claimed, “like mice”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is now able to reveal that Mr Atwan, who is the Editor-in-Chief of the Rai al-Youm Arabic news and opinion website, asserted in the newly-unearthed interview that “in the UK, as well as in many European countries, Israel is considered above the law. It can challenge whomever [it] wants, it can muzzle mouths.” He went on to engage in antisemitism-denial, declaring that “We have witnessed how Israel and its lobbies succeeded in sabotaging the UK Labour Party and isolating the Chairman, who is Jeremy Corbyn [sic], by means of campaigns and accusations that he is, I mean, antisemitic.”

Speaking in Arabic throughout, he also complained that he was not able to refer to a terrorist who murdered Jewish Israelis in Tel Aviv as a “martyr” because of Israeli interference in the media, saying: “Now that things have evolved so that you are forbidden from describing these martyrs as martyrs. These Israelis started interfering with everything. Look, six, I mean, colleagues, journalists, they expelled them from Deutsche Welle, the German television, just because they criticised Israel.”

He was referring to the sacking of several journalists at the German broadcaster after it emerged that they had reportedly used antisemitic language, such as saying that a “Jewish lobby controls many German institutions” to prevent criticism of Israel, and comparing Jews to “ants” that had invaded “through our weak points.”

Mr Atwan emphasised in his interview that “now the Zionists have succeeded in taking control over the media outlets,” and that “They [the Zionists] [have] become stronger than international laws, stronger than British laws, stronger than German laws.” Referring to the Tel Aviv terrorist attack in April, he insisted that “resistance is a legitimate right, all laws have enshrined it, secular and divine.”

Asked by the interviewer, “Who exactly are the bodies who aim to silence Abdel Bari Atwan and seek to incite against him in the UK?” Mr Atwan answered: “Massive institutions. Massive Jewish institutions. And institutions loyal to Israel. And there are also parties. These parties, for example, the Conservative Party, right now, it is controlled, there is control, one way or another, by these institutions, they want it to adopt what is the Israeli policy. There is also the Labour Party, there are groups, Israel’s friends in the Labour Party, Israel’s friends in the Conservative Party, it is they who want to silence us. They want to enforce the Israeli policies upon us. This is the story.

“And these people, they have deep roots in British society. However, in exchange there are people who support the right cause, the cause of justice, the Palestinian cause, and defend it. They were expelled from British parties because of these positions. But they, these people, although the number of Jews in the UK does not exceed 350,000, 400,000 people, nevertheless, they have seventy members in the House of Commons, do you hear? Seventy representatives in the British Parliament, because they have formidable financial power and economic power, and all of them form an alliance against Abdel Bari Atwan. It is because they don’t want voices. They know the extent of these voices’ influence. They know the extent to which people have reacted to these voices, the extent of the blow to their plans of obstruction and coverup in which these Jewish Israeli lobbies engage within British society. This is the gravity of the matter.”

Needless to say, there are not seventy Jewish MPs in the House of Commons and, even if there were, that should not be a cause for concern, any more than if numerous MPs from any other ethnic or religious minority were sat in Parliament in noteworthy numbers.

Mr Atwan ended by claiming that these interests were pressuring the BBC to stop featuring him, but that, he is relieved, thus far the BBC has resisted, concluding: “[They] believe that they own the entire universe, that they control all the media. This is the truth.”

The Al-Mayadeen news channel is viewed by some as pro-Hizballah and supportive of the Syrian Government.

This revelation comes after the BBC came under pressure yet again for hosting Mr Atwan after other recent inflammatory comments.

The controversy relates to a JC report that Mr Atwan recently defended Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas’ remark that Israel has committed “50 Holocausts” and his refusal to condemn the 1972 Munich Olympics terror attack on Israeli athletes. Mr Abbas was condemned by the German Chancellor for his comments, which he made at a joint press conference with the Chancellor on a visit to Berlin, and is facing an investigation by German police.

Mr Atwan reportedly wrote in an article for the news site Raialyoum earlier this month: “I support [Mahmoud Abbas’s] refusal to apologise for the killing of 11 Israeli participants at the 1974 (sic) Munich Olympics, and his use of the term ‘holocausts’ to describe the many massacres to which Palestinians have been subjected by Israeli forces.”

He also reportedly claimed in the article that the Munich terror attack was “not committed by Abbas or by the Black September squad that abducted them” but by “Israeli Mossad operatives and German police,” apparently adding: “[Israeli Prime Minister Yair] Lapid’s hands are soaked in the blood of Palestinian children…Israel, supported by Germany’s guilt complex, considers itself above any law and feels free to twist the facts.”

On the same day as the article, Mr Atwan appeared on the BBC’s Dateline London programme, and said in relation to the recent violent attack on the author Sir Salman Rushdie: “The Satanic Verses actually is blasphemy completely and it is offensive. You know, Salman Rushdie, he was very, very cruel when he talked about the Prophet Muhammad and his wives, and actually, to talk about the wives of the Prophet is really very, very dangerous.” The attack is believed to have been inspired by the fatwa issued and promoted by Iran’s theocratic regime, which has a long history of antisemitic policies.

In 2007, Atwan is reported to have said: “If Iranian missiles strike Israel, by Allah, I will go to Trafalgar Square and dance with delight.” In 2010, it is claimed that Atwan told an audience at the London School of Economics that “the Jewish lobby… [is] endangering the whole world”. In 2021, he is reported to have said that “Israel today is in a state of confusion and panic, they know very well that what happened in Kabul airport will repeat itself at Ben Gurion airport. But Ben Gurion Airport will be closed, there will be no planes in it, they will have no other option but to flee through the sea.  By Allah, they should listen to the advice of Hassan Nasrallah and start learning how to swim because their only option will be Cyprus, their only option will be the Mediterranean Sea.” Mr Nasrallah is the leader of the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group, Hizballah.

Mr Atwan’s remarks have drawn concern that he may be accused of having glorified terrorism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is writing to the BBC and considering legal options.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “These new revelations of Abdel Bari Atwan’s apparent view that ‘massive Jewish institutions’ are silencing him, that ‘Zionists’ control the media and that it is lamentable how many Jews there are in Parliament because of the Jews’ ‘formidable financial power’ must surely now force the BBC to drop him as a regular contributor. This man has no place on our television screens, and it is shameful that the BBC has yet to recognise that. We shall be writing to the BBC and considering legal action over Mr Atwan’s possible glorification of terrorism.”

Polling that we conducted in 2020 for our Antisemitism Barometer already revealed that two thirds of British Jews were deeply concerned by the BBC’s coverage of matters of Jewish concern, and 55% by its handling of antisemitism complaints. It is likely that these figures would be even higher if polled today.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

The inflammatory broadcaster and regular BBC contributor, Abdel Bari Atwan, has appeared on the BBC News channel once again, despite his recent inflammatory comments.

The JC reported that Mr Atwan recently defended Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas’ remark that Israel has committed “50 Holocausts” and his refusal to condemn the 1972 Munich Olympics terror attack on Israeli athletes. Mr Abbas was condemned by the German Chancellor for his comments, which he made at a joint press conference with the Chancellor on a visit to Berlin, and is facing an investigation by German police.

Mr Atwan reportedly wrote in an article for the news site Raialyoum earlier this month: “I support [Mahmoud Abbas’s] refusal to apologise for the killing of 11 Israeli participants at the 1974 (sic) Munich Olympics, and his use of the term ‘holocausts’ to describe the many massacres to which Palestinians have been subjected by Israeli forces.”

He also reportedly claimed in the article that the Munich terror attack was “not committed by Abbas or by the Black September squad that abducted them” but by “Israeli Mossad operatives and German police,” apparently adding: “[Israeli Prime Minister Yair] Lapid’s hands are soaked in the blood of Palestinian children…Israel, supported by Germany’s guilt complex, considers itself above any law and feels free to twist the facts.”

On the same day as the article, Mr Atwan appeared on the BBC’s Dateline London programme, and said in relation to the recent violent attack on the author Sir Salman Rushdie: “The Satanic Verses actually is blasphemy completely and it is offensive. You know, Salman Rushdie, he was very, very cruel when he talked about the Prophet Muhammad and his wives, and actually, to talk about the wives of the Prophet is really very, very dangerous.” The attack is believed to have been inspired by the fatwa issued and promoted by Iran’s theocratic regime, which has a long history of antisemitic policies.

In April, the JC revealed that Mr Atwan characterised the shooting of three Israelis in Tel Aviv as a “miracle” and described the terrorist as a “hero” and those fleeing for their lives were, he claimed, “like mice”.

In 2007, Atwan is reported to have said: “If Iranian missiles strike Israel, by Allah, I will go to Trafalgar Square and dance with delight.” In 2010, it is claimed that Atwan told an audience at the London School of Economics that “the Jewish lobby… [is] endangering the whole world”.

Mr Atwan’s remarks have drawn concern that he may be accused of having glorified terrorism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is writing to the BBC and considering legal options.

A spokesperson for the BBC said: “Abdel Bari Atwan appeared on Dateline as a commentator primarily to give his view on Saudi Arabia’s dealings with Donald Trump, and the allegations that Mr Trump had passed nuclear secrets to the Saudi state. We also felt it was important to cover the attack on Sir Salman Rushdie. We believe the discussion was fair and duly impartial and we believe it was editorially justified for Abdel to appear. If extreme views are expressed on the BBC, we would always seek to challenge them.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is time that the BBC is held to account for regularly platforming Abdel Bari Atwan, who has allegedly spoken in the past about how ‘the Jewish lobby’ is ‘endangering the world’ and has reportedly expressed support for violence against the Jewish state.

“Now, while appearing to offer apologetics for the violent attack on Salman Rushdie because the author’s writings are ‘offensive’, he apparently has no qualms offending Jews and all decent people by doubling down on Mahmoud Abbas’ refusal to condemn the Munich terror attack and his claim that Israel has committed ’50 Holocausts’ and is thus worse than the Nazis, which is a breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

“We are submitting a complaint to the BBC and considering legal action over Mr Atwan’s possible glorification of terrorism.”

Polling that we conducted in 2020 for our Antisemitism Barometer already revealed that two thirds of British Jews were deeply concerned by the BBC’s coverage of matters of Jewish concern, and 55% by its handling of antisemitism complaints. It is likely that these figures would be even higher if polled today.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

Isaac de Castro, an activist and journalist who was integral to the creation of the ‘Jewish on Campus’ movement, appeared on the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism where he spoke openly about the challenges Jewish students in the United States are facing.

Mr de Castro said that “‘Jewish on Campus’ started with just a bunch of Jewish students who were fed up and were meeting on the internet at the very beginning, and height of, [COVID-19]. We were all stuck at home online yelling into the void about what was happening to us on college campuses and how difficult that was and at the same time, everyone was turning to social media to do activism in which they were dragging in antisemitism.

“That, I think, was very fresh and very stressful to everyone. We thought of the stakes of speaking out on antisemitism and how it became so taboo to talk about it because Jews are not perceived as an oppressed group or because supporting Israel is seen as a very, very negative thing on college campuses.”

He explained that the way the organisation managed to convince students to say what was happening to them was to anonymise it.

“[The movement] grew exponentially…thousands of followers a day,” he said. “It was really special, and it was a catalyst for understanding antisemitism on college campuses in the United States. I think people were not really getting the scope of it and these stories put a face to it because it wasn’t just numbers of how many Jewish students have faced antisemitism in which campuses, it was ‘this is my story, this is what I went through, this is what my professor said to me, this is what my peers said to me.’ There was no way of denying how powerful that was.”

When asked what advice he would offer to Jewish students experiencing antisemitism, the activist said: “Find community, whether its a Hillel House or the Jewish student union or confiding in ‘Jewish on Campus’, confiding in Jewish friends. I think it’s very, very important to not isolate yourself and to have like-minded people in which you can confide in because dealing with that by yourself is not great. You’re stronger when you’re united.”

Mr de Castro’s work also looks at the stories of Latino Jews of Sephardic descent, which is the focus of his newest project.

Mr de Castro, himself a Panamanian Jew of both Ashkenazi and Sephardi descent who now lives in the United States, said that his work has been inspired by speaking to people who “have no idea what these communities are like.” 

Speaking on some of the many generations of Latino Jews now living in the United States, Mr de Castro said that “There is a difference in terms of outspokenness, in terms of antisemitism or even understanding antisemitism…there is a difference for sure.”

Throughout the interview, Mr de Castro touched upon a variety of other issues which included his own story of moving to the United States and Jewcy, the Jewish magazine at which he is the editor.

The podcast with Mr de Castro can be listened to here, or watched here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox.

Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, television personality Robert Rinder, writer Eve Barlow, Grammy-Award-winning singer-songwriter Autumn Rowe, and actor Eddie Marsan.

GB News, the conservative news and opinion channel, has deleted the video of an interview between host Neil Oliver and the far-right blogger Peter Sweden, after controversy erupted in relation to his past comments, which he now denies having made.

Peter Sweden, whose real name is believed to be Peter Imanuelsen and who has over 330,000 follows on Twitter, first gained notoriety offline in 2017 after Katie Hopkins, the political commentator who has long courted controversy with remarks about various minorities, including Jews, published a picture with Mr Imanuelsen, before deleting it after an outcry.

At the time and since, more and more tweets attributed to him about the Holocaust and Jewish people have surfaced.

On the Holocaust and Nazis, he is alleged to have tweeted:

  • “If you want to know my position on the holocaust btw, I don’t think it happened. Note I’m not a nazi. [sic]”
  • “The claim that 6 million jews were gassed seem highly unprobable. The concentration camps didnt have the facilities for that. [sic]”
  • “I don’t like fascism, but I think hitler had some good points. I am pretty certain that the holocaust actually never happened. [sic]”
  • “I believe the holocaust is a lie to further the agenda of NOW [New World Order]? [sic]”
  • “I have also heard that concentration camps actually had swimming pools, cinema, theatre, football fields etc (photos). Opinion?”
  • “By the way just so you know i am not a nazi : ) I think hitler had some good points, but i don’t agree with fascism or socialism [sic]”
  • “I’m not a nazi, but they sure managed to keep rapefugees out of germany… [sic]”
  • “they even had a commemorate coin with a swasitka on one side & a so called “star of david” on the other side… [sic]”

Numerous alleged tweets have propagated conspiracies about Jewish power:

  • “How is the protocols of the elders of zion ‘anti-semitic’? Is the jews own text on jewish supremacism anti-semitic? [sic]”
  • “Globalist cabal. In other words, Rothschild, Rockefeller, Goldman Sachs, George Soros etc. The aforementioned are Jewish.”
  • “The globalists (mainly Jews) are the ones bringing in the muslims to europe. They seem to work together. [sic]”
  • “The jewish supremacists are the very ones bringing in the muslims. Both are issues. [sic]”
  • “Jews think they’re superior & they think they are going to have gentiles as slaves. Judaism is an antichrist religion.”
  • “Since you are jewish, why don’t you mention that nearly all pornographic studios are owned by jews ? [sic]”
  • “It is the vatican & the jews who are behind NOW {New World Order]. [sic]”
  • According to statistics 40-75% of jewish households owned slaves. Only 1.4% of whites did” and “These are official stats from the US government. [sic]”
  • “Blair is not jewish from what i have heard. But he is a neocon which are mostly run by jewish people. [sic]”
  • “I think symphatetic jews could be allies, but at a distance. We dont want people like Milo in the AltRight. [sic]”
  • “Why is it often jewish people who are against nationalism…? [sic]”

On the Jews and Christianity, he is alleged to have tweeted:

  • “The way i see this, it is jews hate christianity. That is why they want to try and destroy the west. [sic]”
  • “Look for him ? Jesus has already come. The jews rejected Jesus Christ = they are anti-christ. [sic]”
  • “Im not blocking jews from salvation. If any jew wants to convert & accept Jesus then that is great news ! [sic]”
  • “There has of course been good jews, Peter, John, Paul etc. I suggest you listen to what the bible says about jews. [sic]”
  • “I would suggest you read Martin Luthers book ‘On the Jews and Their Lies’. I think you will be surprised”; “I see you stand with israel. I suggest you read Martin Luthers book ‘On the Jews and Their Lies’”; “Read Martin Luthers ‘On the Jews and Their Lies’. You can see they had a problem with jews using usury back then too”; and “Have you read Martin Luthers views on the jews? [sic]”

These tweets were predominantly from 2016. Following the outcry in 2017 in relation to Ms Hopkins’ picture with him, Mr Imanuelsen apologised, saying: “My views now are very different and I strongly regret things I have said when I was young”. He added that he now believed that the Holocaust happened and that it was a “horrific crime”.

Years on, however, as the controversy erupted this weekend, he has doubled down, claiming: “It is fascinating to see the left hate the truth so much they come with FAKE, photoshopped, so called screenshots with outright LIES about me I have NEVER been a Holocaust denier and anyone claiming I am are LIARS.”

He has described claims that he denied the Holocaust as “categorically false and libel” and has reportedly deleted his previous apologies, possibly because of the paradox of at once apologising for tweets and at the same time claiming that they were never published in the first place.

GB News has now deleted the video of the interview that it posted to Twitter.

A spokesperson for GB News told Campaign Against Antisemitism: “We’ve been made aware that Peter Sweden, also known as Peter Imanuelsen, who appeared on GB News yesterday to talk about falling birth rates, has been accused of being a holocaust denier. As a result of this information, we have removed clips of Mr Sweden’s interview from our website and our social media channels while we investigate. GB News abhors antisemitism and all other forms of racism.”

Peter Imanuelsen told Campaign Against Antisemitism: ”I find it sad to see the mainstream media smearing people with lies, stating that I have been/or are a Holocaust denier. This is completely untrue. I have never denied the Holocaust and it is a lie from the far-left trying to discredit me with views I never had. The truth is that when I was young and started to see the lies in the media, like the lies they now publish about me, I as many lost trust in them and speculated in different views – but Holocaust denial was not one of them.

“These views, like doubts about the moon landing, conspiracy theories about the ”New World Order” and many other views, I have long left behind and strongly distanced myself from. I find it so disingenious to smear people like me with lies, and secondly that people are so full of hate that they cannot accept that someone had bad views and left them behind. But Holocaust denial is a view I never had, and to claim that I did is an outright lie.

“Neither is there any proof to back it up, just some fake, photoshopped screenshots with so called citations from me that are either completely untrue or taken completely out of context. It doesn’t require much technical skill to open a web browser in developer mode and create a fake statement. That I never have been a Holocaust denier is clearly proved to any honest person reading what I actually have written both on my homepage and my Substack.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is extraordinary that GB News would platform someone who has allegedly propagated Holocaust denial and repugnant conspiracies about Jews. This is, at best, a monumental vetting failure that should give the channel pause about where it looks for some of its guests. GB News was right to delete the video, but we and the general public still expect an apology from the station.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

Rabbi Mordechai Lightstone, one of the key figures spearheading the social media of Chabad.org, the official website of the worldwide Chabad-Lubavitch movement, appeared on the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism where he discussed means of tackling online antisemitism.

“You have an issue with the platforms where you have these platforms that allow people to push out disinformation and antisemitism at such scale, so quickly, and it’s so hard to get down. It’s like a whack-a-mole, if they do pull down one thing it pops up in a bunch of other places. And I do think that technology companies do have a responsibility to do this.”

Rabbi Lightstone revealed how he had a video in which he was baking bread swiftly removed due to a perceived copyright infringement over a piece of music, despite him actually having had the rights to the song.

“When there’s an incentive when it comes to content in other ways, they have the ability to use [artificial intelligence] and stuff like that to help filter out potential issues, so you have to imagine if antisemitism is a priority, the ability to help get it down should exist.”

Turning his attention to social media users, Rabbi Lightstone acknowledged that both trolls and ignorant but well-meaning users exist. In the first instance, he spoke of an interaction he had with a Twitter user in which the user stated that “Jews are horrible people” and that he “tried to avoid them” as much as he could, to which Rabbi Lightstone replied: “You realise you just spent fifteen minutes arguing online with a Hasidic rabbi, right?”

Speaking about Twitter users who may make ignorant remarks but are willing to learn from their mistakes, Rabbi Lightstone said: “For some people, there is an education issue. Sometimes, you do have well-meaning people. And I’ve had an experience where I’ve seen someone say something online, and it’s very easy to jump on them…you see the account, there’s a real person behind it, really making, in their minds, a good attempt…there’s a way to engage in dialogue that is constructive.”

He added: “That won’t weed out the trolls. The trolls aren’t there in good faith anyway.”

Throughout the interview, Rabbi Lightstone touched upon a variety of other issues including telling the history of the deadly Crown Heights riot and how he is raising funds for Torah scrolls using NFTs.

The podcast with Rabbi Lightstone can be listened to here, or watched here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox.

Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, television personality Robert Rinder, writer Eve Barlow, Grammy-Award-winning singer-songwriter Autumn Rowe, and actor Eddie Marsan.

Shoshana Gottlieb, a writer, content creator and podcaster who is best known for running the popular Instagram account ‘jewishmemesonly’, appeared on the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism where she discussed how she uses memes as a means of mocking and dismantling antisemitic conspiracy theories. 

“Memes are a recurring internet joke. It’s usually a picture or a video that you can take and turn on its head, and repurpose in other contexts,” Ms Gottlieb explains. “I started making them because I reached a point where I realised I could make them, because I had the meme knowledge and I had the Jewish knowledge, and I put those two things together.”

Ms Gottlieb’s content playfully exposes how ludicrous and nonsensical antisemitic beliefs can be, as well as highlighting some of the weird and wonderful aspects of Jewish culture. In the past, she has used her platform to mock antisemitic tropes such as the Rothschild conspiracy, allegations of media control and the cliche that all Jews are rich.

Speaking on how she created a meme in which she used an image from the television programme The Simpsons to poke fun at those who believe in tropes of Jewish power and control, Ms Gottlieb said: “Someone posted the image of [Marge Simpson] with money coming out of her hair and a bundle of cash, and I’m like ‘Well, people say Jews have a lot of money and people say Jews get money at these secret meetings’…it’s just connecting the dots.

“You find the absurdity. I remember learning about [The Protocols of] the Elders of Zion at school and being like, ‘That’s crazy, no one could ever believe that.’ And now you’re in a YouTube comments section and people are quoting it.”

However, there are some lines that the content creator refuses to cross.

“I stay away from serious antisemitism. I’m not going to make a joke about a synagogue that’s been held hostage, I don’t make jokes about the Holocaust. But when it comes to antisemitic conspiracy theory, at a very superficial level, it’s ridiculous. Before it becomes harmful, it’s just insane. That’s the stuff I’m making fun of,” she said.

Ms Gottlieb revealed that while the response to her content has largely been positive, she has received some antisemitic comments in the past.

“As for antisemitism, I have zero tolerance. Every so often, once in a blue moon, someone will comment something on a post. And the internet, for me, is a fun place. I don’t come on to fight battles and I don’t come on to try to talk down people who literally spend their time finding Jewish creators. 

“I report them to Instagram because I don’t think they should have a platform, I block them, I delete their comment and I continue on my way. My internet experience is infinitely happier for it.”

Ms Gottlieb told us that her experience of online antisemitism has not been limited to Instagram. 

“One time on Twitter, someone was creating lists of Jews, lists for the next gas chambers. It was really bad, and it was me and a bunch of other Jews on Twitter,” she said. “I think there are some people you can push back on when you say antisemitic things, but when it’s people who come in to purposefully annoy you, what’s the point? They just want to get a rise out of me. I’m not going to give them that.”

Throughout the interview, Ms Gottlieb touched upon a variety of other issues that included the importance of high-quality Holocaust education, representation of Jews in the media, and her own podcast, Pop Culture Parasha, in which she and her co-host pair that week’s Torah portion with a film or television programme and discuss the similarities.

The podcast with Ms Gottlieb can be listened to here, or watched here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox.

Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, television personality Robert Rinder, writer Eve Barlow, Grammy-Award-winning singer-songwriter Autumn Rowe, and actor Eddie Marsan.

The books section of The Daily Telegraph is continuing to sell books by the conspiracy theorist and antisemitic hate preacher, David Icke, despite his output being banned by some other retailers.

The website currently lists eleven David Icke titles, available either in hard copy or e-book formats. 

They include the upcoming self-published tract, The Trap: What it is, how it works, and how we escape its illusions, which will be available from 1st September, which the website has put it in the “Philosophy of Mind” category.

Mr Icke has self-published all of his work since the mid-1990s, after his endorsement of the notorious antisemitic hoax The Protocols of the Elders of Zion in his books The Robots’ Rebellion (1994) and And the Truth Shall Set You Free (1995) saw him dropped by his publisher, Gateway.

This has not, however, prevented Mr Icke’s books being available from some mainstream retailers. Although, in 2020, Britain’s most popular book retailer, Waterstones, said that it would remove all of Mr Icke’s books from sale, WH Smith was still found to be selling his books and DVDs by May 2021.

Mr Icke uses social media, his books and his stage performances to incite hatred. His preaching is so absurd that since the 1990s he has been dismissed as a crank, but because he is dismissed, there has been no major opposition to him and he has built up a following of thousands upon thousands of disciples whom he has persuaded to adamantly believe that the world is in the grip of a conspiracy run by the “Rothschild Zionists”. His repertoire includes conspiracy myths and tropes classified as antisemitic according to the International Definition of Antisemitism, adopted by the British Government. Campaign Against Antisemitism has successfully persuaded some venues to pull out of hosting his events.

After years of pressure from Campaign Against Antisemitism, Mr Icke was banned from most social media platforms.

Campaign Against Antisemitism shall be writing to The Daily Telegraph.

A United Nations investigator, who is tasked with a much-criticised probe into Israel’s conflict with the antisemitic genocidal Hamas terrorist group, is facing calls to end his investigation after he accused the “Jewish lobby” of controlling social media during his appearance on a podcast.

In an interview with David Kattenberg, a contributor to the controversial publication Mondoweiss, Miloon Kothari, who forms part of the UN Human Rights Council’s Independent International Commission of Inquiry on the Occupied Palestinian Territory, said that “We are very disheartened by the social media that is controlled largely by the Jewish lobby or specific NGOs.”

Jewish groups have described Mr Kothari’s comments as “appalling” and “outrageous and absurd”.

The US Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat Antisemitism, Deborah Lipstadt, also described the comments as “outrageous”.

The Israeli Government has cited Mr Kothari’s reference to a trope about excess Jewish power as indicative of his unfitness to lead the investigation, and as evidence of UN bias.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism worldwide.

Khaled Hassan, an Egyptian political risk and intelligence analyst whose research looks at antisemitism, Islamism and conspiracy theories, appeared on the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism where he recounted his story of how he went from living in Egypt and harbouring antisemitic views to living in the United Kingdom and not only disavowing those views, but converting to Judaism. 

When Mr Hassan was asked what his impression of Jewish people was during his time in Egypt, he said: “This is actually one of the most difficult questions to answer. Not necessarily because I don’t know how to describe it but because I want to explain to someone born in Europe or the [United States] how it actually works. 

“I think the best way to put it is, imagine you find out that your neighbour did something so hideous and horrible that the whole community just hates them. The whole community wants to avoid them because obviously, any association with them would actually also put you under scrutiny and people would question you, question your convictions. Sadly, this is how Jews are viewed in [much of] the Middle East, in Egypt and the Arab-speaking world.” 

He continued: “[Jews are viewed as] this group of people who are fundamentally evil, who are fundamentally horrible, in a way, and that’s why nobody is even willing to consider Hebrew literature, everyone’s terrified of touching even one simple book. So that is really the perception that we’ve had, it’s one of suspicion, of fear, and obviously thinking that they are inherently evil. And education does reinforce it.”

Explaining how he unlearned these views, the political risk and intelligence analyst said: “I was very different from an early stage because I loved tourism, I loved seeing people from different places, I loved America. Unlike a lot of Egyptians, I loved the idea of American rights.”

Mr Hassan explained how the term ‘radicalisation’ is often misinterpreted as being inherently negative.

“It’s not always something bad,” Mr Hassan said. “A radical is just somebody who believes in views that are uncommon where they are, within their own environment. And it always begins with this sense of grievance, you always feel that something is wrong, and you need to right this wrong, and this is when you start to find answers to questions that you have. So this is precisely what happened to me when I was a teenager.

“In radicalisation, we call something a ‘cognitive opening’. It’s this willingness to actually listen, this willingness to actually hear information. For me, it all started when I started examining where I want to study. As a teenager, I just wanted to study somewhere where I could actually view these ideas, and that was always the U.S., so I would say this was really the changing point for me.

“And one of the key turning points for me was definitely my involvement in peace talks between Jordanians, Palestinians, Egyptians and Israelis, because I was very fortunate to be involved in some of these discussions on a grassroots level.”

On his conversion to Judaism, Mr Hassan said: “So that’s my journey; I started questioning all of these beliefs around me when I was a teenager and decided that I’m not going to inherit any beliefs, I will just find the beliefs that suit me. And it really took years. I examined different faiths and eventually made the decision that Judaism is right for me.”

Throughout the interview, Mr Hassan touched upon a variety of other issues including the Colleyville synagogue hostage attack, the ‘Free Palestine’ convoy in North London in May 2021 and COVID-19 conspiracy theories.

The podcast with Mr Hassan can be listened to here, or watched here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox.

Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, television personality Robert Rinder, writer Eve Barlow, Grammy-Award-winning singer-songwriter Autumn Rowe, and actor Eddie Marsan.

Rabbi Michael Schudrich, Poland’s current, and longest-serving, Chief Rabbi, appeared on the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism where he discussed the revival of the Polish Jewish community and the way in which the country dealt with antisemitism following the Holocaust.

Outlining the devastating effects of the Holocaust on Polish Jewry, Rabbi Schudrich said: “September 1st, 1939. The beginning of World War Two. At that point, there are 3.5 million Jews living in Poland. The heart, the soul of the Ashkenazi world. Only five years later, ninety percent are no longer alive having been murdered by Germans and accomplices,” before adding: “That statement is so horrific, most people don’t think how many survive. Ten percent survived, that’s 350,000 Polish Jews.

“The question is, ‘Where are they?’ The vast majority of the survivors leave Poland in the 25 years after World War Two. If you want to feel safe saying the statement ‘I am a Jew,’ it made good sense to leave post-Holocaust, Soviet-occupied Communist Poland, and so most of the Jews left. But not all the Jews left and those that stayed, most of them agreed with those that left; Stay Jewish, leave Communist Poland. Stay in Communist Poland, stop being Jewish, to the extent that you often didn’t even tell your children or grandchildren.

“And so while a couple hundred thousand left, some tens of thousands stayed. Most gave up their Jewish identity, keeping the deep, dark secret of who their real identity was for fifty years…from 1939 to 1989, the fall of communism, and at that point, there was a new phenomenon; people were starting to tell their children and grandchildren, friends, colleagues neighbours, that they’re really Jewish. Since 1989, thousands of Poles have rediscovered their real Jewish roots. That’s the Jewish community of Poland today.”

Speaking on the existence of antisemitism in Poland before and after the Holocaust, he said: “It was not socially unacceptable to be an antisemite before the war. The Holocaust changed that. The only thing was, after the Holocaust, many Jews left Poland so quickly and the other ones were hiding, [Poland] never had a chance to deal with what it means to be an antisemite after the Holocaust. And so with the fall of communism in 1989, people could start to look and say ‘What role should antisemitism play in Poland today?’ 

“After 1989, with Poland once again being democratic, they were challenged with recreating the old, new Poland, meaning they kept some values from before the war and they rejected others. So out went communism, out went fascism, and for many, also, it meant rejecting antisemitism. It represented something from the bad, old Poland. It doesn’t mean everyone rejected antisemitism, it doesn’t mean there’s no antisemitism today, but it does mean that there’s less than what people expect.”

However, while Rabbi Schudrich celebrated how far the country’s Jewish community has come, and indeed, how far the country has come in accepting it, he acknowledged that antisemitism has begun to creep up again.

“Unfortunately, about five years ago, things became less good than they were before since 1989. What happened? We have to look at it within a Western world context, meaning Europe and the United States. Something happened five or six years ago where it became more acceptable, more respectable, to say antisemitic things than it was since the Holocaust. And this is something that happened very sadly not only in Poland but throughout Europe and the United States.”

Throughout the interview, Rabbi Schudrich touched upon a variety of other issues including antisemitism in Japan, where he served as the rabbi of the country’s Jewish community, as well as detailing the incidents of an antisemitic attack in which he was involved.

The podcast with Rabbi Schudrich can be listened to here, or watched here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox.

Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, television personality Robert Rinder, writer Eve Barlow, Grammy-Award-winning singer-songwriter Autumn Rowe, and actor Eddie Marsan.

The Jewish community in Chile has expressed its disgust after the appearance of an advertisement for cheap alcohol that uses a well-known antisemitic meme.

The advert, published by the alcohol company, Arbol Verde, in an edition of one of Chile’s national newspapers, Las Últimas Noticias, features the “Smirking Merchant” meme. This depicts a hook-nosed man with a nefarious grin wearing a head covering and holding banknotes. The meme is thought by many to be a classically antisemitic representation of a Jewish person.

The meme was created in 2001 and accompanied a racist representation of a Black man with a caption that read: “A world without Jews and Blacks would be like a world without Rats and Cockroaches.”

The Jewish Community of Chile responded on Twitter and said that it was “unacceptable advertising alluding to the classic stereotype of a Jew that Nazi propaganda turned into the germ of antisemitism that led to the genocide of six million Jews. Unpresentable way of promoting a product and a serious lack of editing in the media.”

Approximately 18,000 Jews live in Chile, which makes up approximately 0.1 percent of a population of over nineteen million.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism worldwide.

The Jewish creative duo of award-winning director Rachel Myers and street artist and activist BournRich appeared on the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism where they discussed their latest film, the Tiny Kindness Project, and how tackling antisemitism and promoting Jewish visibility are recurring themes in both of their works.

The Tiny Kindness Project, a film directed by Ms Myers that stars BournRich, focuses on the street artist’s project in which he wrote and disseminated messages of hope onto facemasks during the COVID-19 pandemic to combat division.

“The world was almost at a standstill and so what I want to do with this film is bring people together, show harmony and kindness, and put messages on masks to let people know everything is okay and to break down their barriers,” BournRich said.

On one of the masks, the word ‘Shalom’, meaning ‘hello’ or ‘peace’ in Hebrew, was written, and the artist’s hamsa (a hand-shaped symbol popular in certain parts of Jewish culture) necklace also featured in the film.

Speaking on the presence of Jewish symbolism in the film, the artist said: “I always have to put something of my Jewish identity in my work.”

Ms Myers explained how the presence of BournRich, who is both Jewish and Black, in her film continued her work’s overarching theme of Jewish visiblity as a means of combating antisemitism.

“I think Jewish identity takes lots of different shapes and forms and one thing that I feel as an artist who’s Jewish is that so often in depictions of Jews on screen, they are a certain type of Jew…I think showing all experiences is really important, and so when I met [BournRich] and saw how his identity came out in his work as an artist, I thought that was very important.

“As an artist, I feel like I’m always trying to dispel myths about what something means…the theme of your podcast is really on point for what the [film] is about because I think the tropes of antisemitism come from these old ideas of this tiny population and I think so often that the cliches that people fall into about what Jews are, Jews in the media, all come from a lack of exposure and misunderstanding, a lack of education.”

Ms Myers went on to reveal that “When I went to college, my roommate next door was a Mormon and she’d never met a Jew before and she’d heard the old antisemitic trope that Jews have horns.” 

The director continued: “I want to show that Jews are many types of people.”

Throughout the interview, the duo also discussed white supremacy in the United States today and the work of the Black Jewish Entertainment Alliance which, like previous Podcast Against Antisemitism guest, Grammy-Award-winning singer-songwriter Autumn Rowe, BournRich is a member.

The podcast with Ms Myers and BournRich can be listened to here, or watched here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox.

Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, television personality Robert Rinder, writer Eve Barlow, and actor Eddie Marsan.

Lyn Julius, journalist, author and co-founder of the charity Harif, which aims to educate people about Jews from the Middle East and North Africa, appeared on the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism where she explained how the persecution of Jews in the Arab world resulted in a destroyed civilisation almost overnight, and the lasting impact this had on modern Jewry.

Ms Julius said: “The decline was extremely dramatic. In a generation and a half, it went from tens of thousands of Jews to maybe zero or less than ten for most of these countries.”

“So how do we explain this dramatic decline?” she continued. “Arab nationalism played its part. Also, the rise of Islamism, which actually goes back to the 1930s, to the Muslim Brotherhood, which was founded in Egypt, and they incited riots against the Jews of Egypt as early as the 1930s. Then, of course, there was the influence of Nazim on Arab nationalists. There was the import of Christian and Nazi antisemitism into this region, Nazi ideas of Jewish conspiracy and control.”

The author added that another contributing factor was the “backlash against Israel’s victory in the first Arab-Israeli war and subsequent wars. The Arab governments really took their frustrations out on what remained of their Jewish communities. It was all these factors, really, that contributed towards the ethnic cleansing of these Jewish communities.”

Elaborating on the role of countries’ governments, Ms Julius said that “there was a lot of state-sanctioned persecution. The Arab League actually drafted anti-Jewish laws stripping them of their citizenship, dispossessing them of their property, freezing their bank accounts. 

“But the main thing they did was to criminalise Zionism and that meant that Jews could be arrested, they could be jailed and they could even be executed for being Zionists. But how do you define Zionism? Is having a Magen David on your tallit, on your prayer shawl, is that Zionist? Is that Zionism? And so all sorts of spurious excuses were produced in order to criminlise Jews, and this of course put Jews in a very precarious and dangerous position. 

“Coupled with outbreaks of violence, and then there were riots in several of these countries in the 1940s, Jews were physically under threat. They could not rely on the forces of law and order to protect them.”

Throughout the interview, Ms Julius touched upon a wide variety of topics which included the challenges faced by Mizrachi Jews and why we still hear the antisemitic “Khaybar” chant at rallies around the world today.

The podcast with Ms Julius can be listened to here, or watched here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox.

Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, television personality Robert Rinder, writer Eve Barlow, Grammy-Award-winning singer-songwriter Autumn Rowe, and actor Eddie Marsan.

Izabella Tabarovsky, an expert on Soviet and contemporary left antisemitism, appeared on the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism where she discussed the parallels between the two, and how much of the modern-day far-left antisemitism draws from Soviet anti-Zionist propaganda.

Ms Tabarovsky said that much of the antisemitic rhetoric emanating from the far-left is something that “I used to hear,” adding: “I grew up in the Soviet Union. It’s something that I read about in Soviet propaganda materials which I have been researching over the last several years. They make for a pretty depressing read because it’s the same slogans and you also know where they borrowed them. Essentially, it’s a reprocessed antisemitic conspiracy theory. 

“Take ‘Zionism is racism,’ ‘Zionists are fascists,’ ‘Zionists act like Nazis’…the whole idea that Zionism is the greatest evil on Earth and always suspect, and Zionists are always up to no good, that is the conspiracist aspect to it.”

Describing the conflation between the term “Zionist” and “Jew”, Ms Tabarovsky noted that “It’s just a direct parallel and it’s truly incredible for me to be hearing it today in America and in the Western press. I truly thought I left all of it behind when I came to America.”

When asked about recent remarks in which the Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov claimed that Hitler had “Jewish origins” in his latest insulting attempt to justify his country’s invasion of Ukraine, Ms Tabarovsky: “When I saw that, it was as if they’re acting on these old Soviet propaganda memos. But there’s also something new. With antisemitism, we know that it adjusts itself to the current conditions. A new angle is applied to old antisemitic conspiracy theories and rhetoric.

Speaking on Vladimir Putin and Mr Lavrov, Ms Tabarovsky said that “They know really, really well how to manipulate the Jewish topic, the Jewish question, and they know the power of that manipulation. They know it can unify their supporters. Hatred against Jews can unify people across the spectrum, as we know.”

Throughout the interview, Ms Tabarovsky touched upon a wide variety of topics which included her escape from the Soviet Union and why she feels that antisemitism from the far-left manages to go relatively unchecked compared to antisemitism from the far-right.

The podcast with Ms Tabarovsky can be listened to here, or watched in its entirety here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox.

Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, television personality Robert Rinder, writer Eve Barlow, Grammy-Award-winning singer-songwriter Autumn Rowe, and actor Eddie Marsan.

Ahead of his upcoming show at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, the award-winning comedian Simon Brodkin, who in 2018 performed at Campaign Against Antisemitism’s comedy fundraiser, appeared as the first guest of Podcast Against Antisemitism’s second season where he explained his newfound liberation in speaking about antisemitism and his Jewish identity on stage, among other topics.

The comedian previously performed on stage as a variety of characters, the most notable of which being the “happy-go-lucky, south London self-proclaimed legend” Lee Nelson. Through his character of Lee Nelson, Mr Brodkin found great success which included his own television show and numerous live tours.

However, he said that at some point after, he thought: “Hang on, I would like to start doing stuff out of character and as myself.”

“And that was the big change of realising, ‘I can talk about things that have only a connection with myself,’ and that was amazing and liberating and interesting for me,” he said. “And suddenly the whole name of the game with straight stand-up is to connect and talk about things that can only be true to yourself so it’s the complete antithesis of the character comedy. 

“I was sort of hiding behind those characters because I was never quite comfortable in my own skin and that’s been a really cool journey for me talking about things that are close to my heart…my Jewish identity is something that I’ve been open about and talking about and of course, with every bit of Jewish identity, you only have to go one, two, three generations back until you get some antisemitism, and sadly that’s ingrained very much in our culture. 

“My grandma escaped from Nazi Germany and I will not be alone with that. And I started bringing that to the table, bringing that to the stage, and it’s been joyous for me.”

However, Mr Brodkin’s career has not always been smooth sailing. After performing jokes about the antisemitic former Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn a few years ago, Mr Brodkin unwittingly found himself on the receiving end of a Twitter pile-on.

“The comic needs to be able to look at themselves in the mirror and go ‘That can stand up to scrutiny. I can justify saying that because the punchline to the joke is funny enough but also the target of the joke is a justifiable target.’

“The Jeremy Corbyn thing was really interesting for me because actually, I was slow to the party there. At first, when some of my wiser friends were telling me, ‘This Jeremy Corbyn guy…he’s an antisemite,’ I was like ‘Ah, what? Really? C’mon.’ I was in that camp, and then it clicked for me. I got it, I realised it, I read enough and saw enough and learned enough I was like ‘Oh my God.’ 

“I wanted, then, to make sure that I was doing what I could. If I’m gonna talk about antisemitism on stage, there [was] nothing more relevant at the moment then in the UK than Jeremy Corbyn and so I couldn’t talk about antisemitism, and being a Jew today, without mentioning him and what I thought of him.”

However, the comedian went on to reveal that following a gig at which he performed jokes about Mr Corbyn, he was bombarded with angry tweets. 

“[The audience member] heckled me, after that she had a word with me but then after that, when she got home, she went on Twitter…it was a pile-on.”

My Brodkin said that he wasn’t surprised, however. “I’m used to some other antisemitic pile-ons…the head of the KKK, Mr David Duke, he outed me as a Jew on social media and the pile-on I got after that was insane. It was absolutely mad. 

“It was before I was out of character so I felt much more detached from it. I hadn’t made that move into talking about myself so it was sort of one step removed. Since I’ve done stuff on stage as myself, everything feels more personal which is great because you feel like you’re really pouring your heart out in that emotional connection you get, but then if you get some abuse afterward it feels more about you.” 

Throughout the interview, Mr Brodkin touched upon a wide variety of topics which included the antisemitic rapper Wiley, when to draw the line in comedy and his upcoming tour.

The podcast with Mr Brodkin can be listened to here, or watched in its entirety here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox.

Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, television personality Robert Rinder, writer Eve Barlow, Grammy-Award-winning singer-songwriter Autumn Rowe, and actor Eddie Marsan.

The antisemitic former Labour Party leader, Jeremy Corbyn, has described allegations that he is antisemitic as “foul, dishonest and utterly disgusting and appalling.”

In an in-depth and candid interview with Declassified UK, he was asked if he thought that the antisemitism scandal that engulfed him “was the result of his pro-Palestinian political position,” and replied: “Very largely that is the case.”

He insisted: “I have spent my life fighting racism in any form, in any place whatsoever. My parents spent their formative years fighting the rise of Nazism in Britain, and that is what I’ve been brought up doing. And when in the 1970s the National Front were on the march in Britain, I was one of the organisers of the big Wood Green demonstration to try to stop the National Front marching through.

“And somehow or other I was accused of being antisemitic. The allegations against me were foul, dishonest and utterly disgusting and appalling from people who should know better and do know better. People that have known me for 40 years, never once complained about anything I’d ever said or done in terms of anti-racism, until I became leader of the Labour Party. Interesting coincidence of timing. Disgusting allegations which obviously we sought to rebut at all times. And I’ll be forever grateful for the support given by Jewish socialists, the many Jewish members of the Labour Party all over the country, and of course the local Jewish community in my constituency.”

He said of the allegations against him: “It was personal, it was vile, it was disgusting, and it remains so.”

Declassified UK characterised the antisemitism allegations against Mr Corbyn variously as “an extreme example of a tried-and-tested tactic used by pro-Israel groups across the world”, as a “slur” and as a tactic “instrumentalised to destroy critics of the Israeli state”, which is an example of the antisemitic Livingstone Formulation. 

Mr Corbyn replied: “The tactic is you say that somebody is intrinsically antisemitic and it sticks and then the media parrot it and repeat it the whole time. Then the abuse appears on social media, the abusive letters appear, the abusive phone calls appear, and all of that. And it’s very horrible and very nasty and is designed to be very isolating and designed to also take up all of your energies in rebutting these vile allegations, which obviously we did. But it tends to distract away from the fundamental message about peace, about justice, about social justice, about economy and all of that.”

Other portions of the interview also strayed close to tropes about outsized Israeli influence and control over British politics and the Labour Party.

With regard to Labour Friends of Israel, for instance, Declassified UK suggested that it is a front for the Israeli Embassy and Mr Corbyn questioned the funding of the faction: “I’m not opposed to there being friends of particular countries or places all around the world within the party, I think that’s a fair part of the mosaic of democratic politics. What I am concerned about is the funding that goes with it — and the apparently very generous funding that Labour Friends of Israel gets from, I presume, the Israeli Government.” Despite his ostensible tolerance for the faction even as he has suspicions about its funding, he also questioned why Labour never took action against the group and tellingly listed some of the senior Labour MPs who have been involved with it.

He also claimed that then-Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu “also weighed in on this and said that I must not become Prime Minister. Sorry, who is Benjamin Netanyahu to decide who the British Prime Minister should be? It’s not for me to decide who the Israeli prime minister should be…so who is he to make that kind of comment?”

There is no evidence that Mr Netanyahu ever made such a comment. Declassified UK itself could only assume that Mr Corbyn was referring to a 2019 report in a British newspaper in which Mr Netanyahu had reportedly said that “Israel may halt its intelligence co-operation with the UK if Jeremy Corbyn becomes Prime Minister,” which is merely a change in Israeli policy that doubtless would have mirrored changes in British policy had Mr Corbyn been elected. What Mr Netanyahu actually said is therefore entirely different from the impression of attempted Israeli domination of British democracy that Mr Corbyn tried to give.

Mr Corbyn, who has repeatedly played down Labour antisemitism, is indefinitely suspended from the Parliamentary Labour Party but remains a member of the Labour Party after his brief suspension was overturned.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has lodged a complaint against Mr Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the leader during the period of the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s (EHRC) shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day of the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded.

The Labour Party was found by the EHRC to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Ofcom has decided against the broadcaster LBC after one of its reporters repeatedly described Israel’s Embassy to the UK as the “Jewish embassy”.

In a report on the radio channel on 15th May 2021, during the antisemitic genocidal terrorist organisation Hamas’s war with Israel, LBC covered one of numerous anti-Israel protests in London, providing coverage over a four-hour period over the course of the afternoon.

Opening the report, the reporter, on the ground, said: “About 40 metres down the road from me is the gates to the Jewish Embassy but between me and them is a sea of protestors. Thousands are down this street with lots and lots of different signs, ‘free Palestine’, ‘long live Palestine’, ‘free Gaza’, and hundreds of Palestinian flags being waved as well. Protestors have climbed up on to the walls of the nearby hotel and about ten of them are on top of a bus stop as well. There is a huge amount of people down here at the moment. It started at Hyde Park Corner at twelve o’clock and then walked all the way here to the Jewish Embassy. Ben Jamal was the Director of the Palestine Solidarity Campaign. He told me he wants the protest to stay peaceful”.

Ben Jamal was interviewed, saying: “We believe that everyone has equal rights and we believe in principles of freedom, truth, justice, and equality. Those are the principles and firm anti-racist principles that inform why we are marching. And we ask everybody to respect that. Everybody will know when you bring ten, twenty, thirty thousand people on the streets, you will have a few individuals who don’t respect those principles. We ask them to, that’s in their responsibility to adhere to that.”

The reporter then noted: “The Jewish Embassy’s gates are closed. There are lots of police officers outside it. In front of the main gate is a stage where this protest is being conducted from. And the Israeli Embassy sent me a statement which says, ‘Hamas is a radical terrorist organisation that fires rockets indiscriminately on civilian populations. Their charter calls for the establishment of an Islamic state instead of Israel. It is regrettable to see citizens of a democratic country giving legitimacy to such an organisation and its violent actions. Unfortunately, over the last week we’ve seen an incitement to violence and antisemitic signs and slogans chanted in demonstrations. This has forced the Israeli Embassy in the heart of London to need to be barricaded by the police for protection’. That is the Israeli statement. And it’s understood that there are no people in the embassy today. It is Shabbat today as well…” 

According to Ofcom, a recording or version of this report was broadcast three times during the rolling coverage, each time referring to a “Jewish embassy”, sometimes alongside references to the “Israeli embassy” as in the version quoted above.

Ofcom considered that the reports potentially breached Rule 5.1 and 2.3 of the Broadcasting Code, the first covering “due accuracy” and the second referring to “generally accepted standards”, including discriminatory or offensive language. Ofcom’s investigation was prompted by two complaints that the references to a “Jewish embassy” could contribute to antisemitic hate speech and attacks in the UK, which were skyrocketing at the time.

LBC argued that the reporter had “tripped over his words in error during the hear of the moment”, noting “the difficultly of reporting live from a high-stress and tense environment” and observed that the reporter “had to rely on the ‘hostile environment’ training they had received.” LBC also noted that the reporter did correct his language during the initial broadcast and that, once it had identified that the report was repeated twice later on, LBC removed the full four-hour programme as quickly as possible from its catch up services. LBC insisted that “there was absolutely no intent to cause any harm or offence during the recording or broadcast of this report,” noting that, while the error was “far from ideal”, it was “in no way malicious or purposefully intended to offend the Jewish community.” The station also blamed COVID social distancing requirements for causing its usual review procedures to fall short.

Ofcom decided that the report “was not duly accurate, in breach of Rule 5.1 of the Code.”

Regarding Rule. 2.3, Ofcom decided that “the interchanging use of the terms ‘Israeli Embassy’ and ‘Jewish Embassy’, as well as being clearly inaccurate, conflated Israeli national identity with Jewish, including British Jewish, identity. We considered that this was potentially offensive to some listeners in the context of a series of news items reporting on a protest against the policies and action of the Israeli Government in relation to the Israel-Palestine conflict. We considered that it was potentially offensive as it implied that ‘Jews were collectively responsible for actions of the state of Israel’.” This phrasing is one of the International Definition of Antisemitism’s examples of antisemitism.

Ofcom concluded that the report did not constitute antisemitic hate speech, but that there was still the potential to cause offence, and that LBC’s mitigating actions were “insufficient to mitigate the potential offence or justify the broadcast of the potentially offensive content in this programme.” It therefore found that LBC had also breached Rule 2.3.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has previously provided training to Ofcom in the use of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “LBC has a strong journalistic record of exposing antisemitism. Nevertheless, Ofcom has made the correct decision here. During Hamas’s war against Israel, antisemitism was skyrocketing in Britain, with too many people seeking to hold British Jews collectively responsible for the actions and perceived actions of the Israeli Government. For a major radio station to appear, even if in error, to lend credence to this conflation by describing the Israeli Embassy as the ‘Jewish embassy’, cannot go without unremarked. We have trained Ofcom in the use of the International Definition of Antisemitism and are pleased to see that the regulator has appropriately applied it in this instance.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

Reports have surfaced that a “Jewish Studies Centre” backed by the Iranian regime has published over 1,000 inflammatory articles about Jews since its establishment in 2016.

The Centre has apparently published articles, reports, comment pieces, books, and videos. Much of the output is arranged into ten categories with names like “Jews and the Media”, “Jewish Methods”, and “Jewish Corruption”.

One such category bears the name “Jewish Plots”. Containing about 50 articles, this section of the website exists to accuse Jews of taking part in a conspiracy to undermine Iran and the rest of the Islamic world.

Other examples of the output include claims that Jews are “bloodthirsty” and a “deviant” people who are guilty of “infanticide”, and that Jews are “promoters of corruption, drug trafficking, superstition, racism and homosexuality around the world”. This includes the claim that Jewish fashion designer Tommy Hilfiger is part of a wider Jewish conspiracy to promote sexual permissiveness.

Some of the material includes Holocaust denial, which is described as a “myth” and “a new religion in the West” promoted by Jews in order to extract money from the United States and establish the State of Israel. 

The Jewish Studies Centre, which some critics have said is a deliberately misleading name, is supported by the Revolutionary Guards, the Foreign Ministry, the Religious Endowments Organisation, and a number of other bodies directly associated with the Iranian state.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The South Africa-based newspaper, Jewish Report, has been expelled from the Press Council of South Africa.

The move comes after a November 2020 article in the Jewish Report, which reported the opinion of two experts on antisemitism who argued that there was antisemitic imagery used in a cartoon advocating for Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) against Israel.

The cartoon, which was posted to the Facebook page of the South African Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (SA BDS) Coalition, showed a grotesque, overweight banker in a pin-striped suit, with the logo of Israeli-owned dairy company Clover Industries on one shoulder, shovelling money into his mouth while a much smaller worker is left with much less. The words in the image read, “Don’t buy clover products!!” and “Don’t feed Clover’s greedy bosses!” 

The caption on the post says: “Greedy bosses connected to apartheid Israel. Blood curdling milk [and cheese, yoghurt, etc.]. Every reason to boycott Clover! Change your brand. Viva GIWUSA [General Industrial Workers Union of South Africa] and the struggle for a living wage! Clover was recently permitted by the Competition Commission and the department of trade and industry to be owned by Central Bottling Company (CBC), in turn owned by Milco, an Israeli concern operating in the Occupied Territories. The unions and Palestine solidarity organisations jointly submitted objections to the Competition Tribunal. Our objections were ignored.”

Milton Shain, an Emeritus Professor of History at the University of Cape Town, said that, although the cartoon is not an obvious representation of a Jewish capitalist, “it has enough resonance with age-old antisemitic images and tropes.”

David Saks, from the South African Jewish Board of Deputies, agreed, saying that the image “helps confirm suspicions that stereotypes of greedy, exploitative Jews are being used to fuel the anti-Israel positions held by the various trade unions.”

Following the publication of the Jewish Report article, and a complaint by a member of the Palestine Solidarity Alliance on behalf of the SA BDS Coalition and the General Industrial Workers Union of SA (Giwusa), the Press Council of South Africa, which offers its members a code of ethics to guide South African journalists, expelled the Jewish Report. This is the first time in twenty years that the Council has expelled a member.

In response, the Chairperson of the Jewish Report, Howard Sackstein, issued a statement saying: “Through its failure to recognise the racist undertones of the cartoon, the Press Council became party to the perpetuation of racism, hatred and bigotry in South Africa. By calling on the South Africa Jewish Report to apologise to racists, the Press Council discredited itself and failed the people of South Africa.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Concerns have been raised about a controversial Hungarian media figure invited to the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Budapest on 20th May.

Hungarian journalist Zsolt Bayer has a history of making inflammatory remarks. 

The journalist, whose political views have variously been described as “ultra-conservative” and “far-right”, is reported to have said that the Hungarian Academy of Science had been infiltrated by Jews.

Mr Bayer is also reported to have written in a 2008 column about the “limitless hunger of the Jewish financiers in Brooklyn and Wall Street yuppies, which plunged the American and as a consequence the global monetary world into depression.”

A 2011 article for the conservative, pro-government Hungarian daily newspaper Magyar Hírlap contains several inflammatory remarks relating to Guardian journalist Nick Cohen and other Jewish figures with typically Jewish surnames.

Nick Cohen’s article criticised the rightward turn in Hungarian politics. Mr Cohen wrote that he would not call the conservative government headed by Viktor Orbán “fascist” or “neo-fascist”, but that “a foul stench wafts from the ‘new society’ Orbán’s patriots are building on the Danube. You can catch a smell of it in [the ruling party] Fidesz’s propaganda” which, Mr Cohen argues, involves forming a political pact with Jobbik, a political party that was at the time explicitly far-right and which blamed Jews, Roma people and homosexuals for Hungary’s social problems.

In response, Mr Bayer is reported to have written an article in Hungarian calling Mr Cohen “stinking excrement”. Mr Bayer’s article goes on to use more subtle pejorative references. Mr Bayer juxtaposes the typically Jewish surname Cohen with the names Cohn-Bendit and Schiff.

The former is believed to refer to former MEP and radical student leader, Daniel Cohn-Bendit. Mr Cohn-Bendit is a vocal supporter of the European Union, and has criticised Mr Orbán in the European Parliament for adopting laws that allegedly restrict the freedom of the press. Mr Cohn-Bendit says that this has resulted in Mr Orbán’s allies harbouring a “hatred” for him.

The name “Schiff” refers to Sir András Schiff, a Hungarian-born classical pianist and conductor who is an outspoken critic of Mr Orbán. Mr Schiff has questioned whether Hungary was worthy of taking on the Presidency of the Council of the European Union due to its Government’s policies, said that he would refuse to perform or even visit Hungary due to antisemitism, and said that “antisemitic baiting has become socially acceptable in Hungary” under Fidesz and Mr Orbán’s rule.

Both Mr Cohn-Bendit and Mr Schiff are Jewish. Then Mr Bayer writes that “There is nothing new under the sun. Unfortunately they were not all buried up to their necks in the forest of Orgovány.”

Orgovány was the site of a series of massacres committed by the leaders of the Hungarian White Terror. This was a period of repressive violence between 1919-21 carried out by opponents of Hungary’s short-lived Soviet Republic and its Red Terror. Far-right Hungarian figures often associate the 1919 Hungarian Soviet Republic with Jewish influence, which fits into a conspiracy theory about “Judeo-Bolshevism”, which holds Jews responsible for communism. As many as 1,000 people were killed in the White Terror, many of them Jewish. Mr Bayer’s appeared to imply that he is unhappy that these Jewish journalists were not also killed during this period.

On another occasion, Mr Bayer referred to US Secretary of State Antony Blinken, who has a Hungarian-Jewish background, as a “ROOTLESS Hungarian”, echoing a typical trope about Jews that questions whether Jews have sufficient allegiance or loyalty to their countries of residence.

Though Mr Bayer rarely uses the word “Jew” or “Jewish” directly, it is believed that readers in Hungary are aware of what Mr Bayer may be implying when he refers to these events and who he may mean when he claims that the interests of white European Christians are under attack.

In 1988, Mr Bayer co-founded the Fidesz political party together with Mr Orbán. At the time, the Party was a centre-left and liberal activist movement formed in opposition to the ruling Marxist-Leninist Hungarian Socialist Workers’ Party, which had held power since the failed democratic revolution in 1956. Fidesz took a national-conservative turn during the 1990s.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Jon Benjamin, the British Ambassador to Mexico, appeared on the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism where he discussed the varying rates of antisemitism in countries around the world.

Mr Benjamin, who has represented the United Kingdom in several countries throughout his 36-year-long diplomatic career, said: “My experience of antisemitism around the world varies so hugely. It has something to do with whether there is or isn’t a Jewish community in the country concerned. Early on, I was posted to Indonesia, there are effectively no Jewish people in Indonesia. I’ve been in other countries where the Jewish minority is very small, such as in Turkey.

“And there is always a difference between whether people are basing whatever views they have, favourable or negative, on personal interaction or a more abstract notion of a people, or religion or ethnic group, however they define it, which they don’t actually interact with themselves.”

Mr Benjamin went on to note that “perceptions of Israel…of the Middle East, in general, have a lot to do with how Jewish people are perceived in various parts of the world.

“There is always a spike of antisemitism when there is a spike in the conflict between Israel and Hamas, or Hizballah, or in the intifada periods…there’s always some sort of relationship.”

An intifada is a rebellion or uprising, but the Palestinian intifadas were characterised by acts of terrorism targeting Jews.

Speaking on his current country of residence, Mr Benjamin said: “I’m very struck here in Mexico, [when] I’ve met with the leaders of the Jewish community…and they themselves say that they think the Jewish community here in Mexico may be 40 to 50,000 strong in terms of its size, suffers less antisemitism than any other sizeable Jewish community almost anywhere in the world. 

“It doesn’t mean there’s none, and again, it can be linked to what’s going on in the Middle East itself. But it was very pleasing to me in my first meeting with them to hear them say that broadly speaking, they don’t suffer huge waves of antisemitism.”

Throughout the interview, Mr Benjmain touched upon a wide variety of topics which included the incident in which West Ham fans reportedly chanted “I’ve got a foreskin haven’t you, f***ing Jew” to a visibly Jewish man on a flight, how he first became involved in the fight against antisemitism and why he believes that travelling can help combat prejudice.

The podcast with Mr Benjamin can be listened to here, or watched in its entirety here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox.

Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, television personality Robert Rinder, writer Eve Barlow, Grammy-Award-winning singer-songwriter Autumn Rowe, and actor Eddie Marsan.

It has been reported that the state-backed Jordanian daily newspaper, Al-Rai, has published a number of articles with inflammatory content, including Holocaust denial.

The articles reportedly purport to “corroborate” the recent false claims by Russian Foreign Minister, Sergei Lavrov, that Adolf Hitler was of Jewish origin, with one article claiming to provide concrete historical evidence that Hitler was Jewish. One of the articles also claims that the fact that Ukrainian President, Volodymyr Zelenskyy, is Jewish suggests that Jews are willing to become Nazis.

The articles also state that Israel exaggerates the scope of the Holocaust, using it to extort Western governments for money, that Zionists collaborated with the Nazis, and that there is a sinister “global Zionist” conspiracy, led by the Rothschild banking family, to export terrorism around the world.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Sharon Schurder, a London-based painter who uses her experiences of antisemitism as inspiration for her artwork, appeared on the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism where she provided insight into her creative process.

Ms Schurder revealed how she experienced antisemitism on more than one occasion whilst taking public transport, which led her to feel unsafe to the degree that she felt no other option but to take taxis to work.

“I’m Orthodox, so I had a little siddur with me, so it’s pretty obvious that I was Jewish. And someone tried to send me a picture through AirDrop…I didn’t open it because it was just a guy behind me laughing away so I kind of knew it was going to be something. And he was saying stuff, like ‘blah blah blah, Jewish, blah blah blah’.”

Ms Schurder added that on another journey, someone yelled “you’re killing babies” at her, and in a separate incident whilst waiting on a platform at Borehamwood and Elstree train station, a man screamed at Ms Schurder and her children: “Go chat with Netanyahu…you don’t belong here.”

“I’m a grandchild of Holocaust survivors,” Ms Schurder revealed, “so I’m probably always cognisant of ‘are we really welcome, are we really wanted?’

“It’s London, that can’t be happening, that you can’t just travel normally on public transport. It was unnecessary and terrifying.” 

When asked about the process behind turning her experiences into art, Ms Schurder said: “My aim in every painting is to make people look at that painting and make them stop and think….that activism, trying to be pumped into the paint. 

“There is a lot of meaning behind it. In my art, it’s very value-based…for me, it’s a lot about combatting antisemitism with a very strong Jewish pride.”

Throughout the interview, Ms Schurder touched upon a wide variety of topics which included discussing her grandfather, a Holocaust survivor who also painted, the story of how she began painting, and what it was like being featured in British Vogue.

The podcast with Ms Schurder can be listened to here, or watched in its entirety here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox.

Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, television personality Robert Rinder, writer Eve Barlow, Grammy-Award-winning singer-songwriter Autumn Rowe, and actor Eddie Marsan.

A leaked audio recording of a well-known YouTuber reported to have a large following on the far-right appears to show him saying that he would like someone to “press the button to wipe Jews off the face of the earth.”

Paul Joseph Watson runs the Prison Planet YouTube channel, which has 1.9 million subscribers, and is a former editor of Infowars, a website owned by far-right conspiracy theorist Alex Jones. Mr Watson is a well-known voice in the controversial “alt-right” movement in which inflammatory conspiracy theories commonly circulate.

Mr Watson’s alleged comments were apparently secretly recorded during a private conversation, and they come in the context of other racist and homophobic slurs. The recording appears to show that Mr Watson says he is sick of “media f***** activists” sticking signs “up in my face trying to get me to join the gay f***** Palestinian cause. I don’t give a shit about Israel and Palestine. I care about white people. Not sand n***** Jew P*** f***** c***s.”

Mr Watson’s output rarely contains such explicit racism, and he is known to have appeared on platforms with former members of the youth conservative movement Turning Point USA, Candace Owens, various figures associated with former UKIP leader Nigel Farage, figures associated with the Brexit Party, and he has reportedly interacted with billionaire Elon Musk on Twitter.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Fiyaz Mughal OBE, the founder of Muslims Against Antisemitism (MAAS), a charity comprising British Muslims whose mission is to tackle antisemitism, appeared on the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism where he discussed the growing danger of Islamist antisemitism.

Referring to antisemites within pockets of the Muslim community, Mr Mughal said that “We need to tackle them, we need to call them out. We need to inform, we need to educate. But we can’t hide this poison anymore under the carpet.”

He added: “It’s very much linked to Islamism, and the rise of Islamist extremism, and it’s not clearly linked to being a Muslim or Islam but Islamists, the political idealogy of taking the religion and fusing it with political ideology, and that political ideology, we know, has been influenced by groups like the Muslim Brotherhood…by groups like Hamas. And these groups actively use antisemitism to draw people into their web, into their activism, to draw money from them, to use them as cannon fodder in conflicts.  

“And so it is clear that antisemitism is part of a campaign by Islamist groups as a means of mobilising more people against Jews. So, we need to tackle it. It can’t just be swept under the carpet, This is dangerous, dangerous stuff.”

Mr Mughal added that whilst it is clear that polling has shown that the majority of Muslims do not harbour such views, Islamist ideas were “quite entrenched” within a “vocal minority” of the community, making the issue, as he sees it, “a long-term problem”. 

“We know that British Muslims just want to get on with their lives. They want to have, like Jewish communities, the opportunity to be Muslims, be British, and to just get a job, get on with their lives,” the MAAS founder said. “But correspondingly, that small but vocal minority within British Muslim communities, has become much more entrenched, much more vocal, much more aggressive, and willing to turn out and intimidate Jewish institutions, Jewish communities, and those where there are larger concentrations of Jews.

“Take for example, who would have thought in London, a convoy of people from Bradford would turn up in Golders Green to talk about raping Jewish women? That is a prime example of the violence, of the state of open violence, in that small but vocal section of Muslim communities.”

Mr Mughal concluded by lamenting that Islamists reduce Islam “to the most basic form of emotion…hate, rage, anger, sadness. They destroy the nuance within Islam. The poetry, the beauty, the flourishing of it. They brutalise Islam, they make it so brittle that it becomes even painful for believers in Islam to sometimes carry on believing in it. This is what Islamists are doing. 

“And so they are damaging the religion from within, and it is essential for British Muslims to take them on…we have to challenge them. They are a threat to Jews, but they are a threat to Muslims and to the identity of British Islam today.”

Throughout the interview, Mr Mughal touched upon a wide variety of topics which included his motivations behind the creation of MAAS, Islamophobic stereotypes, and his speech at CAA’s rally outside the BBC last year where we were greeted by an unwelcome visitor.

The podcast with Mr Mughal can be listened to here, or watched in its entirety here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox.

Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, television personality Robert Rinder, writer Eve Barlow, Grammy-Award-winning singer-songwriter Autumn Rowe, and actor Eddie Marsan.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has produced a video detailing the complete history of our legal battle with the notorious antisemite Alison Chabloz, which you can watch in full here.

Alison Chabloz is a virulent antisemite and Holocaust denier who has an extensive record of using social media to publicise her hatred for Jews and to convert others to her views about Jewish people. 

She is fixated on the idea that the Holocaust did not occur, and that it was fabricated by Jews and their supporters as a vehicle for fraudulently extorting money in the form of reparations. This forms the basis for her second obsession, that Jews are liars and thieves who are working to undermine Western society. 

She is also connected to far-right movements, at whose meetings she gives speeches and performs her songs, in the UK and North America, and is currently banned from entering France, where Holocaust denial is illegal.

Last month, Ms Chabloz was sentenced to jail once again, after being found guilty of a communications offence following action by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

The two-day trial at Westminster Magistrates’ Court concerned a video of the scene in the classic Oliver Twist film when Fagin, a fictitious Jewish criminal (a character that has come under significant criticism over the past century for its antisemitic depiction), is explaining to his newest recruit how his legion of children followers pick pockets. Ms Chabloz uploaded the video and sings an accompanying song of her own about how Jews are greedy, “grift” for “shekels” and cheat on their taxes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Robert Rinder MBE, the criminal barrister and television and radio broadcaster, best known nationwide for his ITV reality show, Judge Rinder, appeared on the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism where he opened up about being from a family of Holocaust victims and survivors and observed how antisemitism endures today.

“I know people who live in certain communities that feel that they don’t want to put a menorah in their window outside of Jewish communities because they felt that it was inviting attack,” Mr Rinder said. “The reality is there’s something peculiarly disturbing about going to a state-funded Jewish school, and having worked for as long as I have over the years in prisons, it is easier to get into a medium-security prison. That is the same, in terms of the protection and all of the security that is in place, to protect Jewish kids that go to school every day simply to learn.”

He continued: “Now, that doesn’t exist because we are, as a people, especially paranoid. That exists on a rational assessment of the enduring day-to-day threats that our children face by going to school. This idea that putting a menorah in your window in the UK…that sending your kids to a Jewish school, that expressing your Judaism in the street by wearing Jewish clothing, represents a risk – even the fact that it represents a risk to your body, to your life – is the most clear and articulate expression imaginable of the enduring dark presence of antisemitism, anti-Jewish racism.

“And yes, there is security at other primary schools, but it doesn’t come close to this. What do we do about it? The answer is activism, and there’s really good activism everywhere, and above all else, including as many people in that activism. Making it part of their buffet, if you like, of things that they care about. That they cannot be anti-racist – it’s impossible to be anti-racist, it’s impossible to be an activist, and consequently on the right side of history – unless you include anti-Jewish racism, also, at the centre of your activism. Knowing the existential risk, every day, even now, of Jews who are just living their lives in various parts of the country. Going to a synagogue to pray, wherever they are, the levels of security, and so on and so forth.” 

Speaking on how to combat antisemitism, Mr Rinder said that one way included “the type of important thing that Campaign Against Antisemitism is doing, which is to say that ‘There is nowhere for these people to hide, legally. We will come after you.’ The fact that they are held legally to account is enormously important, because we are a nation of laws in this country, and there are really good quality laws that can be used to stop these people. The difficulty is that people don’t necessarily use them, so what CAA is doing is of limitless importance.”

Mr Rinder added: “The other thing I would do is really support Campaign Against Antisemitism. It’s impossible to overstate the value of what they do, of holding people to account. The idea that you cannot be an institutional racist and hide, because you are breaking the law, and that we will use those legal tools to stop you, I think is an enormously powerful weapon and a light in the darkness.”

Throughout the interview, Mr Rinder touched upon a wide variety of topics which included his work in Holocaust education, the emotional requirements of exploring his family history on television, and why he defended members of the far-right National Front in court.

The podcast with Mr Rinder can be listened to here, or watched in its entirety here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox.

Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, writer Eve Barlow and actor Eddie Marsan.

The official television station of the Palestinian Authority (PA) has broadcast an imam’s exhortation to “exterminate” the Jews, according to an Israeli media watchdog.

According to Israel-based Palestinian Media Watch, the imam appealed to “Grant us victory over the infidels. Allah, delight us with the conquest and liberation of the Al-Aqsa Mosque. Allah, make us among the first to enter, the conquerors, the worshippers, and those calling out ‘Allahu Akbar’ inside [the mosque] to You, Master of the Universe. Allah, delight us with the extermination of the evil Jews, O Master of the Universe, and [the extermination] of their hypocritical supporters who have evil in their hearts.”

The prayer was broadcast on PA Television on 17th April as part of Ramadan coverage at the Al-Ain Mosque in El-Bireh, near Ramallah.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A Swedish newspaper has handed an award to a celebrated journalist despite him having written a pitying article for a terrorist who murdered Jewish children in Toulouse in 2012.

Veteran journalist Göran Greider, who has been Editor-in-Chief of the newspaper Dala-Demokraten since 1999, has been given the prestigious Lagercrantzen award by Sweden’s biggest newspaper, Dagens Nyheter, to celebrate a career in which he has published approximately 30 books and already won many other prizes. Those who awarded him the prize state that he is a “lovely body of a man in Swedish cultural life.”

However, in March 2012, Mr Greider penned a piece sympathising with Islamist terrorist Mohammed Merah, who shot three Jewish children in the Toulouse school massacre, and blamed the state of Israel for their murder.

Mr Merah, 23, born and raised in Toulouse, went on a killing spree beginning on 11th March, shooting an off-duty French Army paratrooper. Four days later, he killed two off-duty French soldiers and wounded another. On 19th March, he burst into the Ozar Hatorah Jewish day school in Toulouse, opening fire and killing rabbi Jonathan Sandler, 30, and his two sons Arié, five, and Gabriel, four, and Myriam Monsonego, seven, who Mr Merah shot at point-blank range after his first gun jammed. Mr Merah also wounded Bryan Bijaoui, seventeen.

In his article for Dala-Demokraten, published five days after the murders, Mr Greider described Mr Merah as “a tragic example of how an unstable man is torn apart by his time: he hated the military for the war against the Taliban and he hated Israeli for what the Israeli military exposed the Palestinians to,” citing Mr Mehra as a victim of French class injustice and xenophobia, and suggesting that he would become a political pawn in that year’s French Presidential election.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Florence Schechter, a comedian and presenter who is also the founding Director of the Vagina Museum, appeared on the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism where, speaking from first-hand experience, she provided an insight into the crossover between antisemitism and LGBTQ+ phobia.

“The Museum shared a post which was about International Women’s Day, and we were talking about some trans women from history,” Ms Schechter said, “and somebody replied to that post saying ‘Imagine my surprise, I found out the founder’s Jewish’, and there was this weird, like, ‘Look at the Jews, trying to destroy society.’”

Agreeing with an assertion made by Pink News’ CEO Benjamin Cohen, who appeared on Podcast Against Antisemitism in February, that antisemites also tend to be homophobic, racist, misogynistic and transphobic, Ms Schechter explained: “What’s really interesting is there’s a current narrative at the moment that in particular, trans people, but the LGBT community in general, are trying to control society and influence it, and I saw a tweet recently where somebody was like, ‘Isn’t it weird that this tiny minority of trans people have infiltrated all our big organisations and are changing the rules in their favour, isn’t that weird?’ And I was like, oh, that’s just an antisemitic argument wrapped up against trans people instead. 

“And because there’s this exact style of argument happening, I think there’s a lot of people who have the overlap of ‘Whose the person with the strings? It’s the Jews and it’s the queers.’”

Ms Schechter also revealed that she has also received large amounts of online antisemitism outside of Twitter. “On my YouTube videos, for a few of them, I had to shut off comments because people were making rape threats and death threats towards me because I was Jewish. I found myself listed on an antisemitic website once…I won’t name the website but it was a website that listed people who are a threat to white supremacy. 

“They had all these pages of all these famous people, Jews and non-Jews, who were a threat to white supremacy…it had links to my website, links to my Twitter so that people could find me really easily…it was really scary.”

The podcast with Ms Schechter can be listened to here, or watched in its entirety here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox. Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, writer Eve Barlow and actor Eddie Marsan.

Jewish leaders in Rome have spoken out against a cartoon depicting Ukrainian President Volodomyr Zelenskyy, who is Jewish, with a hooked nose, which is a classic antisemitic stereotype.

The image, by satirical cartoonist Vauro Senesi, shows profiles of Mr Zelenskyy and Russian President Vladimir Putin side-by-side surrounded by the words “No alla guerra…senza ze e sensa vla!” (“No to war without Zes and Vlas”, a pun on the phrase ‘No ifs or buts’). While Mr Putin is represented with a stern, square visage, Mr Vauro’s representation of the Ukrainian President gives him a very prominent hooked nose.

In a tweet, President of the Comunità Ebraica di Roma (Jewish Community of Rome), Ruth Dureghello, said that “It is not a coincidence, but a habit that a certain gentleman depicts Jews with hooked noses in the style of the Defence of the Race. Not for this reason is it less serious and no one can get used to shame.”

Ms Dureghello was referring to the fortnightly Italian publication Difesa della razza (Defence of the Race) that ran from 1938 to 1943. It is widely regarded as the main tool for promoting antisemitism by the Italian fascist regime headed by Benito Mussolini, which ended in 1945 with the Allied victory in World War Two. Difesa began publication shortly after the 1938 Manifesto della razza (Manifesto of Race), which stripped Italian Jews of their citizenship and Government and professional positions.

This is not the first time that Mr Senesi has been accused of drawing inflammatory cartoons. In 2012, an Italian court fined Italian journalist Peppino Caldarola €25,000 for allegedly slandering Mr Senesi, after Mr Caldarola produced a satirical version of one of Mr Senesi’s cartoons that allegedly depicted Jewish Italian politician Fiamma Nirenstein in a classic antisemitic form. The President of the World Jewish Congress, Ronald S. Lauder, called the ruling “a travesty”.

Mr Senesi has denied any allegations of antisemitism, describing himself as an “anti-Nazi communist”. He said: “In this drawing there is no reference to the Jewishness of Zelenskyy, something which is wholly meaningless to me. If I draw a caricature (it’s called that because it ‘charges’ the facial features) it is obvious that I exaggerate his features so that it resembles him: Zelenskyy has a major nose not because he is Jewish but because it is his nose. I have never thought that Jews necessarily have a hooked nose, also because I know very many who have noses of various kinds. I would have preferred not to answer all those cretins who have commented on Zelenskyy’s nose. I’m only doing so because it is bad faith unless it is imbecility.”

Italian Senator Andrea Marcucci took to Twitter to denounce Mr Senesi, writing: “Re-proposing Nazi propaganda on the Jews to draw President Zelenskyy is literally a disgusting operation.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Luc Bernard, a video game developer and the creator of the first video game about the Holocaust, appeared on the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism where he spoke about how video games could be an instrumental resource in teaching young people about the Shoah.

Mr Bernard, whose grandmother assisted children who arrived in the United Kingdom on the Kindertransport, an initiative in 1938-39 to rescue nearly 10,000 Jewish children from Europe, described his motivation in the creation of his game, The Light in the Darkness.

“Some don’t believe video games can be educational. That’s something I disagree with,” he said. “The problem is, no one has thought about what is the next step, or how do we continue education in new ways? Because I think education is trying to get the digital generation to adapt to them, rather than trying to adapt to the digital generation.”

Pointing to the successes of previous artforms in providing Holocaust education after meeting initial resistance, Mr Bernard said: “Comic books were viewed as insane at one point until Maus came out. Films were kind of viewed like, ‘I don’t know, man,’ until Shoah came out, and Schindler’s List. Video games need to be able to tackle the subject because we’re the number one form of entertainment, and I think rather than discourage game developers towards doing it, we should actually be able to guide game developers and encourage them to make these games, because then there would be more awareness.” 

The story of the game revolves around Polish Jews in France during the Holocaust, Mr Bernard told our host. “You follow a Polish Jewish family in France, so you get to play, more like interact and experience, the story from France before the occupation, up to the occupation, antisemitism rising…we’re kind of going through every single step.

“What I really wanted to do is actually have you become attached to these characters, get to see who they were, get to live their life, rather than just go automatically into the bad things, because you know how film is, you want people to become attached emotionally so it has a bigger impact on the viewer, or on the player…also, in between scenes, you will have an option to listen to survivor testimonies, French survivors. You’ll be able to see the similarities to compare what they went through to what that current scene is showing.”

Asked whether ‘video game’ is an accurate title for The Light in the Darkness, Mr Bernard said that “it could be called several things,” including “an interactive story” or “an educational video game.” 

Despite Mr Bernard referring to The Light in the Darkness as a ‘game’, he clarified that he has removed the player’s ability to make choices within the game to mirror the reality of the Holocaust for Jewish people. “If I made choice-based things, it would make it seem like Jews could have saved themselves. There’s so many factors to the Holocaust [and] why it happened. The fact that loads of countries closed their doors, didn’t allow refugees in. How, as the Jews were trying to get to what was British Palestine back then, Britain closed it down. How Britain only allowed 10,000 children on the Kindertransport. All those things are pretty much out of everyone’s control and I know some people [whose] mothers had to give them up just so they could live. If I made it choice-based so that it could affect the story, it would just make it seem like people had a choice and that’s why I really just had to eliminate that, and that’s again what makes it very weird for a video game. It’s very different to anything else I’ve ever done before.”

Mr Bernard chose to set the game in France under the Vichy Government. “What makes the Vichy government so interesting is that it was France that deported the Jews, it was France that decided to deport the children. France went full-on collaboration and they weren’t Nazis – they were bad people, and they had the same intent as the Nazis – and setting it in France shows how it wasn’t just the Nazis that did this, and how everyday people can become hateful.

“I think when people will play it, they’ll be like ‘wait, this was the French Government that did this? It was the French policeman that rounded them up?’, then they’ll actually realise the extent to how bad the Holocaust was because a lot of people just think it was just the Nazis. And, no, it was Europe. Europe did this.”

Mr Bernard, who is himself French, said “I actually love France, but it also means you have to address the dark, historical past of your country.” 

The Light in the Darkness is expected to be released later this year for Xbox and Windows, with other platforms also under consideration.

Throughout the interview, Mr Bernard touched upon a wide variety of topics which included his own Jewish background, why the far-right has infiltrated video games, and how other video games have traditionally fallen short in how they depict Nazis.

The podcast with Mr Bernard can be listened to here, or watched here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox. Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, The Sunday Telegraph columnist Zoe Strimpel and actor Eddie Marsan.

The comedian and actor Elon Gold appeared on the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism where he spoke about how he uses comedy to tackle antisemitism.

Speaking on his approach to discussing antisemitism in his comedy, Mr Gold stated that his priority is to consider whether his material is funny and whether he is making “the right point”. 

Describing what constitutes “the right point”, Mr Gold clarified: “If it comes from my heart and from my anger about antisemitism.”

“All of comedy is complaining, and I realised that a few years ago. You have to be annoyed about something to joke about it and to want to deride it, mock it, ridicule it, but first, it has to annoy you. So what annoys me? Antisemitism. It annoys the crap out of me and I’m angry about it because it’s not funny at all, but now I have to find the funny because that’s my job and I happen to be obsessed with finding the funny in hate, because when you do that, when you find the funny in hate, you get to expose the ignorance of bigotry. And you get to mock these bigots.”

Mr Gold outlined what this approach looks like by providing an example of one of his comedy routines that touches upon the Charlottesville “Unite the Right” rally. “One of my favourite new bits that I’ve been doing lately is mocking those idiots who went to the rallies with the tiki torches going around going ‘the Jews will not replace us.’” Mr Gold joked: “‘And I’m like, ‘the Jews will not replace you? We don’t want to replace you, we just want to put braces on you. Replace you? We just want to manage your portfolio.’”

Discussing why he feels the routine is so impactful, he says that it’s because “It’s got these funny jokes but it’s making a point. Here are these groups of morons walking around with tiki torches going ‘the Jews will not replace us’…what is that message, even? As it turns out, it’s about immigration and it’s a whole thing that it’s their farkakta (nonsense) brains that they think there’s some global conspiracy of the Jews trying to replace them, but it’s all just nuts.

“So it’s my job now to mock these nut-jobs. And I do it from the right place. I know I’m in the right and they’re dead wrong. You can’t justify any sort of racism, homophobia…you’re not right.”

Turning to the subject of offence, Mr Gold has clearly given careful consideration to this issue. “There are bits that I do where I literally do a German accent. And that, you know…you talking about something that’s triggering. The last thing I ever want to do is… let’s say a Holocaust survivor is in the audience, or even the son or grandson of one. And to offend one of them would hurt me deeply. So of course, it’s not my intention to offend, but it is my intention to mock Nazis.”

Mr Gold went on to explain how he differentiates those who may take offence at different types of jokes, for example a dirty joke. “If you’re offended by that, that’s your problem. With antisemitism, with an area as sensitive as that, now we’re not talking about sex, we’re talking about something that people are getting killed over, to this day, and for thousands of years. And I do make it a point not to do any Holocaust jokes. There’s nothing funny about it, and that’s not even a topic I would ever want to bring up.

“However, if Whoopie Goldberg brings it up and says something idiotic like ‘the Holocaust isn’t about race,’ I’m gonna do jokes like ‘oh, the Holocaust isn’t about race? Yeah, I’m pretty sure that’s what my great-grandparents heard in the camps.’” In a German accent, Mr Gold jokes: “By the way, this is not about race. This has nothing to do with race, you Jews are always jumping to conclusions!”

Mr Gold goes on to explain his thought behind the joke, saying: “I’m doing the accent, I’m mocking Nazis, but the joke isn’t, God-forbid on the victims. It’s not even on the Holocaust. It’s on Whoopie, and it’s on the Nazis. It’s on the bad guys. Whoopie’s not bad, she said something bad and wrong and it’s my job to correct it with jokes.”

“So to me, I have to say something about this. It’s an impulse, I can’t just ignore it. And by the way, when she said it, again, I wasn’t offended by it. I just said to myself ‘Oh, I have to correct that error.’ And my only weapon is jokes.”

Throughout the interview, Mr Gold touched upon a wide variety of topics which included opening up about an encounter of antisemitism that his family experienced, why he refuses to work on the Sabbath, and his recurring role in the most recent season of Curb Your Enthusiasm.

The podcast with Mr Gold can be listened to here, or watched here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox. Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, The Sunday Telegraph columnist Zoe Strimpel and actor Eddie Marsan.

Dr Efraim Zuroff, the Chief Nazi Hunter at the Simon Wiesenthal Center, appeared on the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism where he said that he believes anti-vaccination protesters who wear yellow Stars of David are trivialising the Holocaust.

Much of the rhetoric that has emerged from anti-vaccination conspiracy theorists has compared lockdowns to the Holocaust. These crude and inflammatory comparisons have included protesters donning yellow stars bearing the word “Unvaccinated”, a comparison that has been made across the world, including in the United Kingdom, Canada, Ukraine and elsewhere.  

Such symbolism is reminiscent of the kind of insignia Jews in Germany and occupied Europe were forced to wear by the Nazis. Those wearing such items in 2021 do so in order to compare the persecution of the Jewish people with protective measures sanctioned by governments and other administrative bodies in order to deal with the pandemic. Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

“It’s Holocaust trivialisation,” Dr Zuroff said. “In other words, to, in a sense, turn the Holocaust into a far more trivial event than it was in fact.”

He continued: “It’s very ironic but in a certain sense, I have to say that there’s a small silver lining here which goes to prove the success of the people who have devoted their lives to promoting Holocaust education, Holocaust research, Holocaust commemoration. In other words, the Holocaust has become the ultimate tragedy, and that’s why everyone who has a cause wants to connect that cause or to claim that it’s similar to the Holocaust…related to the Holocaust, because that’s the most effective tool.”

However, Dr Zuroff went on to lament the negative effect that wearing the yellow star has on the Holocaust. 

“It’s a horrible thing because it basically turns the Holocaust into something much, much more minor than it actually was.”

Throughout the interview, Dr Zuroff touched upon a wide variety of topics which included highlights from his storied career, the details of ongoing trials of alleged Nazi war criminals, and explained the difference between Holocaust denial and distortion.

The podcast with Dr Zuroff can be listened to here, or watched here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox. Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, The Sunday Telegraph columnist Zoe Strimpel and actor Eddie Marsan.

A pig’s head and an antisemitic epithet were reportedly left outside the Moscow apartment of a respected Russian journalist.

Alexei Venediktov, the Editor of the Echo of Moscow radio station, took to social media to report the incident, posting one photograph of a pig’s head with a wig on, lying on the floor by his front door, and another picture of a Ukrainian coat of arms fixed to the door itself with an antisemitic slur attached to it.

Echo of Moscow was formed towards the end of the Soviet Union, and since then has been a significant representative of the new freedoms granted as part of the policy of Glasnost (openness) instituted by Mikhail Gorbachev, the last President of the Soviet Union, as part of a campaign to increase government transparency, allowing citizens to publicly discuss problems with the communist system, and potential solutions, for the first time.

Later, Mr Veneditkov, who has Jewish heritage, revealed a still from CCTV footage outside his apartment building. It appears to show a figure posing as a food delivery worker arriving at his front door. However, Mr Venediktov said that the food company in question contacted him and explained that the uniform seen in the video has been out of use for several years.

Mr Venediktov expressed his concern on the social media platform Telegram, writing: “This in the country that defeated fascism. Why not just fix a six-pronged star to my apartment door?”

In addition to the antisemitic element, this incident is also the latest example of the Russian Government’s crackdown on independent media.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The controversial columnist Yasmin Alibhai-Brown, has deployed the Livingstone Formulation yet again, asserting that “These days, any criticism of Israel is deemed ‘antisemitic’.”

Ms Brown made the claim in a column this week for the i newspaper on Israel’s response to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

The “Livingstone Formulation”, named by sociologist David Hirsch after the controversial former Mayor of London, Ken Livingstone, is used to describe how allegations of antisemitism are dismissed as malevolent and baseless attempts to silence criticism of Israel. In its report on antisemitism in the Labour Party, the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) found that suggestions of this nature were part of the unlawful victimisation of Jewish people in the Party.

Late last year, Ms Brown made a similar claim, arguing in an article that “any criticism of the state [of Israel] is deemed antisemitic by apologists and diehard allies, and suggesting that this is motivating a “purge” of Labour Party members. In the article titled “The UN is warning of spiralling violence, yet the West has forgotten the Palestinians” for the i newspaper, Ms Alibhai-Brown also wrote that “a report from Jewish Voice for Labour accused Sir Keir Starmer’s Labour Party of purging Jewish members who call Israel to account.”

That was not Ms Alibhai-Brown’s first offence of this nature either. The year before, she replied to journalist Stephen Bush’s reaction to being appointed to lead a Jewish charity’s review of racial inclusivity in the Jewish community by tweeting: “maybe ask them about the Palestinians.” The review was concerned with British Jews and was unrelated to Israel, a distinction that Ms Alibhai-Brown is apparently incapable of apprehending.

Previously Ms Alibhai-Brown also expressed her opposition to the Labour Party’s adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitismdescribing the fringe minority of Jewish individuals who agreed with her as “good Jews”.

Newspapers and television broadcasters who host Ms Alibhai-Brown must think again before giving a platform to someone who takes such positions.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

The journalist and broadcaster Angela Epstein appeared on the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism where she revealed that her son was nearly assaulted by three men after they had seen him wearing his skullcap, or kippah.

When Ms Epstein was asked by our host whether she was surprised that polling by Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that a shocking 46% of British Jews said that they do not display visible signs of their Judaism due to antisemitism, she replied that she was not.

“Antisemitism is the oldest hatred documented in terms of people’s disregard, hatred, dislike for cultures that they feel are alien to them,” Ms Epstein said. “I completely understand why in certain circumstances, loathe as we are to admit it considering our history, that people would want to not display their Jewish credentials.”

Ms Epstein went on to reveal that the issue of Jewish visibility was a personal one to her after her son was nearly attacked. 

“One of my kids was rounded upon by three Arab-speaking men when he was travelling recently in Europe. They were staying in the same place…the night before they had seen him and he wasn’t wearing his kippah and they were perfectly friendly. And the next day, when they saw him and he was, they rounded upon him,” Ms Epstein said.

She added: “Fortunately, the German police were very good and they have since been arrested.”

Ms Epstein stated that the incident was an example of what happens “when you display your Judaism in certain situations,” adding: “There are lots of people who are amenable and reasonable but equally, it’s an age-old hatred and we still haven’t found out why they don’t like us.”

Throughout the interview, Ms Epstein touched upon a wide variety of topics, including her Jewish Ukrainian heritage, how her last name can sometimes conjure unwanted connotations, and what it means to be a Jewish mother.

The podcast with Ms Epstein can be listened to here, or watched here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox. Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, The Sunday Telegraph columnist Zoe Strimpel and actor Eddie Marsan.

Rabbi Yaakov Baruch, the rabbi of Indonesia’s only synagogue, Shaar HaShamayim, appeared on the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism to discuss why he feels compelled to create education on the Holocaust for his country.

Rabbi Baruch discussed how, in partnership with Israel’s Yad Vashem World Holocaust Remembrance Center, he created Indonesia’s first ever Holocaust exhibition. His motivation behind the creation partly stemmed from his desire to commemorate his own relatives who were killed during the Holocaust, stating that his grandmother lost 40 relatives. Rabbi Baruch also wants to educate Indonesians about the Holocaust, which he believes is desperately needed. 

Rabbi Baruch said that he believes that many Indonesians are still either ignorant of the atrocities of the Holocaust or think that it may have not occurred at all, with some even posting swastikas and images of Adolf Hitler to their social media accounts. He revealed that many visitors to his Holocaust exhibition thanked him for his work, saying that they never imagined that such events could have taken place. Rabbi Baruch said: “Many Indonesians don’t know about [the Holocaust], and [those] who know the Holocaust know mostly from Holocaust denial groups.”

Rabbi Baruch told our host that during a televised appearance in Indonesia, he was confronted by a Holocaust denier. “When I was on local TV talking about the Holocaust museum…he said that the Holocaust is a hoax on live TV. It so destroyed my heart. But what I can do is, I can tell him that this is not a hoax, that’s why I’m doing this.”

Despite this, however, Rabbi Baruch is pleased that the exhibition has largely received positive feedback from locals of all backgrounds, including the local government, though some Muslim groups had criticised it and accused Rabbi Baruch’s exhibition of attempting to normalise relations with Israel. However, this has not deterred him.

“I tell them what we do is nothing to do with the conflict in the Middle East…the Holocaust happened before the State of Israel, before the [creation] of Indonesia, even. I just want to share the history,” he says.

The podcast with Rabbi Baruch can be listened to here, or watched here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox. Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, The Sunday Telegraph columnist Zoe Strimpel and actor Eddie Marsan.

Ukranian President Volodomyr Zelenskyy has been the target of an article by an Iranian pro-government media outlet that reportedly relies on antisemitic tropes. 

The long article, circulated by the Fars News Agency, uses what The Jerusalem Post calls a “word salad” of typical antisemitic notions. Mr Zelenskyy is accused of Jewish “immorality”, including hedonism, greed, corruption and malign political influence through the control of Ukrainian oligarchs, Donald Trump, and the convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein, who is described as “one of Zelensky’s most influential role models.”

Mr Zelenskyy is accused in the article of being not only a “hedonistic Jew” but an amoral “follower of the school of hedonism, which legitimises the attainment of pleasure in any way possible, and this school has spread to all aspects of his existence.”

The article also emphasises Mr Zelenskyy’s Jewish heritage and brands him a “Zionist”, an epithet of abuse in official Iranian outlets. Mr Zelenskyy is said to have “thanked the Zionist regime for its support of his country.”

Mr Zelenskyy’s is accused of having “deep ties to Jewish officials and the rich, such as George Soros.” Mr Soros is a Jewish financier who is often the target of antisemitic conspiracy theories.

From there, the Fars News Agency article makes a bizarre leap into the realms of conspiracy theory by connecting Zelensky and Ukraine’s need for financial and military aid not only to the former American president and George Soros’s Open Society Foundation, but to Jeffrey Epstein. The article describes how Epstein was “one of Zelensky’s most influential role models. The abuse of women and illicit sexual relations is a powerful tool in the hands of managers who try to achieve their goal by any means possible.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The world’s largest group of Christian broadcasters has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Troy A. Miller, CEO of the National Religious Broadcasters, said: “Fighting antisemitism is a key issue for believers, and it’s very important that our understanding of the issue reflects cultural realities.

“An accurate and contemporary definition of antisemitism helps us to recognise and combat this form of hatred wherever it emerges.”

It was reported that South Korea adopted the Definition last year. Britain was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism and Lord Pickles worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

UK media regulator Ofcom has sanctioned London-based radio station Rinse FM after they aired a song that was deemed to have contained “antisemitic hate speech.”

On 12th July 2020, Rinse FM’s presenter introduced the song “Better in Tune with the Infinite” by Jay Electronica as “one of my absolute favourites”. A complaint was then made over the following lyrics: “The synagogues of Satan might accuse or jail me. Strip, crown, nail me, brimstone hail me…To the lawyers, to the sheriffs, to the judges. To the debt holders and the law makers. [Bleeped] you, sue me, bill me.”

In their report, published on 19th July 2021, Ofcom stated that it referred to the International Definition of Antisemitism in making their assessment, citing the following paragraph: “Antisemitism is a certain perception of Jews, which may be expressed as hatred toward Jews. Rhetorical and physical manifestations of antisemitism are directed toward Jewish or non-Jewish individuals and/or their property, toward Jewish community institutions and religious facilities.”

The regulator deemed the lyrics to have negative connotations containing antisemitic tropes, stating: “In our view, the UK listeners would be likely to understand the phrase ‘synagogues of Satan’ to be a reference to the Jewish place of worship, and that it makes an explicit association between Jewish place of worship and Satan. We considered that UK listeners would have understood this association to suggest that Jewish people are evil or worship the Devil, which is a well-established antisemitic trope.

“Immediately following the reference to the ‘synagogues of Satan’ were the lyrics ‘Strip, crown, nail me, brimstone hail me’ which we considered to be a reference to the crucifixion of Jesus Christ. In our view, the juxtaposition of the lyrics may have evoked for UK listeners the antisemitic allegation that Jewish people are collectively responsible for the crucifixion of Jesus Christ

“These words were later followed by the lyrics ‘To the lawyers, to the sheriffs, to the judges. To the debt holders and the law makers’, whom the artist addresses with ‘[Bleep] you, sue me, bill me’. In the context of the preceding lines and in particular, reference to the phrase ‘synagogues of Satan’, we considered that some UK listeners may have interpreted these references to be references to the Jewish community.”

Ofcom initially made its decision about Rinse FM’s airing of the song in July 2021. The radio station responded in October that year claiming that it was not always possible for an under-resourced station to “nip in the bud” any material that might be considered “controversial”. This was, however, rejected in the regulator’s most recent ruling, which said: “We consider that Rinse FM was treated fairly during the investigation process and in line with Ofcom’s procedures for investigating breaches of content standards for television and radio. During the investigation process, the licensee made representations in response to Ofcom’s request for formal comments [and] it was given the opportunity to respond to Ofcom’s preliminary view on the breaches”.

This is not the first time the rapper was accused of antisemitism. In 2020, he was criticised over the lyrics: “And I bet you a Rothschild I get a bang for my dollar…The synagogue of Satan want me to hang by my collar.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

The multi-award-winning author and scholar of Hebrew and Yiddish literature, Dr Dara Horn, appeared on the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism where, among other topics, she discussed her mixed feelings towards Holocaust education.

Dr Horn said: “In the United States, there was this idea in the Jewish community about 30 or 40 years ago that Holocaust education was going to prevent antisemitism…you had the opening of this massive Holocaust museum in Washington, you started having mandatory curricular about the Holocaust in schools and other Holocaust memorials opening around the United States, you started having Hollywood movies about this, and a lot of that came from the Jewish community.

“The idea was that people would go to these museums or learn about this in school. They’d learn where hatred can lead, what the world did to the Jews and they would then stop hating Jews. It wasn’t a ridiculous idea but 30 years later and what’s interesting is there’s much higher levels of antisemitism now in the United States than there were 30 years ago, so maybe we should reevalute this?”

Dr Horn continued: “What it’s come to mean is that Holocaust education is the only education that people have about antisemitism and so what that has come to mean is that antisemitism consists of murdering six million Jews.”

Referring to her newest book, People Love Dead Jews: Reports From a Haunted Present, Dr Horn says: “I list a bunch of things that aren’t the Holocaust, and I list everything from trolling Jews on social media to expelling entire Jewish communities from entire countries and seizing all their assets, which of course happened in many, many countries in the Islamic world in the twentieth century. I was like, ‘all of those things are not Holocaust, none of them are a big deal!’”

“When somebody is trolling you on social media and they’re photoshopping your face into a gas chamber, the problem is not that that person doesn’t know about the Holocaust. It’s not an education problem,” Dr Horn added.

During the discussion with our host, Dr Horn also discussed her reaction to the Colleyville synagogue attack, why she decided to learn Talmud and whether Yiddish is making a comeback.

The podcast with Dr Horn can be listened to here, or watched here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox. Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, The Sunday Telegraph columnist Zoe Strimpel and actor Eddie Marsan.

On the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism, Ben M. Freeman, an author, activist and educator, spoke about the importance of having a basic understanding of history and why it is vital in tackling antisemitism. 

Speaking on his passion for studying history, Mr Freeman told our host that “I was always able to view history from a bird’s-eye perspective, and I don’t know why that is…it’s just the way my mind works. So, for me, that means I’m able to spot patterns.

“That’s why I can look at Paul [the Apostle], and then Marx, and then things that were said later on, things that are said today, and then draw a connection.”

Mr Freeman said that looking at common themes between historical events can better explain the events behind antisemitic incidents and “tell us why”. “So much of the commentary on Jew-hatred is just commentary, it’s just people describing what happened. ‘This person said this, that person said this,’ and for me, we have to get to the ‘why’, and the ‘why’ is not going to be answered in 2022, it’s going to be answered looking back in history to thousands of years ago.”

When asked where he would recommend people who may not know a lot about antisemitism to start in their fight against anti-Jewish racism, Mr Freeman explained how a basic understanding of common antisemitic tropes can be used to build a deeper framework of knowledge, explaining that it was for this reason that he outlined these often-used tropes in his book, Jewish Pride: Rebuilding a People

“In chapter one, I break it down into economic libel, blood libel, conspiracy fantasy and the racial libel. Then, if you kind of understand those basic ideas, look into history. Look at how we’re perceived. Look at how we have been treated. Look at narratives that have come about that you might not even be aware are about Jews.”

“I am obsessed with history,” Mr Freeman continued. “You have to understand the ‘why’. You have to understand the theory, the context, and to do that, we have to look at history. Start off with the basics. Look at the Holocaust, look at things that were said then, and it’s then always about going back in time because it didn’t start wherever you’re studying, it started before that, before that, before that.”

The podcast with Mr Freeman can be listened to here, or watched here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox. Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, The Sunday Telegraph columnist Zoe Strimpel and actor Eddie Marsan.

BBC Sounds, an online streaming platform that contains live and archived radio broadcasts, has agreed to include additional background information about the content of an interview containing Holocaust denial, after contact from Campaign Against Antisemitism.

The interview in question is between interviewee, Lady Diana Mosley, and interviewer, Sue Lawley, and was first broadcast in November 1989 as part of the BBC’s Desert Island Discs series. Lady Mosley was the wife of Sir Oswald Mosley, the leader of the antisemitic British Union of Fascists. The two wedded in Joseph Goebbels’ house in the presence of Adolf Hitler. 

During the interview, Lady Mosley, who died in 2003, reportedly says of her late husband: “He didn’t know a Jew from a gentile…as the Jews were so anti him and attacked him, he, as it were, picked up the challenge.”

When Ms Lawley asked Lady Mosley whether she believed that six million Jews had died in the Holocaust, Lady Mosley replies: “I don’t really, I’m afraid…believe that six million people were…I just think it’s not conceivable, it’s too many.”

“But whether it’s six million or one really makes no difference morally, it’s equally wrong,” Lady Mosley adds. “I think it was a dreadfully wicked thing.”

Lady Mosley also referred to historians’ reporting of Hitler as “nonsense”, adding that “if you don’t like someone, you attack them.”

Ms Lawley reportedly told Lady Mosley that “It’s almost as if you’re rewriting history.” She also said, in response to Lady Mosley’s denial of her husband’s antisemitism, “But did he not call them [the Jews] ‘an alien force which rises to rob us of our heritage’?”

At first, a BBC spokesperson said: “This episode of Desert Island Discs is part of the most complete possible archive resource of programmes from the past 80 years and is not something that is being newly transmitted. The programme page indicates that Lady Diana Mosley was married to Sir Oswald Mosley, the leader of the British Union of Fascists, and clearly shows the date of broadcast. Radio 4’s audience is likely to be aware of the controversial views that Lady Diana Mosley held if they choose to explore the archive.”

However, Campaign Against Antisemitism complained to the BBC that more specific background information about the interviewee should be provided. The omission of such information was particularly noteworthy given, as The Telegraph reported, the BBC was appending such warnings to its backlog of fictional programmes, such as Dad’s Army.

The BBC has now responded to us to say that, following our complaint, “for clarity, we have now provided updated and additional information about the content, including highlighting her denial of the Holocaust.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We are pleased that, following contact from us, the BBC is bringing its provision of background information in relation to actual Holocaust deniers in its archive into line with the context that it provides for its backlog of fictional programming. We would like to think that this is the beginning of a new responsiveness to Jewish communal concerns at the BBC, given recent events and the broadcaster’s record.”

Recently, Campaign Against Antisemitism visited Broadcasting House, the BBC’s headquarters in London, to tell the Corporation to “switch off the Jew-hate”. We projected selected instances from just the past eighteen months of the BBC’s bias against Jews or antisemitism onto the broadcaster’s iconic building. The intervention came as the BBC is rocked with controversy over antisemitism, triggered by its abominable coverage of an antisemitic incident on Oxford Street which its Executive Complaints Unit has largely defended (and even that defence has had to be further clarified). In December, we held a rally outside Broadcasting House, attended by hundreds of protestors, to deliver the message: “BBC News: Stop Blaming Jews!” Lord Grade, a former Chairman of the BBC, told Podcast Against Antisemitism that the BBC’s reportage was “shoddy journalism” and called for answers in a video supporting the rally, which was endorsed also by Dame Maureen Lipman.

Ofcom is now investigating the coverage, which, as our projections onto the Broadcasting House showed, is only one example of many in which the BBC has exhibited bias against Jews or even indulged in antisemitism. The result has been the gradual erosion of the Jewish community’s confidence in the BBC.

Polling that we conducted in 2020 for our Antisemitism Barometer already revealed that two thirds of British Jews were deeply concerned by the BBC’s coverage of matters of Jewish concern, and 55% by its handling of antisemitism complaints. It is likely that these figures would be even higher if polled today.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

On the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism, Rabbi Emily Reitsma-Jurman, a rabbi at the West London Synagogue of British Jews, discussed the “daunting but important” task of teaching prospective converts to Judaism about antisemitism.

Rabbi Emily said that teaching converts about antisemitism was a “huge challenge”, owing to the fact that she needed to fulfill her obligation of warning them about Jew-hatred without quelling their enthusiasm surrounding their newfound religion. “We know we have that responsibility,” she said, “but we try to do it in such a way that it’s balanced out with all of the positives that they’ll get from living a religiously, culturally, wonderfully Jewish life.”

Rabbi Emily also stressed the importance of teaching the history of antisemitism whilst also “checking in” with her students emotionally in order to better equip them on how to handle real-life antisemitism. “Sometimes it’s obvious antisemitism, sometimes its much less obvious. Or, it’s a weird feeling that they get when they’re in a situation, and so we try to keep having those conversations with them as they’re going through the process of learning

“To catch them up with all that history is daunting, but important.”

Rabbi Emily also noted that many of her students felt “caught off guard” at the video footage that surfaced last May of a convoy of cars driving through a Jewish neighbourhood shouting “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” through megaphones. “Everyone had seen it and shared it, and suddenly I found myself with conversion students who were saying ‘I don’t know what to do when I see this, and I don’t know how to feel when I see this,’ and it struck me that up until that point, I had been very good at teaching a sort of academic form of antisemitism. ‘This is what makes up antisemitism, this is how we can recognise it.’ What I hadn’t done was help them deal with the emotional side of it.

“So, what do you do when you feel unsafe? What do you do when you feel insecure? What do you do when something is happening in front of you? Where do you go to report it? And also sitting with them in the sadness that that’s what we need to do. They have a real sense of grief, I think, a lot of the time when they learn about this. But they’re so excited about being Jewish, they’re so enthusiastic about it, and now we have to deal with some of the issues that come around that.”

Rabbi Emily added: “I’m not going to solve antisemitism with my students, but I can help them express their feelings and help them to know that there are safe places to go.”

The podcast with Rabbi Emily can be listened to here, with the longer, video version available here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox. Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, The Sunday Telegraph columnist Zoe Strimpel and actor Eddie Marsan.

BBC Sounds, an online streaming platform that contains live and archived radio broadcasts, reportedly features an interview containing Holocaust denial without providing context or a content warning.

The conversation in question is between interviewee, Lady Diana Mosley, and interviewer, Sue Lawley, and was first broadcast in November 1989 as part of the BBC’s Desert Island Discs series. Lady Mosley was the wife of Sir Oswald Mosley, the leader of the antisemitic British Union of Fascists. The two wedded in Joseph Goebbels’ house in the presence of Adolf Hitler. 

During the interview, Lady Mosley, who died in 2003, reportedly says of her late husband: “He didn’t know a Jew from a gentile…as the Jews were so anti him and attacked him, he, as it were, picked up the challenge.”

When Ms Lawley asked Lady Mosley whether she believed that six million Jews had died in the Holocaust, Lady Mosley replies: “I don’t really, I’m afraid…believe that six million people were…I just think it’s not conceivable, it’s too many.”

“But whether it’s six million or one really makes no difference morally, it’s equally wrong,” Lady Mosley adds. “I think it was a dreadfully wicked thing.”

Lady Mosley also referred to historians’ reporting of Hitler as “nonsense”, adding that “if you don’t like someone, you attack them.”

Ms Lawley reportedly told Lady Mosley that “It’s almost as if you’re rewriting history.” She also said, in response to Lady Mosley’s denial of her husband’s antisemitism, “But did he not call them [the Jews] ‘an alien force which rises to rob us of our heritage’?”

A BBC spokesperson said: “This episode of Desert Island Discs is part of the most complete possible archive resource of programmes from the past 80 years and is not something that is being newly transmitted.

“The programme page indicates that Lady Diana Mosley was married to Sir Oswald Mosley, the leader of the British Union of Fascists, and clearly shows the date of broadcast. Radio 4’s audience is likely to be aware of the controversial views that Lady Diana Mosley held if they choose to explore the archive.”

Recently, Campaign Against Antisemitism visited Broadcasting House, the BBC’s headquarters in London, to tell the Corporation to “switch off the Jew-hate”.

We projected selected instances from just the past eighteen months of the BBC’s bias against Jews or antisemitism onto the broadcaster’s iconic building.

The intervention came as the BBC is rocked with controversy over antisemitism, triggered by its abominable coverage of an antisemitic incident on Oxford Street, which its own Executive Complaints Unit has largely defended (and even that defence has had to be further clarified). In December, we held a rally outside Broadcasting House, attended by hundreds of protestors, to deliver the message: “BBC News: Stop Blaming Jews!” Lord Grade, a former Chairman of the BBC, told Podcast Against Antisemitism that the BBC’s reportage was “shoddy journalism” and called for answers in a video supporting the rally, which was endorsed also by Dame Maureen Lipman.

Ofcom is now investigating the coverage, which, as our projections onto the Broadcasting House showed, is only one example of many in which the BBC has exhibited bias against Jews or even indulged in antisemitism. The result has been the gradual erosion of the Jewish community’s confidence in the BBC. Polling that we conducted in 2020 for our Antisemitism Barometer already revealed that two thirds of British Jews were deeply concerned by the BBC’s coverage of matters of Jewish concern, and 55% by its handling of antisemitism complaints. It is likely that these figures would be even higher if polled today.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected]

The German public broadcaster Deutsche Welle has fired five employees – including four from its Arabic desk – and has dropped a number of freelancers following an audit on antisemitism.

The audit was prepared by former Justice Minister Sabine Leutheusser-Schnarrenberger, integration expert Ahmad Mansour, and Beatrice Mansour, an expert on the prevention of radicalisation.

Although the audit found no systemic problem, it led to the firings. Another eight cases are still under investigation.

According to the Bild newspaper, one of the fired journalists had described Israel as a “cancer that should be cut out”. Another wrote in a 2018 essay that a “Jewish lobby controls many German institutions” to prevent criticism of Israel.

In 2019, a freelancer and trainer at the Deutsche Welle Academy compared Jews to “ants” that had invaded “through our weak points”.

The audit began last year, seeking online postings and information on those implicated in allegations of antisemitism, including , including “distributors and partners of Deutsche Welle.”

According to the audit, the staff in question had not merely engaged in criticism of Israel, which is protected free speech, but had used “classic antisemitic imagery up to and including Holocaust denial.”

The Director General of Deutsche Welle, Peter Limbourg, apologised this week and announced that a ten-point “code of ethics” would be established to prevent such problems in the future. It will reportedly include explanations of antisemitism, and the difference between legitimate criticism of Israel and calling for the destruction of the Jewish state. Deutsche Welle also announced plans to strengthen its Israel desk.

The country’s main Jewish umbrella group, the Central Council of Jews in Germany (CCJ), welcomed Deutsche Welle’s actions. “There must not be taxpayer-financed Israel-hatred and antisemitism in the media,” declared CCJ president Josef Schuster.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

Indonesian Muslim groups have alleged that the country’s first-ever Holocaust exhibition is simply an attempt to normalise relations with Israel, calling for the closure of the exhibit.

The exhibition was launched to coincide with Holocaust Memorial Day on 27th January and was featured at Shaar HaShamayim, Indonesia’s only synagogue, located in North Sulawesi province. The exhibition, titled “Shoah: How is it Humanly Possible?”, was created by the Yad Vashem World Holocaust Remembrance Center.

Rabbi Yaakov Baruch, the synagogue’s rabbi, stated that “When I had this idea to build a Holocaust museum, the reason was to remember my family who died in the Holocaust on my grandmother’s side.” He also added that he wanted to “educate Indonesians on the danger of antisemitism, especially the danger of hate crimes.”

However, despite Rabbi Baruch’s personal connection to the exhibition, Muslim groups have called for its closure over allegations that the exhibition is an attempt to normalise relations with Israel. 

Sudarnoto Abdul Hakim, the Head of Foreign Relations and International Cooperation of the Indonesian Ulema Council, a top Islamic scholar’s body also known as MUI, said: “We demand any exhibition be stopped and the museum be cancelled [and] discontinued.”

“Jewish communities and the descendants of Jewish people everywhere, including in Indonesia and North Sulawesi, should also see fairly clearly the brutal acts that have been perpetrated by Israeli Zionists against the Palestinian people since 1948.”

Objections were also raised by Hidayat Nur Wahid, Deputy Speaker of Indonesia’s legislative branch, the People’s Consultative Assembly, over the exhibition’s links to Israel’s Yad Vashem.

However, criticism of the exhibition was not unanimous among Indonesia’s Muslim community, as Nahdlatul Ulama, the largest Islamic organisation, not only in Indonesia but also the world, spoke out in favour of the exhibition. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A newspaper in New York has apologised after using an overtly antisemitic cartoon to promote an investigative series about a local funding issue.

The Journal News in Rockland County, in the Lower Hudson area known locally as Lohud, ran the cartoon depicting a rabbi as a puppet-master manipulating children on top of a pile of cash. The words alongside read: “Rabbi holds the strings on $76m for East Ramapo School District.”

The Agudath Israel organisation immediately released a statement condemning the cartoon for evoking one of “the worst antisemitic tropes.” The concept of “the Jew as a conspiratorial puppet master, covertly manipulating the world economy and events” goes back to at least the 1700s and was “further amplified” by The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, the group said. This imagery had stoked hatred for hundreds of years, the organisation observed, and was employed by the Pittsburgh synagogue gunman, who murdered eleven worshippers in 2018.

Agudath Israel also demanded an apology and called for a commitment by the publication to “avoid bigoted imagery” in the future.

In response, Rockland County’s largest newspaper published an apology on its website acknowledging that its “hurtful” image and words “degrade and demean” Jews. In its statement, the publication acknowledged that it had “posted a promotional illustration” on social media channels “whose words and imagery unintentionally featured an antisemitic trope.” Within an hour, the statement read, it had deleted the posts “after a reader contacted us pointing out this hurtful choice of imagery.”

The statement continued: “Members of our team did not recognise the stereotype that degrades and demeans Jews in the image and accompanying language. We’re deeply sorry this passed our review.”

The statement added that they “condemn all forms of antisemitism” and expressed gratitude to “all who sought to educate us on the history and hate behind the image.” 

The paper also said it would postpone the story that it was promoting, and would “review the story’s visual elements.”

The statement concluded by saying that in coming days it would “reflect on our misstep over the illustration and engage in considerable outreach and listening with local Jewish communities.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

On the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism, Eve Barlow, a music and culture journalist who has written for The Telegraph, The Guardian and the LA Times, opened up about how tackling antisemitism online has affected her life and mental health.

Ms Barlow revealed that in response to her increased advocacy for the Jewish community and opposition to antisemitism, she had received a torrent of antisemitic abuse and was isolated from her friends. “I found myself more and more pushed to the fringes and to the sides of people’s social circles to the extent that I really was winding up spending most of my time either with a select one or two close friends or completely alone.”

Ms Barlow added that as a result of her income decreasing due to her ever-growing profile as an activist against antisemitism, she began focusing more of her time on raising awareness of anti-Jewish racism. “I had been fighting [antisemitism] for so many years, so by the time that war happened last year, I had all the verbiage. I had experienced all of the trolling. So I found myself in a place where my verboseness and my preparation to know what to say and how to say it with effect created so much noise and attention around me that…it was kind of out of control, and my numbers were growing like mad because people suddenly needed a voice.” 

Speaking on the online trolling that she has received, Ms Barlow said that when she did not take the necessary precautions to place restrictions on her social media posts, “thousands upon thousands” of people would reply with hateful comments, adding “I’ve had to take precautions to make sure that my personal security is a lot tighter.”

When asked about her mental health, Ms Barlow said that “on the whole, I put up a pretty affronted and assured and unapologetic stance” and that she felt the need to “set an example,” but acknowledged that her mental health “ebbed and flowed”. Ms Barlow also said that at times, she worried about the impact the online trolling was having on her real life.

“This viral hatred of me online…what is it reducing me to? Because people don’t see you as a person anymore, they see you as this thing…they have this idea of you…and then people who were your ‘friends’, they stop seeing you as a person and they run away from you. The amount of people who abandoned me in that moment and who have never come back to me…it speaks volumes about how humanity has been manipulated and disaffected by social media,” she said.

However, despite all of the online trolling she has received, Ms Barlow said: “I really have to keep believing in people, and keep believing in the power of community, and the power of truth.”

The podcast with Ms Barlow can be listened to here, with the full, hour-long version available here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox. Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, The Sunday Telegraph columnist Zoe Strimpel and actor Eddie Marsan.

On the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism, Benjamin Cohen, the founder and CEO of Pink News, spoke on his experiences antisemitism and homophobia, as well as his feelings about the BBC.

Mr Cohen spoke candidly on his experiences of online antisemitism and homophobia. “People were getting my picture and making versions of me in concentration camps, things like that…essentially calling for me to be killed.” Mr Cohen revealed that this led to him needing to get the police involved.

He went on to say that his experiences made it “crystal clear” to him that “there is this meeting of the hatreds and that they are fundamentally the same people that hate everyone.” 

When asked about the advice he would give to those experiencing antisemitism or homophobia, Mr Cohen recommended using Twitter’s quality filter and its reporting functions, which he believes has markedly improved.

Speaking on the BBC, Mr Cohen said that he was not surprised that two thirds of the Jewish community were unhappy with the Corporation’s coverage of Jewish matters, stating: “Look, I’m not a big fan of the BBC. I think the BBC has a lot to answer for on a lot of different issues.”

“I think if you did a poll of LGBT+ people, you’d find a similar percentage of people say that they don’t believe the BBC reports fairly. Maybe even higher,” he added. “To me, the problem is the BBC has this view of impartiality which means that it goes out of its way to represent contrary views in a way that I don’t believe should be platformed. 

“If you’re going very strongly on the fact that you’re impartial, and then as a Jew, or as an LGBT+ person, or as another minority group, I’m hearing that they’re supposedly impartial and then I see something which clearly isn’t, you kind of make a rod for your own back because you’re saying “I am the most impartial news organisation out there,” or “I will report everything fairly,” but we can all find examples where the BBC doesn’t report it fairly and they’re making it so much worse for themselves because they are stating to be impartial.”

The full podcast with Mr Cohen can be listened to here, or watched here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox. Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, The Sunday Telegraph columnist Zoe Strimpel and actor Eddie Marsan.

On Wednesday night, Campaign Against Antisemitism visited Broadcasting House, the BBC’s headquarters in London, to tell the Corporation to “switch off the Jew-hate”. The video can be viewed below.

We projected selected instances from just the past eighteen months of the BBC’s bias against Jews or antisemitism onto the broadcaster’s iconic building.

The intervention comes as the BBC is rocked with controversy over antisemitism, triggered by its abominable coverage of an antisemitic incident on Oxford Street, which its own Executive Complaints Unit has largely defended (and even that defence has had to be further clarified). In December, we held a rally outside Broadcasting House, attended by hundreds of protestors, to deliver the message: “BBC News: Stop Blaming Jews!” Lord Grade, a former Chairman of the BBC, told Podcast Against Antisemitism that the BBC’s reportage was “shoddy journalism” and called for answers in a video supporting the rally, which was endorsed also by Dame Maureen Lipman.

Ofcom is now investigating the coverage, which, as our projections onto the Broadcasting House showed, is only one example of many in which the BBC has exhibited bias against Jews or even indulged in antisemitism. The result has been the gradual erosion of the Jewish community’s confidence in the BBC. Polling that we conducted in 2020 for our Antisemitism Barometer already revealed that two thirds of British Jews were deeply concerned by the BBC’s coverage of matters of Jewish concern, and 55% by its handling of antisemitism complaints. It is likely that these figures would be even higher if polled today.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The BBC seems to be completely comfortable showing contempt for the Jewish community. Its claim to represent all communities was always laughable, but in the wake of recent controversies it is insulting. The broadcaster is making every effort to deflect criticism of its reportage and editorial practices, despite overwhelming evidence that they are not fit for purpose. Neither universal condemnation, nor demonstrations, nor interventions by the Prime Minister and Culture Secretary, nor even the high-profile resignation of a rabbi have moved the BBC to reflect on its failings. It is probably the single most unaccountable organisation in British public life. The BBC’s credibility has worn very thin indeed.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

The Health Minister for the areas of Yemen controlled by the rebel Houthis, the Iranian proxy whose organisation is known as Ansar Allah, embarked on a rant about Jewish people in which, among other statements, he accused Jews of controlling the global economy.

Taha Al-Motawakel’s rant was made on 21st January in Sanaa, the largest city in Yemen, and was televised on Al-Eman TV.

During the four-minute-long excerpt uploaded to YouTube, Mr Al-Motawakel can be seen saying that Jewish people “control the global economy” and invested their money in the United Arab Emirates because they were too “cowardly and miserly” to invest in Tel Aviv, owing to the supposed fact that Jewish people know that Tel Aviv is “in the midst of a conflict with the Arabs and the Muslims.”

He then went on to say that “Jewish billionaires” began to “conspire against the Islamic nation from Abu Dhabi and Dubai,” before going on to call the two cities “Jewish colonies” that are “managed, controlled and supervised by the Jews.”

He continued, stating: “As you know, the Jews always work in the shadows.”

“It is America and Israel who are killing us today,” he added. “The horrific massacres committed today are not designed by human minds. They are the result of Jewish hatefulness.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy or of Jews controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions” is an example of antisemitism.

The video concludes with Mr Al-Motawakel emphatically stating: “We are in a real confrontation with the Jews.”

Also in January, a Houthi scholar stated that the “Jewish regime” of the Saud clan must be “uprooted”. 

In April, explicitly hostile attitudes to Jewish people and Israel, including repeated use of the slogan “curse on the Jews”, were found in educational materials in Yemen.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Turkish pro-government media published an article that appears to try to link Jews with the Armenian genocide which took place in 1915, during WWI, under the Ottoman regime.

The article, alleging that “Jewish influence behind the scenes” had been involved in the “Armenian deportation,” was a long and rambling conspiracy theory, stretching from fourteenth-century Venice to 1970s London, referencing WWI and Nazi ideology. Its thesis supports the position of the Government of Turkey, which denies responsibility for the Armenian genocide.

The pro-Government media which supports the ruling AK Party has frequently published articles containing antisemitic content. This latest essay, headlined “Young Turks, Jews, Freemasons and the Armenian deportation,” was published by Daily Sabah. The outlet is known for its pro-Government line, undermining claims that the Turkish Government has instructed Turkish media to reduce the inclusion of antisemitic tropes in output as the country seeks reconciliation with Israel.

The article was tweeted by the newspaper with the claims of “Jewish influence” highlighted.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

The BBC’s Executive Complaints Unit (ECU) has responded to complaints by Campaign Against Antisemitism and other Jewish communal groups over its coverage of the antisemitic Oxford Street incident late last year.

On the first night of the Jewish festival of Chanukah, Jewish teenagers who were celebrating on Oxford Street were attacked by a group of men who hurled antisemitic abuse at them, forcing them to retreat to their bus. The men, who appeared to be of Middle Eastern heritage, proceeded to hit the vehicle with their hands and then their shoes, spitting on it, trying to break windows and performing Hitler salutes. The victims filmed part of the attack.

In its coverage of the incident, the BBC reported that the explicit expressions of antisemitism evident in the footage were merely “allegations”, and simultaneously claimed — alone among all media outlets — that “some racial slurs about Muslims can also be heard from inside the bus,” an assertion made with no evidence to support it and which was even contradicted in the article by a witness from the bus who said that she heard no such slurs. It was also subsequently contradicted by independent audio analysis.

On its BBC London Evening News, the BBC even suggested that “it’s not clear what role [the supposed slurs] may have had in the incident.” After public fury, the BBC amended the article to refer to an “anti-Muslim slur” in the singular, but failed to show any evidence why a supposed slur that nobody could hear with certainty was described as “clearly heard” and reported as fact — and even implied to have been a cause of the antisemitic harassment — while the harassment itself remained mere “allegation”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism and others submitted complaints to the BBC, and we held a rally outside Broadcasting House in London, attended by hundreds of protestors, to deliver the message: “BBC News: Stop Blaming Jews!” Lord Grade, a former Chairman of the BBC, told Podcast Against Antisemitism that the BBC’s reportage was “shoddy journalism” and called for answers in a video supporting the rally, which was endorsed also by Dame Maureen Lipman.

In its report, the ECU, which is a unit within the BBC but independent of its editors, considered whether the BBC’s coverage lacked impartiality, whether it was reasonable to include an unqualified reference to a supposed anti-Muslim slur (while describing the evident antisemitism as merely “alleged”), and whether the BBC was right to continue to defend its coverage in the face of universal outrage from the Jewish community.

In its four-page report, the ECU expressed satisfaction with the BBC’s correction of the website article’s description of “slurs” to “slur”, but upheld the complaint in respect of the television report, where there was no like correction for the misleading reportage. More significantly, the BBC defended the inclusion of the slur and its portrayal as fact, as well as the minimisation of the antisemitism as merely alleged. Finally, the ECU issued a mild rebuke over the BBC’s slowness in accepting that there was doubt over its coverage, but ultimately stood by the broadcaster’s reporting as a whole.

Over the course of rationalising its conclusions, the ECU effectively and disgracefully threw the CST under the bus. It also explained the fact that BBC staffers heard Jews spouting an anti-Muslim slur as an example of the “Apollonian tendency” whereby people hear what they imagine they are likely to be hearing. In so doing, however, the ECU thereby betrayed the very prejudices at the BBC that the ECU insists were not at play.

The full report by the ECU is reproduced below.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It took the BBC two months and four pages to deliver a whitewash non-apology that stands by its spurious reporting of an anti-Muslim slur and dismisses the monumental offence generated by its coverage.

“It is a travesty that the BBC thinks that it can toss the Jewish community a bone by upholding minor elements of our complaint while defending almost the entirety of its reportage and conduct over the course of this abominable saga. Sadly, this sort of stonewalling is exactly what British Jews have come to expect from our public broadcaster.

“Ironically, the ECU’s claim that its staffers hearing Jews spout an anti-Muslim slur is an example of the ‘Apollonian tendency’ betrays the very prejudices that the ECU insists were not at play.

“The BBC’s insistence that ‘we will always welcome feedback on – and constructive scrutiny of – our reporting’ has always been laughable. Today, it is nothing short of insulting. If the BBC thinks that it has settled this matter and appeased the Jewish community, it is deeply mistaken.

“We welcome Ofcom’s reaction to the ECU’s pitiful report by announcing its own investigation, which will hopefully deliver the justice to the Jewish community that the BBC has once more denied.”

Polling that we conducted last year for our Antisemitism Barometer revealed that two thirds of British Jews are deeply concerned by the BBC’s coverage of matters of Jewish concern, and 55% by its handling of antisemitism complaints. These figures reflect years of eroding confidence in the BBC on the part of the Jewish community.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

Oxford Street: Men filmed spitting at Jewish people on bus,  BBC News Online (England) & BBC London News, BBC One (London), 2 December 2021

Finding by the BBC Executive Complaints Unit

Complaint

On 2 December 2021 the BBC published an article, headlined as above, about an incident in which abuse was directed at a group of Jewish students on a bus in London’s Oxford Street. That evening BBC One (London) broadcast a report on the same story in its main news bulletin at 6.30pm. Subsequent to both, the BBC received representations from a significant number of groups and individuals, including the Board of Deputies of British Jews and the Chief Rabbi critical of the accuracy and impartiality of the BBC’s coverage of the events described, particularly in relation to the claim that an anti-Muslim slur had been heard from inside the bus.  In the light of the deeply-felt concerns expressed by senior leaders in the Jewish community and others, the Director-General in his role as Editor-in Chief instructed the BBC’s Executive Complaints Unit to investigate the complaints as a matter of urgency.

Outcome

The ECU, though part of the BBC, is independent of programme-makers, and is tasked with judging complaints about BBC output against the requirements of the BBC’s editorial standards, as expressed in the Editorial Guidelines.  If we conclude that a complaint has identified a breach of those standards, we will uphold it in that respect – or, if it seems to us that the breach had already been recognised and appropriate action taken to remedy it, our finding will be that the complaint has been resolved.  In reaching our finding we have watched and read the relevant output, watched and listened to an enhanced audio version of the disputed recording, examined the editorial processes which led to the inclusion of the claim about an anti-Muslim slur in both the online and broadcast items, and considered the BBC’s subsequent decision to stand by its reporting. We have also considered the two reports commissioned by the Board of Deputies, along with the result of a separate check carried out on behalf of the BBC.  

Three main questions, which emerged from the complaints, provide a focus for our finding. First, did the overall coverage lack impartiality, both in its choice of language and its focus – in effect, as some have suggested, “victim-shaming” the Jewish passengers on the bus, implying they bore a share of responsibility for the incident, or otherwise creating a false equivalence?  Second, was the BBC justified, on the basis of the evidence available to it at the time, to include a line saying an insult of some kind had been heard coming from the bus (in addition to those already reported as having come from the pavement)?  And finally, in the light of new analysis of the recording, was the BBC right to continue to defend all the statements included in its reports as accurate and not requiring amendment? 

Taking these in turn, the first BBC report on this story was published on the afternoon of 2 December. The BBC became aware of the story via social media the previous day but considerable effort had gone in to verifying the footage and establishing the facts. The headline Oxford Street: Men filmed spitting at Jewish people on bus was placed above the following introduction which gave a flavour of the article’s tone and content:

An alleged antisemitic incident involving passengers on a bus in central London is being treated as a hate crime, the Met Police has said. It happened on Monday night in Oxford Street during the Jewish festival of Hanukkah, the force said. Footage appears to show men spitting at and abusing people on the bus. Boris Johnson said the clip was “disturbing”.

A number of complainants have cited the use of the word “alleged” and phrases like “appears to show” as evidence of a lack of impartiality, in contrast with the lack of qualification in the phrase “some racial slurs about Muslims can also be heard from inside the bus” (a form of words to which the finding will return, in a different context). Others also highlighted the reporter’s reference in the television item to any role the words from the bus might have played.  As to “alleged” and the like, the terminology was used on the basis of legal advice taken by the programme-makers, and was by no means unusual in reporting matters under police investigation which may fall to be decided by the courts, and where not all the facts have been established.  We saw no evidence to suggest it was intended to contrast with the treatment of the anti-Muslim slur claim – which was contextualised in the online item in a way the statements about the behaviour of those outside the bus were not, by the inclusion of a quote from one of the students on the bus, in which she denied hearing any such insults from her fellow-passengers.  In relation to the second point, the reporter in the television item said (in connection with the words supposedly spoken from the bus) “It’s not clear at the moment for the person which said that what role this may have played in the incident” .  As is sometimes the case in unscripted broadcasting, it is apparent that the reporter’s intended meaning was not expressed with complete clarity, but what can be said is that he did not assert that the slur had played a role, and that, at that point in time, there were elements of uncertainty about what had happened which it was appropriate for the report to reflect.  In any event, the reference came towards the end of a piece in which the overriding focus had been on the behaviour of those outside the bus, which was hardly conducive to the view that the passengers shared responsibility for the incident.  

For these reasons, and judged against the evidence available at the time, the ECU did not accept that either item lacked impartiality in the senses complained of, or that the charges of victim-blaming or false equivalence are warranted. In two significant respects however both items were inaccurate. The original online copy spoke of some racial slurs about Muslims” whilst the TV reportexplained “you can hear some racial slurs about Muslim people”.In later versions the online copy was changed to “a slur about Muslims” reflecting thatthe original iterations had mischaracterised the nature of the insult and there was insufficient evidence that it had happened on more than one occasion.  In the ECU’s judgement the original versions did not meet the BBC’s standards of due accuracy but, on the basis set out above, the ECU regarded the correction of the online item as resolving the complaint in that respect.  As there was no equivalent correction in the case of the TV report, and as the inaccuracies in it were no less significant than those in the online item, the ECU upheld this aspect of the complaint.

In connection with the second of the questions set out above – about whether reporting that an insult of some kind had been heard coming from the bus was justified on the basis of the evidence available at the time – it is important to note that, at the time the BBC ran the story, the principal primary source material consisted of a mobile phone recording lasting 58”[Other material has since emerged but has no direct relevance to our finding.], which we understand had been provided to the Community Security Trust (CST) when the incident was reported to them and subsequently began to circulate on social media.  The CST became a point of contact about the incident for the media, and it was to the CST that BBC London applied on the morning of 2 December for clearance to use the recording.  In the somewhat unusual circumstances which obtained here, it was inevitable that reporting of the incident would reflect such information as could be gleaned from the recording; and, in the light of the CST’s leading role in relation to antisemitic incidents as well as their involvement in the incident in question, it was natural and appropriate that the BBC should turn primarily to the CST for verification (as many other media outlets did).  The ECU has been shown a detailed timeline of events from the moment the BBC became aware of the story on 1 December, and it shows an unusually high level of consultation among colleagues about the content of the recording.  It was on the afternoon of 1 December that it was first identified as containing an anti-Muslim slur (in the form of “Dirty Muslims”), and the recording was subsequently assessed by at least seven members of BBC London news staff and a senior editor in network news, all of whom agreed that the phrase “Dirty Muslims” could be heard, before a decision to include a statement to that effect in BBC output was made.  Properly, however, the BBC did not rely on its own assessment alone.  The claim was put by the reporter in the television item to the representative of the CST with whom he had been dealing, who replied (in a WhatsApp exchange which the ECU has seen) in terms which the BBC took as confirmation that the phrase in question had been spoken and, in the ECU’s judgement, it was entirely reasonable to take them in that sense.  We should make clear, however, that we do not say the CST’s response determined the BBC’s decision to include the claim in its output – it was only one part of the decision-making process, but it does have some significance for the ECU’s view on the outcome of that process. With hindsight, and in the light of subsequent evidence that the recording was open to another interpretation, it might be argued that even further verification should have been sought, but the situation at the time was that no alternative interpretation had been proposed, and in our view the elements of internal scrutiny taken together with the CST’s response amounted to an editorial process which we would regard as more than sufficient in any but the most extraordinary circumstances.  We therefore do not believe we can fairly find that the decision to broadcast the claim in question constituted a breach of editorial standards, even if it were accepted in the light of later evidence that the claim itself was questionable.  And, in view of allegations of latent or even active antisemitism which have been made, the ECU considers it important to say it was manifest from the evidence we have seen that the decision, whether or not mistaken, was made entirely in good faith.

We now turn to the third question, about whether the BBC has been right to continue to defend the statements in its reports about an anti-Muslim slur as accurate and not requiring amendment.  Since 2 December the matter has been the subject of (to our knowledge) three outside assessments, two commissioned by the Board of Deputies from a Professor of Linguistics and a team of digital forensic and data security specialists, and one commissioned by the BBC from a firm of translators; and in the course of assessing the evidence offered by the Board of Deputies and preparing a response to complaints, the mobile phone recording has been listened to by a number of senior members of BBC News management (and a member of staff with a working knowledge of Hebrew), and discussed with the BBC’s Jerusalem Bureau with input from native Hebrew-speakers there (though with inconclusive results, which led to the commissioning of the firm of translators).  In response to the Director-General’s instruction to the ECU we have viewed and listened to a version of the material with enhanced audio (as set out above), and the Head of the ECU has listened to the material in studio conditions with the help of a BBC sound engineer who was able to apply a number of further enhancements.

In this connection, the ECU notes the suggestion, in a report commissioned by the Board of Deputies from a Professor of Linguistics that BBC staff may have misheard the phrase as a result of the “Apollonian tendency”, which he describes as the mind’s inclination to create order or meaningfulness, especially when encountering unfamiliar information.  Although it might be observed that such a tendency might apply as much to those undertaking investigations on behalf of others as to BBC staff, it corresponded with the experience of members of the ECU, both as investigators of complaints and in their previous roles as programme-makers, in which they had encountered cases where the same audio material can genuinely be construed in entirely different senses by different listeners.  The interpretation arrived at may well depend on cues which the listener is unaware of having received and, once arrived at, may be very difficult to controvert.  In the ECU’s view, the contesting interpretations of the material under consideration were a case in point, and it might not be possible to determine with certainty which of them is correct on the basis of the recording alone.  The question we therefore addressed was whether the BBC’s response should have acknowledged an element of doubt about the anti-Muslim slur claim.  In this connection, we noted that the report commissioned by the BBC did not result in unanimity, with three of the four translators involved construing the phrase as “Dirty Muslims” and one as the Hebrew for “Call someone, it’s urgent”.  While the majority finding gives support to the view that “Dirty Muslims” is a sustainable interpretation, the more significant point for the ECU is that the sole exception indicates that it was not the only possible interpretation.  In the ECU’s judgement this, taken together with the evidence put forward by the Board of Deputies, should have led the BBC to recognise at an earlier stage that there was genuine doubt about the accuracy of what it had reported.  

It follows that the online article as it stands must now be regarded as no longer meeting the BBC’s standards of due accuracy and, to the extent that the anti-Muslim slur claim has itself become controversial, it also lacks due impartiality in failing to reflect alternative views.  The same applies, mutatis mutandis, to the television item, though that could not have been updated as an online item can.  

The complaints were therefore partly upheld in relation to accuracy and impartiality.

Partly upheld

Further action

The online item will be revised in the light of the finding and a posting will be made on the Corrections and Clarifications page about the television item (which will also acknowledge the original element of inaccuracy in the phrase “some racial slurs about Moslems”).

Image credit: Nathan Lilienfeld

On the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism, Piotr Cywiński, the Director of the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum, touched on why the Museum is so important in preserving the memory of the Holocaust and the lessons that we must take away from it.

On the importance of the Museum, Mr Cywiński said: “To see the remains is certainly to understand more, especially for those people who are from the younger generation, even their grandparents were born after the war so it’s not really their own history,” Mr Cywiński said. He also explained how by visiting the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp, “to enter in some barracks, to approach the ruins of crematoriums and gas chambers,” one leaves with a “personal, individual experience” that he believes cannot be obtained from films or documentaries.

Speaking on why Mr Cywiński believes it is crucial to have a thorough knowledge of the history of the Auschwitz concentration camp in order to have an understanding of the modern world, the Museum’s Director said that the Nazi’s persecution of Jews was not merely about history but “part of our heritage, part of our identity, part of our understanding of what humans are…what they’re able to do.”

When asked about his thoughts on antisemitism in the post-Holocaust era, the Director said that “It is the same attack with the same arguments…the same words, the same symbols, same cartoons that are published in some newspapers. So, the main difference in antisemitism today, than, let’s say 100 years ago, is that now we know where is the end of this road.” 

Mr Cywiński also spoke on how crucial it is to remember the lessons of the Holocaust and not make the same mistakes. “Remembrance is not a key for the past, it is a key for the future. And we are still full of bystanders…we do not feel concerned by what is in the world. We see a growing impression, maybe also for pandemic reasons, we are more closed in on ourselves now, but we are seeing some growing indifference, passivity all around the world. ‘It’s not my history, it’s Africa. It’s not my history, it’s the Middle East, it’s not my history, it’s…I don’t know…somewhere in the United States.’ It’s very easy to say that…very, very easy. But this was the biggest problem for the victims of all the genocides, that the rest of the world was falling in, more or less, total indifference.”

Mr Cywiński concluded by revealing the damaging impact that the COVID-19 pandemic has had on the Museum, acknowledging that it would need to adapt so that hopeful visitors who might not be able to visit in person could still experience the Museum. He also expressed his excitement for planned additions to the Museum. These included online tours with a real guide where visitors could ask questions, the development of virtual reality technology and the creations of new exhibitions.  

He added that the Museum staff’s “most important moral obligation” was to maintain the preservation of the site and the “hundreds and thousands of documents and objects.”

The full podcast with Mr Cywiński can be listened to here, or watched here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox. Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, The Sunday Telegraph columnist Zoe Strimpel and actor Eddie Marsan.

Following the online backlash to a recent photograph of Marcus Rashford, Jesse Lingard and the antisemite rapper Wiley spending time at a Dubai club together, which went viral earlier this week, Mr Rashford has distanced himself from the musician and has condemned Wiley’s antisemitic remarks, which provoked Wiley into yet another tantrum

In his tirade in 2020, Wiley likened Jews to the Ku Klux Klan and claimed that Jews had cheated him and were “snakes”, tweeted that Jews should “hold some corn” – a slang expression meaning that they should be shot – and added: “Jewish community you deserve it”. He also called on “black people” to go to “war” with Jews and repeatedly evoked conspiracy theories that Jews were responsible for the slave trade and were imposters who usurped black people — a conspiracy theory that has incited acts of terrorism against Jews in the United States.

In the days that followed, Wiley continued to rail against Jews on Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. Following discussions with Campaign Against Antisemitism, a major 48-hour boycott of Twitter and Instagram in which we participated, and our projection of antisemitic tweets onto Twitter’s London headquarters, which then went viral, Twitter, Facebook (which owns Instagram), Google (which owns YouTube) and TikTok agreed to remove Wiley from their platforms, depriving him of access to his nearly one million social media followers.

The image of the footballers was reportedly taken at Dubai’s V Hotel where Wiley was performing. 

Mr Rashford released an initial response on Twitter in which he said: “This picture has been brought to my attention which I understand now, given context, could easily be misconstrued. I would like to reinforce that I do not and will not condone discriminative language or behaviour of any kind aimed at the Jewish community or any other community.”

However, after disappointment at the mildness of his statement, he later clarified his comments by adding: “I wasn’t aware of comments that had been made when I got pulled into a photo opportunity. Comments that I absolutely condemn. I apologise for any upset caused. We just all happened to be in the same place at the same time.” 

Mr Linguard also tweeted a response, writing: “I’ve been made aware of a photo circulating currently, that can easily be misconstrued. I want to make it clear that I do not condone any form of racism whatsoever!”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We applaud Marcus Rashford for doing so much to fight racism, hence it was so disappointing to see him and Jesse Lingard hanging out with Wiley, who has called for Jews to ‘hold some corn’, which is a slang expression meaning that they should be shot. Mr Rashford, after an initial disappointing explanation, went on to condemn Wiley’s record of antisemitism, demonstrating his commitment to opposing all racism, for which we commend him.”

Wiley, despite promises of permanent suspensions from Twitter to Campaign Against Antisemitism, has repeatedly been able to create new accounts and spout racist hate towards Jews, even directly attacking Campaign Against Antisemitism. 

One such incident occurred in December when Wiley targeted a senior figure in Campaign Against Antisemitism directly, changing his profile picture to an image of this member of our team and tweeting a further picture of him. He then proceeded to taunt him in a series of tweets, including calling him a “coward” and then posting a video on Instagram taunting him.

The rapper, who recently released an album unsubtly titled “Anti-Systemic”, told our member on Instagram this morning: “Don’t hide” and “come outside”. Wiley has recently been charged with assault and robbery. We are in touch with the police over the taunts and are examining legal options.

In the days that followed, Campaign Against Antisemitism unearthed footage from the rapper’s Instagram Live in which he shouts to his audience: “Why did Hitler hate you? For nothing?”

Wiley’s most recent tirade, and subsequent suspension following action from Campaign Against Antisemitism, unfolded last night when he tweeted a series of YouTube videos that included the titles: “15 Reasons Why JEWISH People Are RICHER”, “Why did Hitler hate the Jews? Dr. Geoff Waddington” and “‘I’m here to separate the ‘good Jews’ from the ‘Satanic Jews’” – Louis Farrakhan”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms. We also continue to make representations to the Government on this matter.

Over 100 Buddhist leaders have signed a letter condemning antisemitism in the United States. 

The letter begins by addressing the recent Texas synagogue attack where terrorist and British national Malik Faisal Akram held four Jewish people hostage for eleven hours, before going on to acknowledge “the long standing, systemic antisemitism that is a poison to our lives in the United States of America and globally.”

“We vow to include antisemitism in our continuous work we are currently engaged in and call for a fresh and coordinated effort to dismantle racism and hatred of peoples at every level of our culture, society, government, our communities, and our own hearts,” the letter continues. “Everyone of us, what ever our faith is, should be able to practice without the fear of being bombed, set on fire, held hostage, or our places of practice vandalized with hate messages. We stand together.”

The signatories stated that they “strongly condemn acts of violence, hatred and bigotry of any kind,” adding: “We continue to see a disturbing rise of anti-Jewish hate erupt in communities around the world. These attacks are rooted in antisemitism, and we denounce antisemitism in any form, and in any context. As Buddhist practictioners, we must stand and safeguard the rights of all spiritual centers, especially attacks rooted in antisemitism and racism.”

The letter concluded with the signatories acknowledging that they “have not always been a refuge for Jewish people” before stating: “We renew our vows to untangle antisemitism’s roots and cultivate a tender, loving and respectful world. Antisemitism is painfully on the rise and we vow to be part of the healing. We will practice the humility that is essential to listening deeply, cultivating and acting with compassion as we build a truly beloved community.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Robert Rinder has written about “the tragic reality of being Jewish in London in 2022” in a new article, published yesterday.

In the article for the Evening Standard, the barrister and television personality has written about how antisemitic insults were hurled at his friend’s children whilst they were at a falafel restaurant in Golders Green, despite them not being Jewish.

Mr Rinder wrote: “But as she told me this awful story, I realised — with a profound sadness — that I was completely unsurprised. Because it’s happening to Jews all the time.”

“It’s completely shattering to think how the grimy tendrils of anti-Jewish hatred have spread over so many aspects of life in the UK, whether it’s being spat at or accosted in the street or any of the countless other acts of abuse,” he continued. “For example, many in the Jewish community send their children to Jewish schools, and I think it’d break your hearts to see the precautions they have to take.”

Mr Rinder went on to state that he believes that the vast majority of the people in the United Kingdom are appalled by anti-Jewish racism, “but this is the tragic reality of being Jewish in London in 2022. Not in some far off time or place, but right now and right here; in the greatest, most cosmopolitan city in the world.”

Mr Rinder called on people to “stand up to every instance of cruelty, big or small, because the descent into human depravity never begins with grand acts of violence, it starts with murmured insults and grows from there,” and added that “It’s the subtle way horror gets going — not with a bang or people screaming hate in broad daylight, with whispered comments everybody else tolerates.”

Robert Rinder has said in the past that he believes that there is an existential threat to Jews in Britain, but that he has “an enduring belief in the British public. That ultimately, for every one loud antisemite, there are hundreds, no, thousands of people that have the courage to stand up to it.”

In 2019, Mr Rinder spoke at the #TogetherAgainstAntisemitism rally in Parliament Square.

On the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism, Eyal Booker, a contestant on season four of the hit show Love Island, opened up about his personal experiences of antisemitism growing up.

Mr Booker said: “The start of my secondary school life was when I realised that antisemitism is very real and that because we wore a school uniform that identified us as going to a Jewish school, it sounds dramatic but we had a target on our back. 

“It was very obvious, and…and there were other kids from other schools that didn’t like that we were Jewish, didn’t like that we went to a Jewish school and would try and intimidate us…would, as you said, throw rocks and stones at our school bus.”

He went on to say: “They would wait for us as we got off the bus because we would get off in small groups and intimidate us and chase us home and that’s when…that’s when it got quite real because I can vividly remember, you know, running up that hill like my life depended on it because I didn’t know who was behind me or what was coming for me, and that was at a point that I realised that antisemitism is real and it exists and it is dangerous.”

The Love Island star went on to say that he had trauma from what he had experienced, revealing that it took time to recover: “Slowly but surely I realised that, ‘okay, not everyone wants to attack me and hates me’.”

Mr Booker also disclosed his thoughts on antisemitism today, saying: “I’m shocked that we still live in a world where hatred is fuelled by more hatred, and that, you know, we have to continuously ask people to stand in alliance with us and say ‘please, can you not see that this is wrong?’ We’re people like anyone else, why would you not just call out wrong and hatred behaviour when you see it? 

“Because we know wrong from right, we all do. We’re humans, we have morals, we have values. We can see when somebody is feeling uncomfortable, when there is aggressive body language or behaviour towards them. We can see when there is someone vulnerable, on their own or in a small group of young kids or girls or women that are being attacked, and it makes me feel sick that people would stand by and let that happen because they think, for some unknown reason, that we’re bad people or we’ve done something wrong, because we were born into a religion and a society and we’ve decided to grow up in that way.”

The full podcast with Mr Booker can be listened to here, or watched here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox. Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, The Sunday Telegraph columnist Zoe Strimpel and actor Eddie Marsan.

It has been revealed that the BBC did record a controversial debate about anti-Zionism even as the broadcaster assured the Jewish community that it was not planning to air one.

Rabbi Jonathan Romain, who was the first religious leader to speak out against Jeremy Corbyn after the 2019 General Election was called, has revealed that BBC Radio 4 recorded an inflammatory debate between him and the controversial blogger Robert Cohen over whether anti-Zionism should be a “protected characteristic”.

The debate was reportedly recorded on 7th January and was due to be broadcasted on 13th January. Although the BBC insisted, after outrage from the Jewish community, that “We are always exploring a range of possible topics but there’s no planned item about anti-Zionism on the Sunday programme,” Rabbi Romain revealed that, after the segment was recorded, producers told him that it would be broadcast as planned. It was later pulled.

Rabbi Romain said: “I was approached by the BBC on Friday morning to do an interview on the move to make anti-Zionism a protected philosophical belief.” He described the debate as “robust” and lasting “between seven and eight minutes,” during which he “forcefully made the point that Zionism originally meant the establishment of a Jewish homeland and ever since 1948 has meant the maintenance of a Jewish homeland, but it does not refer to particular borders. It is perfectly permissible to criticise particular Israeli policies, and half of all Israelis do, but if [Mr Cohen] and others are anti-Zionist, they are denying Israel’s very right to exist. What is more, given that every other people have that right, and he wishes Palestinians to have it too, then denying it just to Jews is exceptionalism and antisemitic.”

Rabbi Romain revealed: “Later that afternoon, I was phoned by the producer and told, very regretfully, that ‘someone higher up the chain’ had decided that as the application to make anti-Zionism protected was only a proposal and had not been initiated yet, the BBC would postpone the item until it was made.”

Prior to asking Mr Cohen to participate, the BBC intended to invite Diana Neslen, a member of the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, Jewish Voice for Labour.

On Sunday the BBC issued a second statement saying: “We are always exploring a range of possible topics but there was no item about anti-Zionism on the Sunday programme this weekend.”

The BBC has lately been embroiled in a host of controversies relating to antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

Despite media and FBI claims that the attack on Congregation Beth Israel in Texas was “not specifically related to the Jewish community,” the hostages taken by terrorist Malik Faisal Akram have confirmed that his motivation was in fact antisemitic.

The FBI’s claim, blindly repeated by the world’s media, had sparked fury in Jewish communities around the world. For example, the BBC led with the headline: “Texas synagogue hostage stand-off not related to Jewish community – FBI”

Speaking to CNN, Beth Israel community member Jeffrey Cohen recounted that 44-year-old Mr Akram, from Blackburn in Lancashire, UK, had imbibed antisemitic conspiracy theories to the extent that he believed Jews to be so powerful that if he wanted a criminal to be released from prison, all he had to do was to enter a synagogue and demand that local Jews exercise their political might to fulfil his request.

At one point Mr Cohen told how the terrorist, who was killed by the FBI, demanded to speak to the “Chief Rabbi”, however no such office exists in the United States, so they simply called a rabbi from another synagogue. Mr Akram was apparently utterly convinced that Jews and their rabbis wielded such immense power that they could overturn prison sentences by decree.

The account has been corroborated by others, forcing the FBI to backtrack and admit that far from being “not specifically related to the Jewish community,” the attack was in fact “a terrorism-related matter, in which the Jewish community was targeted”.

Mr Akram entered the synagogue during Sabbath services, making threats against the congregation and holding them hostage, demanding the release of Aafia Siddiqui, who is currently serving an 86-year prison sentence in Texas.

In comments that could be heard on a live stream of the synagogue service that was cut off during the incident, Mr Akram could be heard speaking in a northern English accent and claiming that he had a bomb and that he would not leave the synagogue alive.

In additional comments that suggest that the FBI did little of use during the attack, Rabbi Charlie Cytron-Walker told CBS Mornings that he and the two other hostages had escaped by hurling a chair at the attacker and running out of the building. Only once the hostages were free did the FBI enter the building and shoot Mr Akram dead. The account was corroborated in Mr Cohen’s CNN interview.

Previous reports had suggested that the FBI freed the hostages.

Two teenagers have now been arrested by the UK’s Counter Terrorism Policing North West.

The person who Mr Akram wanted freed in return for the safety of the hostages was being held in a Texan prison. Dr Siddiqui is convicted of two counts of attempted murder, armed assault, using and carrying a firearm, and three counts of assault on US officers and employees. Upon her conviction, raising her middle finger in court she shouted: “This is a verdict coming from Israel, not America. That’s where the anger belongs.” Dr Siddiqui had refused to work with a legal team provided to her by the Pakistani embassy on account of them being Jewish, and she had also demanded that jurors be subject to some sort of genetic testing to assess whether they were Jewish.

In a letter to former US President Obama, Dr Siddiqui wrote: “Study the history of the Jews. They have always back-stabbed everyone who has taken pity on them and made the ‘fatal’ error of giving them shelter…and it is this cruel, ungrateful back-stabbing of the Jews that has caused them to be mercilessly expelled from wherever they gain strength. This why ‘holocausts’ keep happening to them repeatedly! If they would only learn to be grateful and change their behaviour!”

A statement purportedly from Mr Akram’s brother claimed that Mr Akram had in fact released all of the hostages voluntarily before the authorities conducted their raid and killed him.

The statement added: “We would also like to add that any attack on any human being be it a Jew, Christian or Muslim etc is wrong and should always be condemned. It is absolutely inexcusable for a Muslim to attack a Jew or for any Jew to attack a Muslim, Christian, Hindu vice versa etc.”

The statement was published on a Facebook the “Blackburn Muslim Community” Facebook page which had to apologise for a post about Mr Akram’s death praying for “the Almighty” to “bless him with the highest ranks of Paradise”. The apology absurdly claimed that they had not been aware of the circumstances of Mr Akram’s death when posting the message, before the entire Facebook page was taken offline. Campaign Against Antisemitism is investigating who operates the “Blackburn Muslim Community” Facebook page and has alerted the authorities.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We join Jewish communities around the world in relief that Malik Faisal Akram’s attack on Congregation Beth Israel in Texas ended without physical injury to worshippers at the synagogue.

“The FBI’s claim during the attack that it ‘was not specifically related to the Jewish community’ has now been shown to be the opposite of reality. The FBI’s grasp of the nature of the attack and its role, if any, in securing the safety of the hostages will now be under considerable scrutiny. It is appalling how the FBI’s patently absurd analysis was blindly parroted by the world’s media.

“That the perpetrator came from the United Kingdom raises very serious questions for British authorities, including whether Mr Akram was encouraged or supported by local elements who may pose a continuing threat to the Jewish community or the wider public. This would appear to be supported by the fact that two teenagers have already been arrested by Counter Terrorism Policing North West. That a ‘Blackburn Muslim Community’ Facebook page purporting to represent the local Muslim community published a now-deleted post calling for ‘the Almighty’ to ‘bless him with the highest ranks of Paradise’ demands an urgent investigation. We are looking into who operates the page and have alerted local law enforcement.”

The Prime Minister has called for “swift” action by the BBC over its biased coverage of antisemitic Oxford Street incident.

A spokesperson for the Prime Minister confirmed that Boris Johnson agrees with Culture Secretary Nadine Dorries’ letter to BBC Director General Tim Davie urging the BBC urgently to get a grip on the issue.

Speaking to journalists on Wednesday, the spokesperson said that the Prime Minister “agrees with the Culture Secretary that the BBC should move forward swiftly to set out what action they plan to take. We look forward to that happening in good time.”

Ms Dorries wrote to Mr Davie explaining that the BBC’s outrageous coverage of the Oxford Street incident was “not only distressing for those involved but also the wider Jewish community.” Although she has no control over the BBC’s editorial decisions, she expressed dismay that the row had been allowed to “drag on for so long” and urged the BBC to “resolve the issue” as quickly as possible, otherwise Ofcom, the broadcaster regulator, should intervene.

Her intervention comes after Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to Ms Dorries and the BBC over the Corporation’s coverage of the antisemitic incident on Oxford Street, in which the BBC baselessly defamed the Jewish victims and suggested that they may have brought the attack upon themselves. The coverage prompted condemnation from Campaign Against Antisemitism and other communal groups, a rally outside Broadcasting House held by Campaign Against Antisemitism and attended by hundreds, and the resignation of a rabbi and long-time BBC broadcaster.

Ms Dorries wrote: “Whilst it would obviously be inappropriate for the Government to take a view on the details of the case, as the BBC is editorially and operationally independent, and responsibility for regulation sits with Ofcom, I would like to understand the actions the BBC has taken so far in response to the concerns raised by the Board of Deputies and how you intend to resolve the issue in a suitably timely manner.  You will know my concerns about the speed of the process which I asked officials to communicate to the BBC.

“It is crucial that the BBC can be properly held to account for the fulfilment of its Mission and Public Purposes as set out in the Charter, including through a fair and effective complaints process.  I expect the mid-term Charter to consider whether this is currently the case.”

The interventions come as the BBC has become embroiled in multiple other controversies relating to antisemitism. First, BBC Radio 4 was forced to pull a debate on whether anti-Zionism should be a protected characteristic, which was due to feature a member of the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, Jewish Voice for Labour.

Meanwhile, on its website, the BBC reported that a Labour Party councillor had been “suspended from the party over an offensive tweet about leader Keir Starmer” but studiously avoided mentioning that the tweet in question claimed that Sir Keir was following “commands from Israel”. After outrage, the BBC article was updated to incorporate the inflammatory language.

Then, yesterday, a presenter claimed on BBC 5 Live Breakfast that there is “absolutely no evidence” that Jeremy Corbyn is antisemitic, and belittled antisemitism in the Labour Party as mere “allegation”. Campaign Against Antisemitism is writing to the BBC on this issue.

These are just the latest scandals relating to antisemitism in which the BBC has become embroiled in just the past few weeks, and follow years of eroding confidence in the BBC on the part of the Jewish community.

Our Antisemitism Barometer last year revealed that two thirds of British Jews are deeply concerned by the BBC’s coverage of matters of Jewish concern, and 55% by its handling of antisemitism complaints.

The BBC’s coverage of the Oxford Street incident and our rally, which was endorsed by former BBC Chairman Lord Grade and actress Dame Maureen Lipman, has been discussed on previous episodes of our weekly podcast, Podcast Against Antisemitism. Episodes are available every Thursday and can be streamed here or downloaded wherever you get your podcasts.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

Campaign Against Antisemitism shall be writing to the BBC after a presenter claimed on BBC 5 Live Breakfast this morning that there is “absolutely no evidence” that Jeremy Corbyn is antisemitic.

Rachel Burden said towards the end of the programme, referring to her interview earlier with the businessman John Caudwell, who described the former Labour Party leader as “a Marxist and antisemite”, that she redirected him back to the topic under discussion but “I should have challenged him on the particular allegation of antisemite [sic] because there is absolutely no evidence that the leader of the Labour Party at that time, Jeremy Corbyn, was or is antisemitic. He had to deal with allegations of that within his party but there is nothing to suggest that he himself as an individual was. So I apologise for not challenging more directly, I should have done, and I want to emphasise there is no evidence for that at all.”

It would be understandable for Ms Burden to say that Mr Corbyn would dispute the characterisation, but it is unacceptable for her to editorialise and dismiss publicly-available evidence that has been reported in the national media for years.

Over two years ago, for example, Campaign Against Antisemitism published data, using a peer-reviewed research method, showing that Mr Corbyn was personally responsible for 24 incidents relating to antisemitism, which was equal to fifteen percent of all recorded incidents involving parliamentary candidates and party leaders in the lead-up to the 2019 General Election. That meant that, if Jeremy Corbyn were a political party, the ‘Jeremy Corbyn party’ would be responsible for almost four times more incidents than all the other major parties combined.

For Ms Burden to dismiss this evidence without basis represents both offence and inaccuracy under the BBC’s code.

Moreover, it is remarkable that Ms Burden would refer to the antisemitism in the Labour Party as mere “allegation” even though the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) reported that the allegations of racism against Jews in the Party were not only made out but were so bad as to have broken the law. Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant in the EHRC’s investigation.

The BBC is currently mired in scandal in connection with having referred to evident antisemitism in an antisemitic incident on Oxford Street also as mere “allegation”. The Culture Secretary has written to the Director General of the BBC over its coverage of the incident and the ensuing controversy, which remains live. Ms Dorries’ intervention came after Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to her and the BBC over the Corporation’s coverage, in which the BBC also baselessly defamed the Jewish victims and suggested that they may have brought the attack upon themselves. The coverage prompted condemnation from Campaign Against Antisemitism and other communal groups, a rally outside Broadcasting House held by Campaign Against Antisemitism and attended by hundreds, and the resignation of a rabbi and long-time BBC broadcaster.

Just in the past week, the BBC has also become embroiled in two further controversies relating to antisemitism. In one case, BBC Radio 4 was forced to pull a debate on whether anti-Zionism should be a protected characteristic, which was due to feature a member of the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, Jewish Voice for Labour.

Meanwhile, on its website, the BBC reported that a Labour Party councillor had been “suspended from the party over an offensive tweet about leader Keir Starmer” but studiously avoided mentioning that the tweet in question claimed that Sir Keir was following “commands from Israel”. After outrage, the BBC article was updated to incorporate the inflammatory language.

These are just the latest scandals relating to antisemitism in which the BBC has become embroiled in just the past few weeks, and follow years of eroding confidence in the BBC on the part of the Jewish community.

Our Antisemitism Barometer last year revealed that two thirds of British Jews are deeply concerned by the BBC’s coverage of matters of Jewish concern, and 55% by its handling of antisemitism complaints.

The BBC’s coverage of the Oxford Street incident and our rally, which was endorsed by former BBC Chairman Lord Grade and actress Dame Maureen Lipman, has been discussed on previous episodes of our weekly podcast, Podcast Against Antisemitism. Episodes are available every Thursday and can be streamed here or downloaded wherever you get your podcasts.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Over two years ago, we published data, using a peer-reviewed research method, showing that Jeremy Corbyn was personally responsible for 24 incidents relating to antisemitism. For Rachel Burden to editorialise and dismiss this evidence without basis represents both offence and inaccuracy under the BBC’s code. Moreover, it is obscene for her to belittle Labour’s antisemitism as mere ‘allegation’, even though the EHRC, following an investigation in which we were the complainant, found those allegations to be made out to such an extent that the Party was deemed to have broken the law. This is not the first time in the past few weeks that the BBC has reduced evident antisemitism to mere ‘allegation’, as it has done with the Oxford Street incident. As these controversies relating to antisemitism and the BBC grow in number, it is no wonder that the Jewish community has lost confidence in our public broadcaster.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

The Culture Secretary has written to the BBC’s Director General over the broadcaster’s coverage of the antisemitic Oxford Street incident, while the Corporation has become embroiled in two further scandals relating to antisemitism.

Nadine Dorries wrote to Tim Davie explaining that the BBC’s outrageous coverage of the Oxford Street incident was “not only distressing for those involved but also the wider Jewish community.” Although she has no control over the BBC’s editorial decisions, she expressed dismay that the row had been allowed to “drag on for so long” and urged the BBC to “resolve the issue” as quickly as possible, otherwise Ofcom, the broadcaster regulator, should intervene.

Her intervention comes after Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to Ms Dorries and the BBC over the Corporation’s coverage of the antisemitic incident on Oxford Street, in which the BBC baselessly defamed the Jewish victims and suggested that they may have brought the attack upon themselves. The coverage prompted condemnation from Campaign Against Antisemitism and other communal groups, a rally outside Broadcasting House held by Campaign Against Antisemitism and attended by hundreds, and the resignation of a rabbi and long-time BBC broadcaster.

Ms Dorries wrote: “Whilst it would obviously be inappropriate for the Government to take a view on the details of the case, as the BBC is editorially and operationally independent, and responsibility for regulation sits with Ofcom, I would like to understand the actions the BBC has taken so far in response to the concerns raised by the Board of Deputies and how you intend to resolve the issue in a suitably timely manner.  You will know my concerns about the speed of the process which I asked officials to communicate to the BBC.

“It is crucial that the BBC can be properly held to account for the fulfilment of its Mission and Public Purposes as set out in the Charter, including through a fair and effective complaints process.  I expect the mid-term Charter to consider whether this is currently the case.”

However, at the same time, the BBC has become embroiled in two further controversies relating to antisemitism. In one case, BBC Radio 4 was due to hold a debate on whether anti-Zionism should be a protected characteristic. The debate was due to feature Diana Neslen, a member of the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, Jewish Voice for Labour. After widespread condemnation from the Jewish community, the debate was pulled.

Meanwhile, on its website, the BBC reported that a Labour Party councillor had been “suspended from the party over an offensive tweet about leader Keir Starmer.” The article studiously avoided mentioning that the tweet in question claimed that Sir Keir was following “commands from Israel”. After outrage, the BBC article was updated to incorporate the inflammatory language.

These are just the latest scandals relating to antisemitism in which the BBC has become embroiled in just the past few weeks, and follow years of eroding confidence in the BBC on the part of the Jewish community.

Our Antisemitism Barometer last year revealed that two thirds of British Jews are deeply concerned by the BBC’s coverage of matters of Jewish concern, and 55% by its handling of antisemitism complaints.

The BBC’s coverage of the Oxford Street incident and our rally, which was endorsed by former BBC Chairman Lord Grade and actress Dame Maureen Lipman, has been discussed on previous episodes of our weekly podcast, Podcast Against Antisemitism. Episodes are available every Thursday and can be streamed here or downloaded wherever you get your podcasts.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

Rabbi YY Rubinstein has resigned from his role as a broadcaster for the BBC over the Corporation’s coverage of the antisemitic Oxford Street attack in November.

Rabbi Rubinstein, who had worked with the Corporation for 30 years, posted his letter of resignation on Facebook yesterday, in which he wrote that “The current crisis over antisemitism at the Corporation and its attempts to turn the victims of the recent antisemitic attack on Jewish children in London and claim that the victims were actually the perpetrators, was and is inexcusable.” He added: “The obfuscation, denial that followed, was and is utterly damning.”

Rabbi Rubinstein described his resignation as “a very sad moment”, before ending the post by writing: “I simply don’t see how I or in fact any Jew who has any pride in that name can be associated with the Corporation anymore.”

In its coverage of the Oxford Street incident, the BBC reported that the explicit expressions of antisemitism evident in footage of the incident were merely “allegations”, and simultaneously claimed — alone among all media outlets — that “some racial slurs about Muslims can also be heard from inside the bus,” an assertion made with no evidence to support it and which was even contradicted in the article by a witness from the bus who said that she heard no such slurs. On its BBC London Evening News, the BBC even suggested that “it’s not clear what role [the supposed slurs] may have had in the incident.” After public fury, the BBC amended the article to refer to an “anti-Muslim slur” in the singular, but failed to show any evidence why a supposed slur that nobody could hear with certainty was described as “clearly heard” and reported as fact — and even implied to have been a cause of the antisemitic harassment — while the harassment itself remained mere “allegation”.

Lord Grade, a former Chairman of the BBC, described the BBC’s reportage as “shoddy journalism” and called for answers in a video supporting the protest, while Dame Maureen Lipman encouraged people to attend “Because you care, and you will be demonstrating against my often-times employer asking for parity with other victims of racism, prejudice and abuse.” Lord Grade discussed the matter further on our podcast, Podcast Against Antisemitism.

Last month, in response to the coverage of the incident, hundreds of protestors attended Campaign Against Antisemitism’s “BBC News: Stop Blaming Jews!” rally outside Broadcasting House in London, which was endorsed by Lord Grade and Dame Maureen Lipman.

The rally came after the BBC failed to respond substantively to contact from Campaign Against Antisemitism and other Jewish organisations about its recent coverage, which is not out of the ordinary for the public broadcaster. Polling that we conducted last year for our Antisemitism Barometer revealed that two thirds of British Jews are deeply concerned by the BBC’s coverage of matters of Jewish concern, and 55% by its handling of antisemitism complaints. These figures reflect years of eroding confidence in the BBC on the part of the Jewish community.

We have submitted a complaint to the BBC and have also written to the Chairman and Director-General of the BBC to voice our concerns. In our letter, we called on the BBC to reveal their evidence that an anti-Muslim slur can be heard on the bus and explain why the claim that an anti-Muslim slur can be heard is asserted as fact (despite nobody else being able to discern such a slur) while the evident antisemitism is caveated as mere allegation.

We also reiterated our call for the BBC to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism and once again offered to provide the Corporation with training in how to identify and deal with antisemitism, which will go some way to restoring what little remains of the confidence of the Jewish community in our nation’s public service broadcaster.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Rabbi Rubinstein’s courageous and principled decision to resign as a broadcaster at the BBC is just the latest sign of the collapse in the Jewish community’s confidence in the Corporation. No self-respecting Jewish person wants to be publicly associated with the BBC after it yet again demonstrated its bias against Jews in its recent reportage of an antisemitic incident on Oxford Street in Central London.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

A Muslim media analyst who advises the BBC on coverage of Islam has reportedly apologised for sharing an extract from a book by the antisemite Gilad Atzmon.

Faisal Hanif, who words at the Centre for Media Monitoring, which is affiliated to the Muslim Council of Britain and has advised the BBC on its coverage of Islam, shared an extract from Mr Atzmon’s book, Being in Time, which has been described as “profoundly antisemitic”. The extract itself did not contain antisemitic passages.

Mr Hanif apologised for sharing the post, admitting that it was an error “both professionally and personally to fail to check Mr Atzmon’s wider views.”

He said: “I stand opposed to all forms of racism including antisemitism and Islamophobia. I came across a blog post by Gilad Atzmon which was clearly not antisemitic and was comparing right and left ideology when I was researching the corrosive impact of the far right. While I took the blog post at face value at the time, I was unaware that Gilad Atzmon himself was profoundly antisemitic.”

Mr Atzmon is an antisemite who has reportedly blamed the Grenfell Tower tragedy on “Jerusalemites” as well as reportedly telling university students that “the Jews were expelled from Germany for misbehaving.” He is not shy about his antisemitism, telling a Jewish Twitter user in 2014: “I am not a Jew any more. I indeed despise the Jew in me (whatever is left). I absolutely detest the Jew in you.”

At one stage, Mr Atzmon was forced to make a humiliating apology to Campaign Against Antisemitism following defamation proceedings, and Campaign Against Antisemitism has successfully pressured venues not to feature Mr Atzmon due to his record of antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has launched a new weekly podcast. New episodes of Podcast Against Antisemitism are available every Thursday and can be streamed here or downloaded wherever you get your podcasts.

The controversial columnist Yasmin Alibhai-Brown has once again overstepped the line, arguing in an article that “any criticism of the state [of Israel] is deemed antisemitic by apologists and diehard allies, and suggesting that this is motivating a “purge” of Labour Party members.

In the article titled “The UN is warning of spiralling violence, yet the West has forgotten the Palestinians” for the i newspaper, Ms Alibhai-Brown also wrote that “a report from Jewish Voice for Labour accused Sir Keir Starmer’s Labour Party of purging Jewish members who call Israel to account.”

This is a fine example of the ‘Livingstone Formulation’, by which allegations of antisemitism are dismissed as malevolent and baseless attempts to silence criticism of Israel. In its report on antisemitism in the Labour Party, the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) found that suggestions of this nature were part of the unlawful victimisation of Jewish people in the Party.

This is not Ms Alibhai-Brown’s first offence of this nature. Last year, she replied to journalist Stephen Bush’s reaction to being appointed to lead a Jewish charity’s review of racial inclusivity in the Jewish community by tweeting:“maybe ask them about the Palestinians.” The review was concerned with British Jews and was unrelated to Israel, a distinction that Ms Alibhai-Brown is apparently incapable of apprehending.

Previously Ms Alibhai-Brown also expressed her opposition to the Labour Party’s adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitismdescribing the fringe minority of Jewish individuals who agreed with her as “good Jews”.

Newspapers and television broadcasters who host Ms Alibhai-Brown must think again before giving a platform to someone who takes such positions.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

The journalist India Willoughby has doubled down on inflammatory Nazi and Holocaust analogies.

Ms Willoughby tweeted earlier this month that “If Liz Truss replaces Boris [Johnson], it will be like Hitler coming to power. We’re f*****.”

After receiving criticism for hyperbolically and needlessly invoking the Nazis, she doubled down, tweeting: “Excuse me? I think you’ll find the Nazis hated trans people. They burnt down the world’s leading trans research institute and made us wear pink triangles before being sent to the camps.” Ms Willoughby is transgender. She appears to have since deleted this tweet.

This is not the first time that the commentator and former BBC journalist has made inflammatory analogies to Nazi Germany. In 2020, she tweeted that she “[does not] like invoking the Nazis, but for trans people, this is like being Jewish in Germany at that time.”

Current policies in the UK are not remotely like those of Nazi Germany, which forcibly transferred minority communities to concentration camps and murdered six million Jewish men, women and children. It must be possible to have reasonable political debate in Britain without invoking the Nazis and, in the process, effectively diminishing the Holocaust.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has launched a new weekly podcast. New episodes of Podcast Against Antisemitism are available every Thursday and can be streamed here or downloaded wherever you get your podcasts.

In a recent documentary intended to shine a light on British antisemitism, the BBC chose to interview Mohammed Hijab, a YouTuber who proudly filmed himself harassing members of the Jewish community in Golders Green over “child-killing” for a YouTube video.

The premise of the YouTube video in question, released in May, was initially outlined by one of the presenters as them just wanting to “have a dialogue…a discussion…a friendly debate,” but quickly became an excuse for the presenters to accost passing members of the Jewish community, including children.

This involved one of the presenters, Ali Dawah, confronting Jewish passers-by with a microphone and asking: “Do you agree with what’s happening [in Israel]?” Mr Dawah is also seen following and questioning a group of Jewish men and their children who are walking away from him.

When the YouTubers saw that Jews were crossing the street in order to avoid a confrontation, another one of the presenters, known as Smile2Jannah, commented: “The thing is, if somebody is being butchered in this way, the least you should be able to do is have a conversation. Provide your view. I mean, why would you cross the road and not be willing to engage?”

His co-host, Mohammed Hijab, then instructed the cameraperson to film them crossing the road, before Smile2Jannah said: “They should understand, they should realise that people want answers. People want to know your opinion, so go on record. Give your opinions. Discuss, debate.”

The YouTubers also brought with them an LED billboard, upon which they displayed images of Jewish Holocaust victims in a concentration camp. Next to the images were the words: “Did we learn nothing from the Holocaust?” The images were then proceeded by photos from the conflict between Israel and Gaza.

Standing in front of the billboard, Mr Hijab went on to say that “as Muslims”, they “have no problem with Jews, per-se,” before pressuring them to “reveal their viewpoints.” Shouting at a Jewish man who was walking away, Mr Hijab yelled: “Do you condemn the killing of children? Do you condemn it? Do you condemn it? See, look at you. The silence is deafening.”

In an outtake from that video, uploaded to Mr Hijab’s own YouTube channel, Mr Hijab is seen acting aggressively towards another Jewish man off-camera, yelling: “You need to go back to the Torah. That’s what I tell you all. Go back to the Torah, read it from the beginning again.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is astonishing that the BBC has tried to portray this man as some kind of champion of coexistence. During the period of peak racism against Jews in this country in the spring, Mohammed Hijab spent a Shabbat harassing Jews in Golders Green, trying to hold British Jews responsible for the politics of the Middle East and comparing Israel to Nazi Germany, both breaches of the International Definition of Antisemitism. In effect, the BBC has presented a documentary about ‘both sides’ of antisemitism, interviewing not only victims and experts, but also purveyors. It is shameful, but par for the course for an institution that has long ago set its face against the Jewish community.”

A BBC spokesperson said: “The programme was a serious examination of the nature and impact of antisemitism on British Jews and included interviews with a range of people in the UK. We reject any suggestion that it presented anyone as a ‘champion’. The reporter challenged the contributor throughout the interview on his past actions in a robust manner.

“As our editorial guidelines make clear, a serious examination of any issue can mean our output includes people whose views may cause offence to our audiences.”

Recently, the BBC also used footage of a Jewish Chanukiah to illustrate a controversy about a Christmas party at 10 Downing Street.

Last night, hundreds of protestors attended Campaign Against Antisemitism’s “BBC News: Stop Blaming Jews!” rally outside Broadcasting House in London, which was endorsed by Lord Grade and Dame Maureen Lipman.

The rally was prompted by the BBC’s appalling coverage of an antisemitic incident on Oxford Street over Chanukah, when a group of Jewish teenagers celebrating the festival were accosted by racist thugs who forced them back onto their bus and began hitting the vehicle with their hands and then their shoes, spitting on it, trying to break windows and performing Nazi salutes, as well as shouting antisemitic insults and swearing.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has launched a new weekly podcast. New episodes of Podcast Against Antisemitism are available every Thursday and can be streamed here or downloaded wherever you get your podcasts. 

This evening, hundreds of protestors attended our “BBC News: Stop Blaming Jews!” rally outside Broadcasting House in London, which was endorsed by Lord Grade and Dame Maureen Lipman.

The rally was prompted by the BBC’s appalling coverage of an antisemitic incident on Oxford Street over Chanukah, when a group of Jewish teenagers celebrating the festival were accosted by racist thugs who forced them back onto their bus and began hitting the vehicle with their hands and then their shoes, spitting on it, trying to break windows and performing Nazi salutes, as well as shouting antisemitic insults and swearing.

The BBC reported on its website that the explicit expressions of antisemitism evident in the video were merely “allegations”, and simultaneously claimed — alone among all media outlets — that “some racial slurs about Muslims can also be heard from inside the bus,” an assertion made with no evidence to support it and which was even contradicted in the article by a witness from the bus who said that she heard no such slurs. On its BBC London Evening News, the BBC even suggested that “it’s not clear what role [the supposed slurs] may have had in the incident.” After public fury, the BBC amended the article to refer to an “anti-Muslim slur” in the singular, but failed to show any evidence why a supposed slur that nobody could hear with certainty was described as “clearly heard” and reported as fact — and even implied to have been a cause of the antisemitic harassment — while the harassment itself remained mere “allegation”.

Lord Grade, a former Chairman of the BBC, described the BBC’s rapportage as “shoddy journalism” and called for answers in a video supporting the protest, while Dame Maureen Lipman encouraged people to attend “Because you care, and you will be demonstrating against my often-times employer asking for parity with other victims of racism, prejudice and abuse.”

At the rally, Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said to the crowd: “We don’t want to be here, but we have to be here, because we have to say: ‘BBC News, stop blaming Jews’.” He added: “We see no evidence for the BBC’s claim, which is a distraction from the real story, which is that Jewish teenagers were prevented by racist thugs from celebrating Chanukah.”

The founder of Muslims Against Antisemitism, Fiyaz Mughal OBE, observed that “It’s sad we have to come out here again, when Jews are blamed by institutions that we think we should have trust in.”

The crowd demanded: “BBC News where’s the proof! BBC News tell the truth!”

The rally came after the BBC failed to respond substantively to contact from Campaign Against Antisemitism and other Jewish organisations about its recent coverage, which is not out of the ordinary for the public broadcaster. Polling that we conducted last year for our Antisemitism Barometer revealed that two thirds of British Jews are deeply concerned by the BBC’s coverage of matters of Jewish concern, and 55% by its handling of antisemitism complaints. These figures reflect years of eroding confidence in the BBC on the part of the Jewish community.

We have submitted a complaint to the BBC and have also written to the Chairman and Director-General of the BBC to voice our concerns. In our letter, we called on the BBC to reveal their evidence that an anti-Muslim slur can be heard on the bus and explain why the claim that an anti-Muslim slur can be heard is asserted as fact (despite nobody else being able to discern such a slur) while the evident antisemitism is caveated as mere allegation.

We also reiterated our call for the BBC to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism and once again offered to provide the Corporation with training in how to identify and deal with antisemitism, which will go some way to restoring what little remains of the confidence of the Jewish community in our nation’s public service broadcaster.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Tonight’s rally sends a message to the BBC that the Jewish community has had enough of years of the BBC victim-blaming Jewish people for antisemitism, downplaying racism towards Jews, platforming antisemites and fuelling antisemitism in Britain. We demand explanations over the BBC’s outrageous coverage of the recent antisemitic incident on Oxford Street, when the BBC’s reports victim-blamed Jewish teenagers for being attacked. We also call on the BBC to finally adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism and accept antisemitism training from us for its staff and reporters.”

We will be discussing the incident and the rally further in our podcast this Thursday, which will also feature a full interview with Lord Grade.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

Image credit: Nathan Lilienfeld

Campaign Against Antisemitism has come to understand that the police who were tasked with investigating the antisemitic attack on Jewish teenagers celebrating Chanukah on Oxford Street have found no evidence of BBC London News’ supposedly “clear” anti-Muslim slur from the victims.

The attack occurred on a bus that travelled down Oxford Street on 30th November carrying a group of visibly Jewish teenagers celebrating the Jewish festival of Chanukah. Videos taken by passengers on the bus appeared to show a group of men hitting the vehicle with their hands and then their shoes, spitting on it, trying to break windows and performing Nazi salutes, as well as shouting antisemitic insults and swearing. Further footage was published showing that the teenage passengers had been dancing in the street before being accosted and forced back onto the private bus.

Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to the BBC last week demanding explanations over its outrageous coverage of the antisemitic incident on Oxford Street.

Originally, the BBC reported on its website that the explicit expressions of antisemitism evident in the video were merely “allegations”, but the BBC simultaneously claimed — alone among all media outlets — that “some racial slurs about Muslims can also be heard from inside the bus,” an assertion made with no evidence to support it and which was even contradicted in the article by a witness from the bus who said that she heard no such slurs. On its BBC London Evening News, the BBC even suggested that “it’s not clear what role [the supposed slurs] may have had in the incident.” The BBC appears to have fed this unsubstantiated claim to the Met, which assured the Corporation that the incident will be looked at “in its entirety.”

The public reacted to the article with fury, with nobody able to identify any “anti-Muslim slurs” in the audio accompanying the video. Despite justifiable calls for the BBC to release the evidence for its assertion, it has failed to do so, instead merely amending the article to refer to an “anti-Muslim slur” in the singular. A BBC spokesperson stated that: “The audio appears to show that a slur can be heard coming from the bus. We have changed our story to clarify only one such slur can be heard clearly.”

Still, however, nobody is able to discern any slur — let alone being able to hear one “clearly”, as the BBC has insisted — and no evidence has been provided. Moreover, the alleged slur is still reported as fact while the obvious antisemitism remains a mere “allegation”.

In our letter, we also noted polling that we conducted last year, in our Antisemitism Barometer, which revealed that two thirds of British Jews are deeply concerned by the BBC’s coverage of matters of Jewish concern, and 55% by its handling of antisemitism complaints. In view of these figures, we trust that you will take these concerns seriously.

We have called on the BBC to reveal its evidence that an anti-Muslim slur can be heard on the bus and explain why the claim that an anti-Muslim slur can be heard is asserted as fact (despite nobody else being able to discern such a slur) while the evident antisemitism is caveated as mere allegation.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We understand that police investigating the antisemitic attack on Jewish teenagers celebrating Chanukah on Oxford Street have found no evidence of the supposed ‘anti-Muslim slur’ from the victims that BBC London has said could be ‘clearly heard’, and now that part of their investigation has been closed down. The BBC must immediately release whatever evidence they have based their reporting on or apologise fulsomely and publicly.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism is holding a “BBC News: Stop Blaming Jews!” protest outside the BBC’s headquarters at Broadcasting House tonight at 18:30. 

A BBC Arabic journalist has reportedly praised an activist who once created and shared a video that asked “How true is the #Holocaust and how did the Zionists benefit from it?”

Activist Muna Hawwa was suspended by Al Jazeera after she created and shared a video that asked, “How true is the #Holocaust and how did the Zionists benefit from it?”

Ms Hawwa was also reportedly suspended from Twitter. Upon her return to the platform, BBC Arabic journalist Layla Bashar al-Kloub allegedly tweeted in May: “My dear Muna…there was a great victory for you, yourself specifically, the victory of the free word, and the victory of exquisite journalism, you have proved everybody you are capable of confronting large institutions by yourself, may Allah strengthen you.”

It was also said that in November 2016, Ms al-Kloub tweeted: “The Zionist entity does not recognize any international law or agreement, their entire [legal] proceedings are infringements of human rights treaties. They are the terrorists, not us.” The tweet has since been deleted.

On Wednesday, Campaign Against Antisemitism announced a “BBC News: Stop Blaming Jews!” protest outside the BBC’s headquarters at Broadcasting House this Monday 13th December.

We are demanding explanations over the BBC’s outrageous coverage of the recent antisemitic incident on Oxford Street during the Jewish festival of Chanukah, when the BBC’s reports victim-blamed Jewish teenagers for being attacked.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected]

Campaign Against Antisemitism has launched a new weekly podcast. New episodes of Podcast Against Antisemitism are available every Thursday and can be streamed here or downloaded wherever you get your podcasts. 

Image credit: The JC via Twitter

Campaign Against Antisemitism has announced a “BBC News: Stop Blaming Jews!” protest outside the BBC’s headquarters at Broadcasting House this Monday 13th December.

We are demanding explanations over the BBC’s outrageous coverage of the recent antisemitic incident on Oxford Street during the Jewish festival of Chanukah, when the BBC’s reports victim-blamed Jewish teenagers for being attacked.

This incident is one of many in which the BBC has victim-blamed Jewish people for antisemitism, downplayed racism towards Jews, platformed antisemites and fuelled antisemitism in Britain.

This bias against Jews has not gone unnoticed. Polling conducted last year for our Antisemitism Barometer revealed that two thirds of British Jews are deeply concerned by the BBC’s coverage of matters of Jewish concern, and 55% by its handling of antisemitism complaints.

The BBC must provide explanations for its recent coverage, adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism and finally take up our offers of antisemitism training for its staff and reporters.

Join us on Monday so that the outrage of decent people can be heard.

To attend the protest, please register at antisemitism.org/bbc.

We will also be discussing the Oxford Street incident on tomorrow’s episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism. The episode can be streamed here tomorrow or downloaded wherever you get your podcasts.

A German news broadcaster has suspended cooperation with a Jordanian television station following the discovery of antisemitic comments and caricatures posted on the channel’s social media network.

Deutsche Welle announced the suspension following reports in Vice magazine about the Jordanian TV channel, Roya TV.

Deutsche Welle’s Guido Baumhauer apologised for their failure to “notice these disgusting images” and said that the broadcaster would now have to “re-evaluate the cooperation” with Roya TV.

He added that some content disseminated on the station’s social media channels was not compatible with Deutsche Welle’s values and they would now “review our selection of partners even more critically,” particularly with regard to antisemitism.

Deutsche Welle said it had originally selected Roya TV for partnership because of the Jordanian station’s promotion of gender equality, the rights of minorities in Jordan and media literacy among young people. 

Deutsche Welle has a “legal mandate to bring German and European perspectives into the international discourse,” a spokesperson added, and had “established an active dialogue with media partners in many countries.”

Deutsche Welle is also currently investigating allegations of antisemitism against several employees in its own Arabic editorial department as well as freelance journalists abroad.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

Channel 4 has appointed to its board a figure who defended Jeremy Corbyn over antisemitism allegations.

Tess Alps, a former chairman of the TV advertising industry body ThinkBox and member of the Labour Party, has been made a non-executive director of the channel.

When the Labour Party under Mr Corbyn was accused of racism towards Jews – allegations that were confirmed by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) following an investigation in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant – Ms Alps defended Mr Corbyn.

In 2019, Ms Alps reportedly said, in connection with Labour antisemitism,: “I would be only too happy to change my mind if I saw proper evidence. Being pro-Palestinian rights or anti current Israeli government practice is not the same thing at all. I feel the hurt of my many Jewish friends, some of whom have been subject to shocking abuse, but…”

She then apparently asked her interlocutor on Twitter to send her a direct message so that they could continue the exchange privately.

Her appointment, which is controversial for other comments that she has made as well, comes at a sensitive time for the channel, as the Government considers the possibility of privatising it.

Ms Alps reportedly said in a statement that she always supports the leader of the Labour Party and claimed that Mr Corbyn “didn’t stop some of the terrible things that might have happened, but that is not the same as being the author of them.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

Campaign Against Antisemitism has launched a new weekly podcast. New episodes of Podcast Against Antisemitism are available every Thursday and can be streamed here or downloaded wherever you get your podcasts.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to the BBC demanding explanations over its outrageous coverage of the antisemitic incident on Oxford Street last week.

The Metropolitan Police Service is investigating as a hate crime an attack on a bus that travelled down Oxford Street on 30th November carrying a group of visibly Jewish teenagers celebrating the Jewish festival of Chanukah. Videos taken by passengers on the bus appeared to show a group of men hitting the vehicle with their hands and then their shoes, spitting on it, trying to break windows and performing Nazi salutes, as well as shouting antisemitic insults and swearing. Further footage was published showing that the teenage passengers had been dancing in the street before being accosted and forced back onto the private bus.

Originally, the BBC reported on its website that the explicit expressions of antisemitism evident in the video were merely “allegations”, but the BBC simultaneously claimed — alone among all media outlets — that “some racial slurs about Muslims can also be heard from inside the bus,” an assertion made with no evidence to support it and which was even contradicted in the article by a witness from the bus who said that she heard no such slurs. On its BBC London Evening News, the BBC even suggested that “it’s not clear what role [the supposed slurs] may have had in the incident.” The BBC appears to have fed this unsubstantiated claim to the Met, which assured the Corporation that the incident will be looked at “in its entirety.”

The public reacted to the article with fury, with nobody able to identify any “anti-Muslim slurs” in the audio accompanying the video. Despite justifiable calls for the BBC to release the evidence for its assertion, it has failed to do so, instead merely amending the article to refer to an “anti-Muslim slur” in the singular. A BBC spokesperson stated that: “The audio appears to show that a slur can be heard coming from the bus. We have changed our story to clarify only one such slur can be heard clearly.”

Still, however, nobody is able to discern any slur — let alone being able to hear one “clearly”, as the BBC has insisted — and no evidence has been provided. Moreover, the alleged slur is still reported as fact while the obvious antisemitism remains a mere “allegation”.

In our letter, we also noted polling that we conducted last year, in our Antisemitism Barometer, which revealed that two thirds of British Jews are deeply concerned by the BBC’s coverage of matters of Jewish concern, and 55% by its handling of antisemitism complaints. In view of these figures, we trust that you will take these concerns seriously.

We have called on the BBC to reveal its evidence that an anti-Muslim slur can be heard on the bus and explain why the claim that an anti-Muslim slur can be heard is asserted as fact (despite nobody else being able to discern such a slur) while the evident antisemitism is caveated as mere allegation.

We have also once again called on the BBC to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism, and have again offered antisemitism training, as previous offers to the former Director-General, Lord Hall, were repeatedly rebuffed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

Campaign Against Antisemitism has launched a new weekly podcast. New episodes of Podcast Against Antisemitism are available every Thursday and can be streamed here or downloaded wherever you get your podcasts.

German media company Deutsche Welle has suspended four employees and one freelancer amid its investigation that was launched this week after accusations of antisemitism were made against it.

The accusations come from a report by the Süddeutsche Zeitung, a German newspaper, which alleges that several members of Deutsche Welle’s Arabic editorial team made antisemitic comments.

One example mentioned states that an editor was said to have called the Holocaust an “artificial product” on Facebook, reportedly adding that Jews would continue to control “people’s brains through art, media, and music.”

Another reported remark said that “everyone involved with the Israelis is a collaborator and every recruit in the ranks of their army is a traitor and must be executed.”

Deutsche Welle’s investigation is allegedly being carried out by former German Justice Minister Sabine Leutheusser-Schnarrenberger and psychologist Ahmad Mansour. The media company said that the staffers would remain suspended until the investigation was complete and that it would “immediately draw the necessary consequences” once it has concluded.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has launched a new weekly podcast. New episodes of Podcast Against Antisemitism are available every Thursday and can be streamed here or downloaded wherever you get your podcasts.

German media company Deutsche Welle is launching an investigation after accusations of antisemitism have been made against it.

The accusations come from a report by the Süddeutsche Zeitung, a German newspaper, which alleges that several members of Deutsche Welle’s Arabic editorial team made antisemitic comments.

One example mentioned states that an editor was said to have called the Holocaust an “artificial product” on Facebook, reportedly adding that Jews would continue to control “people’s brains through art, media, and music.”

Another reported remark said that “everyone involved with the Israelis is a collaborator and every recruit in the ranks of their army is a traitor and must be executed.”

Deutsche Welle now plans to launch a full, independent investigation, stating: “On the orders of the Intendant, Deutsche Welle will immediately commission an independent external investigation.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has launched a new weekly podcast. New episodes of Podcast Against Antisemitism are available every Thursday and can be streamed here or downloaded wherever you get your podcasts.

The Metro has apologised today after Campaign Against Antisemitism and others called out the newspaper for printing a letter yesterday telling readers that racism against Jews matters less if it comes from a member of another minority.

The letter, from “Vytautus” in Sheffield, claimed that “Racism is [exclusively] an attempt by a ‘privileged’ majority to undermine the destiny of a minority individual or group – it can only be applied by the privileged. What we term ‘racism’ by minorities is not racism but ‘prejudice’, as the minority cannot affect the destiny of the privileged majority.”

The letter went on to describe the cricketer Azeem Rafiq’s past antisemitic comments as “prejudicial” but insisted that they were not “racist”, because Mr Rafiq is from a minority community.

As to whether Mr Rafiq’s comments could not be racist also because they targeted Jews, the letter was ambiguous.

Campaign Against Antisemitism and others called out the newspaper for printing a “dangerously irresponsible” letter.

Metro’s editor, Ted Young, tweeted in response to complaints: “The MetroTalk page is carefully edited with all sorts of views coming in from around the country Nicole. Our readers always challenge views that are clearly wrong in the cut and thrust of debate. But In hindsight this should not have made the page. Apologies.”

Mr Young promised an apology in today’s edition, which was duly printed: “Yesterday, we published a letter that argued remarks about Jewish people from cricketer Azeem Rafiq did not amount to racism. The MetroTalk page is carefully edited with all sorts of views coming in from around the country. Our readers always challenge views that are clearly wrong in the cut and thrust of debate. But in hindsight the letter should not have made the page. Apologies.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

A BBC presenter has been accused of repeatedly comparing Israel to Nazis and calling for “Death to you Zionist scum.”

According to media watchdog HonestReporting, Nasima Begum, an occasional presenter for BBC Radio Manchester, reportedly tweeted “whats sad is that the Jewish population faced genocide themselves in Hitlers Germany but theyve implemented the same on Palestine for years [sic]” in 2011. The following year, she tweeted: “exiling a people from their own land justifies anything. It’s the holocaust all over again except this time it’s innocent Palestinians and ironically the perpetrators are you Zionist scum.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

In another 2012 tweet, she called for “Death to you Zionist scum.”

While these tweets date from some years ago, her habit of inflammatory utterances on social media has persisted. Earlier this year, for example, Ms Begum allegedly claimed that Zionists have a “hold on mainstream media.” Ms Begum also claimed this year that for similar reasons she attended a rally against the BBC – her own employer – and praised the controversial rapper Lowkey.

She has also reportedly posted other shocking remarks, such as questioning the very idea that any Israelis can be “innocent” and saying: “I swear Israel is just the most vile ever thing to exist.”

Ms Begum recently tweeted a long apology, writing that “I am deeply apologetic for any harm or offence that I have caused with my ignorant language,” referencing the “tweets from over a decade ago” but not her more recent remarks.

She further claimed that the old tweets “do not reflect my views and are not a reflection of whom I am as a person – now nor at the time that they were written. However, I take full responsibility for the utterly reprehensible and unacceptable language that I used at a time when I was driven by what I felt and considered to be the lack of fair reporting in the wider media.”

The statement went on, eventually concluding with the “hope that my apology is accepted and that my character shines through however I understand and appreciate that it may take time to heal the wounds of those that I have hurt and I do not expect anyone to forgive me. But I do want all those affected to know that this apology is sincere.”

Mr Begum’s record – coming, moreover, from someone who tweets from the handle “viva viva falesteena” – raise serious questions about the BBC’s vetting and impartiality.

Earlier this year, Tala Halawa was fired by the BBC over numerous antisemitic comments she had made on social media.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

Concern has been raised after a Chinese state-run news outlet proposed a “final solution to the Taiwan question”.

The term was used on Twitter by Global News, which is self-described as “China’s national English language newspaper”. It said: “The CPC’s warning against secessionism is not just talking the talk, and whether the final solution of Taiwan question will be peaceful or not, the secessionists will be judged, condemned and punished.”

Frank Müller-Rosentritt, a member of the German Parliament and its Committee on Foreign Affairs, compared the terminology to Nazi propaganda. The Final Solution (Die Endloesung), or the Final Solution of the Jewish Problem, is the name given by the Nazis to their programme to exterminate six million Jews during the Holocaust.

Mr Müller-Rosentritt said: “If a Chinese propaganda medium operates with historically loaded terms, then all alarm bells should ring for us against the background of our history.”

One Twitter user replied to the article by saying: “As a German living in Taiwan I never ever want to hear anyone talking about a ‘final solution’. This is disgraceful.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Belarus state television has described a murdered Jewish dissident as “a cosmopolitan enjoying state benefits to fatten himself up and live in two countries, to make money here and spend it there.”

Andrei Zelzer, a 31-year-old programmer, was shot dead by security forces during a raid at his home in Minsk as part of a crackdown against dissidents by the Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko.

Plainclothes personnel from the State Security Committee of the Republic of Belarus reportedly entered Mr Zelzer’s home with orders to arrest him. According to the Government, Mr Zelzer killed one of them during the raid.

Ryhor Azaronak, a news anchor on STV, a state television channel, then described Mr Zelzer using tropes reminiscent of antisemitic Soviet propaganda, claiming also that Mr Zelzer was American. It is understood that no new outlet has confirmed this dubious claim about his nationality, although Mr Zelzer did work for a US-based information technology company founded by a Belarusian Jew who now lives in the United States.

During the monologue, Mr Azaronak reportedly employed a stereotypical accent of Yiddish-speaking Soviet Jews.

It is believed that there are about 9,500 Jews in Belarus.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Tortoise news website has apologised after publishing a cartoon on social media showing Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg as a parasite controlling the world.

The cartoon reportedly referenced a story about a Facebook whistleblower who testified in the United States Senate last week, and was shared to Tortoise’s 19,000 followers on Instagram.

The cartoon, which showed Mr Zuckerberg as a parasite with octopus-like tentacles engulfing the planet, was captioned: “This parasite can now be found the world over! It is ever mutating to control more and more of our cognitive functions.”

Tortoise media, which was launched in 2019 by former BBC News director James Harding, describes itself as “slower, wiser news without all the noise.”

“We fully accept that the cartoons should not have appeared and apologise for the hurt they have caused. We are removing them immediately from the Tortoise website and social media,” Tortoise said in a statement, adding that the website recognised the “unintended echoes of antisemitic visual tropes” in the image.

The cartoonist, Edith Pritchett, also apologised, saying that it had not occurred to her that the cartoon could have caused offence in that way, but that “it should have done and I am extremely sorry to have caused such hurt.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “This appalling cartoon plays into age-old antisemitic tropes of parasitism, global power and media control. We welcome Tortoise’s prompt removal of the cartoon and apology, but the real question is how a media organisation led by some of the country’s leading journalists could design and approve such an image. The publication of this cartoon demonstrates that insensitivity and ignorance about the mutations and manifestations of antisemitism remain rampant in the media industry and how much more work there is to do to educate the most influential people in our society.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

In a fawning obituary, The Guardian has omitted the antisemitic beliefs of self-avowed antisemite, Mikis Theodorakis.

Mr Theodorakis, the Greek composer known for writing the scores to Zobra the Greek and Serpico, said on television in 2011 that he was “anti-Israel and antisemitic.” He also said that “everything that happens today in the world has to do with the Zionists” and that “American Jews are behind the world economic crisis that has hit Greece also.” It was reported that in November 2003, he branded Jews “the root of evil” and in 2004, it was alleged that he claimed that Jews owned the world’s banks and media. Mr Theodorakis allegedly later apologised for these comments.

While The Guardian does not mention his self-reported hatred for Jews in its obituary of nearly 2000 words, it does describe his politics as “firebrand” that may have been “naïve”. The article also states that “he was criticised for his politics, his music, his private life,” but leaves out specifically Mr Theodorakis’ perpetuation of antisemitic conspiracy theories. The Times also produced an obituary but included the composer’s record of antisemitism.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Mikis Theodorakis was a self-described antisemite who unashamedly spouted racist rhetoric on television. It is inconceivable that The Guardian would omit his views were they directed at any other minority, and sadly unsurprising that it has whitewashed his self-confessed antisemitism. The newspaper must apologise and amend the obituary to give a fuller picture of Mr Theodorakis.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected]

BBC Bargain Hunt expert Tim Weeks has apologised after it was revealed that Nazi memorabilia was due to be sold at his auction house.

Some of the items that were listed in Mr Weeks’ Wessex Auction Rooms auction included a £2,000 Third Reich banner, a £300 swastika and a collection of badges. The items have since been removed from the auction which is being held today.

Mr Weeks apologised for the incident, stating: “Upon learning that a number of Third Reich items are listed for auction I have contacted the head of our militaria department to withdraw them immediately from sale as we would never wish to cause any offence. We apologise if any has unintentionally been caused.”

A man is facing trial after being accused of creating the website “Radio Aryan” in order to upload antisemitic and racist podcasts.

James Allchurch, 49 from Pembrokeshire, appeared at Haverfordwest Magistrates’ Court yesterday where he denied fifteen counts of distributing a sound recording stirring up racial hatred. He was bailed to appear at Swansea Crown Court on 15th September.

Mr Allchurch reportedly wore a mask, visor and sunglasses, and asked that people refer to him as “Sven Longshanks”. When asked why Mr Allchurch wished to be called Sven Longshanks, he allegedly replied: “This is my life’s work that is on trial and that’s the name that my work is published under.”

The court reportedly heard that Radio Aryan had been running since 2015, and that twelve of the charges related to material allegedly offensive to people from black or ethnic minority communities while three relate to podcasts accused of being antisemitic.

Mr Allchurch reportedly pleaded not guilty to all charges.

The Chinese state news agency, Xinhua News, has been condemned for posting an “antisemitic” cartoon of Secretary of State Antony Blinken, who is Jewish.

The tweet, posted on 30th July, depicted Secretary Blinken with devil horns and a nose that was exaggerated in size, a key feature in antisemitic Nazi propaganda. It also portrayed him towering over the Director of the World Health Organisation in a manner that seemed to imply global control, a common antisemitic trope. Accompanying the cartoon read: “U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken met with World Health Organisation (WHO) Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus in Kuwait”

In a tweet on Friday, the American Jewish Committee condemned the cartoon as “antisemitic” and “despicable”. It added: “Xinhua’s depiction of @SecBlinken, a Jew and stepson of a Holocaust survivor, utilises overt tropes of antisemitism, including a large nose, devil horns, and accusations of global control. What a shameful display.”

This is not the first instance of Chinese state-affiliated media being charged of antisemitism. In May, China Global Television Network (CGTN) was accused of airing a programme that expressed “blatant antisemitism”. Presenter Zheng Junfeng discussed the motivation behind the United States’ support for Israel, stating that “some people believe that US pro-Israeli policy is traceable to the influence of wealthy Jews in the US and the Jewish lobby on US foreign policy makers.” Persisting with the antisemitic stereotype, Mr Zheng went on to say that “Jews dominate finance and internet sectors…so do they have the powerful lobbies some say? Possible.”

In June, Secretary Blinken called for reforms of UNRWA textbooks including “taking steps to ensure the content of all educational materials currently taught in UNRWA-administered schools and summer camps is consistent with the values of human rights and tolerance and does not induce incitement.” He stated that UNRWA “disseminates antisemitic and anti-Israel material in its curricula,” and advised that the State Department would be “looking very, very carefully” at the processes UNRWA uses to deal with hateful educational materials.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Media monitoring organisation Honest Reporting has alleged that the Ramallah-based Mariam Barghouti, whom it describes as “a go-to voice on Israeli-Palestinian affairs” is spreading “vicious Jew-hatred” via social media and her media contributions,

The media-monitor claims that Ms Barghouti spreads “vicious Jew-hatred” on her verified Twitter account which has more than 74,000 followers. In her posts, she has described Israel as “beating Hitler at his own game since 1948,” and has referred to “racist Zionist-Nazi’s [sic].”

In other posts, she has asserted that “Zionism did nothing but exploit the tragedy of the Holocaust,” and claimed that former Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu “supports racism…and the ethnic cleansing of a people,” adding that he was “a war criminal and a Nazi.” Honest Reporting offers links to the tweets “in case they are deleted,” noting that “they can be viewed here and here.”

The media monitor says that Ms Barghouti’s so-called “accounts of everyday West Bank life” that have been published by many outlets including The New York TimesThe Washington PostThe Guardian and, most notoriously, Newsweek “provide withering narratives” about Israel, or as Ms Barghouti calls it, the “colonialist project.”

Other pronouncements include a claim that the Israeli army, police and settlers were “working together in tandem” to carry out “ethnic cleansing” of the Palestinians and that Tel Aviv “is a settlement.” 

Readers “should never have been exposed to the thoughts and opinions of someone who has harboured such deeply antisemitic sentiments,” declares Honest Reporting, noting that despite her alleged antisemitism, Ms Barghouti continues to appear in “the pages and on the websites of some of the most high-profile publications in the world” allowing her propaganda to be “internalised” by a large number of people.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism will be writing to talkSPORT to demand a live on-air apology after two of the radio show’s presenters allowed a hateful comment from a caller about Tottenham Hotspur’s chairman, Daniel Levy, to go unchallenged.

The show’s segment was presented by Perry Groves, a football pundit and former footballer, and Jordan Jarrett-Bryan, a reporter for Channel 4 News, and included a discussion about Tottenham Hotspur player Harry Kane.

Mr Jarrett-Bryan asks the caller: “Are you saying Spurs should get the fee that they feel he’s worth, and if they don’t get that, he’s not going anywhere?”

Referring to Mr Levy, the caller responds: “He’s a Jew, he’s not gonna let him go for nothing, is he?”

The presenters, visibly shocked, then cut off the caller and tried to swiftly move the conversation on without acknowledging the comment that had just been made.

This is not the first time talksSPORT has been involved in controversy relating to inflammatory comments. Phil Brown, the football player turned manager, issued a heartfelt apology in 2018 to Campaign Against Antisemitism after referring to Chelsea Football Club midfielder Tiemoue Bakayoko as having had a “Holocaust of a game” on the radio show.  

Last year on talkSPORT, Mr Groves made a nearly identical remark when he referred to goalkeeper Mat Ryan’s performance in the match, saying that the player “had a Holocaust of a game.”

Mr Levy has received antisemitic abuse in the past. One incident in April saw a tweet that was said to have contained several antisemitic tropes removed and reported to the police.

In a separate incident, a user wrote: “Them 3 fat AMERICAN C***S YOU F***ING BASTARDS. And as for that Jew levy your family should have been gassed. Inters owners also ruined the cal champions. Perez is in the f***ing mafia”.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Perry Groves and Jordan Jarrett-Bryan must apologise live on air for their failure to call out a remark by a caller disparaging Daniel Levy because he is Jewish. Perry Groves has his own inflammatory record to redeem, while, for Jarrett-Bryan, whose pinned tweet is all about stamping racism out of football, it is particularly disappointing that he missed the opportunity to do his part in achieving that aim. TalkSPORT’s listeners deserve better.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

Netflix, the streaming service for films and television, has released a statement on Twitter condemning antisemitism and Holocaust denial.

The tweet, posted on Monday, read: “We stand united against antisemitism in all its forms, including the worrying increase in hate crimes and Holocaust denial. We must never forget that appalling chapter in human history.”

Accompanying the statement was a link to The Last Days, a documentary that focusses on the Nazi concentration camps and the lives of Holocaust survivors.

Netflix’s statement follows the recent surge in antisemitism that has continued across the United States.

According to new research conducted by the ADL, antisemitic incidents in the United States were more than double in May 2021 than they were in May 2020.

Addressing the increase in Jew-hatred, President Joe Biden said: “The recent attacks on the Jewish community are despicable, and they must stop. I condemn this hateful behaviour at home and abroad — it’s up to all of us to give hate no safe harbour.”

Vice President Kamala Harris added: “The surge in antisemitic attacks against the Jewish community in the U.S. and around the world is despicable—it must be called out, condemned, and stopped. As a country, we must stand united against hate of any kind.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Ofcom is considering sanctions against radio station Rinse FM after they aired a song that was deemed to have contained “antisemitic hate speech.”

On 12th July 2020, Rinse FM’s presenter introduced the song “Better in Tune with the Infinite” by Jay Electronica as “one of my absolute favourites”. A complaint was then made over the following lyrics: “The synagogues of Satan might accuse or jail me. Strip, crown, nail me, brimstone hail me…To the lawyers, to the sheriffs, to the judges. To the debt holders and the law makers. [Bleeped] you, sue me, bill me.”

In their report, published on 19th July of this year, Ofcom stated that it referred to the International Definition of Antisemitism in making their assessment, citing the following paragraph: “Antisemitism is a certain perception of Jews, which may be expressed as hatred toward Jews. Rhetorical and physical manifestations of antisemitism are directed toward Jewish or non-Jewish individuals and/or their property, toward Jewish community institutions and religious facilities.”

The regulation company deemed the lyrics to have negative connotations containing antisemitic tropes, stating: “In our view, the UK listeners would be likely to understand the phrase ‘synagogues of Satan’ to be a reference to the Jewish place of worship, and that it makes an explicit association between Jewish place of worship and Satan. We considered that UK listeners would have understood this association to suggest that Jewish people are evil or worship the Devil, which is a well-established antisemitic trope

“Immediately following the reference to the ‘synagogues of Satan’ were the lyrics ‘Strip, crown, nail me, brimstone hail me’ which we considered to be a reference to the crucifixion of Jesus Christ. In our view, the juxtaposition of the lyrics may have evoked for UK listeners the antisemitic allegation that Jewish people are collectively responsible for the crucifixion of Jesus Christ

“These words were later followed by the lyrics ‘To the lawyers, to the sheriffs, to the judges. To the debt holders and the law makers’, whom the artist addresses with ‘[Bleep] you, sue me, bill me’. In the context of the preceding lines and in particular, reference to the phrase ‘synagogues of Satan’, we considered that some UK listeners may have interpreted these references to be references to the Jewish community.”

Rinse FM said that “as a full-time Community Radio station with limited resources it is not always possible to ‘nip in the bud’ any potentially controversial material” and went on to acknowledge that the lyrics “may be seen by some as an antisemitic trope” when taken out of context, but that the wording “Synagogues of Satan” was lifted from the Bible and that, therefore, finding it controversial “would ultimately lead to the accusation that the Bible itself is antisemitic which would open up a much wider and controversial debate.”

However, the station also stated that following the complaint, it was “reviewing [its] Programme Production processes and policies”, including:

• ensuring that at least two people review any potentially controversial track, commentary or statement;

• reviewing the “frequency and specific advice, messages and reminders that we give to all Presenters” in relation to “unconscious bias and the need… to look at themselves and seek greater awareness of any ‘isms’ of their own”, in particular “in the current climate of heightened community tensions and subjective judgements”; and,

• putting a greater emphasis on the types of issues raised in this complaint in all future training and training material.

Ofcom concluded that the radio station was had breached the following broadcasting codes:

Rule 3.2: “Material which contains hate speech must not be included in television and radio programmes […] except where it is justified by the context.”

Rule 3.3: “Material which contains abusive or derogatory treatment of individuals, groups, religions or communities, must not be included in television and radio services […] except where it is justified by the context.”

Rule 2.3: “In applying generally accepted standards broadcasters must ensure that material which may cause offence is justified by the context… Such material may include […] offensive language, […] discriminatory treatment or language (for example on the grounds of […] religion belief […]). Appropriate information should also be broadcast where it would assist in avoiding or minimising offence.”

This is not the first time the rapper was accused of antisemitism. Last year, he was criticised over the lyrics: “And I bet you a Rothschild I get a bang for my dollar…The synagogue of Satan want me to hang by my collar.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

The Sunday Times has removed a reference to Orthodox Jews in an article about “vultures preying” on shopping centres after a complaint from Campaign Against Antisemitism.

The article, titled “Vultures prey on bombed-out shopping centres”, focussed on investors who are purchasing the now-derelict shopping centres in Britain, with particular emphasis on vultures, which are a type of investor. However, the publication initially included a gratuitous reference to Orthodox Jews and thereby implied comparisons between Jews and vultures.

The article, brought to our attention by CAMERA UK, an organisation promoting fair coverage of Israel in British media, read: “Mark Garmon-Jones, head of shopping centre investing at Savills, said over a quarter of the buyers were backed by Israeli money, often invested via the UK’s Orthodox Jewish community.”

After Campaign Against Antisemitism contacted The Sunday Times to raise our concerns that the reference to Orthodox Jews was gratuitous and may promote the stereotype of Jewish greed or predatory behaviour, the publication advised us that it was removing the reference from the article.

We are also writing to Savills.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

A journalist who tweeted “Hitler was right” and other antisemitic comments and images has revealed that she was fired from the BBC in a supposedly “heartfelt apology” in which she blames “industrial scale pro-Israel censorship” for her termination.

Tala Halawa, until recently a Palestine Affairs Specialist at the BBC Monitoring Service, posted a series of antisemitic tweets in 2014, including one that read: “#Israel Is more #Nazi than #Hitler! Oh, #HitlerWasRight #IDF go to hell. #PrayForGaza”. She also asserted that “ur media is controlled by ur zionist government in order 2 produce ignorant people [sic]”, shared the graphic that caused Naz Shah MP to be suspended from the Labour Party several years ago as well as an image of a child being burned on a menorah, and posted on Facebook: “They [Zionists] are crying the holocaust every single moment but they’re practicing it every single moment as well.” The social media posts dated from prior to Ms Halawa’s employment at the BBC.

Campaign Against Antisemitism and others submitted complaints to the BBC, which subsequently announced that she no longer works for the BBC.

But in a social media post, Ms Halawa has revealed that the BBC fired her.

The post was ostensibly a “heartfelt apology”, focusing on the one Hitler tweet to the exclusion of her other inflammatory posts. She wrote: “The offensive and ignorant words I posted at the time do not reflect my political views then as much as they do not today. I hope those who were hurt by them will accept my heartfelt apology for posting without thinking”.

However, Ms Halawa then went on to blame “pro-Israel interest groups”, “right-wing media outlets”, a “pro-Israel mob” and a “pro-Israel censorship campaign…industrial in scale and international in its reach” for her termination, thereby implying that her posts were not in fact antisemitic and that those who campaigned for her to be disciplined or removed were acting in bad faith and potentially at the behest of Israel – accusations that, falling firmly within the Livingstone Formulation, are themselves antisemitic.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has “graded” Ms Halawa’s “apology” and found it severely wanting.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani accused Jewish financier George Soros, who is often the target of antisemitic conspiracy theories, of “wanting to destroy America” during a rant in a TV interview on Wednesday.

According to Mr Giuliani, Mr Soros, a hate figure for American right-wingers, wanted to “destroy America so we become socialists” and that it was “all part of a socialist theory to bring down this country.”

Mr Giuliani went on to allege that Mr Soros supported the “rewriting of history” by taking down statues, saying: “That’s what Lenin did; that’s what Mao did…that’s exactly what Mao did. China doesn’t have a history anymore.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

A Canadian television channel has cancelled one of its programmes after the programme’s Twitter account used “antisemitic rhetoric” in a post, B’nai Brith Canada reported last Wednesday.

OMNI is a multicultural television channel owned by Rogers Sports & Media which aired Lama TV, a programme founded by Lama Aggad that was self-described as “the largest Canadian Arabic TV show that airs on OMNI and OMNI 2 National Television channels.”

However, after an inflammatory post in which Lama TV’s Twitter account accused a Christian terrorist of having a Jewish last name, OMNI dropped the programme from its schedule.

The post was in response to B’nai Brith Canada’s tweet, in which the Jewish group wrote: “Deeply disturbing to hear a speaker at tonight’s vigil for the London hate attack victims claim that the tragedy is linked to ‘whatever is happening in Jerusalem and Gaza.’ The London suspect is not Jewish.”

Lama TV replied by saying: “Veltman is a Jewish surname. Prove to us it isn’t.”

B’nai Brith Canada wrote in their report of the incident that “Disinformation like Lama TV’s tweet plays directly into hateful conspiracy myths and inflames animosity against Canadian Jews, including online. In addition, in a video posted to Lama TV’s YouTube account, [Ms] Aggad describes ‘Jewish Zionists’ as people who ‘break agreements,’ labels Israel, the world’s only Jewish state, a ‘terrorist state’ and repeatedly calls on viewers to launch an ‘electronic intifada’.”

B’nai Brith Canada raised the incident with Rogers Sports & Media, at which point the mass media company confirmed that it had not aired Lama TV since December 2020 due to “production reasons”, but also clarified that it would never broadcast the programme again as a result of its “antisemitic rhetoric”.

Michael Mostyn, Chief Executive Officer of B’nai Brith Canada, said: “We commend Rogers for doing the right thing. There can be no room for antisemitism or discrimination of any kind in Canadian media. B’nai Brith will continue to work tirelessly to ensure that there are consequences for the perpetrators of antisemitism in Canada, especially after the outrages our community has witnessed over the past few months.”

Last week, we wrote that Canadian Jews had faced their “highest ever” number of antisemitic incidents recorded in a month during May. This news came after our report of Canada’s significant increase in antisemitic incidents during the conflict between Hamas and Israel.

Canadian Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, offered his support to Canada’s Jews. In a tweet, he wrote: “I am deeply disturbed by recent reports of antisemitic acts in Montreal and across the country. This intimidation and violence is absolutely unacceptable – and it must stop immediately. There is no place for hate of any kind in Canada.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.