Three people have been arrested over their alleged involvement in an unofficial version of the Disney game Club Penguin, after users were said to be exchanging messages full of antisemitic abuse.

City of London police say that they detained the trio for alleged copyright offences in connection with their role in running ‘Club Penguin Rewritten’. The suspects have been released on bail.

The arrests come two years after the BBC launched an investigation into another unauthorised clone of the popular children’s game, where users also exchanged antisemitic material.

The original, authorised Club Penguin was launched in 2005 as one of the first social networks aimed at children. During the peak of its popularity, the Disney platform had over 200 million users. Anybody was free to join, but content filters and human moderators prevented any inappropriate material from being shared.

Disney closed the website in 2017, after which unofficial fan-operated clones were launched using stolen or copied source code. Such clones became increasingly popular during pandemic lockdowns.

In a BBC video explaining the earlier scandal, users were shown writing things like “due to all my fans and support I will be ***** the jews [sic]”.

Detective Constable Daryl Fryatt, from the Police Intellectual Property Crime Unit (PIPCU) at City of London Police, confirmed the seizure of the site and arrests. He said: “Following a complaint under copyright law, PIPCU have seized a gaming website as part of an ongoing investigation into the site. Three people were arrested on 12th April on suspicion of distributing materials infringing copyright, and searches were carried out.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

Image credit: YouTube screenshot

YouTube has bowed to pressure and finally removed a channel from its platform that allegedly inspired the Texas hostage-taker, as the platform is accused by a moderator of ignoring his warnings.

After weeks of pressure, including in particular from the JC, the social media network has removed the channels belonging to Israr Ahmed and Wagdy Ghoniem, which boasted 3.5 million subscribers between them.

Malik Faisal Akram, the Briton who took four hostages at the Beth Israel Synagogue in Colleyville before being shot dead by the FBI, was reportedly obsessed with two hardline Pakistani clerics popular on YouTube, one of whom was Israr Ahmed. Mr Ahmed had 2.7 million subscribers on the social media network and was particularly popular with Mr Akram, according to the JC. On his videos, he reportedly called Jews “the ultimate source of evil [and] the biggest agents of Satan”, adding that they “control the banking system of the world.” In another video, entitled “History of the Jews”, Dr Ahmed claimed that Jews had been acting against humanity for over 2,000 years. “The name of Jews became an expletive,” he said. “They became akin to pigs.”

Testimony from moderator-turned-whistleblower and counter-terrorism expert, Khaled Hassan, reportedly prompted the company to act. Mr Hassan, who worked for Crisp, a content moderation firm contracted to YouTube, repeatedly raised the issue of antisemitism on YouTube, according to the JC. This included flagging Mr Ahmed’s channel and that of the Egyptian Jihadist and Muslim Brotherhood leader Wagdy Ghoniem, who is banned in the UK.

Mr Hassan’s report to YouTube warned that Mr Ahmed’s videos “pose[d] a serious risk of inciting hatred against Jews [and] a realistic possibility of leading to real-world violence” and was submitted in October last year, but was reportedly ignored. In January, Mr Akram targeted the Colleyville synagogue after watching Mr Ahmed’s videos, according to his friends and acquaintances.

YouTube reportedly said that, “upon review, we removed the channels belonging…to Israr Ahmad for violating our hate speech policies, and a further eleven videos have been removed as either a result of this circumvention or for violating our Violent Extremism and hate speech policies.”

Mr Ghoniem’s channel had been taken down “for circumvention of our terms of service,” according to the technology company. This came after Mr Hassan’s report had pointed out that he “has been on the list of extremists banned from entering the UK for inciting terrorism since 2009,” has been wanted on terrorism charges in America since 2004, and an Egyptian court had convicted him for leading a terrorist cell in 2014.

Mr Hassan’s report recounted how Mr Ghoneim had falsely claimed that Egypt’s President “is secretly a Jewish person working on advancing the interests of Israel while causing harm to Egypt’s economy and national security”. Mr Hassan claimed that the failure to remove Mr Ghoneim’s videos amounted to “promoting radical ideologies and enabling radical/terrorist groups to recruit members into their ranks.”

Although YouTube’s publicly-stated policy is that all “hate speech” that promotes “violence or hatred against individuals or groups” based on race or religion “is not allowed” and will be “removed,” Mr Hassan told that JC that he believed this policy to be a “sham”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

A second baseman in the Boston Red Sox minor league has been released after embarking on a Twitter rant in which he targeted the baseball team’s Jewish Chief Baseball Officer, Chaim Bloom.

Brett Netzer was released after tweeting, in addition to other inflammatory tweets, that “chaim bloom is a bad actor. dude went to hebrew school and studied the torah growing up but sold his soul to the sodom and race groups. good thing he is good at whatever he does in baseball.”

Mr Netzer also tweeted: “is chaim bloom even jewish?? highly doubtful.”

He added: “the popular slavery/oppression victim-card doesnt go very far when the egyptians were the first people to enslave the One True God’s chosen people, the Hebrews. ironically there is no word for irony in Hebrew lol”

Mr Netzer also targeted Black people, writing: “ive heard a lot of black people call themselves ‘kings’ in america. king of what? lol. i think its time black people go back to their roots and start to re-establish their true black culture- not the fake bullsh*t in america.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A Brazilian podcaster has been fired and could potentially face criminal charges after he called for the launch of a Nazi Party in Brazil.

Bruno Aiub, a 31-year-old podcaster with a following of 3.6 million on YouTube and 1 million on Twitch, said on his podcast Flow, where he interviews politicians, that “I think there should be a Nazi party recognised by law” and that “the radical left has much more space than the radical right.”

He further stated that “If someone wants to be anti-Jewish, I think they have a right to be.”

Estudio Flow, the producer of the podcast, has since removed the video from social media and fired Mr Aiub from his position as host of the podcast.

Other people who have been interviewed on the podcast in the past have asked for their interviews also to be removed from social media, while Estudio Flow also lost several sponsors and the rights to broadcast football matches of the Football Federation of the State of Rio de Janeiro.

Following the incident, Mr Aiub apologised and argued that his comments were made when he was “totally drunk”.

The public prosecutor’s office reported that it may order an investigation into the “alleged offence of apologising for Nazism”. This includes not only Mr Aiub’s comments but also comments by centrist MP Kim Kataguiri, who reportedly claimed that Germany had “made a mistake by criminalising the Nazi Party.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Police in Germany have reportedly pressured Telegram to remove far-right content.

Telegram is a Russian-founded online messaging app with end-to-end encryption as well as ‘self-destruct timers’ on messages and media. Though used by many ordinary people, the service has also become the main messenger app for the far-right.

Recently, Telegram blocked 64 channels due to pressure from the German Government and police. 

Among those blocked from the platform are Attila Hildmann, a far-right German nationalist who has been accused of anti-Jewish prejudice.

Germany’s Federal Criminal Police (BKA) asserted that Telegram has been more aggressive in removing propaganda from Islamist terror groups than far-right conspiratorial content. The BKA argues that Germany’s Network Enforcement Act makes it an obligation for Telegram to monitor and remove illegal content. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A family in Birmingham, Alabama has received both death and arson threats after reporting an incident in which their teenage son witnessed his teacher leading the class in giving Nazi-style salutes during a history lesson.

Mariya Tytell, the mother of Ephraim “Epps” Tytell, who attends Mountain Brook High School in the Birmingham suburb of Mountain Brook, described the incident as part of “a pattern” of antisemitism.

Her son “came home very upset,” she said, adding that he told her and his father that students were performing the Nazi salute. As the only Jewish student in the history class, it had made him feel “very scared and uncomfortable,” he had told them.

Ms Tytell admits that she initially thought that it had been “a misunderstanding” and brushed off her son’s concerns, but she then received calls from other parents and realised that this had not been the case.

A statement from the regional education authority said that the lesson was to explain about symbols changing over time and that the teacher allegedly “using the Bellamy salute” as an example. Before its adoption by the Nazis, this was a gesture to show allegiance to the American flag. School leaders said that the teacher had not instructed students to give the salute.

A short video, taken by a classmate, showing students raising their arms toward the American flag was circulated on social media. Ms Tytell said that an administrator told her son to apologise for sharing the video, and that when her son refused, he allegedly faced retaliation from his teacher including having his phone taken away and having his seat moved to the front of the classroom.

Ms Tytell said that the family tried to work out the issue with the school’s administration but claims that they were brushed off and that after speaking to the media about the incident, the family received death and arson threats.

“We kind of see it as a failure of leadership and also as part of a longer pattern of constant antisemitic incidents,” said Ms Tytell.

Danny Cohn, CEO of the Birmingham Jewish Federation and acting CEO of the Alabama Holocaust Education Centre, said that he did not think the teacher was “being intentionally antisemitic.”

Mr Cohn said that the reason for the incident could be attributed to a lapse in judgment, but added that he understood the reaction that it had provoked. When Jews “see the Nazi salute, they’re not listening for context,” he said. “They just see something that’s sent more than six million of our people to their deaths.”

He said that he had asked Mountain Brook Schools to allow its teachers to participate in a Holocaust education programme.

Mountain Brook school district leaders later conceded that the history lesson had lacked sensitivity. They also reportedly said that they did not condone performing the salute when a picture would have been sufficient and that the issue had been addressed with the teacher. They added that they stand against antisemitism and that they were working with local Jewish organisations.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

A British boxer has deleted his Twitter account after posting “tone deaf” photographs of him and his girlfriend outside of Auschwitz concentration camp.

Jamie McDonnell, 35, posted three photographs that caused outrage on social media, with many Twitter users criticising him. 

The former British IBF champion appeared to double down in response to the backlash by accusing those who took offence of being “keyboard warriors”. In response to one Twitter user, Mr McDonnell wrote: “Ok mate it’s a tourist place is it not so if we visit we can’t smile, come on pal.” 

In another post, the boxer wrote: “I have a weekend away with my girlfriend, I’m not going to not smile am I, but I understand what’s happened chill out a bit.”

Mr McDonnell has since deleted his Twitter account. 

Concerns have been raised that the Texas synagogue hostage-taker may have been influenced by antisemitic Urdu sermons that YouTube has failed to remove from its platform.

Malik Faisal Akram, 44, a Briton who took four hostages at the Beth Israel Synagogue in Colleyville before being shot dead by the FBI, was reportedly obsessed with two hardline Pakistani clerics popular on YouTube.

Israr Ahmed has 2.7 million subscribers on the social media network and was particularly popular with Akram, according to the JC. On his videos, he reportedly called Jews “the ultimate source of evil [and] the biggest agents of Satan”, adding that they “control the banking system of the world.” In another video, entitled “History of the Jews”, Dr Ahmed claimed that Jews had been acting against humanity for over 2,000 years. “The name of Jews became an expletive,” he said. “They became akin to pigs.”

Interestingly, one YouTube user reportedly asked why English subtitles for the sermons were not provided, prompting another to reply: “I’m happy that there are no subtitles. If these are available with subtitles, this’ll be removed from here.”

Meanwhile, the cleric Tariq Jamil has claimed in a video to his nearly six million subscribers that Jews “distorted” the holy books, among other inflammatory remarks. Akram reportedly organised a “rock star” welcome to Mr Jamil, who leads the hardline Islamic movement Tablighi Jamaat, when he visited Akram’s hometown of Blackburn in 2017. The local Tablighi mosque, Makki Masjid, had loudspeakers installed on the roof so that a crowd overflowing outside could hear his sermons.

According to Akram’s family, he joined Tablighi Jamaat and became a dedicated follower of is leader, Mr Jamil, in 2003. Within a year, he began adopting the harsh strictures of the sect, including growing a long beard and forcing his wife to wear a veil, against her wishes, according to reports. He also apparently began disappearing for months at a time in Pakistan and Britain. It is understood that Akram also raised funds for the group in Britain, a campaign of which Mr Jamil’s visit to Blackburn was part.

Akram was reportedly later banned from the Tablighi mosque after calling for jihad against Israel and the United States inside the mosque, as well as insulting the Gulf states who were warming ties with Israel. It is not believed that Akram had further engagement with Tablighi Jamaat after the ban.

A spokesperson for Google, which owns YouTube, said that the company was reviewing the videos and subscription channels highlighted by the JC. In 2019, YouTube updated its hate speech policy, leading to a significant increase in videos being removed from the platform. The guidelines state that antisemitism and hate speech are prohibited and that videos that breach the policy will be removed.

Previously, YouTube removed Urdu sermons by other figures after the JC reported them, but allowed the creators to continue to upload videos. The videos referenced the “Jewish lobby” and described Hitler as “an angel”. It is not known whether Akram watched those videos, but YouTube failed to remove the channels and continues to profit from them.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Scenarios like this make you wonder what exactly it takes for social media companies like YouTube to forgo a fraction of their profits by removing antisemites from their platforms. The substance of these racist sermons was apparently not enough for YouTube. Perhaps now, this evidence that the sermons may have incited Malik Faisal Akram to take Jews hostage in a synagogue will move the company to act. Or does it take actual dead Jews to persuade social media networks not to take the blood money that comes from broadcasting videos such as these? Government regulation of social media cannot come fast enough for the next victims of a social media user incited by those they watch or read online.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

Piers Corbyn has posted a swastika to his Facebook profile days after speaking at an anti-vaccination event where Holocaust comparisons were made.

The image, posted to both his Facebook and Instagram, displays a swastika above a photograph of the Royal Albert Hall, accompanied by the words: “The Royal Albert Hall is forcing medical apartheid.”

A video recently emerged of Mr Corbyn claiming that allegations of antisemitism against him and his brother, the antisemitic former Labour Party leader, Jeremy Corbyn, are a “pack of lies”, and in August, Mr Corbyn suggested that “troublemakers” in Jewish areas posted leaflets created and distributed by Mr Corbyn, which compared the COVID-19 vaccines to the Auschwitz death camp, through their own doors in a “plot” to portray him as antisemitic. Mr Corbyn has compared vaccinations to Nazi policy on more than one occasion.

This post comes days after Mr Corbyn spoke at an anti-vaccination event where former UKIP candidate Jeff Wyatt also spoke and made a comparison between vaccination mandates and the Holocaust.

Mr Wyatt said: “As a little boy, I was amazed that the Jews were brought into the concentration camps. I was amazed that the German people in 1930s allowed the Nazis to do what they did. But here we are. Here we are in 2021, 2022, our fellow countrymen are allowing this fascism to take place.”  

At other times during the conference, references were made, from another speaker, to “globalist cartels” behind an “anti-human agenda.”

Mr Wyatt is the former Deputy Leader of the For Britain Movement who stood as a UKIP candidate in Milton Keynes. The For Britain Movement has been described as a “far-right UKIP splinter group” and has been accused of antisemitism and racism.

This is not the first time that Mr Wyatt has made such comparisons. Mr Wyatt spoke at an anti-vaccination rally in November, hosted by Piers Corbyn, where he also made comparisons to the Holocaust whilst wearing the yellow star that was forced upon Jews during the Holocaust.

​​On a video uploaded to the official YouTube account for UKIP Cambridge & SE Cambs, Mr Wyatt can be seen talking to the camera at an anti-lockdown rally from last year whilst holding a sign that reads “No Gestapo Policing”.

Following the confirmation that the dead British man who attacked Congregation Beth Israel in Texas was 44-year-old Malik Faisal Akram, the “Blackburn Muslim Community” Facebook page has reportedly prayed for “the Almighty” to “bless him with the highest ranks of Paradise” in a now-deleted post.

Mr Akram entered the synagogue during Sabbath services, making threats against the congregation and holding them hostage, demanding the release of Aafia Siddiqui, who is currently serving an 86-year prison sentence in Texas.

In comments that could be heard on a live stream of the synagogue service that was cut off during the incident, Mr Akram could be heard speaking in a northern English accent and claiming that he had a bomb and that he would not leave the synagogue alive.

Following a standoff, the authorities raided the synagogue, killing Mr Akram and freeing the hostages.

A statement purportedly from Mr Akram’s brother published by the same Facebook page claimed that Mr Akram had in fact released all of the hostages before the authorities conducted their raid and killed him. The statement added: “We would also like to add that any attack on any human being be it a Jew, Christian or Muslim etc is wrong and should always be condemned. It is absolutely inexcusable for a Muslim to attack a Jew or for any Jew to attack a Muslim, Christian, Hindu vice versa etc.”

Dr Siddiqui is convicted of two counts of attempted murder, armed assault, using and carrying a firearm, and three counts of assault on US officers and employees. Upon her conviction, raising her middle finger in court she shouted: “This is a verdict coming from Israel, not America. That’s where the anger belongs.” Dr Siddiqui had refused to work with a legal team provided to her by the Pakistani embassy on account of them being Jewish, and she had also demanded that jurors be subject to some sort of genetic testing to assess whether they were Jewish.

In a letter to former US President Obama, Dr Siddiqui wrote: “Study the history of the Jews. They have always back-stabbed everyone who has taken pity on them and made the ‘fatal’ error of giving them shelter…and it is this cruel, ungrateful back-stabbing of the Jews that has caused them to be mercilessly expelled from wherever they gain strength. This why ‘holocausts’ keep happening to them repeatedly! If they would only learn to be grateful and change their behaviour!”

Campaign Against Antisemitism is investigating who operates the “Blackburn Muslim Community” Facebook page and alerting the authorities.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We join Jewish communities around the world in relief that Malik Faisal Akram’s attack on Congregation Beth Israel in Texas ended without physical injury to worshippers at the synagogue, and in giving thanks to the courageous law enforcement officers who secured their safety.”

“That the perpetrator came from the United Kingdom raises very serious questions for British authorities, including whether Mr Akram was encouraged or supported by local elements who may pose a continuing threat to the Jewish community or the wider public. That a ‘Blackburn Muslim Community’ Facebook page purporting to represent the local Muslim community published a now-deleted post calling for ‘the Almighty’ to ‘bless him with the highest ranks of Paradise’ demands an urgent investigation. We are looking into who operates the page and alerting local law enforcement.”

The American social networking and microblogging platform, Tumblr has made changes to its app in order to block more than 400 search terms, including “antisemitism,” “racism” and “xenophobia”, in a move intended to reduce the risk of Apple banning it from the App Store.

Although some of the banned terms are designed to block access to pornography, Tumblr has stated that other terms relating to “potentially sensitive content” were banned so that the platform could “remain available within Apple’s App Store.”

In order to comply with Apple’s guideline, Tumblr said that it was “having to extend the definition of what sensitive content is as well as the way you access it.”

In 2018, the platform changed its community guidelines to explicitly ban hate speech.

In a blog post at the time, Tumblr stated that it was incumbent “on all of us to create a safe, constructive, and empowering environment.”

Tumblr said that to achieve this, its community guidelines needed “to reflect the reality of the internet and social media today,” as the internet was “being exploited by hate groups.”

Following the 2018 changes, users were able to report hate speech directly in the mobile app. Those guidelines were used to remove antisemitic, anti-Muslim, and anti-LGBT content.

The platform notes that under the new changes, users may see fewer results when searching for certain terms or phrases “that fall under the expanded definition of sensitive content,” and that in certain circumstances, a search “may not produce any results at all,” with users seeing a message stating that “content has been hidden.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

A major Parliamentary report has called on social media companies to introduce enhanced measures to tackle racism against Jewish people on their platforms.

The Joint Committee on the Draft Online Bill, which is studying the Government’s proposed legislation to regulate social media, has recommended changes to ensure rapid response by social media companies to requests from the police for information. The report stopped short of calling for an end to anonymous accounts, as these carry wider benefits, but it did call on companies to prevent abuse by anonymous accounts, for example by enhancing traceability for use by law enforcement.

The 200-page report also recommends that technology companies be required to appoint a “Safety Controller” from senior management who would be personally liable if the company fails to comply with the new rules.

The report insists that “no-one should be abused for their religious faith or identity and tech companies must take steps to prevent the spread of such material and remove it from their platforms.” In particular, the report raises concerns over algorithms that may amplify antisemitic abuse in social media networks.

“Platforms will have a duty to design their systems to identify, limit the spread of, and remove racist abuse quickly following a user report,” the Committee said, and declared that technology companies would “have to address hate crimes such as stirring up racial hatred that may not currently be covered.”

On abuse in football, the report specifies that companies should share information about offenders with clubs to enable abusive fans to be banned from matches.

The report also calls on Ofcom to produce a Code of Practice on platform design.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has launched a new weekly podcast. New episodes of Podcast Against Antisemitism are available every Thursday and can be streamed here or downloaded wherever you get your podcasts.

Teenagers are being indoctrinated into neo-Nazism by their peers, a new report says.

The study, produced by the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation & Political Violence (ICSR) at Kings College London and the CST, found that in looking at the growth of ten neo-Nazi youth movements, the radicalisation into the racist ideology was being enacted from teenagers to fellow teenagers, as opposed to older members to younger ones, a perception that the study dismissed as largely a myth.

The report states: “With very limited exceptions, all groups in the sample demonstrate antisemitic beliefs, demonising the Jewish community and often depicting them as the root of various problems. This includes promoting antisemitic conspiracy theories and occasionally inciting violence against the Jewish community. Islamophobia and xenophobia are also common.”

Discussing what the report, titled “We Are Generation Terror!”, termed “youth-on-youth radicalisation”, the report’s author Hannah Rose said: “Young people are both vulnerable to online grooming through manipulation by seasoned extreme-right extremists and, increasingly they are themselves the groomers, the propagandists, the recruiters and the plotters, and the convicted perpetrators.”

The report also found that social media platforms’ restrictions on racist content, namely Instagram, Twitter, TikTok and Telegram, were being easily bypassed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently produced a series of posts highlighting TikTok’s problem of allowing content that promoted Holocaust denial. 

In July, we reported that according to a new study, antisemitic content on the social media platform TikTok had increased by 912%. According to research from Dr Gabriel Weimann of the University of Haifa and Natalie Masri of IDC Herzliya’s Institute for Counter-Terrorism, antisemitic comments on TikTok grew 912% from 41 in 2020 to 415 in 2021, and the platform saw 61 antisemitic postings so far this year compared to 43 last year. Antisemitic tropes and images that were used in video content included Nazi salutes, diminishing the impact of the Holocaust, and propagating caricatures of Jews with long, hooked noses. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years, continues to urge the Jewish community to remain vigilant and welcomes the seriousness with which the authorities are treating the danger.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has launched a new weekly podcast. New episodes of Podcast Against Antisemitism are available every Thursday and can be streamed here or downloaded wherever you get your podcasts. 

Spotify has reportedly removed nearly 150 hours of antisemitic, racist and white supremacist material from its platform following a media investigation.

The streaming giant does not allow hateful content on its platform, but a Sky News investigation reportedly found “days’ worth” of listening, promoting “scientific racism, Holocaust denial and far-right antisemitic conspiracy theories”.

Much of it was buried within hours-long episodes, but in some cases there were explicit slurs in titles, descriptions and artwork.

Spotify removed the content after being alerted, but it remains online on other, unmoderated platforms, such as Google Podcasts.

Searching for the phrase “Kalergi Plan”, for example, directs users to a podcast with 76 episodes discussing the far-right antisemitic conspiracy theory which imagines that Jewish elites promote mass immigration as part of a deliberate plan to erase the white European race. One of the episodes apparently contains a monologue that ends with an explicit call for violence against Jews.

Another US-based podcast featured racist slurs and white supremacist symbols in its title, descriptions and artwork, with the host promoting various antisemitic theories, Holocaust denial and scientific racism.

Yet another series talks of the “beauty” of white supremacism and features readings of essays and books by Hitler, Goebbels and other Nazi figures.

Spotify allows users to report material that violates the platform’s guidelines, and the company is developing new technology to identify hateful material. But questions remain over what is being done currently to monitor podcast material, the large volume of which requires a mix of algorithmic and human moderation, as well as technology that can detect hate speech in audio.

Hannah Kirk, AI researcher at the Oxford Internet Institute and The Alan Turing Institute, observed numerous technological challenges, including the amount of memory needed to store long audio files, the difficulty of sifting through multiple speakers and fast-paced dialogue, and the complexity of linguistic cues in audio, such as tone, pitch of voice, awkward silences and laughter. The technology to encode these sorts of linguistic signals is not currently available.

Google podcasts, which is more of a directory than a platform, reportedly does not wish to limit what people can find and will only remove content in rare circumstances, according to what a spokesperson has previously told The New York Times.

A Spotify spokesperson told Sky News: “Spotify prohibits content on our platform which expressly and principally advocates or incites hatred or violence against a group or individual based on characteristics, including, race, religion, gender identity, sex, ethnicity, nationality, sexual orientation, veteran status, or disability. The content in question has been removed for violating our Hate Content policy.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has launched a new weekly podcast. New episodes of Podcast Against Antisemitism are available every Thursday and can be streamed here or downloaded wherever you get your podcasts.

Once again, the antisemite Wiley has been able to create an account on Twitter and spout racist hate towards Jews, even directly attacking Campaign Against Antisemitism. Twitter has suspended his account after we called on the platform to do so.

The rapper Richard Kylea Cowie, who is known as Wiley, went on an antisemitic tirade on social media in July 2020, has gone on another tirade this week, culminating today. Using the handle @WileyRecordings, he has tweeted an image of himself in Hasidic garb and a video titled “the Jewish Faces that Control Hiphop and Mainstream Black Music.” He posted a further video “discuss[ing] historical tensions between blacks & Jews” and, in another tweet, asserted: “The more they block me the harder I go and when I get through the door I will stand there and look in their faces with the same look they don’t wanna see….They are just angry they can’t control me…” He also tweeted a video of the antisemitic hate preacher Louis Farrakhan titled “I’m here to separate the ‘good Jews’ from the ‘Satanic Jews’”, and a video of another antisemitic hate preacher, David Icke.

Wiley then went on to target a senior figure in Campaign Against Antisemitism directly, changing his profile picture to an image of this member of our team and tweeting a further picture of him. He then proceeded to taunt him in a series of tweets, including calling him a “coward” and then posting a video on Instagram taunting him.

The rapper, who recently released an album unsubtly titled “Anti-Systemic”, told our member on Instagram this morning: “Don’t hide” and “come outside”. Wiley has recently been charged with assault and robbery. We are in touch with the police over the taunts and are examining legal options.

At this minute, Wiley is currently live on Instagram spewing antisemitic rhetoric, talking about banks that are owned by “Jewish families” and speculating that maybe Jews do in fact control the world. We are in contact with Instagram, calling on the platform to ban him immediately.

In his tirade in 2020, Wiley likened Jews to the Ku Klux Klan and claimed that Jews had cheated him and were “snakes”, tweeted that Jews should “hold some corn” – a slang expression meaning that they should be shot – and added: “Jewish community you deserve it”. He also called on “black people” to go to “war” with Jews and repeatedly evoked conspiracy theories that Jews were responsible for the slave trade and were imposters who usurped black people — a conspiracy theory that has incited acts of terrorism against Jews in the United States.

In the days that followed, Wiley continued to rail against Jews on Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. Following discussions with Campaign Against Antisemitism, a major 48-hour boycott of Twitter and Instagram in which we participated, and our projection of antisemitic tweets onto Twitter’s London headquarters, which then went viral, TwitterFacebook (which owns Instagram), Google (which owns YouTube) and TikTok agreed to remove Wiley from their platforms, depriving him of access to his nearly one million social media followers.

At the time of Wiley’s original antisemitic tirade, Campaign Against Antisemitism immediately reported Wiley to the Metropolitan Police Service, but the police eventually confirmed to us that Wiley was not in the UK at the time of his tirade. Under Home Office rules, that means that the Metropolitan Police must give primacy to police in the jurisdiction where Wiley was at the time. Lawyers acting for Campaign Against Antisemitism have filed a criminal complaint with the Public Prosecution Service in the Netherlands, which is where he was located when he launched his tirade against Jews.

We also called for Wiley to be stripped of his MBE and have his Ivors Award rescinded.

However, barely a year later Wiley was again active on Twitter, Instagram and YouTube, notwithstanding their pledges to ban him. Wiley tweeted at the time: “In all my years on earth I realised everyone wants you to care about their stuff like Holocaust etc but not one of them give a f*** about the enslavement and f***ery of black people so it’s hard for me to care for them knowing they don’t care for us #YaGetIt #JusSayin.”

This week, he has gone on another tirade, and only now has Twitter finally removed him, after we called once again on the platform to do so. We are also calling on Instagram, to which he has shifted his attention, to do the same. If these platforms had kept to their word, he would not have been on them in the first place.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has called on several venues over the past year to drop the unrepentant Wiley from their line-ups.

Earlier this year, we published a major report that shows how Twitter fails to implement consistently its own policies on hate. The report showed how Twitter appointed Campaign Against Antisemitism as a partner to monitor anti-Jewish racism on its platform and promised regular meetings, only to cease those meetings and ignore offers of antisemitism training after we began alerting the company to the inconsistent application of its policies by personnel.

Not only were phrases like “f*** the Jews” not considered to breach Twitter’s rules, but other phrases such as “Hitler was right” were sometimes permitted and sometimes removed, without any form of coherent reasoning. Moreover, one of the few areas where Twitter has in the past said that it would take action is over Holocaust denial, pledging to remove “attempts to deny or diminish” violent events such as the Shoah. Our report, however, shows that Twitter personnel repeatedly raised no objection to phrases such as “#Holohoax” and other, more elaborate tweets of Holocaust denial.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The antisemite Wiley has been able to return to Twitter and Instagram to spout racist hate, even adopting the image of one of our personnel as his profile picture and taunting him. We are in contact with the police and are examining legal options.

“Twitter has suspended Wiley’s account after we called on the platform to do so, but the company has failed to prevent him joining the platform repeatedly over the past year, despite its pledge to ban him. The company continues to ignore a wide range of antisemitic accounts that we have brought to its attention, presumably because they fail to attract the same degree of public interest and negative publicity as this case.

“We are now in contact with Instagram, asking for his live stream to be ended and his account removed, and we are in touch with the police about some of his deranged output.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms. We also continue to make representations to the Government on this matter.

VK, a Russian social media platform with an active user base of at least 60 million, is reportedly rife with antisemitism, online watchdog Fighting Online Antisemitism has said. 

Some examples of the alleged content include offensive caricatures that evoke classic antisemitic tropes of Jews with exaggerated facial features, as well as portraying Jews in positions of power over the media.

Comparisons between Jews and rodents and leeches were also made, and it was even reported that content promoting Holocaust denial and admiration for the Nazis were present. 

Allegations that Jewish people have masterminded the COVID-19 pandemic to further their own gains were also not uncommon. Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

It was also reported recently that VK was fined 3 million roubles for not deleting banned content, though it is not known whether this content relates to the antisemitic posts reported. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Fighting Online Antisemitism

The controversial fringe environmentalist group, Insulate Britain, has doubled down on an inflammatory comparison of perceived climate apathy and the Holocaust.

The group has become notorious over recent weeks for its obstruction of major highways in acts of civil disobedience designed to pressure the Government to insulate all homes in Britain by 2030.

Insulate Britain latched onto the Archbishop of Canterbury’s comment in an interview last week implying a comparison of current climate talks with the run-up to the Holocaust. Shortly after making his remark, Archbishop Justin Welby issued an unserved apology.

However, Insulate Britain claimed that the Archbishop should not have apologised, tweeting: “We stand with @JustinWelby original statement [sic].”

In the face of outrage, the group then doubled down and made the equation more explicit, tweeting: “Those who know and are silent now will be known as bystanders, just as those amongst the general population in Germany who were passive and indifferent to the rise of Nazi Germany and the escalating persecution that culminated in the Holocaust.”

After even greater outrage, the provocative group deleted the second tweet but has not issued an apology.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Comparisons to Nazi Germany risk trivialising the suffering and murder of the six million men, women and children who died at the hands of that regime. Archbishop Welby did the right thing by issuing an unreserved apology. It is startling that Insulate Britain should double down on the comparison and baselessly reference the Holocaust, which was a deliberate and systematic genocide, entirely different from the perceived climate apathy which the fringe group is protesting. Insulate Britain will find that making such comparisons will not strengthen its cause.”

A former supporter of Jeremy Corbyn who sought to run as a Conservative candidate in local council elections has reportedly been suspended by the Conservative Party after it emerged that he administrated a Facebook group that asked members: “Is Zionism Racism?”

According to a report, Khalid Sharif, who was confirmed as the Redbridge Conservative candidate for the Clayhall ward in next year’s local elections, has been suspended by the Party.

The poll was featured on Mr Sharif’s IG–Soc: Connecting Muslims in Redbridge Insha’Allah Facebook group. Comments by other members underneath the July poll reportedly included the claim that “just asking the question will be considered antisemitic. The Zionists have great powers hence they’ve made sure no one can say anything against them.”

Mr Sharif, a former member of the pro-Corbyn group, Momentum, apparently joined the Conservatives last year after Mr Corbyn’s election defeat, having described the former Labour leader as a “breath of fresh air” and lamenting that “that era has gone.”

A spokesperson for the Conservative Party reportedly confirmed that Mr Sharif has been suspended pending the outcome of an investigation.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The Paris Criminal Court has fined seven defendants who subjected the runner-up of the Miss France beauty competition to antisemitic abuse on Twitter after she revealed that her father is Israeli.

Four women and three men were sentenced today to fines ranging from 300 to 800 euros for posting antisemitic tweets targeting April Benayoum, Miss Provence and the runner-up of the Miss France contest, late last year.

Two of the defendant will also have to complete a two-day citizenship course.

An eighth defendant was let off after the court concluded that his tweet did not target Ms Benayoum.

Ms Benayoum’s father is Israeli and her mother is Serbo-Croatian.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Gab’s Twitter account has been deactivated after its CEO reportedly tweeted about “Judeo-Bolshevik” societies and dismissed accusations of antisemitism levelled against him as “Biblical truth”. 

Gab is a social-media platform that was founded in 2016 with a claim to “champion free speech,” and has become a haven for supporters of the QAnon conspiracy theory and other far-right groups and individuals banned from mainstream platforms.

Gab’s founder, Andrew Torba, was accused of antisemitism yesterday after he reportedly posted a string of tweets containing inflammatory remarks about Jewish people, including one which said that Gab was building a “parallel Christian society” after being “fed up and done with the Judeo-Bolshevik one”. 

The term “Judeo-Bolshevism” is an antisemitic trope that was used in Nazi propaganda and states that communism is a Jewish plot. 

Responding to the backlash to his tweet, Mr Torba appeared to double-down and continued tweeting. “Sadly many Christians today are so afraid of being called a silly meaningless name by the world (bigot, antisemite, homophobe) that they refuse to even remotely share or discuss the Gospel in their daily lives, let alone live it,” one post read.

Another tweet said: “Can’t even post basic Christian orthodoxy held for 2,000 years on Twitter dot com without being called ‘antisemitic’ by both the left and right.”

“You reveal your anti-Christian hatred when you refer to Biblical truth as ‘antisemitism’,” another post said in response to an accusation of antisemitism.

Mr Torba reportedly also posted two graphics. One, which was reported to have originated from an antisemitic cartoonist, depicts the nail in the hand of Christ, with the nail being labelled “Judeo” and the hand being labelled “Christian”. Another showed a man slaying a serpent with many heads, with one of those heads being labelled “Judaism”.

Responding to a tweet in which a user stated that Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ was “one of the most antisemitic films in history”, portrayed Jews as “grotesque and eternally cursed with bloodlust for money”, and refused to consult any Jewish scholars, the Gab account wrote: “What a king”

There has been some speculation as to whether Mr Torba’s account was deleted or whether he deactivated it himself in order to avoid a suspension, which he has reportedly done before. When one user allegedly notified Twitter of the posts, he was reportedly told by the social media platform that they were not in violation of the Twitter rules. 

This is not the first time that Gab has tweeted incendiary remarks about Jewish people. In July, Gab’s Twitter account was suspended after tweeting that antisemitism is “anything Jews don’t like.”

While Gab proclaims to be “pro-free speech,” others have described the network as racist and alleges that it promotes several conspiracy theories. Earlier this year, Andrew Torba was accused of wooing far-right figures to his platform with promises of greater visibility.

Far-right figures have turned to sites such as Gab to avoid restrictions on hate-content on more mainstream platforms such as Facebook and Twitter. Mr Torba has tried to distance Gab from the far-right groups that have made it their home. In 2018, on a podcast, he said: “Do we have alt-right users? Certainly. Alt-right users also exist on Facebook, on Twitter, on Reddit, and everywhere else on the Internet.” He went on to insist that Gab had “good people” who “believe in individual liberty…and free expression.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

A Saudi YouTube channel has reportedly uploaded a cartoon aimed at children where Allah turns Jews into apes due to their “trickery and deception”.

The story is reportedly from the Quran and seemingly depicts three groups of Jewish people; a group who sinned, a righteous group, and a group opposing the righteous group. 

The video uploaded to the Ibtikar Media channel says that in a test of the Jews’ faith, Allah would send a surplus of fish on the Sabbath, but would forbid them from fishing so that they can focus on prayer. 

The story goes on to say that the group of Jewish “sinners” then “employed a trick” where they would cast their fishing nets on Friday so that the fish would get caught in the net on Saturday, to then be collected on Sunday. According to the video, this group would fish on the Sabbath by “employing trickery and deception”. 

The righteous Jews “would warn the people about Allah’s wrath and His punishment, and would forbid them from doing what they were doing,” and the third group would “oppose the people who forbade these acts.”

The narrator of the animation continues: “When the sinners did not heed the words of advice, Allah’s punishment came upon them at night. The group that commanded good were spared the punishment. The fate of the third group was not mentioned. The punishment of the sinners was that they were transformed into apes.”

The video concludes by saying that the Jews who were transformed into apes were able to recognise their relatives, however, their relatives were not able to recognise them. The narrator states that shortly after that, the Jews who were turned into apes died, “leaving no descendants”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

Concerns have been raised over the Slovenian Prime Minister’s reported tweet in which he referred to “Soros puppets” in the EU Parliament.

In his tweet, the Prime Minister posted a graphic in which an image of George Soros is seemingly surrounded by arrows and images of Members of Parliament. Prime Minister Janez Janša wrote alongside the image: “13 of the 226 known Soros puppets in the EU parlement [sic]

Prime Minister Janša appeared to double down on his comments in response to online criticism, tweeting that “there is no conspiracy theory”. 

George Soros is a Jewish financier who is often the target of antisemitic conspiracy theories. It is indisputable that George Soros has, in recent years, been subjected to antisemitic campaigns around the world, painting him as a shadowy Jewish bogeyman. Mr Soros has been frequently targeted by, amongst others, the Hungarian government and several Eastern European advertising campaigns, which have been described as worryingly antisemitic.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Dr Alex George, the UK Youth Mental Health Ambassador and former Love Island star, has spoken out against the antisemitic abuse that his girlfriend, who is Jewish, has received on Instagram.

Dr George took to the social media app to repost his girlfriend Ellie Hecht’s Instagram story in which she highlighted some of the antisemitic abuse that she had been receiving. These messages included: “Jew? Need to check unfollow or not”, “Back to Nazi camp you go”, and “Jew should of been died in the war”.

Ms Hecht said: “Here are a handful of shocking messages I have received for my family heritage, from some uneducated trolls. I wasn’t going to post this but I have seen a lot of antisemitism recently and it isn’t talked about enough and I am shocked by the silence of the majority in the wake of very recent antisemitism.

“Jewish people have been persecuted for hundreds of years and it is still NOT okay. I couldn’t be more proud of my family heritage and on that note, I urge people to educate themselves before committing a hate crime. THINK before you send a horrible message. THINK before you are cruel to someone else for NO reason.”

She added: “Sadly, hate crime has gone up by 9 percent in the UK after the pandemic. This makes me so sad. Think about it like this: even after the Holocaust, even after all of those millions of people died because they were Jewish or gay or had a disability, and this is still happening. It makes me realise how bleak the future will be for my children.”

Dr George, commenting on the incident from his perspective, wrote: “I will not tolerate antisemitic abuse (nor any other abuse) towards Ellie in any way, shape or form. I can’t believe I am actually having to type this. Disgusting.”

He continued: “I feel awful now, all Ellie has done is be my gf. Feels like in a way I have brought this to her door. No one deserves that kind of abuse.

He later thanked his followers for sending in messages of support, writing: “Thank you for all the kind messages to Ellie and I. Things do need to change. The good people in the world outweigh the bad.”

A few hours later, Dr George spoke directly to his Instagram followers in a video posted on his story, in which he said: “I just want to say thanks to everyone for your messages. I know I’ve kinda said that already but yeah, just to reiterate, and had a lot of messages from Jewish people, people from Jewish background, culture, who’ve experienced antisemitism and yeah, it’s pretty shocking.”

He continued: “It’s not okay really is it but we need to do more to tackle this.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.  

Antisemitism is being “introduced to teenagers” through Instagram and TikTok, according to a new report from the anti-racism organisation Hope Not Hate. 

The report also found that users were being led down a “rabbit hole of political extremism” due to the social media platforms’ algorithms and that users were spreading antisemitic sentiments using emojis and filters. 

Common, antisemitic hashtags used on the platforms allegedly included #JewWorldOrder and #synagogueofsatan. In addition, hashtags seemingly belonging to broader conspiracy theories such as #illuminati and #NWO (New World Order) embedded hidden content that redirected users to antisemitic tropes. It was also reported that Instagram’s algorithm would present people looking at these hashtags with far-right accounts for them to follow. 

We reported last year that Instagram and Facebook came under pressure to take action following the revelation that a network of 80,000 white supremacists was operating on its platform. 

A spokesperson for Instagram said: “Antisemitism is completely unacceptable and we don’t allow it anywhere on Instagram. We’ve always removed attacks against people based on their religion, and last year we made important updates to our policies, to remove any content that denies or distorts the Holocaust, as well as more implicit hate speech, such as harmful stereotypes that Jewish people control the world.”

Hope Not Hate’s report said that while TikTok banned hashtags that appear blatantly antisemitic, such as #killthejews, other hashtags that may not include an overt reference to Jewish people but would still be considered antisemitic or direct people to antisemitic content, such as #rothschildfamily, #synagogueofsatan and #soros, had been viewed 25.1 million times in six months.

A spokesman for TikTok said: “TikTok condemns antisemitism, and we work aggressively to combat hate by proactively removing accounts and content that violate our policies and redirecting searches for hateful ideologies to our community guidelines.”

We recently produced a series of posts highlighting TikTok’s problem of allowing content that promoted Holocaust denial. 

In July, we reported that according to a new study, antisemitic content on the social media platform TikTok had increased by 912%. According to research from Dr Gabriel Weimann of the University of Haifa and Natalie Masri of IDC Herzliya’s Institute for Counter-Terrorism, antisemitic comments on TikTok grew 912% from 41 in 2020 to 415 in 2021, and the platform saw 61 antisemitic postings so far this year compared to 43 last year. Antisemitic tropes and images that were used in video content included Nazi salutes, diminishing the impact of the Holocaust, and propagating caricatures of Jews with long, hooked noses. 

Last week, we wrote that new measures laid out by Ofcom could mean fines for video-sharing platforms like TikTok and Twitch.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

An Australian anti-vaccination blogger has received backlash after uploading photographs to social media in which she placed yellow stars on her children and wore a concentration camp inmate’s uniform.

Sarah Mills, who is popular in anti-vaccination circles, has a following of more than 100,000 followers across Instagram, TikTok and Facebook.

In one photo, which she accompanied with the words, “history is repeating itself”, the mother of three can be seen with her children posing whilst wearing the yellow star that was forced upon Jews during the Holocaust with the words “No Vax” written on them. The caption to the photo read: “As of today I may no longer enter restaurants, cafes, theatres, cinemas, concerts, museums, sporting events, pools, clothing stores or anything deemed non-essential. I live in regional [New South Wales] so we’ve been living freely for a while now, until today. Yesterday I was safe to be in public, today I am a threat.”

In another image captioned “Prisoner 385968 reporting for duty”, Ms Mills can be seen wearing the blue and white uniforms that prisoners in concentration camps were forced to wear with a number tag. She added: “Does anyone know where we get our full uniform? I’ve found the shirt but wasn’t sure if there’s anywhere you can get them as a set? or are we just provided them upon arrival? Sending love to my future inmates.”

In a previous post in which she referred to her perception of a division between people who chose to have the COVID-19 vaccination and those who did not, the blogger wrote: “I’m starting to learn who would have hidden Anne Frank and who would have turned her over to the Nazis.”

Ms Mills denied comparing unvaccinated people to Holocaust victims, telling Daily Mail Australia: “I am in NO way comparing the deaths of millions of people to not being allowed into Kmart, but people need to look at where that ‘them/us’ situation began.”

The inflammatory and misleading comparison has been used among anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks, which have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

In August, antisemitic protest signs have prompted hate speech and incitement of violence investigations in France. Earlier this year, organisers of an anti-vaccine demonstration in the city of Avignon were described as “brainless” for using the Nazi yellow star in their protest. Joseph Szwarc, a Holocaust survivor, spoke out against these use of the yellow star, saying: “You can’t imagine how much that upset me. This comparison is hateful. We must all rise up against this ignominy.” With tears in his eyes, Mr Szwarc added: “I wore the star, I know what that is, I still have it in my flesh. It is everyone’s duty to not allow this outrageous, antisemitic, racist wave to pass over us.”

The comparison has been made across the world, including in the United States, Canada, Ukraine and elsewhere.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Facebook

New measures laid out by Ofcom could mean fines for video-sharing platforms (VSP) like TikTok and Twitch.

The broadcasting watchdog said that one-third of users have seen hateful content on such sites. The new rules state that VSPs must take “appropriate measures” to protect users from content related to terrorism, child sexual abuse and racism. This would mean the platforms must:

  • provide and effectively enforce clear rules for uploading content.
  • make the reporting and complaints process easier.
  • restrict access to adult sites with robust age-verification.

Ofcom stated that the progress taken by the eighteen VSPs in question would be published in a report next year. 

Incidents of antisemitism have been reported on both TikTok and Twitch. 

In July, we reported that according to a new study, antisemitic content on the social media platform TikTok had increased by 912%. According to research from Dr Gabriel Weimann of the University of Haifa and Natalie Masri of IDC Herzliya’s Institute for Counter-Terrorism, antisemitic comments on TikTok grew 912% from 41 in 2020 to 415 in 2021, and the platform saw 61 antisemitic postings so far this year compared to 43 last year. Antisemitic tropes and images that were used in video content included Nazi salutes, diminishing the impact of the Holocaust, and propagating caricatures of Jews with long, hooked noses. 

In August, Twitch, the world’s biggest streaming site for watching video games, announced that it would introduce new measures to prevent “hate raids” that include antisemitic abuse, images of swastikas, and other racist or homophobic abuse. The move follows complaints from users in minority groups after some users of Twitch were subjected to high levels of abuse in recent months in so-called “hate raids.” 

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

A trial date has been given for a man accused of creating the website “Radio Aryan” in order to upload antisemitic and racist podcasts.

James Allchurch, 49 from Pembrokeshire, appeared at Haverfordwest Magistrates’ Court last month where he denied all fifteen counts of distributing a sound recording stirring up racial hatred.

Mr Allchurch reportedly wore a mask, visor and sunglasses, and asked that people refer to him as “Sven Longshanks”. When asked why Mr Allchurch wished to be called Sven Longshanks, he allegedly replied: “This is my life’s work that is on trial and that’s the name that my work is published under.”

The court reportedly heard that Radio Aryan had been running since 2015 and that twelve of the charges related to material allegedly offensive to people from black or ethnic minority communities while three relate to podcasts accused of being antisemitic.

On Wednesday, Mr Allchurch appeared at Swansea Crown Court where he reportedly denied fifteen charges of distributing a sound recording stirring up racial hatred on or before 17th May, 2019, to on or before 18th March, 2021. He allegedly only spoke to say his name and “not guilty” in response to each of the charges that were read out.

The charges allege that Mr Allchurch distributed recordings that included the titles “Rivers Of Blood”, “Banned In The UK”, “The Leftist Supremacist Mindset”, and “The Usual Suspects”. The alleged offenses were said to have taken place in Gelli, a village in south Wales.

Judge Paul Thomas released the defendant on unconditional bail, stating: “Your trial will be on 27th June but there will be a further hearing either in March or April.”

Congressman Thomas Massie has reportedly tweeted and deleted an image that compared vaccine passports to the Holocaust.

The Republican representative for the State of Kentucky’s 4th congressional district posted the tweet on Wednesday. The image depicted an arm with numbers written on it in a style reminiscent of the tattoos forced upon Jews in Nazi concentration camps. Accompanying the image, it says: “If you have to carry a card with you to gain access to a restaurant, venue or an event in your own country…that’s no longer a free country”.

Comparisons between vaccines and the Holocaust have been made across the world, including in the United StatesCanadaUkraine and elsewhere, as anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently published a resource on Instagram detailing why it is wrong to compare vaccines to the Holocaust.

Rabbi Shlomo Litvin of Lexington, Kentucky condemned the tweet in a statement, writing: “This shameful tweet shows tremendous ignorance of public policy, history, and a horrible lack of judgment. While we are relieved the congressman deleted the ill-thought-out tweet, such comments must be repudiated. The Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson my personal mentor and the foremost Jewish leader of the modern era, spoke often about the need not only for education but for moral education. Ignorance like this lays to bare that need in our society today, and I have reached out to Congressman Massie’s office with an offer to share our communities perspective and to educate.”

In April, Rabbi Litvin criticised Kentucky’s Libertarian Party after it compared vaccine passports to the yellow stars which Jews were forced to wear by the Nazis during the Holocaust as “morally wrong”, adding that the comparison minimised “the horrors inflicted on millions of people.”

On Monday, we reported that Wellstar Health System, an American healthcare company based in the State of Georgia, confirmed that an employee who made a TikTok video making a similar comparison was no longer employed by the organisation.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Twitter has made it more difficult for its partners, including Campaign Against Antisemitism, to report racist hate on its platform.

Last summer, Twitter invited Campaign Against Antisemitism to become a ‘Twitter partner’, allowing us to report problematic material directly through the company’s ‘partner portal’ to Twitter personnel (rather than machines) for review. Following our experience to date, we recently published a damning report, which prompted major national media coverage, showing how Twitter fails to implement consistently its own policies on hate.

However, Twitter appears to have reacted by making it even harder for us and its other so-called ‘partners’ to report hateful material to the company, in two ways.

First, reference numbers for reports are now not expressly connected to the specific tweets reported, making it impossible to report multiple tweets over short periods, which is precisely what partners are supposed to be empowered to do.

Second, Twitter has removed the option for ‘hate directed at a group’ as the basis for reporting a tweet. Although it remains possible to submit reports through other, less relevant options, the apparent removal of the hate option is a regressive step that makes reporting hate on Twitter more difficult and indicates that Twitter is not prioritising tackling racism on its platform.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Twitter has an endless capacity to lower the bar when it comes to antisemitism. Not only has it abjectly failed to tackle anti-Jewish racism on its platform, contrary to its nicely-worded statements and policies, and to listen to our advice or agree to offers or antisemitism training for staff, but now it has made it more difficult for third parties to monitor and report hate by other users. There comes a point when apathy becomes complicity, and Twitter is very quickly reaching it.”

Recently, Oliver Dowden, the Culture Secretary, has reiterated his call on social media companies to take action against hate on their platforms. “They must face up to their responsibilities, clean up their sites immediately and need not wait until they are forced to act by the government,” he said, adding: “I will continue to work closely with community leaders to hold the feet of social media companies to the fire so they deliver on their promises.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms. We also continue to make representations to the Government on this matter.

Wellstar Health System, an American healthcare company based in the State of Georgia, confirmed yesterday that an employee who made a TikTok video comparing the COVID-19 vaccine to the Holocaust is no longer employed by the organisation.

The video shows a woman, since identified as Jessica Renzi, in surgical scrubs talking to the camera, discussing COVID-19 vaccines and saying how she wanted to “do her part”. Ms Renzi can be heard saying: “Since we’re going to the vaccine passport and all those things, I thought I’d make it so much easier and I was just going to go ahead and get the number tattooed on me instead.” She then flips the camera around to reveal her arm, tattooed with the numbers ‘7734209’, which reads “GO2HELL” when viewed from the other way, in a style reminiscent of the tattoos forced upon Jews in Nazi concentration camps.

Ms Renzi, who was reportedly a surgical technician at Wellstar Health System’s Wellstone facility in Marietta, Georgia, allegedly created other videos seemingly similar in content before deleting her TikTok account.

Several people then sent tweets to Wellstar Health System informing the company of Ms Renzi’s video, to which it responded: “Thank you for bringing this to our attention. We cannot discuss personnel issues due to employee privacy. We are investigating in accordance with our mission, which is to care for the health and wellbeing of every person we serve. Thank you.”

However, shortly after, the company began responding to the tweets with the following statement instead: “Jessica Renzi is no longer employed by Wellstar Health System. We stand strongly against antisemitism & behaviour of any kind that does not serve our commitment to diversity, equity & inclusion.” The company also included a link to its “Diversity, Equity & Inclusion” policy.

Last month, it was reported that antisemitic content on TikTok has increased by 912%, according to a new study.

In May, Lily Ebert, a Holocaust survivor and educator, had her TikTok videos targeted by antisemitic trolls praising Hitler.

In October of last year, a director at TikTok told a Knesset Committee that hatred had “no place” on the video-sharing platform and that they would increase their efforts to remove antisemitic content.

Last summer, we reported that numerous users of the social media video platform were pretending to be Holocaust survivors in an abominable new antisemitic trend dubbed “trauma porn”.

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds Labour Party councillors in Bassetlaw after they apologised for ‘liking’ a fellow councillor’s Facebook post which compared the Conservative Party to Adolf Hitler’s SS.

The SS, the abbreviation of Schutzstaffel, was the leading paramilitary organisation under Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party.

Ian Ampleford, a Momentum activist, shared a Facebook post explaining that he had been banned from a Facebook group because he “made an innocent post comparing the Tories to the SS”. He added sarcastically: “I would like to take this opportunity to apologise unreservedly to anyone who voted for a German military organisation at the last general election.”

It is understood that Mr Ampleford’s original message, leading to his ban from the group, stated that his SS grandfather “would be proud of what the Tories have done to Britain”. This post was reportedly “liked” by Claire Plevin, a councillor for the ward of East Retford North.

Following this, East Retford West councillor, Jim Anderson, added to the inflammatory comparison with a post of his own, in which he stated that he was not surprised that Mr Ampleford had been “blackshirted”. He added: “Surely most self respecting SS thinkers would be appalled at being linked in such a way.” This post was then “liked” by Cllr Clarkson, the current Mayor of Retford.

Campaign Against Antisemitism called on the councillors to apologise. A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism told the Daily Express: “There is no reasonable basis for this offensive compariason. Such trivial equations of today’s politics with the darkest period in human history diminish the meaning and memory of the Holocaust. This is the opposite of the example politicians are supposed to be setting, both about Holocaust education and how to conduct public debate. Labour councillors must apologise.”

All three councillors were criticised by their Labour colleagues and fellow councillors, and were reportedly approached for comment by the media.

Cllr Clarkson said: “I would like to make an unreserved apology. I hold my hands up for innocently and naively liking a post by Jim Anderson as I was flicking through Facebook. I did not read the actual post, so did not know the context. I was merely liking a picture of what I assumed was Jim sat with a glass of wine and a copy of Private Eye whilst he was on holiday. That is my mistake and one which I will certainly learn from.”

He added: “I wholeheartedly support the Campaign Against Antisemitism’s comment that there is no excuse for comparing modern day politicians to the Nazis. Indeed, those with whom I have worked and been acquainted with over many years know that I would never sink to make these kind of comparisons and/or refer to Nazism or the Holocaust in any way other than within its historical context. Once again, I give my unreserved apology for any hurt that may have been caused by my flippant liking of an image on social media without reading the text associated with it.”

Cllr Plevin said: “My actions were wrong and inappropriate, and I apologise unreservedly.”

We applaud Cllr Clarkson and Cllr Plevin for recognising the impropriety of their endorsements of the inflammatory posts and apologising. No apology from Cllr Anderson – who posted one of the inflammatory comments himself – has yet been reported, and we call on him to follow his colleagues’ example.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Police are investigating after a series of antisemitic Facebook posts, apparently spanning years, from a Norwegian imam were revealed recently.

Noor Ahmad Noor is an imam who served as the Director for the Norway branch of Minhaj-ul-Quran, an international non-governmental Muslim organisation that is said to be thought of as moderate and geared toward outreach, for many years. As part of his role as Director, Mr Noor would have participated in meetings with top government officials.

However, he was suspended indefinitely in light of the recent news concerning his history of antisemitic Facebook posts. One of the posts allegedly stated that Jews were dangerous and “should be killed”, while another from 2019 asserted that Jews “put the world in danger” and it was “necessary to kill them.”

Addressing the allegations, the imam said: “My posts were published in frustration over attacks in Gaza. Innocent children and women were killed. My criticism and frustration should have been directed at the regime. And not against a group of people. I apologise.”

Releasing its own statement, Minhaj-ul-Quran wrote: “These are attitudes and values we have zero tolerance for as a religious community. This is contrary to what we have been working for for decades.”

In February, a host on Norway’s state-owned broadcaster went on an antisemitic rant on live radio referring pejoratively to Israel as “God’s chosen people”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Merchandise featuring the neo-Nazi slogans “Camp Auschwitz” and “6mwe” have been found on the image-sharing social media platform, Pinterest.

Last week, an article from The Markup revealed that 64 ‘pins’ – images that can be uploaded and shared – featured merchandise containing the acronym “6mwe”, the neo-Nazi acronym for the phrase “6 million wasn’t enough”, which refers to Nazi Germany’s genocide of six million Jews in the Holocaust.

Nine pins were discovered that featured throw pillows, backpacks, travel mugs, and face masks with the phrase “Camp Auschwitz” over a skull and the phrase “Work brings freedom”, the slogan above the gates of Auschwitz, one of the most notorious concentration camps where over a million people were murdered.

These pins seemingly contravene several of Pinterest’s community guidelines, specifically the ones which prohibit content that features:

  • Support for hate groups and people promoting hateful activities, prejudice and conspiracy theories
  • Support for white supremacy, limiting women’s rights and other discriminatory ideas
  • Hate-based conspiracy theories and misinformation, like Holocaust denial

In fact, when searching for the term “6mwe” through the Pinterest website, you are met with the message: “Pinterest isn’t a place for hateful images, content or activities. Find out more about our policies.”

The means of accessing these pins were not found through the search function on the Pinterest website, but through Google. Typing “6mwe hoodie” will not yield any results when entered on Pinterest itself, but when typed into Google, you are presented with a backdoor portal that can allow you to view the hateful content on Pinterest. This is because Pinterest’s strategy on targeting hateful content revolves around restricting access to it, rather than taking it down. This means that Pinterest may have a blind spot when it comes to considering how individuals may be able to access its content using other methods.  

When presented with the findings, the pins were removed. Crystal Espinosa, a spokesperson for the website, said that “there’s no place for content like this on Pinterest.” She added: “When we identify or are made aware of content that violates our policies, we review and take action.”

When asked why the pins were accessible in the first place, Ms Espinosa said that moderation over the website could be improved, and that “given the volume and complexity of content, there is always more work to do, and we also recognise that we have more opportunities to improve.”  

The “Camp Auschwitz” pins all lead to Redbubble, an online marketplace that allows users to upload their custom designs to a variety of products. Marissa Hermo, a spokesperson for Redbubble, said that these items were violations of its policy and were removed on the same day as they were uploaded. “We have a suspend-for-review mechanism in place for specific topics, so this content should not have been available for public view,” Ms Hermo said.

38 antisemitic pins reportedly lead to actual products hosted by various online sellers. Most of the products had been removed or had inactive links, but nearly one-third were still available to buy from vendors like donefashion.com, funnysayingtshirts.com, myclothzoo.com, teesbuys.com, teeshirtxyz.com, and teejabs.com. These websites were approached for comment but did not respond.

When approached for comment, it was pointed out by Google spokesperson Jane Park that content can be taken down from the search engine when a website removes said content from its own platform first, and then uses the “Outdated Content” tool. “Our results reflect information available on the open web, and sites can choose if they want to have their pages indexed by Google,” said Ms Park.

Presented with this information, Ms Espinosa said: “We have oversight of the content that appears on our platform and work with Google to expedite removal of links to content that has been removed from Pinterest. We’re always working to speed up this process so that policy-violating content is not persistent elsewhere.”

At the time of writing, Campaign Against Antisemitism found that 6mwe merchandise was still available on Pinterest with an active link leading to the product from an online vendor. In the comment section, a user wrote: “sorry if you don’t like it, but if you don’t order this shirts its doesnt’t matter or may be do you have any idea or suggestion the interesting shirts. thanks : )”

Campaign Against Antisemitism also discovered several accounts on Pinterest sharing images of Nazis with the numbers “1488” in their profile name (examples can be seen here and here). 1488 is often used as a coded reference to the neo-Nazi fourteen-word oath: “We must secure the existence of our people and a future for white children”, a slogan initially devised by David Lane, a member of the white supremacist terrorist group “The Order” which was responsible for the murder of Jewish radio host Alan Berg. The number 88 refers to the eighth letter of the alphabet, H, and is intended as a code for “Heil Hitler.”

This is not the first instance of neo-Nazi items being advertised through large, online websites.

Last year, Amazon removed t-shirts, hoodies and cups, emblazoned with “6mwe”. The neo-Nazi items were allegedly also available for a short time at American online site Teespring, but the apparel site reportedly said that the neo-Nazi attire had been removed and the seller “permanently banned”, with a spokesperson noting that the site “categorically” did not “allow or condone” harmful content that may lead to “harassment or violence” or “threats to the health and safety of the public.”

Earlier this year, the online marketplace Etsy apologised for selling a t-shirt with the phrase “Camp Auschwitz” and reported that it had immediately banned the seller after being made aware of the item. The item, which came to prominence after photographs emerged of a protestor at the attack on Capitol Hill wearing similar apparel, was described on the website as “everything you’ve dreamed of and more” and “flattering for both men and women”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Barely one year after his antisemitic social media rampage, Wiley has been accepted back on Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

On 24th July 2020, the rapper Richard Kylea Cowie, who is known as Wiley, spent days engaged in an escalating rant on social media against Jews. After likening Jews to the Ku Klux Klan and claiming that Jews had cheated him and were “snakes”, Wiley tweeted that Jews should “hold some corn”, a slang expression meaning that they should be shot. He added: “Jewish community you deserve it”. He then also called on “black people” to go to “war” with Jews.

Wiley repeatedly evoked conspiracy theories that Jews were responsible for the slave trade and that modern-day Jews are in fact imposters who usurped black people — a conspiracy theory that has incited acts of terrorism against Jews, such as a shooting in Jersey City and a stabbing attack in Monsey, NY during the festival of Chanukah last December.

In the days that followed, Wiley continued to rail against Jews on Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. Following discussions with Campaign Against Antisemitism, a major 48-hour boycott of Twitter and Instagram in which we participated, and our projection of antisemitic tweets onto Twitter’s London headquarters, which then went viral, TwitterFacebook (which owns Instagram), Google (which owns YouTube) and TikTok agreed to remove Wiley from their platforms, depriving him of access to his nearly one million social media followers.

However, it appears that all is forgiven as Wiley is once again active on Twitter, Instagram and YouTube in what is just the latest example of social media platforms not taking antisemitism seriously.

A few weeks ago, newly returned to Twitter, Wiley tweeted: “In all my years on earth I realised everyone wants you to care about their stuff like Holocaust etc but not one of them give a f*** about the enslavement and f***ery of black people so it’s hard for me to care for them knowing they don’t care for us #YaGetIt #JusSayin”

Recently, we published a major report that shows how Twitter fails to implement consistently its own policies on hate. The report showed how Twitter appointed Campaign Against Antisemitism as a partner to monitor anti-Jewish racism on its platform and promised regular meetings, only to cease those meetings and ignore offers of antisemitism training after we began alerting the company to the inconsistent application of its policies by personnel.

Not only were phrases like “f*** the Jews” not considered to breach Twitter’s rules, but other phrases such as “Hitler was right” were sometimes permitted and sometimes removed, without any form of coherent reasoning. Moreover, one of the few areas where Twitter has in the past said that it would take action is over Holocaust denial, pledging to remove “attempts to deny or diminish” violent events such as the Shoah. Our report, however, shows that Twitter personnel repeatedly raised no objection to phrases such as “#Holohoax” and other, more elaborate tweets of Holocaust denial.

A separate study revealed that 90% of antisemitic social media posts remain on Facebook and Twitter even after being reported. The Center for Countering Digital Hate (CCDH) conducted the study of 714 antisemitic posts across Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and TikTok. Its research found that 84% of antisemitic posts remained, with 90% remaining on Facebook and Twitter specifically. The findings from the CCDH noted that in particular, the social media giants’ response to tackling racist conspiracy theories was particularly disappointing. They ignored 89% of antisemitic conspiracy theories and addressed only 5% that blamed Jewish people for the COVID-19 pandemic. Only one in 20 posts that attacked Jewish people directly were removed. In situations where a post had clear links to violence or neo-Nazism, 30% of posts were removed.

Recently, Campaign Against Antisemitism called on the New World Fest music festival to drop the unrepentant antisemite Wiley from its line-up. The grime artist was due to appear at the festival last weekend, however, it was reported that he did not show up.

At the time of Wiley’s original antisemitic tirade, Campaign Against Antisemitism immediately reported Wiley to the Metropolitan Police Service, but in September the police force confirmed to us that Wiley was not in the UK at the time of his antisemitic tirade. Under Home Office rules, that means that the Metropolitan Police must give primacy to police in the jurisdiction where Wiley was at the time. Lawyers acting for Campaign Against Antisemitism have filed a criminal complaint with the Public Prosecution Service in the Netherlands, which is where grime artist Wiley was located when he launched his tirade against Jews.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “One year after his antisemitic social media rampage, why on earth is Wiley back on Twitter, Instagram and YouTube? Not only have social media companies abjectly failed to take antisemitism on their platforms seriously, as evidenced by our recent report and other findings, but to permit Wiley back on their networks despite their pledges barely a year ago adds insult to injury. They have no shame.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms. We also continue to make representations to the Government on this matter.

https://twitter.com/EskidanceLive/status/1408697107784122374

90% of antisemitic social media posts remain on Facebook and Twitter even after being reported, a new study has revealed.

The Center for Countering Digital Hate (CCDH) conducted the study of 714 antisemitic posts across Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and TikTok. Its research found that 84% of antisemitic posts remained, with 90% remaining on Facebook and Twitter specifically.

Imran Ahmed, the Chief Executive of CCDH, said that the study showed that social media was a “safe space for racists to normalise their conspiracies and hateful rhetoric without fear of consequences.”

He added: “This is not about algorithms or automation; our research shows that social media companies allow bigots to keep their accounts open and their hate to remain online, even when human moderators are notified.”

The findings from the CCDH noted that in particular, the social media giants’ response to tackling racist conspiracy theories was particularly disappointing. They ignored 89% of antisemitic conspiracy theories and addressed only 5% that blamed Jewish people for the COVID-19 pandemic.

Only one in 20 posts that attacked Jewish people directly were removed. In situations where a post had clear links to violence or neo-Nazism, 30% of posts were removed.

A spokesman for Facebook, which also owns Instagram, said: “These reports do not account for the fact that we have taken action on fifteen times the amount of hate speech since 2017, the prevalence of hate speech is decreasing on our platform and, of the hate speech we remove, 97 percent was found before someone reported it.”

A Twitter spokesman said: “We strongly condemn antisemitism. We’re working to make Twitter a safer place, and improving the speed and scale of our rule enforcement is a top priority. We recognise that there’s more to do.”

It was reported that TikTok said in a statement that “it condemns antisemitism and proactively removes accounts and content that violate its policies,” while it was said that YouTube “made significant progress” in removing hate speech over the past few years.

Recently, we published a report which revealed that Twitter invited Campaign Against Antisemitism to become a “Twitter partner”, allowing us to report problematic material directly through the company’s “partner portal” to Twitter personnel (rather than machines) for review, only for the platform to cease contact with us after we had flagged up hundreds of antisemitic tweets. Following the news of this report, Twitter has reportedly declined to respond.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms. We also continue to make representations to the Government on this matter.

Twitter has reportedly declined to respond to a major report by Campaign Against Antisemitism that shows how the social media giant fails to implement consistently its own policies on hate.

The report, published a few days ago, showed how Twitter appointed Campaign Against Antisemitism as a partner to monitor anti-Jewish racism on its platform and promised regular meetings, only to cease those meetings and ignore offers of antisemitism training after we began alerting the company to the inconsistent application of its policies by personnel.

Not only were phrases like “f*** the Jews” not considered to breach Twitter’s rules, but other phrases such as “Hitler was right” were sometimes permitted and sometimes removed, without any form of coherent reasoning.

Moreover, one of the few areas where Twitter has in the past said that it would take action is over Holocaust denial, pledging to remove “attempts to deny or diminish” violent events such as the Shoah. Our report, however, shows that Twitter personnel repeatedly raised no objection to phrases such as “#Holohoax” and other, more elaborate tweets of Holocaust denial.

To the extent that this is because Twitter staff are unschooled in recognising Holocaust denial or anti-Jewish racism, it is all the more disappointing that Twitter has failed to take up offers of antisemitism training for its personnel by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Twitter reportedly told The Times, when confronted with Campaign Against Antisemitism’s findings, that “all online abuse — including antisemitic abuse — has no place on Twitter [and] is prohibited by our rules”. However, as the report shows, whatever the policies may or may not say is largely irrelevant when they are inconsistently applied. During the period of our partnership with Twitter, at no time did Twitter adequately explain to us the parameters for removing or permitting tweets or who is reviewing hateful material or how they have been trained.

The reality is that, contrary to Twitter’s stated position, antisemitic abuse very much has a “place on Twitter”. Twitter’s abysmal record and apparent disinclination to improve reveal that it is either incapable or unwilling to regulate itself, underscoring the need for Government legislation to compel it — and other social media companies — to do so.

On the publication of the report, Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We do not have confidence in Twitter’s capacity to address the rampant antisemitism on its platform. As Twitter’s partner in trying to combat anti-Jewish hate, we have not come to this conclusion lightly. But the opacity of Twitter’s parameters, its inconsistent implementation of its own policies, its lack of interest in our offers of training for its personnel, and its decision ultimately to stop engaging with us at all, are not the actions of a company that takes antisemitism seriously.

“If Twitter brought us on as a partner as some sort of fig leaf for its inaction, we are now laying bare the true picture of the company. Having cut off contact with us after we provided clear evidence that Twitter’s policies on hateful material are failing, it is clear that the company is neither capable nor interested in tackling antisemitism, and it must now fall to an independent regulator to assume that role instead. We continue to urge the Government to take action now to stem the tide of antisemitic hate online.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms. We also continue to make representations to the Government on this matter.

The children’s charity Barnardo’s is investigating one of its staffers for reportedly sharing inflammatory social media posts, including an image that resulted in Naz Shah MP’s suspenion from the Labour Party in 2016.

Rubina Halim, a Barnardo’s teacher, shared an image on Facebook that situates Israel in the middle of the United States and calls for the relocation of Israel to America. She added the comment: “The perfect solution to the Israel-Palestine conflict.”

This was the same image for which Naz Shah MP apologised and was suspended from the Labour Party in 2016 under then Labour Leader Jeremy Corbyn. Labour’s Deputy Chair of Newham Council, Cllr Nazir Ahmed, was also suspended for sharing the same image earlier this year.

Ms Halim made the inflammatory post on Facebook. In a separate post, she stated that Israel has “governments around the world in their pockets” and alluded to how Israel “controlled and manipulated” the media.

“Think about their spyware – can they not hack anyone anywhere? Think about how [Israel] have governments around the world in their pockets,” the Facebook post read. It continued: “Think about how the media is controlled and manipulated.”

Ms Halim’s posts were not limited to Facebook, however, as it appeared that she had shared several more on LinkedIn, including one that depicted an American dollar bill, folded into the shape of a Star of David. On a separate post, another comment written by Ms Halim read: “Are you surprised that the UK government have been bought by Israel.”

Ms Halim also appeared to endorse a controversial post that was shared by a user who went by the name of Mohammed Sadat Ali, in which he shared an article titled “Jewish Faith, Talmud, and Zionist in Islamic Review”. Mr Ali wrote that the article explained “why the Jewish state of Israel is referred to as a racist, chauvinistic, theocratic, conservative and highly dogmatic state,” a post that Ms Halim shared and added: “Need to read this!”

In response to the criticism surrounding her post, Ms Halim said: “I am not antisemitic and truly do not recognise how my post could be described as antisemitic. My sincerest apologies if my post has offended you in any way.”

In a statement, Barnardo’s said: “We would like to assure the public that these are strictly the personal views of the staff member and do not represent the views of Barnardo’s. Barnardo’s does not tolerate any kind of racism, including antisemitism and all our staff and volunteers are required to adhere to strict codes of conduct and policies on equality and diversity. The individual has been instructed to remove the offending content immediately and firm action has been taken pending a full and thorough investigation.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

Over the summer of last year, the British rapper Wiley delivered a multi-day antisemitic tirade over several social media networks, leading to a mass, online walkout. Following a protest by Campaign Against Antisemitism at Twitter’s London headquarters and interventions from the Prime Minister and Home Secretary, Twitter was finally forced to acknowledge the scale of antisemitic hatred on its platform and commit to addressing it. 

Within weeks, Twitter invited Campaign Against Antisemitism to become a “Twitter partner”, allowing us to report problematic material directly through the company’s “partner portal” to Twitter personnel (rather than machines) for review. We were led to understand that these personnel were trained to identify antisemitism. 

As well as submitting material for review on a regular basis, we also collated and summarised the material in monthly reports, which we submitted to Twitter at the end of December, January and February.

In aggregate, we submitted a selection of 1,000 of the most horrendous antisemitic tweets to Twitter incorporating classic antisemitic tropes, Holocaust denial and anti-Jewish incitement. Among them were numerous tweets incorporating the hashtag #HitlerWasRight or the phrase “Holohoax” and references to “fake Jewish Holocaust”, conspiracies about Jewish power and control, blood libels against Jews, calls to “Gas the Jews” and other extreme antisemitic hate speech and abuse.

The following is a sample of tweets from just one day – 4th December 2020 – all of which Twitter deemed acceptable for its platform.

  • “Wow. Biden’s now over 81 million votes? It’s like the Holohoax: you can just keep making up numbers” [complaint ticket 0183098131]
  • “G-d forbid anyone running for office condemn Israel for what they did and are currently doing to the Palestinians. They wouldn’t get elected considering Jews control our government, MSM [mainstream media], social media, Hollywood, financial institutions” [complaint ticket 0183100735]
  • “Except Hitler was right” [complaint ticket 0183140200]
  • “It’s probably the same useless junk that is in any other vaccines. All vaccines were created by Jews to control the population of the goyim. (((Jonas Salk)))” [complaint ticket 0183100251]
  • “What the f*** is this joke man???? What year are we living? THIS F***IN[‘] PROVES ZIONIST JEWS R PART OF THIS. WHY? VERY SIMPLE. THEY CONTROLLING THE WORLD. THEY CONTROL MEDIA. YET NOTHING IS GOING ON. THEY ENJOYING JUST LIKE THEY ENJOYED 1915 ARMENIAN GENOCIDE. SO F*** U ALL! [sic]” [complaint ticket 0183099274]
  • “3 baby Jew rats. 1 will grow up and Rob empires. 1 will go up committing sex act. 1 will grow up and become a Rabbi and will commit Jewish Talmudic Hebaric Terrrorism [sic]” [complaint ticket 0183140615]

This sample of tweets from just one single day showcases the variety of antisemitic tropes and the diversity of Anglophone Twitter users promoting them. But the degree of anti-Jewish racist vitriol on Twitter is well-established, and it has only intensified during the pandemic. What was remarkable, however, was that all of these tweets – and hundreds of others like them – were brought to Twitter’s attention over the course of several months by Campaign Against Antisemitism but were expressly deemed by the company to be acceptable on its platform.

Astonishingly, about 60 percent of the tweets that we submitted were not deemed to have breached Twitter’s policies on hate. For example, in December we reported 239 tweets, of which only 43 were found to be in violation of Twitter’s rules.

Meanwhile, although 194 of those tweets were found not to have violated the rules, the material in permitted and prohibited tweets was often the same. Moreover, 37 of the permitted tweets were subsequently reversed on re-submission or escalation, a token gesture that raised further questions about the consistency of Twitter’s implementation of its own rules: Why are some tweets removed while others incorporating the same antisemitic content are permitted to remain? Why do some Twitter operators deem certain tweets to be antisemitic but other operators take a different view on the same tweets?

At no time has Twitter adequately explained to us the parameters for removing or permitting tweets or who is reviewing hateful material or how they have been trained. Campaign Against Antisemitism’s offers of training for Twitter staff have been ignored.

After we raised concerns about the implementation of Twitter’s policies – following the grime artist Wiley’s antisemitic rampage on social media last summer – Twitter agreed to meet with us monthly to discuss progress. However, after the first meeting in December, notwithstanding that we continued to send reports over the ensuing months, Twitter cancelled further meetings. The tech giant welcomed the continued submission of the reports but asserted that the monthly meetings – of which only one had taken place – could not proceed. Although we continued to send reports, these have no longer been acknowledged or acted upon. In short, Twitter cut off contact with us after we provided clear evidence that their policies on hateful material were failing.

Remarkably, it was Twitter that invited Campaign Against Antisemitism to become its partner on tackling antisemitism on its platform, and it was Twitter that suggested monthly meetings to progress matters. But when its own partner alerted the social media giant to the scale of anti-Jewish hatred and the inconsistency of the implementation of its own rules, Twitter decided not to proceed at all. These are not the actions of a company interested in addressing antisemitism on its platform.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We do not have confidence in Twitter’s capacity to address the rampant antisemitism on its platform. As Twitter’s partner in trying to combat anti-Jewish hate, we have not come to this conclusion lightly. But the opacity of Twitter’s parameters, its inconsistent implementation of its own policies, its lack of interest in our offers of training for its personnel, and its decision ultimately to stop engaging with us at all, are not the actions of a company that takes antisemitism seriously.

“If Twitter brought us on as a partner as some sort of fig leaf for its inaction, we are now laying bare the true picture of the company. Having cut off contact with us after we provided clear evidence that Twitter’s policies on hateful material are failing, it is clear that the company is neither capable nor interested in tackling antisemitism, and it must now fall to an independent regulator to assume that role instead. We continue to urge the Government to take action now to stem the tide of antisemitic hate online.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms. We also continue to make representations to the Government on this matter.

The Executive Director of the controversial activist group, Human Rights Watch, posted a tweet with the phrase “Antisemitism is always wrong, but…”.

Kenneth Roth, an attorney who has headed the organisation since 1993, wrote on Twitter: “Antisemitism is always wrong, and it long preceded the creation of Israel, but the surge in UK antisemitic incidents during the recent Gaza conflict gives the lie to those who pretend that the Israeli government’s conduct doesn’t affect antisemitism.”

His tweet captioned an article about the surge in anti-Jewish racism in Britain over the past few weeks during the conflict between the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group, Hamas, and Israel.

Mr Roth’s tweet appeared to victim-blame the Jews for antisemitism, seeming to justify antisemites holding Jews responsible for the actions or perceived actions of the Israeli Government. According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the State of Israel” is an example of antisemitism.

Many observed that Mr Roth would never countenance blaming other minorities for the hatred visited upon them.

Mr Roth initially doubled down, posting another tweet that said: “Interesting how many people pretend that this tweet justifies antisemitism (it doesn’t and I don’t under any circumstances) rather than address the correlation noted in the Haaretz article between recent Israeli government conduct in Gaza and the rise of UK antisemitic incidents.”

He then deleted the original tweet and reposted the article in a tweet with the following caption: “I deleted an earlier tweet because people misinterpreted its wording. I repost the Haaretz article here without commentary: ‘UK Antisemitism Rose to Record Levels During Israel-Gaza Fighting’ ‘The most intense period of anti-Jewish hatred in recent years.’”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

Mark Zuckerberg has been targeted with antisemitic abuse on Facebook.

On Tuesday, Mr Zuckerberg, the founder of Facebook, posted a collection of photos depicting his dog wearing different items of clothing. One of the photos showed his dog wearing a Jewish skullcap, or “kippah”, and a prayer shawl, or “tallit.” 

In response, the photo’s comment section was swarmed with antisemitic images and memes. Some of the comments included caricatures of Jews with long, hooked noses, allusions to Jews in control of the media, and other widely used antisemitic memes. 

Numerous anti-Israel comments and images were posted as well. According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Accusing Jewish citizens of being more loyal to Israel, or to the alleged priorities of Jews worldwide, than to the interests of their own nations” is an example of antisemitism. 

Last year, the satirical puppet show, Spitting Image, came under fire for a caricature of Mark Zuckerberg with a gratuitously big nose.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

The Culture Secretary has written a letter to social media giants urging them to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Oliver Dowden’s letter to Facebook, Twitter, Google, Snapchat, and TikTok has said that although the Definition is not legally binding, it is “an invaluable tool for organisations to understand how antisemitism manifests itself in the 21st century and to tackle it.”

“It will require platforms to take effective steps to remove and limit the spread of illegal content, including criminal antisemitic abuse,” the letter added.

We recently reported that antisemitism on TikTok had increased by 912%, while on Twitter, abhorrent hashtags such as #HitlerWasRight, #HitlerTheGreat and #Holocaust_was_right were all trending internationally. However, Twitter has confirmed that it is reviewing Mr Dowden’s letter and reaffirmed its condemnation of antisemitism. 

Recently, speaking at Bevis Marks, the oldest synagogue in Britain, about the Definition, Mr Dowden said: “There may be some practicalities about exactly how [social media giants] incorporate it, but the essence of the International Definition [of Antisemitism] I want them to adopt, just as the Government has committed to that.”

Last year, the Culture Secretary announced that social media companies will have a duty of care to users under new legislation, and that “criminal antisemitic posts will need to be removed without delay.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been at the forefront of calls for Online Harms legislation, and last year joined a global coalition calling on Facebook to adopt the Definition.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authoritiesuniversities, public bodies and other institutions. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

Antisemitic content on the social media platform TikTok has increased by 912%, according to a new study.

According to research from Dr Gabriel Weimann of the University of Haifa and Natalie Masri of IDC Herzliya’s Institute for Counter-Terrorism, antisemitic comments on TikTok grew 912% from 41 in 2020 to 415 in 2021, and the platform saw 61 antisemitic postings so far this year compared to 43 last year. 

Antisemitic tropes and images that were used in video content included Nazi salutes, diminishing the impact of the Holocaust, and propagating caricatures of Jews with long, hooked noses. 

Antisemitic usernames, such as “@holocaustwasgood” and “@eviljews”, increased a staggering 1,375% from four in 2020 to 59 in 2021. 

Dr Weimann expressed concern that the platform’s algorithm lends itself to suggesting further hateful content to users who may have clicked on dangerous videos, rather than restricting them. He said that “TikTok’s catering to young, impressionable and naive audiences, combined with bad-faith actors who are posting hateful content online, is something that should be taken very seriously,” before warning that some users may fall down “a rabbit hole of hatred.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “This dramatic increase in antisemitism on TikTok is an urgent concern, particularly because of the platform’s appeal to younger users.

“Social media platforms can act as hotspots for the dissemination of racist tropes and conspiracy theories. Technology companies, therefore, have a responsibility to enforce their own policies, ensure their algorithms do not promote antisemitic material and remove dangerous posts and ban repeat offenders.

“Last year, a TikTok Director declared the company’s intention to intensify its removal of antisemitic content. Instead, the reverse appears to be the case. TikTok must prove it is serious about tackling antisemitism not with empty words but with real action.”

This report follows a similar one released last year which revealed that the social media platform was infested with far-right antisemitism and Holocaust denial.

In May, Lily Ebert, a Holocaust survivor and educator, had her TikTok videos targeted by antisemitic trolls praising Hitler.

In October of last year, a director at TikTok told a Knesset Committee that hatred had “no place” on the video-sharing platform and that they would increase their efforts to remove antisemitic content.

Last summer, we reported that numerous users of the social media video platform were pretending to be Holocaust survivors in an abominable new antisemitic trend dubbed “trauma porn”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

Gab’s Twitter account has been suspended after tweeting that antisemitism is “anything Jews don’t like.” 

Gab is a social-media platform that was founded in 2016 with a claim to “champion free speech,” and has become a haven for supporters of the QAnon conspiracy theory and other far-right groups and individuals banned from mainstream platforms.

The inflammatory tweet reads: “‘Antisemitism’ has become ‘ban and censor anything Jews don’t like,’ and well, that’s not gonna fly on a pro-first amendment pro-free speech website. Sorry.”

The post continues: “Use the block button, or stay on Twitter. No special privileges on Gab for any groups.”

While Gab proclaims to be “pro-free speech,” others have described the network as racist and alleges that it promotes several conspiracy theories. 

Earlier this year, the founder of Gab, Andrew Torba, was accused of wooing far-right figures to his platform with promises of greater visibility.

Far-right figures have turned to sites such as Gab to avoid restrictions on hate-content on more mainstream platforms such as Facebook and Twitter. Mr Torba has tried to distance Gab from the far-right groups that have made it their home. In 2018, on a podcast, he said: “Do we have alt-right users? Certainly. Alt-right users also exist on Facebook, on Twitter, on Reddit, and everywhere else on the Internet.” He went on to insist that Gab had “good people” who “believe in individual liberty…and free expression.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

There was an 80% rise in antisemitic hate crimes – including physical attacks on Jews in the US and Europe – during the May conflict between Israel and Hamas, according to the Secure Community Network (SCN), a US-based group.

SCN partially attributes the spike to an “explosion of disinformation” on social media, which it links to Iran.

According to research by the Network Contagion Research Institute – affiliated to Rutgers University and the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) – this was allegedly spread and “amplified” by Twitter accounts linked to the Iranian regime. These accounts allegedly spread messages such as “Hitler was right” and “kill all Jews” at a rate of 175 times per minute.

According to ADL chief executive Jonathan Greenblatt, “the troll armies of the Islamic Republic of Iran” were behind the Tweets.

SCN said that a study by the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University revealed that the Twitter hashtag “#COVID1948” – promoting the idea that the Jewish state was a dangerous virus – originated with an Iranian network in April 2020 and could allegedly be traced to Iran’s Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei. The hashtag was used to link COVID-19 with various antisemitic conspiracy theories, including blaming a “Zionist plot” for creating the pandemic. These spread rapidly in Iran and across the Middle East and were allegedly officially promoted by Iran’s state-owned media and by its proxies with one Houthi official reportedly saying: “That virus that has spread all over the world – the Jews are behind it.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Leading Silicon Valley figures have signed a letter condemning the recent surge of antisemitism in the United States.

The letter’s signatories include former Twitter CEO, Dick Costolo, Co-founder of HuffPost, Arianna Huffington, as well as several Google and YouTube executives.

The letter begins: “If we’re going to stand against hate in all its forms, we need to stand against antisemitism. Too few Americans acknowledge that antisemitism — prejudice against Jewish people — exists. It is an insidious and long-standing hatred.”

Commenting on the recent spate of antisemitic attacks across the United States, the letter says: “The pain and the fear around these violent attacks reverberates against the unshakable memory of the Holocaust. This horrific mass murder of Jews showed us how deep antisemitism runs, and what can happen when we allow hate against people because of their religion, race, sexuality, or any other aspect of their identity.

“As business leaders, we have a collective responsibility to stand up for the society we want. Today, we stand against antisemitism and violence against Jews. This is true regardless of your views on Israel; this is about protecting people from the injustice of antisemitism and hatred.”

However, while the letter is a welcome step in the right direction, many of these companies still have a long way to go in tackling antisemitism. Recently, for example, Campaign Against Antisemitism reported that Google’s Head of Diversity Strategy wrote that Jews have an “insatiable appetite for war and killing” and an “insensitivity to the suffering [of] others.” He was not fired from Google but merely moved to another post.

Last week, we published findings that YouTube has allowed the creators of virulently antisemitic videos that refer to the “Jewish lobby” and describe Hitler as “an angel” to continue to use platform.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A video by an group described as “antisemitic” was pulled by YouTube after it was revealed that the podcast had allegedly faked an interview with Texas Republican State Senator Bob Hall.

The “Barnes Review History Hour Podcast” goes out under the imprimatur of The Barnes Review, which the Southern Poverty Law Centre, describes as “one of the most virulent antisemitic organisations around”.

Liberal watchdog group Media Matters for America (MMA) initially published a story critical of Senator Hall and the podcast, noting that he had “complained about critical race theory” on the “programme of a white nationalist, pro-Hitler outlet that denies the Holocaust.”

An MMA spokesperson said that after publication, they were made aware that the interview was fake, falsely claiming to have interviewed Senator Hall and splicing in comments from previous interviews. MMA then issued a retraction.

A representative for the senator confirmed that the interview was “fake” and had been “pawned off as original content.”

The YouTube link now notes that the video has been removed for “violating YouTube’s Terms of Service.” A YouTube spokesperson stated: “Our policies don’t allow content that has been manipulated in a way that misleads users.”

The ‘interview’ was also pulled from The Barnes Review website where a man who identified himself as Senior Editor Paul Angel said that he was not aware that the interview had been faked and would not have allowed it to be published if he had been. He also objected to the organisation being accused of Holocaust-denial, insisting that TBR was a “neutral observer” that “presents scientific stuff” on the issue.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

YouTube has allowed the creators of virulently antisemitic videos that refer to the “Jewish lobby” and describe Hitler as “an angel” to remain on its platform.

The JC reported on the antisemitic videos last week, hosted by Urdu-speaking YouTubers, and the hosts have now hit back at the newspaper for shining a light on their racism.

One the hosts, Zaid Hamid, can be seen declaring that “In reality, Hitler was an angel, the way he took action against Jews, the way he killed Jews.”

Pakistani news presenter Imran Riaz Khan stated in a video to his 1.65 million subscribers that “Jewish lobbyists” are “very strong”, and that they “lobby for others too in exchange for money.” He went on to proclaim that there are several “Jewish lobbies” in America and Europe, and that they have a desire to “control America.”

“Anyone who stands in any important elections for the House of Representatives or any other forum, they interview them and view their life and keep an eye on them,” the presenter said, adding: “Anyone who is in big positions in America, Jews keep an eye on them and spy on their lifestyle and anyone who disagrees with them they create troubles for him. Jews were behind Trump. Similarly anyone else who runs for the Presidency has the Jewish lobby support.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy or of Jews controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions” is an example of antisemitism.

Makhdoom Shahab-ud-Din, another YouTuber who has over 600,000 subscribers, is also accused of spreading antisemitic hate. In one video, he claimed that Jewish people “play” an “antisemitism card” when confronted about the actions of the Israeli Government, and that any criticism of Israel causes Jews to “come together and start attacking.”

According to the Definition, “Accusing Jewish citizens of being more loyal to Israel, or to the alleged priorities of Jews worldwide, than to the interests of their own nations” is also an example of antisemitism.

He also went on to praise Hamas, the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group, stating that they “gained a huge success” in their bombing of Israel.

Umer Karim, a Visiting Fellow at the Royal United Services Institute (RUSI) with an interest in Pakistan, said: “The Pakistani Urdu media discourse, whether electronic, print or digital, is heavily influenced by conspiracy theories that remain overarchingly antisemitic and consider Jews responsible for every wrongdoing in the world, particularly when it concerns the Muslim world. These narratives then resultantly fuel extremist attitudes, particularly against Jews who are considered as the centre of all evil, regardless of the fact if they politically support Israel or not.”

However, the YouTubers in question have since attacked the JC for its reporting on the issue.

Mr Khan accused the newspaper of being a “cabal” that is spreading “fake news” about Jew-hatred, even going as far to state that “there’s no hatred of Jews.” During this video, he displayed numerous images of Orthodox Jews in the background.

Further alluding to the antisemitic trope of global Jewish power, Mr Shahab-ud-Din stated that their “reporting” was not “liked by certain powers in the world.” He went on to refer to himself, Mr Khan, and Mr Hamid as the latest “victims” of the “antisemitism card.” He then requested that his viewers subscribe to his backup YouTube channel so that the “Jews fail in their nefarious and dirty objectives.”

A spokesperson for YouTube said: “Hate has no place on YouTube. To fight the spread of harmful content and protect our community, we’ve worked hard to develop responsible guidelines to define and make clear what content is unacceptable. When content is flagged to us, we work quickly to remove videos that violate our policies.”

However, it is notable that while several of the antisemitic videos have been removed, the creator’s channels have been allowed to remain.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “YouTube has become a top tier platform for spreading hatred of Jews. Google has been making some progress in removing antisemitic incitement videos that are in the English language, but that progress is slow. However, as we know, some of the worst anti-Jewish incitement is not in English. The JC’s investigation has shone a spotlight on the fact that some of the worst incitement on YouTube is in languages like Urdu. These prolific broadcasters are whipping up hatred of Jews amongst Urdu speakers around the world, including here in the UK. There can be no excuses — Google needs to act and we will be discussing the JC’s findings with them.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

Clubhouse is rampant with antisemitism yet again with users calling for the death of Jews and donning profile photos of Hamas, the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group.

Clubhouse is a live audio app that emerged during the COVID-19 lockdown, described by Bloomberg News as a favoured haunt for “venture capitalists and other Silicon Valley insiders.”

Last night, users participated in a pro-Hamas Clubhouse room called “Why are all Zionists ugly?” which featured several users donning profile photos of Hamas militants. It is understood that participants in the Clubhouse room also praised Hitler and issued death threats to Jews.

The room was shut down but a second was opened in its place, named “Zionists VS. HAMAS”, which not only featured users with Hamas profile photos but also one user with an image of a Jewish man beneath Hebrew text that called him a “dog” and a “whore.”

It was also reported by a Twitter user that hostile activists also raided another Clubhouse room titled “LGBT Jews and Allies”, where they called for death to Jews and LGBT people.

Last week, it was reported that there was a Clubhouse room called “Is Zionism racism?” that was filled with “antisemitism, hate and ignorance.” According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour)” is an example of antisemitism.

This is not Clubhouse’s first brush with antisemitism. Last month, the Oscar-nominated actor LaKeith Stanfield apologised for failing to stop an antisemitic discussion in a Clubhouse room he was moderating.

Last October, the app found itself caught in controversy after antisemitic stereotypes were allegedly invoked during an online discussion it was hosting on relations between Jews and African Americans.

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

https://twitter.com/Fionn_Grunspan/status/1402751086059048962

The Culture Secretary has called on Facebook to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism and condemned the recent surge of antisemitic incidents in Britain.

Speaking at Bevis Marks, the oldest synagogue in Britain, about the Definition, Oliver Dowden said: “There may be some practicalities about exactly how [social media giants] incorporate it, but the essence of the International Definition [of Antisemitism] I want them to adopt, just as the Government has committed to that.”

Mr Dowden added: “If companies fail to comply with the legislation, they will face fines of up to ten percent of their global revenue. But I’ve set out the overall direction I want them to go in and I don’t see why they can’t get on with it now.

“Ultimately, as the fallback, we will have it [in law] and we’ll look at how we incorporate the [D]efinition into the online harms legislation.”

The Culture Secretary also condemned the recent surge of antisemitism in Britain, stating: “I have lots of shuls in my constituency, not least in Bushey, Borehamwood and Radlett, and I think the community is feeling vulnerable and deeply worried. I have had people contacting me saying they didn’t expect to see these scenes on the streets of London.

“I want to send an absolutely unambiguous message to the Jewish community: that this government is on their side and we will stand absolutely steadfast and resolute in showing zero tolerance for antisemitic abuse, whether it’s in the street or online.

“A Jewish pensioner in Golders Green is a Jewish pensioner and any attacks are antisemitism, pure and simple. It does worry me that there is this kind of conflation with events in Israel. There is no culpability of Jewish people in this country, regardless of one’s views on what is happening in Israel, and it’s really important that we address this.”

Last year, the Culture Secretary announced that social media companies will have a duty of care to users under new legislation, and that “criminal antisemitic posts will need to be removed without delay”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been at the forefront of calls for Online Harms legislation, and last year joined a global coalition calling on Facebook to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities, public bodies and other institutions. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

The Oscar-nominated actor LaKeith Stanfield has apologised for failing to to stop an antisemitic discussion in a Clubhouse room he was moderating.

Clubhouse is a live audio app that emerged during the COVID-19 lockdown. According to various online reports, it is “the top virtual hang-out for venture capitalists and tech-industry entrepreneurs, along with the occasional celebrity,” while Bloomberg News calls it a favoured haunt for “venture capitalists and other Silicon Valley insiders.”

The room, titled “Did Minister Farrakhan Tarnish His Legacy By Being Antisemitic?”, was said to have been widely in support of the antisemitic hate preacher, Louis Farrakhan, defending him against allegations of antisemitism previously levelled against him. Mr Farrakhan has called Judaism a “gutter religion” and had claimed that the Jews would face “God’s ovens” if they continued to oppose him, in a sick reference to the extermination camps of the Holocaust. He has also praised the Nazi leader, saying “Hitler was a very great man”. In addition, Mr Farrakhan has alleged that “Israelis and Zionist Jews” were involved in the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

A Twitter user documented the chat, noting the several slurs that were used in reference to Jews, including “hymies,” “split-tongued liars,” “thieves” and “Satan spawn.” They also reported that members of the room were quoting and praising Hitler.

This room was shut down only after a prolonged period of antisemitic messages were shared. However, a second room appeared shortly after where the hateful messages continued.

One participant in the room said: “Voltaire said, ‘to find out who rules over you, find out who you can’t criticise.’” This quote is commonly misattributed to the French philosopher but in fact originated in an essay by Kevin Strom, an American neo-Nazi, white nationalist, and Holocaust denier.

The participant went on to state: “if you look and see who are the owners, who are the presidents, who are the CEOs of the six major media outlets that control everything that we hear, see, believe, and are told to believe in America, there is a synonymous energy that runs through it.”

Mr Stanfield, who is understood to be a regular user of the social media platform, was present in both rooms and a moderator in the second. It was said that while he did not contribute towards the antisemitic hate speech, he allowed it to continue without challenging it, and claimed that he wanted to “hear both sides.” Later on, in a discussion elsewhere, Mr Stanfield tried to distance himself from the offensive discussions, saying that the conversation had been “derailed”.

Mr Stanfield has since apologised, posting on Instagram on Friday: “I unconditionally apologise for what went on in that chat room, and for allowing my presence there to give a platform to hate speech. I am not an antisemite, nor do I condone any of the beliefs discussed in that chat room.“

Last year, Clubhouse found itself caught in controversy after antisemitic stereotypes were allegedly invoked during an online discussion it was hosting on relations between Jews and African Americans.

Some of those present reported that antisemitic tropes linking Jews with control of commerce and banking were repeatedly invoked during the conversation.

One Clubhouse member declared on Twitter that she had listened in for “only three minutes, but heard enough” in that time to close the app and leave the discussion. She tweeted: “There’s a room on Clubhouse right now that is literally just a bunch of people talking about why it’s ok to hate Jews so I’m done with that app for a while.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

https://www.instagram.com/p/COmK8u7r2CQ/?igshid=1bbjdfniq4ue3

Author Shazia Hobbs is being investigated by police over allegations of posting pro-Nazi hate messages on social media platforms Telegram and Gab.

Ms Hobbs, who wrote a book centred around her own experiences of racism, was said to have attacked a member of an antisemitism awareness group by posting a photo of a Nazi salute with the caption: “raise your hand if you are tired of [name of member].”

Ms Hobbs’ Twitter account has been suspended, reportedly for antisemitic posts. She is also said to have created posts that featured swastikas on the social media platform Telegram and is accused of labelling a Holocaust survivor a “liar” on Gab.

In light of these accusations, her book contract is said to have been cancelled.

Last year, Ms Hobbes was photographed at an event for far-right group Patriotic Alternative. The group is led by the former head of the youth wing of the BNP, Mark Collett, who is reported to have dabbled in Holocaust denial, collaborated with the infamous American antisemite David Duke, and espoused antisemitic and racist views.

report into Patriotic Alternative published last summer found that several members of the group engaged in Holocaust denial.

The group was found using social media platform Telegram to create neo-Nazi channels dedicated to share vile messages, antisemitic conspiracy theories and images glorifying Hitler. An investigation by Scottish news site The Ferret found over 2,000 messages swapped by members of Patriotic Alternative on Telegram.

Ms Hobbs is also known to have associated with the notorious antisemite Alison Chabloz, who was recently jailed for malicious communications relating to Jews.

When asked to comment, the Metropolitan Police said: “Police received an allegation of malicious communications relating to content of an antisemitic nature that had been posted online. Officers are in touch with the complainant. Inquiries are ongoing. There have been no arrests at this stage.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.