This weekend marked the six-month anniversary of the 7th October atrocity, the bloodiest day in Israel’s history and the deadliest day for Jews since the Holocaust.

In the wake of the attack, as Israelis and Jewish communities worldwide grappled with the trauma, a distressing contrast emerged: while grief and shock engulfed many, expressions of support for Hamas erupted in various forms of jubilation and celebration across the globe, some within hours of the massacre.

Some chose to turn a blind eye to the atrocities.

Others attempted to rationalise the unjustifiable.

And, shockingly, some even found inspiration in this heinous act.

For the Jewish people, with hostages still in captivity and justification, glorification and celebration of antisemitic terrorism still ongoing around the world, October 7 is 24/7.

Al Quds Day: a tale of two cities

Every year, on the last Friday of Ramadan, the Al Quds Day march takes place in cities around the world, including in London. Since it was established in Iran in 1979, following the Islamic Revolution, Al Quds Day marches are displays of support for the antisemitic Islamist theocracy that rules Iran, kills its opponents and supports Jew-hating terrorist groups across the world, and for its terror proxies.

In the UK, for example, participants in the marches used to fly Hizballah flags and hold placards stating “We are all Hizballah”, until we and others secured the proscription of Hizballah.

In the days prior to this year’s march, which took place on Friday, the organisers had the audacity to complain about occasional arrests at recent anti-Israel marches in London notwithstanding that their own march was in support of a foreign regime that murders protesters.

Our Demonstration and Event Monitoring Unit was present at the march on Friday. What they saw was predictably despicable, including a woman screaming “Zio-Nazis” at people, flyers emblazoned with Hitler’s face, and more.

As the march proceeded, what became clear was that London on Al Quds Day was a tale of two cities: the hateful marchers in one tale, and, in the other, our digital van displaying the images of hostages and peaceful counter-protesters, some of whom were wearing our “Hamas are terrorists” hoodies.

The Met Police posted on social media that they had identified particular placards that appeared to incite violence in a vehicle that they had proactively stopped near the starting point of the march. “As a result,” they triumphantly declared, “we don’t believe they have been distributed.” Still, they were firm: “Should they be displayed in the crowd, action will be taken.”

But after so many months of policing-by-tweet, it should come as no surprise that our volunteers observed plenty of these placards on display during the march, very often within the sight of police officers. To our knowledge, no action appeared to be taken. This was just the latest example of questionable policing.

The week before, during the anti-Israel demonstration on Easter weekend, a woman reported a placard featuring a swastika to a police officer, who appeared to try to explain that the meaning of a swastika would depend on the context, in echoes of Met Police policy on other antisemitic rhetoric.

Apparently the context of an anti-Israel demonstration rife with analogies of Israel to Nazis and other antisemitic signs, calls for violent intifada, support for Houthi attacks on British vessels and glorification of Hamas terrorism, was not clear enough context of what a swastika might portend.

The Met claimed that it arrested someone in relation to this incident. If so, it raises even more questions about why the police reflexively make excuses instead of taking action in real time.

Extremism in the UK: we want to hear from you

If you could poll the British public on antisemitism or extremism, what questions would you ask?

Click here to let us know.

It is time for Sir Alan Duncan to be expelled

Sir Alan Duncan, the former Conservative MP and Minister, and a particularly unpopular figure in the Jewish community, suggested in an interview on LBC that certain peers in the House of Lords are working for Israel, invoking classic tropes of Jewish power and disloyalty. He later went on to victim-blame Israel for the 7th October Hamas attack.

This is not the first time that he has made accusations of parliamentarians being controlled by Israel. But we believe that it should be the last time that he does so as a member of the Conservative Party.

We called on the Party to investigate, which they have announced that they are now doing. He is not the only Conservative figure that we have been following recently.

We also called for the whip finally to be withdrawn from Baroness Warsi, after she spoke at a Muslim Council of Britain event with Ghada Karmi. The MCB is a controversial group, and Dr Karmi has previously said: “What you saw on October 7th was breaking out from the cage of Gaza by a resistance movement.” Dr Karmi also previously told George Galloway on Al Mayadeen television: “It’s wonderful really and admirable that the Hamas fighters exploded this whole rotten structure.”

We called in addition for the suspension by the Labour Party of another attendee, Afzal Khan MP, of “mass murdering Rothschilds Israeli mafia criminal liars” infamy.

Meanwhile, it was reported that Azmat Husain, the Chairman of the Salford Conservative Federation and the Conservative candidate for Eccles in Salford in the May elections, has withdrawn his candidacy after a Facebook post emerged in which he appears to have written “Jew pigs”. He had claimed that the post was fake.

This is not the first time that there have been serious concerns relating to antisemitism within local Conservative associations in Manchester. The Party has yet to investigate transparently.

We also exposed the social media history of the independent MP, Angus MacNeil, who used to sit with the SNP.

Furthermore, we called out the crossbench peer Lord Bird for saying in a debate in the House of Lords that “The amount of antisemitism you see around the world is because of the fact that Israel is not thinking about the next five or ten years but is only thinking immediately.”

No, Lord Bird, the amount of antisemitism that we are seeing is not because of the Jews or their state. It is because there are antisemites.

The effect of antisemitism on British Jews

Our two-week nationwide billboard campaign spotlighting what it is like to be Jewish in Britain today has concluded. On the billboards, online and on our digital van, we highlighted a number of scenarios to give viewers pause, including:

  • “How would you explain guards outside your child’s nursery?”
  • “Imagine your family feeling unsafe every time they leave their place of worship.”
  • “Do you know how it feels to hide your school blazer so you won’t be attacked?”

Thank you to all of you who have got in touch about the campaign. To quote just one response from Glasgow: “I saw an ad about your campaign in Glasgow today at Finnieston Quay and I wanted to get in touch to say that it really spoke to me. I have been appalled by what I have been reading about antisemitism in the UK. The words on the billboard about guards at nurseries and abuse at a football stadium were really powerful. I hope it helps to make a difference.”

So do we.

Great Ormond Street Hospital

Last December we began discussions with Great Ormond Street Hospital, at the initiative of members of their staff, about providing antisemitism training. This is the same training that we have delivered for years to other NHS trusts, police forces, industry regulators, academic institutions, local authorities and others.

Discussions were proceeding smoothly until approximately six weeks ago, when we were informed that the Hospital’s Muslim Network had expressed concerns about Campaign Against Antisemitism as a provider. We addressed in writing the issues that were raised and offered to meet with the relevant members of staff, with a view to hearing and allaying any concerns.

Unfortunately, the offer was ignored and, apparently without regard for the views of its Jewish staff, the Hospital decided that the Muslim Network should have a veto in relation to antisemitism training, and withdrew from the discussions.

The Hospital assured us that it will still be arranging the provision of antisemitism training, but with a different provider. We replied to the Hospital to say that that is acceptable to us, provided that it uses a reputable trainer that will not compromise on the material to appease anyone at the Hospital who may be ideologically opposed to learning about certain contemporary manifestations of antisemitism.

The Hospital not only failed to provide us with this assurance, but has not responded to us at all for several weeks.

We continued to await contact from the Hospital, but in view of the length of time since our last correspondence, we had no choice but to make this public last week.

If non-Jewish staff at institutions are given a veto over the delivery or content of antisemitism training, such an institution simply cannot be said to be upholding its commitment to equality and diversity. Jewish people and the racism that they suffer cannot be ignored. That is itself antisemitic.

After we revealed the incident, the Hospital released a statement that was wholly unsatisfactory, and we have submitted a Freedom of Information request in order to release more information.

In addition to the victims whom we are assisting and other incidents that we are responding to, here are some of our other high-profile recent cases:

  • We submitted complaints to Ofcom about Matthew Wright for comments on two LBC programmes.
  • We wrote a letter to the Scottish Funding Council regarding the election of Dr Ghassan Abu-Sittah as Rector of the University of Glasgow.
  • We called on UK Border Force to suspend officers involved in potential mistreatment of Israeli survivors of 7th October visiting the UK.
  • We publicised appalling footage from the Refectory at Goldsmiths, which is also midway through an inquiry, to which we have contributed, regarding antisemitism on its campus.
  • We reported a man appearing to make serious threats in a TikTok video to Counter-Terrorism Police, and were in touch with the victim.

It has been six months.

Six months of war. Six months of hostages in captivity. Six months of weekly anti-Israel protests and antisemitic rhetoric on our streets. Six months of surging antisemitism — on campuses and online, in workplaces and in our public life. Six months of police failures.

But we are resolute, and we will continue to fight for justice for the Jewish community, no matter how many more months or years it takes.

This week, James Cleverly, the Home Secretary, announced several proposed amendments to the Criminal Justice Bill, in a clear and targeted rebuke to anti-Israel marchers deliberately causing disruption in London and around the country and outraging the public over behaviour at war memorials and launching fireworks at police.

Mr Cleverly has proposed the following changes to the Criminal Justice Bill:

  • Creating a new offence of desecrating a war memorial punishable by up to three months’ imprisonment and a fine of up to £1,000;
  • Creating a new offence which would make it illegal for someone to have a pyrotechnic article in their possession during a procession or assembly. Offenders could receive a fine of up to £1,000;
  • Providing the police with new powers to arrest protesters wearing face coverings to conceal their identity. Offenders could receive a fine of up to £1,000 and a month in prison;
  • Modifying the reasonable excuse defence that is currently available concerning certain public order offences to prevent a minority of protesters from deliberately causing serious disruption while exploiting defences relating to the right to protest. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Demonstration and Event Monitoring Unit has for months observed protesters causing severe disruption to the public during their weekly anti-Israel demonstrations, including launching fireworks at police officers; desecrating war memorials; and preventing members of the public from travelling.

A further effect of these weekly protests is that a staggering 90% of British Jews say that they would avoid travelling to a city centre if a major anti-Israel demonstration was taking place there.

With protesters using rhetoric like, “Zionists are like Nazis, and if that’s antisemitic then f*** it. I don’t care” in last week’s protests, that sentiment is not surprising.

You can watch interviews, captured by our Demonstration and Event Monitoring Unit and Communications team, here.

For months now, we have been asking for tougher restrictions to be placed on these protests, which have made our urban centres no-go zones for Jews. While the police have failed the Jewish community and law-abiding Londoners, the Government, to its credit, is listening.

These new laws will help address the mob mentality that we have observed in these protests. There is no justification for such scenes, and now, there will be no legal defence.

The people of this country expect the lawlessness on our streets to be brought firmly under control, and with these changes there are now even fewer excuses for police inaction.

The Prime Minister recently explained how the weekly protests prompted the Government to act.

What is happening on British campuses?

In the past week, Jewish students at Birmingham had to face signs reading “Zionists off our campus”.

Our most recent polling shows that only 6% of Jews do not consider themselves to be Zionists. The University of Birmingham claims that it offers a “welcoming and supportive environment”. It doesn’t look that way.

At the University of Leeds, the synagogue and Hillel Jewish student centre was vandalised with graffiti reading “IDF off campus” and “Free Palestine”, and there are reports that the Jewish chaplain has received death threats.

Less than a day later, students on the same campus voiced support for the Houthi rebels in Yemen at an anti-Israel protest. The motto of the Houthis is: “Allah is the greatest, death to America, death to Israel, a curse upon the Jews, victory to Islam.”

When support for an organisation that openly parades its antisemitism goes unchallenged on a university campus, what message is this sending to its Jewish students? What message does it send when they chant “There are many, many more of us than you”?

This is not some sort of social justice movement. It is an attempt by thugs to intimidate Jews and drive them out of our universities. The reaction of the universities must be swift and severe.

What does the David Miller judgment mean?

The Bristol Employment Tribunal has published its judgment in the case of the University of Bristol’s termination of Prof. David Miller.

David Miller, a disgraced academic obsessed with anti-Jewish conspiracy theories, was fired by the University of Bristol in 2021 following a Jewish communal outcry and one month after Campaign Against Antisemitism commenced a lawsuit on behalf of students against the institution.

Prof. Miller has a long record of inflammatory statements about the Jewish community. He now regularly appears on the Iranian state propaganda channel, Press TV.

Prof. Miller later sued the University, and the Bristol Employment Tribunal has now handed down its judgment.

Until this case, the exact reasons for Prof. Miller’s sacking by the University of Bristol were kept from the public. It is now clear that, despite its adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism, Bristol’s failure to recognise that Prof. Miller’s comments constituted antisemitism, as well as its failure to consider some of his most egregious comments, opened the way for this judgment.

But even so, the tribunal found that Prof. Miller’s misconduct was “extraordinary and ill-judged” and deserving of disciplinary action, albeit that it did not warrant dismissal. He was found to be “culpable and blameworthy”, and, if he had been fired for the right reasons, the result at the tribunal may have been different.

Importantly, the tribunal drastically slashed Prof. Miller’s compensation, including due to his behaviour since being dismissed, which the tribunal found led to a ‘realistic chance that the claimant would have been dismissed’ anyway.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is deeply concerned by the way in which the University of Bristol has handled this matter over the course of years. We hope and expect that Bristol will appeal this decision. We are considering the matter with our lawyers.

To understand better what this judgment does and does not mean, watch this explainer here.

In the wake of the judgment, Kemi Badenoch, the Trade Secretary and Minister for Women and Equalities, told the House of Commons: “It is important to underline that this ruling does not change the fact that, while academics have the right to express views, they cannot behave in a way that amounts to harassment of Jewish students. Disguising this as discourse about Israel would be no more lawful than any other form of antisemitism.”

British universities cannot become places where students or academics attempt to intimidate Jews and drive them off campus. We will continue to do whatever it takes to stop that from happening and hold the thugs accountable.

If you are a student, academic, member of staff or chaplain at a university — or you know somebody who is and needs assistance — please contact us at [email protected].

Today, the Bristol Employment Tribunal has published its judgment in the case of the University of Bristol’s termination of Prof. David Miller.

David Miller, an academic obsessed with anti-Jewish conspiracy theories, was fired by the University of Bristol in 2021 one month after Campaign Against Antisemitism commenced a lawsuit on behalf of students against the institution.

Prof. Miller later sued the University, and the Bristol Employment Tribunal has today handed down its judgment.

Our lawsuit related to Prof. Miller’s speech on a Zoom webinar in which he said that the “Zionist Movement” is “the enemy” that must be engaged, that it is “the enemy of world peace,” and that those associated with Zionism, including Jewish students on Bristol campus, “must be directly targeted”.

Taken together, the implication of Prof. Miller’s remarks is that all decent people who support “world peace” should view Bristol Jewish Society and the Union of Jewish Students, and Jewish people, including those who identify with those bodies, and the vast majority of Jewish students as an “enemy” that must be “directly targeted”.

He also said that interfaith work between Jewish and Muslim groups is “a trojan horse for normalising Zionism in the Muslim community”. He also claimed that Jewish students, by virtue of being Zionist, “encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”.

Prof. Miller has a long record of inflammatory statements about the Jewish community.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Until this case, the exact reasons for Prof. David Miller’s sacking by the University of Bristol were kept from the public. It is now clear that, despite its adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism, Bristol’s failure to recognise that Prof. Miller’s comments constituted antisemitism, as well as its failure to consider some of his most egregious comments, opened the way for today’s judgment. But even so, the tribunal found that Prof. Miller’s misconduct was ‘extraordinary and ill-judged’ and deserving of disciplinary action, albeit that it did not warrant dismissal. He was found to be ‘culpable and blameworthy’, and, if he had been fired for the right reasons, the result today may have been different.

“Importantly, the tribunal drastically slashed Prof. Miller’s compensation , including due to his behaviour since being dismissed, which the tribunal found led to a ‘realistic chance that the claimant would have been dismissed’ anyway.

“We are deeply concerned by the way in which the University of Bristol has handled this matter over the course of years. We hope and expect that Bristol will appeal this decision. We are considering the matter with our lawyers.”


If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

A new survey has found that nearly one-third of Jewish students in the United States have experienced or witnessed antisemitism on campus. 

The survey showed that 14% of Jewish students had experienced antisemitism directly on campus and 16% of Jewish students had witnessed antisemitism on campus. 

The survey was conducted by Jewish on Campus, a group led by Jewish students that “seek[s] to end antisemitism on college campuses and beyond”. 

Responses in the survey also showed that 84% of Jewish students felt that antisemitism is a threat to the United States. 

In the study, 1,000 Jewish students and a further sample of 2,000 students more generally were surveyed. 

Julia Jassey, the Chief Executive Officer of Jewish on Campus, said in a statement: “As the new school year begins, these findings provide key evidence of the breadth and depth of antisemitism students face.” 

She added that universities and students should “meet this moment and take antisemitism seriously.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the United States.

As the new academic year approaches, Campaign Against Antisemitism can reveal that 43 universities in Britain have still not properly adopted, or have expressly refused to adopt, the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The number of universities that have adopted the Definition in full, including the eleven integral examples, and have not adopted any other qualifying or competing language, is 134. However, the rate of adoption is slowing, with our research indicating that the most recent adoption may have been as far back as March 2022. The latest information, which is updated in real time, can be found at antisemitism.org/universities.

Among those universities that have not adopted, some have not provided any cogent reasons, such as the University of Brighton and the University of Wales Trinity St David.

Brighton University, for example, told us: “A Race and Faith commission was set up following discussions at the Academic Board and Board of Governors on the subject of the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA) working definition of antisemitism. The Commission recommended that the University should not adopt the definition.”

This Commission relied on work by the UCL Academic Board, which even the UCL leadership has not followed (UCL has adopted the Definition), input from the University and College Union (UCU), which is a staunch opponent of the Definition and whose reputation in the Jewish community is in the gutter, and Prof. David Feldman, a former Deputy Chair of the whitewash Chakrabarti Inquiry into antisemitism in the Labour Party and whose advocacy against the Definition has been grossly counter-productive to the fight against antisemitism.

Some universities claimed that, while they have not adopted the Definition, they nonetheless ‘use’ it, including Cardiff University, Edinburgh Napier University and the University of South Wales.

Others insisted that their existing policies already cover antisemitism and therefore adoption is not necessary, such as Kingston University, Robert Gordon University and SOAS University of London.

SOAS, for example, told us: “While SOAS University of London has not adopted the IHRA definition, we stand firmly against antisemitism, as we do against all forms of discrimination. Our SOAS Charter on Racism, Antisemitism and All Forms of Cultural, Ethnic and Religious Chauvinism makes a clear, demonstrable commitment to every member of staff and every student that we will not tolerate any form of racism or religious chauvinism, and that we will maintain an inclusive space for every member of our community.”

Readers will draw their own conclusions as to the strength of SOAS’s commitment to standing against antisemitism, in light of its appalling record.

Some universities have not adopted the Definition, because it does not cover all faith groups. These include Ravensbourne University London, Swansea University and the University for the Creative Arts.

The University of St Andrews has decided not to adopt the Definition because it believes that it is polarising to adopt only this definition of antisemitism. The University of Greenwich has gone further, adopting both the Definition and the Jerusalem Declaration on Antisemitism. The Jerusalem Declaration is a wrecking document intended to undermine the globally-recognised Definition. Any university that has adopted it alongside the Definition or an amended version of the Definition (for example by omitting the eleven integral examples), such as Greenwich University or Goldsmiths, University of London, cannot be said to have adopted the Definition. Campaign Against Antisemitism recently submitted evidence to an inquiry into antisemitism at Goldsmiths.

The arguments that these universities have deployed to justify their failure to adopt the Definition do not hold water. Those that claim that their existing policies render the Definition unnecessary misunderstand its purpose: the Definition is not a policy on antisemitism but a definition of antisemitism. Existing policies can detail how antisemitism is treated; they cannot identify it. For that, the Definition is needed.

The claim, meanwhile, that the Definition can have a “chilling effect” on freedom of expression or inhibits criticism of Israel are also baseless canards. The Definition, which is context-specific, states clearly that “criticism of Israel similar to that levelled against any other country cannot be regarded as antisemitic.” Moreover, as Campaign Against Antisemitism has shown, the Definition does not at all conflict with freedom of expression under law, and indeed a 2023 report into antisemitism in higher education found that, of 56 universities asked, none knew of a single example in which their adoption of the Definition had in any way restricted or chilled freedom of expression or academic research.

These excuses are wearing thin, particularly as antisemitism on campuses is rising. CST reported at the beginning of this year that there has been a 22% increase in university-related reported antisemitic hate incidents over the past two academic years, while polling conducted in 2021 by Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that 92% of British Jews believe that antisemitism in British universities is a problem.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We commend the vast majority of British universities that have chosen to show solidarity with Jewish students and do their part in the fight against anti-Jewish racism by adopting the International Definition of Antisemitism. It is appalling that a minority of universities continue to take the opposite course, and it is astonishing that they persist in providing excuses that have already been debunked years ago. These universities are bowing to pressure by those who either fail to appreciate the gravity of contemporary antisemitism or do not have the interests of British Jews at heart. It is cowardly. They must urgently revisit their positions.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism will continue to monitor the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Campaign Against Antisemitism has submitted evidence to an inquiry examining antisemitism at Goldsmiths, University of London.

Last year, the University announced that it would launch an investigation into racism against Jews at the institution, and earlier this year it was announced that senior barrister Mohinderpal Sethi KC would lead the investigation.

The Inquiry, billed as an “independent review into antisemitism at the College”, invites current and former University students and staff to come forward with their own experiences.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has submitted a dossier of evidence, incorporating the testimony of students and details of incidents, as well as recommendations.

The Inquiry’s report is expected to be presented by next year.

The investigation was announced last year after Dr David Hirsh, a sociologist at the University, was called a “far-right white supremacist” by Goldsmiths’ then-Students’ Union President.

Initially, the Students’ Union refused to investigate Sara Bafo over the social media post, despite being requested to do so by the University.

Ms Bafo’s alleged tweet was said to have been written in response to a tweet from Dr Hirsh, a prominent and highly-respected antisemitism expert, which said: “There is an antisemitic edge to official, institutional, university campaigns to ‘decolonise’ education.”

In response to the University’s request for the investigation, Ms Bafo tweeted that the University “has tried to get the SU trustee board to investigate me for a tweet I made in response to a Zionist Goldsmiths academic’s explicit racist history & his delegitimisation of ‘Decolonisation’ campaigns,” adding: “This was a dirty tactic from the institution to silence me further as I was leaving.”

However, despite the Students’ Union denying the investigation on grounds of “free speech”, the University announced that an independent probe will take place.

Dr Hirsh said of the probe: “I am really pleased that the leadership of Goldsmiths is taking this difficult and courageous step. I have been clear that there is a hostile environment at the College for scholars and students who refuse to embrace anti-Zionism.”

Dr Hirch featured in a recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism, in which he shared more information about the incident and the investigation.

Last year, the University also announced that it would adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism but “without the case studies”, and that it would be adopting in addition the Jerusalem Declaration, which is a wrecking document intended to undermine the globally-recognised Definition, owing to the fact that the University’s “academic community” favoured it.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Individuals linked to an Islamist group that describes Jews as “monstrous” have reportedly been speaking at British universities. 

According to a report by The JC, the speakers have ties to Hizb ut-Tahrir, an Islamist group that reportedly issued a statement on 11th May 2021 that said: “The monstrous Jews are spreading their brutal aggression on all parts of Palestine.”

In 2004, the group was banned by the National Union of Students (NUS) from British university unions and their societies on the grounds it was “responsible for supporting terrorism and publishing material that incites racial hatred”.

Last month, one of its previous leaders, Anjem Choudary, was charged with three terrorism offences.

Hizb ut-Tahrir was also mentioned in a report from the Tony Blair Institute for Global Change titled “Narratives of Division: The Spectrum of Islamist Worldviews in the UK,” which found that a number of UK Islamic activist groups promote views that align with proscribed extremist groups.

The speakers were hosted by a number of Islamic society events at universities including the University of Birmingham, the London School of Economics (LSE), and the University of Bradford; all of which have adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism in full. 

The links to Hizb ut-Tahrir with the speakers were reportedly not publicised during the events and it is unclear whether the societies knew about the connection. 

One of the speakers, Luqman Muqeem, is understood to have shared extremist content online, including a video of himself that incites Muslims to murder Jews and videos of other activists associated with Hizb ut-Tahrir.

He also reportedly shared a video of Belal Mohammed, a Hizb ut-Tahrir activist, calling for a jihad to “wipe out the Zionist entity”.

In February, Mr Muqueem spoke at the University of Birmingham, where he was joined by alleged Hizb ut-Tahrir activist, Taha Hanif. Mr Hanif is said to have tweeted “Khaybar Khaybar, ya yahud, Jaish Muhammad, sa yahud”, a common chant that can be translated in English as “Jews, remember the battle of Khaybar, the army of Muhammad is returning.”

The “Khaybar” chant is a classic Arabic battle cry referencing the massacre and expulsion of the Jews of the town of Khaybar in northwestern Arabia, now Saudi Arabia, in the year 628 CE. The chant has been heard in numerous anti-Israel rallies in Britain and abroad.

Omar Kaykhusrau, who is said to be a Hizb ut-Tahrir speaker studying for a PhD in economics at Kings College London that spoke at Birmingham City University and LSE, is alleged to have asked Allah to “purge the Zionist scum from Palestine” in a now-deleted Facebook post.

Another of its speakers, Rupon Shahidul Haque, reportedly called for the “liberation of filistin [Palestine] via jihad” in 2021 on Facebook. 

He also posted photographs to Facebook of a meeting he had with imam Sheikh Abu Oma Sara, who in 2016 was jailed by Israel after he issued a video saying: “I say to the Jews clearly: it’s time to slaughter you. It’s time to fight you. It’s time to kill you.”

A 1999 leaflet, distributed by Hizb ut-Tahrir, described Jews as “cowards” and called on Muslims to “purify yourselves against the deceptions of the Jews”. It added: “Know that the Jews and their usurping state in Palestine will, by the Help and Mercy of Allah, be destroyed, until the stones and trees will say: ‘O Muslim, o slave of Allah, Here is Jew behind a tree so come and kill him.’” 

A spokesperson for Hizb ut-Tahrir said that he did not know why “university student union societies would choose not to advertise that invited guests are members of Hizb ut-Tahrir,” and “could not speak on behalf of them”, but suggested NUS’ ban on Hizb ut-Tahrir was part of a wider “cancel culture”. He added that “in such an environment of cancelling debate, it takes no great leap of the imagination to determine why organisers may decide to do so.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2021 showed that almost eight in ten British Jews consider the threat from Islamists to be very serious.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

La Trobe University, in Melbourne, Victoria, has adopted a deficient version of the International Definition of Antisemitism, and has also adopted the Jerusalem Declaration alongside it. 

The Jerusalem Declaration is a wrecking document intended to undermine the globally-recognised Definition.

The University’s adoption of the Definition omits the eleven integral examples, and is therefore deficient. 

A statement on the University’s website reads: “The University was concerned that adoption of the [International Definition] with the eleven examples could pose potential limitations to academic freedom and reasonable political debate which could be misclassified as antisemitic behaviour.”

Britain was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism and Lord Pickles worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism worldwide.

Following the latest Jew-baiting outbursts from the disgraced academic David Miller, Campaign Against Antisemitism will be writing to University and College Union (UCU) demanding clarification on its previous statements of support for him.

Mr Miller was fired by the University of Bristol in 2021 over comments he had made about Jewish students, a month after Campaign Against Antisemitism commenced a lawsuit on behalf of current students against the institution and amidst a Jewish communal outcry.

He is a conspiracy theorist with a history of controversy relating to Jewish students. In one outburst, he asserted that “Zionism is racism”, declared his objective “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world” and accused the Bristol University Jewish Society of being part of a worldwide Zionist conspiracy, adding that it is “fundamental to Zionism to encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”. At the same online event, Mr Miller also observed that the Jewish Society and the Union of Jewish Students are Zionist, thereby implying that Jewish students (and the wider Jewish community) inherently “encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”.

He also portrayed the International Definition of Antisemitism as an attack on free speech and accused the Israeli Government of engaging in an “all-out attack” on the global Left as part of an “attempt by the Israelis to impose their will all over the world”. In comments reminiscent of the darkest years of the United Nations, Mr Miller insisted that “Zionism is racism” and asked how “we defeat the ideology of Zionism in practice”, “how is Zionism ended” and about the way “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world”.

Earlier this week, Mr Miller tweeted that “Jews are not discriminated against” before going on to write: “They are over-represented in Europe, North America and Latin America in positions of cultural, economic and political power.”

He also responded to a Twitter user who asked if could provide “a detailed list with names/positions [Jews] hold re. their being members of an over-represented group” by saying: “Coming shortly!”

His comments drew criticism from Jewish Voice for Labour (JVL), the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, who stated that his comments were “unacceptable” and had “crossed a line”.

JVL has previously published numerous articles in defence of Mr Miller.

In June, Jeanette Findlay, President of UCU Scotland, nonsensically claimed that the Union is committed to fighting antisemitism just seconds before rejecting the International Definition of Antisemitism and defending the disgraced academic Mr Miller.

Ms Findlay said: “We are very clear in UCU Scotland in our opposition to the treatment of David Miller by the University of Bristol. I was personally horrified and shocked when I heard that he had been sacked.”

She described Mr Miller as the victim of a “vicious and sustained assault” before stating that “it is [the Union’s] greatest wish that he will be reinstated.”

UCU has a horrendous reputation in the Jewish community, and this is not the first time its Scotland branch has defended Mr Miller. 

In a 2021 statement, UCU Scotland showed little regard for the anxieties of the concerned Bristol University students, dismissing them at the time as “Zionist lobby groups”. 

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “David Miller’s latest outbursts are yet further proof that we were right to launch a lawsuit against Bristol University on behalf of brave Jewish students, following which he was fired. We were heavily criticised by Mr Miller’s supporters, but now many of his erstwhile defenders are recognising him for what he is. UCU must explain whether it maintains its stance of staunch support for Mr Miller. If it is changing that stance, it should answer whether the price of alienating its Jewish members was worth it to defend such a vile individual.”

Senior commanders from the antisemitic Islamist terrorist group, the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC), have been addressing students across university campuses, it has been revealed.

The JC has reportedly discovered eight IRGC leaders who, since 2020, have spoken to students nationally, using the Islamic Students Association of Britain to arrange the lectures. 

The Islamic Students Association of Britain has branches on university campuses in Bradford, Manchester, Liverpool, Leeds, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Aberdeen, and Cambridge.

Saeed Ghasemi, reported to be a former general in the organisation, allegedly told British students that the Holocaust was “fake”.

“The one that the Jews say happened is fake. The real Holocaust happened in my country in the First World War, 1917-19, when the UK occupied Iran,” he reportedly said during an online talk.

He also is reported to have encouraged his audience of students to join “the beautiful list of soldiers” who would fight and kill Jews in a coming apocalyptic war. 

Hossein Yekta, another person believed to be a high-ranking IRGC member, is said to have accused Jews of having “created homosexuality”. He allegedly told students they should view themselves as “holy warriors”, promising them that the “era of the Jews” would soon be at an end. 

In the wake of the shocking revelations, numerous politicians have voiced concerns. 

Alicia Kearns, the Conservative Party MP for Rutland and Melton and Chair of the Foreign Affairs Select Committee, said: “In organising such despicable talks, the Islamic Students Association of Britain acts at best as a willing propaganda arm of the Iranian regime, and at worst as an agitator for state sponsored terrorism. To broadcast the jihadist and deeply antisemitic ideas of senior members of the IRGC to students across Britain is a brazen act of radicalisation. We must pursue and prosecute those responsible trying to incite violence here in the UK.” 

David Lammy, the Labour Party MP for Tottenham and Shadow Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, said: “The invitation of IRGC commanders and other speakers who glorify its actions to speak to British students is incredibly concerning. Robust action is needed now.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The reports that IRGC commanders are addressing students on British campuses are alarming. This is an antisemitic Islamist terrorist organisation that has repeatedly targeted Jewish people and institutions in Britain and around the world and sponsors practically every major terror group in the Middle East. The IRGC cannot be allowed to disseminate its propaganda in the UK and radicalise impressionable students. What further evidence does the Government need to see before it heeds calls from us and others to ban the IRGC once and for all?”

A statement from the Union of Jewish Students stated that the group was “disgusted” by the news.

“UJS is disgusted that senior members of the Iranian Revolutionary Guards Corps have been speaking on several campuses across the UK,” the statement said. 

“These commanders boasted that the Holocaust was ‘fake’, that they trained al-Qaeda terrorists, and urged students to join ‘the beautiful list of soldiers’ who would fight and kill Jews in an apocalyptic war. We are deeply concerned for Jewish student welfare. This can never be allowed to happen again. We will seek urgent meetings on behalf of Jewish students with senior university leaders and the Government to ensure Jewish students can be safe on campus, free from this hatred that has no place in our society.”

Earlier this year, Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to all MPs calling on them to back the Government’s reported proposal to proscribe the IRGC under the Terrorism Act 2000.

We provided the Home Secretary, Suella Braverman, and the Security Minister, Tom Tugendhat, and all MPs with a dossier on the IRGC, detailing its horrendous record of antisemitism and violence against Jewish people.

The Government of the Islamic Republic of Iran has a long and appalling record of promoting antisemitic propaganda, including Holocaust-denial, and funding and orchestrating violence against Jews. This is in addition to being the world’s biggest state-sponsor of terrorism more generally, the effects of which are not only profound in the Middle East but felt on every continent in the world. According to our nation’s security chiefs, Iran directly threatens the UK.

But what is less known is that it is specifically the IRGC that is one of the principal instruments through which the Iranian regime carries out these endeavours.

Founded in 1979 by Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, the IRGC is a paramilitary force that answers directly to the radical regime. Its purpose is to serve as a praetorian guard for the theocracy at home and to advance its interests abroad. That includes training, arming and supporting terrorist groups and encouraging strategic acts of terror against targets deemed hostile to the Islamic Republic.

The IRGC has a paramount role in cultivating antisemitic sentiment, giving succour to antisemites and backing terrorism against Jews.

The IRGC is a vital organ pumping out antisemitic propaganda in Iran and through the Middle East, it emboldens those who wish harm to Jewish people in the name of extremist religion, and it is the indispensable patron of such antisemitic genocidal terrorist groups as Hizballah and Hamas, both of which are proscribed by the UK.

David Hirsh, an expert in antisemitism and the Senior Lecturer in Sociology at Goldsmiths, University of London, appeared on the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism where he spoke candidly about his experiences of being called a “far-right white supremacist” by the University’s then-Students’ Union President.

This podcast can be listened to here, or watched here.

Initially, the Students’ Union apparently refused to investigate Sara Bafo, its now-former President, following allegations of antisemitism, despite being requested to do so by the University.

She is to said to have tweeted: “D*vid H*rsch is a far right white supremacist. All you have to do is read his work and tweets and that’s all the confirmation needed.” 

Ms Bafo’s tweet was said to have been written in response to a tweet from Mr Hirsh which said: “There is an antisemitic edge to official, institutional, university campaigns to ‘decolonise’ education.”

Ms Bafo later tweeted that the University “has tried to get the SU trustee board to investigate me for a tweet I made in response to a Zionist Goldsmiths academic’s explicit racist history & his delegitimisation of ‘Decolonisation’ campaigns,” adding: “This was a dirty tactic from the institution to silence me further as I was leaving.”

Shortly after, an “independent review into antisemitism at the College” was announced by the University.

Mr Hirsh revealed on the podcast that when he brought up the incident to his department’s union at Goldsmiths, little was done about it.

“There was a little bit of sympathy and warmth and support. I mean, there’s always a little bit, there are always people who are solid. It’s not unanimous by any means.” he said. 

However, he added that after department representatives said that they would speak to members of the union branch, a period followed “where there was a fight going on about whether it was legitimate to say David Hirsh is a far-right white supremacist or not.”

He said: “Just the fact that there’s a fight going on between my colleagues about that is already utterly humiliating, and even more humiliating is that my department colleagues in the union lost, and the union stood firm and refused to do anything about it.

“When I’m at a union meeting now, I’m sitting there thinking, ‘The official position of this branch is that I’m a Nazi’.”

When the topic of mental health arose, he stated that “evidently, it must have” had an impact on him.

“I’ve been dealing with this stuff for twenty years now, for the main part of my adult life, and the main part of my career, and sometimes it’s really hard,” he said. “Sometimes, I get treated with great respect. Sometimes I get treated with nothing but contempt.”

Speaking on the University’s antisemitism investigation, led by senior barrister Mohinderpal Sethi KC, he said that it was “really interesting” and “a real surprise”.

“We’ll see. We’ll see what happens. We’ll see what evidence emerges. We’ll see what the report says. I hope that people who have had experiences of antisemitism at Goldsmiths make submissions,” Mr Hirsh urged. 

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox.

Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, television personality Robert Rinder, writer Eve Barlow, Grammy-Award-winning singer-songwriter Autumn Rowe, and actor Eddie Marsan.

Antisemitic and homophobic vandalism has been discovered at two fraternity houses at the University of Michigan. 

The vandalism includes a swastika at one of the locations. The remaining content of the vandalism has not been reported but has been described as “vile”. 

The incidents have been reported to local law enforcement and are currently under investigation. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the United States.

Image credit: Google

Campaign Against Antisemitism will be writing to the University of West of England over reports that a staff member published numerous incendiary tweets relating to the Holocaust, Zionists, and Israel, many of which breach the International Definition of Antisemitism.

According to Gnasher Jew, Siamak Alimi, a Senior IT Instructor in the Faculty of Arts, Creative Industries, and Education, posted tweets under the account ‘@Salimi’, which has now been deleted.

A screenshot appears to show that on 21st July 2014, the account wrote: “Fed up with feeling sorry for Zionists who hide behind holocaust industry whilst committing atrocities.” 

A tweet from 19th March 2016 asserts that “powerful Jews were not the only ones engaging in slave trade and other forms of exploitation,” before continuing: “The more we emphasize the uniqueness of the role of ‘the jew’ in global exploitation and atrocities rooted in their culture and religion, the more we legitimize the idea of tribalism and ‘chosen-ness’ which people like Gilad [Atzmon] try to negate.”

On 22nd November 2020, the account tweeted: “Zionism is a racist ideology and the creation of Israel was a racist endeavour.”

Similar sentiments appear to have to been expressed on 10th and 11th July of this year when Mr Alimi allegedly wrote that “Zionism is based on racism and Jewish exceptionalism” and that “it is a form of tribal/racist/supremacist nationalism based on National Socialism.” 

Additionally, the account appears to have published tweets comparing Israelis to Nazis, with one tweet referring to “Nazi and Zionist states committing similar atrocities.” 

According to the Definition, “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour)” and “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” are both examples of antisemitism. 

The University adopted the Definition in June 2021. Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the Definition by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Image credit: Brett Jordan via Canva.com

Numerous leading British Muslim organisations have welcomed an antisemitic former Malaysian Prime Minister on his visit to the UK.

Dr Mahathir bin Mohamad is a proud antisemite: in 2012 he insisted that he is “glad to be labelled as antisemitic…How can I be otherwise, when the Jews who so often talk of the horrors they suffered during the Holocaust show the same Nazi cruelty and hard-heartedness towards not just their enemies but even towards their allies should any try to stop the senseless killing of their Palestinian enemies.”

His record bears out this antisemitism:

  • In 2019, he declared in a speech to the UN General Assembly that the “Because of the creation of Israel, there is now enmity towards the Muslims and Islam.” He also reportedly claimed: “If you are going to be truthful, the problem in the Middle East began with the creation of Israel. That is the truth. But I cannot say that.” 
  • In 2018, he said in a BBC Hard Talk interview that “If you are going to be truthful, the problem in the Middle East began with the creation of Israel. That is the truth. But I cannot say that.”
  • In 2012, he claimed in a speech to the Organisation of the Islamic Conference that “The Jews rule the world by proxy. They get others to fight and die for them.”
  • He also described sympathy with Jewish victims of the Holocaust as “wasted and misplaced.”
  • In 2003, he argued at the Organisation of the Islamic Conference summit in Kuala Lumpur that “1.3 billion Muslims cannot be defeated by a few million Jews…There must be a way. And we can only find a way if we stop to think, to assess our weaknesses and our strength, to plan, to strategize and then to counterattack. We are actually very strong. 1.3 billion people cannot be simply wiped out. The Europeans killed six million Jews out of 12 million.”
  • In 1994, during his premiership, he oversaw a ban on the film Schindler’s List by Malaysia censors, reportedly saying in response to claims that the film was banned due to antisemitism: “I am not antisemitic but I am anti-Zionist expansionism and the conquest of Arab territories by the Zionists.”
  • In his 1970 book The Makay Dilemma, he said that “The Jews are not merely hook-nosed, but understand money instinctively” and that “they are hook-nosed. Many people called the Malays fat-nosed. We didn’t object, we didn’t go to war for that.”

Speaking to the Oxford Union in 2019, he was pressed on his views on Jews and said: “We talk about freedom of speech, but yet you cannot say anything against Israel, against the Jews, why is that so? If we are free to say what we like, we can say something that is regarded as antisemitic by the Jews, that is their right, to hold such an opinion of me. It is my right to tell them, also, that they have been doing a lot of wrong things.”

In 2019, at the Cambridge Union, Dr Mohamad said when asked about his past comments about Jews: “I have some Jewish friends, very good friends. They are not like the other Jews. That’s why they are my friends.” On his views on the Holocaust, he said: “The Israelis should know from the sufferings they went through in the war not to treat others like that.” He denied previously stating that only four million died in the Holocaust, although he had made that comment on the record. According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism. On antisemitism, he said: “Of course if you say anything against the Jews, you are labelled antisemitic. No other race in the world labels people like that, why is it forbidden to criticise the Jews when other people criticise us?” He added that: “The Jews do a lot of wrong things, which force us to pass comment.”

Notwithstanding his record, Dr Mohamad, Malaysia’s longest-serving Prime Minister who was in office for 22 years from 1981 to 2003 and then again between 2018 and 2020, was greeted as an honoured guest on his UK visit last month. He delivered an “exclusive private briefing” at the Asia House think tank and attended an event with British Muslim community and business leaders.

The schedule was organised by the UK-based Islam Channel, which was fined £20,000 by Ofcom in 2020 for broadcasting a programme that included “antisemitic hate speech”. The channel said: “We were all inspired by the insightful conversations and impactful moments shared by one of the world’s esteemed leaders.” Its founder, Mohamed Ali Harrath, who interviewed Dr Mohamad, told him: “We can’t see you passing by London without seizing the opportunity to speak to you and benefit from your wisdom.”

Dr Mohamad also reportedly held a meeting to discuss “governance, development, civilisation, leadership” with a group that included Mohammed Kozbar, who is the Chairman of the Finsbury Park Mosque and a former Vice President of the Muslim Association of Britain, which courted controversy last year when it mourned the death of the antisemitic Islamist cleric Yusuf al-Qaradawi. Mr Kozbar reportedly wrote on Facebook that he was “honoured” to meet the Malaysian leader. He added: “What an inspirational figure, a fruitful and constructive dialogue about Muslims in the West, I really benefited from his wisdom and experience.”

The former Prime Minister also held a “lunchtime lecture” at the Dar Ul-Isra Mosque in Cardiff, hosted by the Muslim Council of Wales, which said that it was “honoured” by his visit and his “inspiring” lecture.

At the Centre for the Study of Islam in the UK at Cardiff University, he was presented with a Welsh translation of the Quran etched onto slate.

A Cardiff University spokesperson told the JC: “A roundtable event attended by the former Malaysian Prime Minister, Mahathir Mohamad was held at Cardiff University in June. The event was jointly organised by the Muslim Council of Wales, Perdana Foundation, and the Centre for the Study of Islam in the UK and attended by a range of civil society Muslim leaders from across Cardiff. It’s important to stress that the event was focused on a variety of subjects including development and leadership. At no point were such comments made nor were they a focus of any discussion. For the avoidance of doubt, the hosting of the former Prime Minister is not in any way an endorsement of the antisemitic comments attributed to the former Prime Minister and we condemn such comments in the strongest possible terms.”

An academic serving as an Associate Lecturer at Goldsmiths, University of London and as a Teaching Fellow at Royal Holloway, University of London has reportedly been trolling Jewish individuals and groups online. 

According to Gnasher Jew, Dr Ray Campbell, who works in the Department of Theatre and Performance at Goldsmiths and in Humanities at Royal Holloway, has been using the account ‘@buddy_hell’ to target Jews on Twitter. 

The account shares its name with Dr Campbell’s stage name as a comedian, ‘Buddy Hell’. The tweets accuse the State of Israel of practising forced sterilisation on women, and assert that Chief Rabbi Sir Ephraim Mirvis and David Hirsh, a fellow Goldsmiths academic who is also a prominent and highly-respected antisemitism expert, are racist. 

Goldsmiths is currently conducting an internal investigation into antisemitism after Mr Hirsh was reportedly called a “far-right white supremacist” by its then-Students’ Union President. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism was also the target of numerous tweets. The Twitter account accuses us of “hoping to achieve what the National Front, British Movement and the BNP [British National Party] failed to do: start a ‘race war’”. 

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “These tweets exhibit an extremely alarming pattern of targeting Jews and falsely accusing them of a hidden agenda. The accusations made against us and other groups combatting antisemitism are not only conspiratorial but repugnant, and we wholly reject them.

“This deliberate trolling of Jews has no place in civil discourse, and especially not at an academic institution. Goldsmiths University must immediately investigate these posts and, if the allegations are borne out, take swift and decisive action.”

Last year, Goldsmiths announced that it would adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism but “without the case studies.” 

In addition, it said that it would also adopt the Jerusalem Declaration, which is a wrecking document intended to undermine the globally-recognised Definition, owing to the fact that the University’s “academic community” favoured it. 

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Campaign Against Antisemitism will be writing to the University of Leicester and the University and College Union (UCU) regarding a lecturer who delivered a rant in which he dismissed reports of antisemitism as “lies”.

Dr Joseph Choonara, a lecturer in political economy at the University and a Chair of UCU’s Leicester branch, gave a speech at last week’s Marxism Festival where he appeared on stage next to the controversial filmmaker Ken Loach.

In the video, orginally posted by the Harry’s Place Twitter account, Dr Choonara can be heard saying: “We know that the establishment turned on, and sought to destroy, Corbynism. We know that the lies about antisemitism are just that, they are lies. The lies directed towards Ken Loach are an absolute smear and a disgrace and we should reject them.”

Mr Loach was expelled from the Labour Party in August 2021 without public explanation. Mr Loach had been a leading ally of other controversial figures in Labour’s antisemitism scandal, especially those who denied that there was such a scandal of antisemitism. He said at the time of his expulsion: “Labour HQ finally decided I’m not fit to be a member of their party, as I will not disown those already expelled,” adding that he was “proud to stand with the good friends and comrades victimised by the purge. There is indeed a witch-hunt…Starmer and his clique will never lead a party of the people. We are many, they are few. Solidarity.”

Mr Loach’s voice was among the loudest of those who attempt to dismiss Labour’s antisemitism crisis as non-existent and a right-wing smear campaign. He claimed that Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn was subjected to a “torrent of abuse” that was “off the scale” and that regardless of what he did, the “campaign” of antisemitism accusations was “going to run and run”. He described the BBC’s Panorama investigation into Labour antisemitism as “disgusting because it raised the horror of racism against Jews in the most atrocious propagandistic way, with crude journalism…and it bought the propaganda from people who were intent on destroying Corbyn.”

He was also reportedly behind a motion passed by Bath Labour Party branding the Panorama programme a “dishonest hatchet job with potentially undemocratic consequences” and asserting that it “disgraced the name of Panorama and exposed the bias endemic within the BBC.” 

In 2017, Mr Loach caused outrage when, during an interview with the BBC, he refused to denounce Holocaust denial. The International Definition of Antisemitism states that “denying the fact, scope, mechanisms (e.g. gas chambers) or intentionality of the genocide of the Jewish people at the hands of National Socialist Germany and its supporters and accomplices during World War II (the Holocaust)” is a manifestation of antisemitism. Although Mr Loach later sought to clarify his remarks, he has continued to make inflammatory and provocative statements about Labour’s antisemitism scandal.

While speaking at a meeting of the Kingswood Constituency Labour Party, Mr Loach advocated the removal from the Party of those Labour MPs, some of whom are Jewish, who have taken a principled stand against antisemitism. Shortly after that incident, the Labour Party announced that it would no longer use Mr Loach as a producer of their election broadcasts.

Mr Loach is also featured in the antisemitism-denial propaganda film Oh, Jeremy Corbyn! The Big Lie. Following action by Campaign Against Antisemitism, Glastonbury Festival chose to cancel its screening of the film. This has been followed by a slew of venues across the country.

The Labour Party was found by the EHRC to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

The University of Leicester adopted the Definition in May 2020. Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the Definition by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

In an absurd speech, the President of the University and College Union (UCU) Scotland nonsensically claimed that the Union is committed to fighting antisemitism just seconds before rejecting the International Definition of Antisemitism and defending the disgraced academic David Miller.

Mr Miller was fired by the University of Bristol over comments he had made about Jewish students, a month after Campaign Against Antisemitism commenced a lawsuit on behalf of current students against the institution and amidst a Jewish communal outcry.

He is a conspiracy theorist with a history of controversy relating to Jewish students. In one outburst, he asserted that “Zionism is racism”, declared his objective “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world” and accused the Bristol University Jewish Society of being part of a worldwide Zionist conspiracy, adding that it is “fundamental to Zionism to encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”. At the same online event, Mr Miller also observed that the Jewish Society and the Union of Jewish Students are Zionist, thereby implying that Jewish students (and the wider Jewish community) inherently “encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”.

He also portrayed the Definition as an attack on free speech and accused the Israeli Government of engaging in an “all-out attack” on the global Left as part of an “attempt by the Israelis to impose their will all over the world”. In comments reminiscent of the darkest years of the United Nations, Mr Miller insisted that “Zionism is racism” and asked how “we defeat the ideology of Zionism in practice”, “how is Zionism ended” and about the way “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world”.

In a video posted by the ‘Harry’s Place’ Twitter account, Jeanette Findlay, the Union’s President, said that the Union is “committed to anti-racism in all its forms” including antisemitism, before stating that “it is for that reason that we have rejected the IHRA Definition.”

Ms Findlay went on to erroneously claim that the Definition had been “widely discredited” and that its primary use was to defend Israel from criticism. 

Addressing Mr Miller’s release from the University, Ms Findlay said: “We are very clear in UCU Scotland in our opposition to the treatment of David Miller by the University of Bristol. I was personally horrified and shocked when I heard that he had been sacked.”

She described Mr Miller as the victim of a “vicious and sustained assault” before stating that “it is [the Union’s] greatest wish that he will be reinstated.”

UCU has a horrendous reputation in the Jewish community, and this is not the first time its Scotland branch has defended Mr Miller. 

A student at Durham University who reportedly called Jews “apex predators in capitalism” in social media group chats has been accepted to study for a PhD at the institution.

Hugo Lunn reportedly shared posts that included phrases such as “Hitler would be more efficient if he privatised his death factories” and “the Jewishtocracy.” Another post apparently appeared to mock a student who had been offended by the claim that “the only reason the Holocaust was bad is because the Jews did not consent to being gassed,” saying of the student that “he got triggered, the cuck.”

“Cuck” is a far-right term used to refer to white men who are viewed by the far-right as traitors to their race and gender.

Mr Lunn, who is taking a PhD in medieval history, is understood to have made the comments in the chat group of the Durham University Free Market Association, of which he was President. After details of the discussion emerged following a complaint to the University in 2020, the Association was shut down by the Students’ Union.

The University investigated the comments in the summer of 2020, two months after Mr Lunn had completed his undergraduate degree.

Mary Kelly Foy, the MP for the City of Durham, said: “These comments are extremely concerning, and the University’s leadership and multifaith student body will agree that such abhorrent views have no place on their campus. I am proud to represent such a diverse University and as such I have raised my serious concerns with the University. I expect they will always act to ensure the safety of students and workers and that any such remarks would be swiftly investigated and decisive action taken.”

A spokesperson for Durham University said: “In 2020, in response to concerns raised, we undertook an investigation under our Non-Academic Misconduct Procedure. Our misconduct procedures apply only to members of Durham University. At that time, the individual named by the Jewish Chronicle was not a student at Durham University. We did take action against two other individuals, who were at that time Durham University students. As there was no investigation against the individual, because they were not at that time a student at Durham University, there was no record to be kept and no record to consider when they later applied for further study with us. We are looking into this matter urgently and considering what actions we may take.

“At the same time we are reaching out to communities affected by these comments to offer our support. We condemn any incidents of antisemitism in the strongest possible terms and are working hard to counter all forms of discrimination, including antisemitism.”

According to the JC, Mr Lunn refused to comment on the record.

Durham University has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Connecticut College has appointed an interim President facing multiple allegations in relation to antisemitism.

Leslie Wong is set to become the College’s interim President beginning 1st July until a permanent hire is appointed.

Jewish students at the College expressed their concern at the announcement, however, as during Mr Wong’s previous role as President of San Francisco State University, he was accused of having failed to address concerns over antisemitism at that institution, notwithstanding the pleas of Jewish students.

Connecticut College students were especially outraged at this decision in view of Mr Wong’s appointment in place of outgoing President Katherine Bergeron, who resigned following protests by students against her appearance at a golf club with an allegedly antisemitic history.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the United States.

Image credit: Connecticut College

A student at Lehigh University in Pennsylvania reportedly posted a swastika hand gesture on social media and tagged Jewish classmates.

Lehigh representatives said that the student responsible will be held accountable according to the student code of conduct. 

According to the FBI, over 60 percent of hate crimes against a religious minority are motivated by antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the United States.

The Government’s new ‘free speech tsar’ appears to have changed his mind on the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Prof. Arif Ahmed, a philosophy professor at the University of Cambridge, will begin his role as Director for Freedom of Speech and Academic Freedom at the Office for Students, the independent regulator of higher education in England, later this summer in an appointment that the Department for Education described as “a huge step forward.”

In a blog post in February 2021, he sharply criticised the Definition, writing: “I am strongly against Gavin Williamson’s requirement that universities adopt the IHRA definition of antisemitism….This ‘definition’ is nothing of the kind; adopting it obstructs perfectly legitimate defence of Palestinian rights.” He added: “As such it chills free speech on a matter of the first importance. I hope the Secretary of State reconsiders the need for it; but these new free speech duties ought to rule it out in any case.”

It has long been a canard of opponents of the Definition that it restricts freedom of speech on campuses. Campaign Against Antisemitism has previously published a resource explaining why this is not the case. A recent report also showed how there is no evidence of such restriction either.

However, in an article for The Times this week on his appointment, Prof. Ahmed said: “There are urgent threats to free speech and academic freedom in our universities and colleges.” He went on to indicate that the Definition might constitute one of those threats, writing: “The public sector equality duty means institutions must “have due regard” to the need to achieve certain equality aims. They should be clear about equality implications of their decisions. They must recognise the desirability of achieving equality aims, but in the context of the importance of free speech and academic freedom. Similarly, the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance’s working definition [also known as the International Definition of Antisemitism] is an important tool for understanding how antisemitism manifests itself in the 21st century. Adopting it sends a strong signal to students and staff facing antisemitism. But it must not restrict legitimate political speech and protest.

“I have had concerns about this in the past. Since then, I have seen at Cambridge how in practice the working definition can accommodate robust support for free speech and academic freedom. More recently, the report of the Parliamentary task force on antisemitism in higher education indicates that none of the 56 university adopters who were asked reported that its adoption had in any way restricted freedom of speech. I will act impartially. I have no interest in promoting the views of this or of any future government. I have no interest in any ‘culture war’.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We are pleased that Prof. Ahmed’s view of the International Definition of Antisemitism has apparently changed in the past two years, and that he assumes his new role with a more accurate understanding of the importance and effects of the Definition and a recognition that the popular criticisms of the Definition have no basis in law or evidence in fact. The Definition plays a crucial role in the fight against antisemitism, and we look forward to working with Prof. Ahmed in securing the rights and safety of Jewish students on campus.”

Prof. Ahmed’s appointment is pursuant to the Freedom of Speech Act, which became law in May. The law is intended to help to protect the status of universities “as centres of academic freedom” and also holds students’ unions to the same legal responsibilities as universities and their colleges, requiring them to “take reasonably practicable steps to ensure lawful freedom of speech.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitismby universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

A court has ruled in favour of a professor who sued his erstwhile employer, the University of Sydney, ordering the institution to rehire him after he was sacked in connection with the display of a graphic of an Israeli flag with a swastika superimposed onto it.

The image was displayed as part of a slideshow presentation during a lecture regarding media coverage of the Israel-Palestine conflict.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

Political economist Dr Tim Anderson also requested compensation for the “psychological burden” he was faced with post-dismissal, however this was denied by the court.

The University’s original decision to sack Dr Anderson in February 2019 came after two warnings regarding prior inflammatory remarks that he made about politicians and journalists. 

The court has justified the order to reinstate him by arguing that professors are entitled to express their views under the protection of intellectual freedom.

The order to rehire Dr Anderson is pending the outcome of another appeal against previous legal orders, and it is set to return to court on 5th June.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism worldwide.

The University of Warsaw has unveiled a plaque honouring the memory of its past Jewish students victimised by Polish antisemitism. 

Polish laws introduced in the 1930s required Jewish students to sit only in assigned areas at the back of lecture theatres, referred to as “ghetto seats”.

This practice originated in 1935 at the Polytechnic in Lviv, and by 1937 it became law and was applied to academic institutions throughout Poland. 

The unveiling ceremony was attended by Yacov Livine, the Israeli Ambassador to Poland, who said: “We must remember the dark parts in our joint history as well as the enlightened ones.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout Europe.

The University of Maryland is investigating a report of antisemitic slurs and symbols discovered inside the La Plata Residence Hall.

Those responsible are yet to be found. 

This report is not the first of its kind. The University’s estimated 6,000 Jewish students have previously reported numerous incidents of antisemitism on campus. 

The University of Maryland stated their, “deep concern to learn of these actions, which have no place on our campus or in our community.”

According to the FBI, over 60 percent of hate crimes against a religious minority are motivated by antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the United States.

56 universities have reported that there has been not a single instance where their adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism has restricted or chilled freedom of expression on campus or academic research at their institution.

A Parliamentary Task Force on Antisemitism in Higher Education, established by the Government’s Independent Adviser on Antisemitism with support from members of the All-Party Parliamentary Group Against Antisemitism, has published a report that made various findings about antisemitism on university campuses in the UK.

The task force reported that “56 universities across the UK [were] asked about their experience of using the Definition, which they had all adopted. None knew of or could provide a single example in which the IHRA Definition had in any way restricted freedom of speech or academic research, or where its adoption had chilled academic freedom, research or freedom of expression.”

It has long been a canard of opponents of the Definition that it restricts freedom of speech on campuses. Campaign Against Antisemitism has previously published a resource explaining why this is not the case. This report also shows how there is no evidence of such restriction either.

The report also made other concerning discoveries, including that it is “commonplace” for students not to wear “certain clothing or jewellery around campus because it would make them visibly identifiable as Jewish.” The report even found that some Jewish staff choose to keep their identity secret to avoid “negativity” at work.

Polling by Campaign Against Antisemitism has also shown that, more broadly, almost half of British Jews try not to show visible signs of their Judaism when they go out due to antisemitism.

The report further found that Jewish students spoke “repeatedly” of an “underlying fear of being targeted” over their backgrounds and of being “expected to answer questions about Israel,” even showing reluctance to attend seminars or lectures relating to the Jewish state “for fear of personal interrogation”.

According to the Definition, “Holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the State of Israel” is an example of antisemitism.

The report observed that “Jewish students generally have a positive university experience” but recognised the rise in antisemitic incidents on campuses.

The CST has recently reported recent significant increase in antisemitic incidents on campus, while polling by Campaign Against Antisemitism has found that 96 percent of British Jews believe that antisemitism on university campuses it is a problem.

It recommended further adoption of the Definition by universities and for more robust and transparent disciplinary procedures, and emphasised the importance of religious provision for Jewish students and staff.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Goldsmiths, University of London has announced the barrister who will be leading its “independent review into antisemitism at the College”. 

Senior barrister Mohinderpal Sethi KC will lead the investigation, in which current and former University students and staff will have the opportunity to become involved by coming forward with their own experiences.  

The report is expected to be presented by next year.

The investigation was announced last year after Professor David Hirsh was reportedly called a “far-right white supremacist” by its then-Students’ Union President.

Initially, the Students’ Union apparently refused to investigate Sara Bafo, its now-former President, following allegations of antisemitism, despite being requested to do so by the University.

Ms Bafo’s alleged tweet was said to have been written in response to a tweet from Prof. Hirsh, a prominent and highly-respected antisemitism expert, which said: “There is an antisemitic edge to official, institutional, university campaigns to ‘decolonise’ education.”

In response to the University’s request for the investigation, Ms Bafo tweeted that the University “has tried to get the SU trustee board to investigate me for a tweet I made in response to a Zionist Goldsmiths academic’s explicit racist history & his delegitimisation of ‘Decolonisation’ campaigns,” adding: “This was a dirty tactic from the institution to silence me further as I was leaving.”

However, despite the Student’s Union denying the investigation on grounds of “free speech”, the University announced that an independent probe will take place.

Frances Corner, the Warden of Goldsmiths, said at the time: “We are supporting Dr Hirsh after unwarranted messages about him were posted on social media which I believe are utterly without foundation. These kinds of behaviours are completely unacceptable and will always be challenged.

“As Warden I want to make it clear that this kind of conduct is not in line with the College’s values and that it brings harm to individuals as well as our good reputation as a place of learning.”

Prof. Hirsh said of the probe: “I am really pleased that the leadership of Goldsmiths is taking this difficult and courageous step. I have been clear that there is a hostile environment at the college for scholars and students who refuse to embrace anti-Zionism.”

Last year, the University also announced that it would adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism but “without the case studies.” 

In addition, it said that it would also adopt the Jerusalem Declaration, which is a wrecking document intended to undermine the globally-recognised Definition, owing to the fact that the University’s “academic community” favoured it. 

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail campus@antisemitism.org.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is writing to Loughborough University over a number of incendiary tweets comparing Zionists to Nazis, as first reported by the Gnasher Jew Twitter account

The tweets are believed to come from the account of Fazal Rehman who, according to his Twitter account, works at the University in the maintenance department. 

In one tweet, Mr Rehman appears to have tweeted “Hiel Hitler [sic]”, while another tweet read: “Antisemitism the allegation zionist throw around more  than confetti at a wedding.”

Several tweets made comparisons of Zionists to Nazis, some of which are viewable here, here, here, here, and here

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

Other inflammatory posts included the claim that “Zionist have control of Facebook” and the accusation that “Israelis are bloodthirsty barbarians with no regard for human life except their own.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Abhorrent tweets of ‘Hiel Hitler [sic]’ and comparisons of Zionists to Nazis, which is a breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism, would be disgraceful regardless, but even more so given that these seemingly originate from the account of a Loughborough University employee. Any individual spewing such hateful rhetoric has no business working near students, and we will be in urgent contact with Loughborough University.”

Swastikas and antisemitic slurs were discovered on a blackboard in Davidson College, North Carolina this week.

Photographs of the graffiti, discovered on 26th April on the blackboard of an outdoor classroom, were circulated on social media over the weekend. College President Doug Hicks released a statement announcing that local police were investigating the incident and that support would be provided for “members of our community who feel targeted.”

Jewish students at the College, disappointed by the response, released a statement, saying: “This hate crime is not an isolated incident. We’re not surprised by it. The administration has not done enough to respond.” They also noted that the College “never reached out to Jewish students.” 

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the United States.

The University of Adelaide has reportedly rejected the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Following calls from Jewish students at the University to adopt the Definition, the University of Adelaide has rejected it on the grounds of protecting freedom of speech on campus. 

A spokesperson for the University said: “We proudly encourage critical thinking and respectful debate. Freedom of speech is a right everyone holds, subject to the law. The right to express lawful views about controversial matters is at the heart of a robust democracy. It is also the essence of academic freedom.”

As Campaign Against Antisemitism has shown, it is a canard popular with critics of the Definition that it stifles freedom of expression or academic research.

Last year, it was reported that the University’s student magazine, On Dit, published an article that called for “death to Israel”. According to the Definition, “denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination” is an example of antisemitism. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism worldwide.

A swastika has been discovered at Dartmouth College.

It has been reported that, earlier this week, a swastika was found carved into the ground at the College in New Hampshire. It is understood that the symbol has since been reported to the College and subsequently been removed. 

In an e-mail to its staff and students, the Provost of the College observed: “Antisemitism has been on the rise in the US and has no place at Dartmouth.” 

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the United States.

Image credit: Google

Campaign Against Antisemitism is writing to the University of Gloucestershire over incendiary comments made by its Visa and Immigration Officer about Zionists and Hamas.

Comments posted to the Twitter account of Joe Sucksmith, who is said to work at the University in the student-facing role, included saying that “Zionists should stfu [shut the f*** up] on the topic of racism” and that “Zionism is racism”.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour)” is an example of antisemitism.

Other comments from Mr Sucksmith’s account included writing “Oh f*** off about the Hamas charter” and professing support for the disgraced academic David Miller, whose employment was terminated after Campaign Against Antisemitism brought a lawsuit on behalf of students at the University of Bristol against the institution, which alleged unlawful harassment on the basis of Jewish ethnicity and Judaism, amounting to breaches of the Equality Act 2010, as well as breaches of contract.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Comments minimising the racist hatred of the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group, Hamas, showing solidarity with the disgraced former Bristol professor David Miller, and telling ‘Zionists’ that they have no right to speak about racism, are reprehensible. They have no place even on social media, let alone coming from an official in a university’s administration. The University of Gloucestershire has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism. It must now show that this was not an empty gesture, and urgently investigate and sanction this individual. We will be writing to the University.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Image credit: Twitter via University of Gloucestershire

Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to Staffordshire University and West Midlands Police following reports that a Regional Course Director at the University shared conspiratorial posts about Jews. 

Dr Rizwan Mustafa, whose role at the University includes overseeing accredited training programmes for new police recruits, has reportedly been under investigation since February following the publication of the Government’s report into its Prevent Strategy.

The report was produced by Sir William Shawcross, who was appointed as the Independent Reviewer of Prevent, the Government’s flagship anti-radicalisation programme, in January 2021.

The report claimed that Dr Mustafa shared content which called for the destruction of Israel and asked: “Where is the Caliph of the Muslims? Don’t you care that the Jews are defiling the place of the prophet’s nocturnal journey with their filth? The Jews are the most hostile people towards the believers.” He is also alleged in the report to have “shared conspiracy theories” about the origins of Al Qaeda and the Islamic State.

Following the release of the report, Simon Foster, the West Midlands Police and Crime Commissioner, said: “I am deeply concerned about this matter and am treating it with the utmost seriousness.

“I have immediately requested that West Midlands Police conduct an investigation into this matter and report to me as a matter of urgency, so that I can then determine the best course of action, based on the outcome of that investigation.”

In response to Campaign Against Antisemitism’s letter, Staffordshire University has confirmed that an internal investigation is underway.

Staffordshire University has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

The former NUS President Shaima Dallali is reported to have joked about killing Zionists.

According to the JC, Ms Dallali, who was removed from her position as NUS President amidst investigations into her conduct following allegations of antisemitism, made the inflammatory comments in 2014 in relation to entering the West Bank.

She is alleged to have said of Israeli border guards: “I don’t want no Zionist near my passport, I’ll probs kill him tbh.”

Ms Dallali’s lawyers have apparently said that her remarks were “clearly not remotely serious”.

The JC added that in a Facebook comment, Ms Dallali said that fatwas from radical clerics meant “we’re not allowed to go to occupied Palestine…Israel and that…It’s still not allowed because you’ll need Israeli authorities to stamp your passport and that’s like recognising Israel…”

One of the clerics reportedly cited was Yusuf al-Qaradawi who, in 2009, said on Al-Jazeera TV that he would “shoot Allah’s enemies, the Jews” and called upon God to “kill them, down to the very last one.”

Ms Dallai is alleged to have described him as the “moral compass for the Muslim community at large”. 

In a 2010 interview on BBC Arabic, Mr Yusuf al-Qaradawi reportedly said: “Throughout history, Allah has imposed upon the [Jews] people who would punish them for their corruption. The last punishment was carried out by Hitler. By means of all the things he did to them – even though they exaggerated this issue – he managed to put them in their place. This was divine punishment for them. Allah willing, the next time will be at the hand of the believers.”

Ms Dallali’s lawyers are said to have stated that she does not endorse all of the cleric’s views and added that the JC’s newest findings was an example of old posts being dredged up to “besmirch her reputation”, that it was “not language she would use now” and “would not have been taken remotely seriously by anyone reading it”.

Her removal as NUS President, which came after she became the first President in the Union’s 100-year history to have been suspended, arrived in the wake of Rebecca Tuck KC’s damning report into the allegations of antisemitism within the NUS.

Ms Tuck’s report, which was released in January and followed an investigation into which Campaign Against Antisemitism, the Union of Jewish Students (UJS) and others provided input, observed that NUS allowed the development of a “hostile environment” for Jewish students, with instances in which Jewish students were “subjected to harassment” likely to be in breach of the Equality Act 2010, in addition to NUS’s own code of conduct. It rightly recognised that there had been a “poor relationship” between NUS and Jewish students for a long time. Ms Tuck drew on Campaign Against Antisemitism’s input and past research, including our annual Antisemitism Barometer survey of the Jewish community.

The report recommended improvements in NUS’s record-keeping, elections, due diligence of candidates, and code of conduct complaints. It also called for antisemitism training and the provision of educational materials, and a governance review. Ms Tuck also advised improvements in discussions about Israel, including the inclusion of an “experienced facilitator” in such debates.

Importantly, the report also called for the establishment of an advisory panel to ensure the implementation of the recommendations and for a survey of Jewish students to test that implementation, which were among the suggestions made to Ms Tuck by Campaign Against Antisemitism to ensure the durability of any recommendations that the report made. Indeed Ms Tuck observed how the recommendations of past reports relating to NUS have often not been implemented, a point that we stressed to her.

The announcement of Ms Tuck’s investigation last April came after Robert Halfon MP (then the Chair of the Education Select Committee) wrote together with Campaign Against Antisemitism to the Charity Commission calling for an investigation into the union’s charitable arm, which the Commission agreed to launch. The full dossier on NUS, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, can be read here.

There were numerous controversies involving NUS in 2022. In one scandal, the rapper Kareem Dennis, known as Lowkey, was due to headline NUS’s centenary conference but, after initially dismissing the concerns of Jewish students, who pointed out the rapper’s inflammatory record, the Union came under media scrutiny and eventually Mr Dennis withdrew from the event. As the scandal erupted, Robert Halfon MP excoriated NUS for failing to send a representative to attend a hearing held by the Education Select Committee, which he chairs.

This scandal was immediately followed by the election of Shaima Dallali as NUS’s new President, despite her history of antisemitic tweets and other inflammatory social media posts. Ms Dallali was forced to apologise for tweeting the words of an antisemitic chant. In 2012, during an escalation of tensions between Israel and the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group Hamas, Ms Dallali tweeted the words “Khaybar Khaybar, ya yahud, Jaish Muhammad, sa yahud.” Translated into English, this chant means “Jews, remember the battle of Khaybar, the army of Muhammad is returning.” It is a classic Arabic battle cry referencing the massacre and expulsion of the Jews of the town of Khaybar in northwestern Arabia, now Saudi Arabia, in the year 628 CE.

These scandals come after decades of atrocious relations between NUS and Jewish students. Ms Tuck’s investigation is at least the third major such inquiry into NUS’s relations with Jewish students in the last twenty years.

It was reported recently that, claiming that her dismissal was discriminatory, Ms Dallali is taking legal action against NUS.  

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Birkbeck, University of London has confirmed to Campaign Against Antisemitism that Professor Rob Singh will be leaving the institution at the end of the academic year.

The confirmation comes after we provided the University with evidence that appeared to show Prof. Singh using the most appalling language in correspondence with a third party.

We wrote to Vice-Chancellor Professor David Latchman CBE, sharing copies of the messages, which contained expressions of various forms of bigotry, including a number of antisemitic comments, urging the University to investigate.

Comments included appearing to accuse a Jewish person of contemplating theft and saying “Too bad you live down to stereotypes.” asking “Is it difficuybeing a Jew?” [sic] and “Are you pretending to be a Jew?” There was also a reference to “Jew boy” and other inflammatory language. In addition there were also references in the messages to “f***ing apes” and uses of the n-word, and abuse directed at other minority groups.

Prof. Latchman responded to Campaign Against Antisemitism to inform us that Prof. Singh would be leaving the University on 31st July 2023, without going into further detail.

Prof. Singh currently serves as Professor of Politics and Director of Education in the Department of Politics at Birkbeck. He did not respond to a request for comment.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The language used in the correspondence that was provided to us is extreme and appalling, containing various forms of bigotry, including a number of antisemitic comments. Someone who repeatedly uses such language, even in the heat of sustained argument, has no place teaching impressionable young people. It is right that he is imminently leaving Birkbeck.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

The University College London (UCL) Jewish Society has submitted a letter to the UCL Council, urging it to reject alternative definitions of antisemitism that contradict the International Definition of Antisemitism, which the University has previously adopted.

The Jewish Society letter is backed by Campaign Against Antisemitism, UJS and other leading Jewish community charities.

In 2021, UCL’s Academic Board passed an advisory resolution calling on the University to “retract and replace” the International Definition of Antisemitism, which UCL adopted in 2019. The resolution was greeted with outrage, with one academic resigning in protest and others writing a letter in support of the Definition.

Tomorrow, UCL’s Council is considering the Academic Board’s recommendations to dilute the Definition by adopting three other definitions, including the so-called Jerusalem Declaration, which is a wrecking document intended to undermine the globally-recognised International Definition of Antisemitism. The letter urges the Council not to do so and instead to uphold the status quo.

The letter notes that UCL was the first University to admit Jewish students, and yet numerous serious antisemitic incidents on campus prompted an internal investigation and a report, followed by the appointment of an Antisemitism Programme Manager by the University.

A recent survey of Jewish students at UCL by the Jewish Society found that 98 percent of Jewish students support only the International Definition of Antisemitism, while polling by Campaign Against Antisemitism for our Antisemitism Barometer has shown that a staggering 92 percent of British Jews believe that antisemitism in British universities is a problem, and the CST has recorded a 22 percent increase in antisemitism on campus.

In a statement, the UCL Jewish Society said: “We strongly stand behind IHRA as the only definition that can protect our Jewish students at UCL. Jewish students are most affected by any policy changes on antisemitism. This is a crucial moment and we thank the Jewish community for their unwavering support. We look forward to Council standing up for Jewish students.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “UCL’s Jewish students have every right to expect that, when it comes to defining the hatred that they themselves experience, the University will listen to them. Like the overwhelming majority of the Jewish community, there is near-unanimous support among UCL’s Jewish students for the International Definition of Antisemitism, and the strength of that opinion must be heeded by UCL’s Council. The International Definition of Antisemitism is the only definition that can protect Jewish students.

“We are proud to have supported UCL’s Jewish Society, along with other communal organisations, in making the voice of its members heard.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Campaign Against Antisemitism is considering legal action after the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) Palestine Society reportedly shared a quote from the Secretary-General of Hizballah.

In 2019, following a gruelling effort over several years by Campaign Against Antisemitism and our allies, Hizballah was completely proscribed by the Home Secretary, Sajid Javid, with the support of the Foreign Secretary, Jeremy Hunt.

Hizballah’s Secretary-General, Hassan Nasrallah, has previously said: “If Jews all gather in Israel, it will save us the trouble of going after them worldwide.” Hizballah has been true to its mission, bombing Jewish targets from Buenas Aires to Burgas, and it has even been blamed for setting off two bombs in London outside buildings used by Jews and Israelis.

According to the JC, the SOAS society shared an Instagram post to its story which contained a quote from Mr Nasrallah that read: “The law of executing Palestinian prisoners will increase the faith, courage and willingness of the Palestinian youth to carry out operations, and this measure is a foolish one.

“Everything that is happening now indicates the end of the Zionist entity.”

The society reportedly also shared a video hours prior of an interview, during which a girl says that “The Jews are hateful”.

In 2021, Professor David Hirsh, a lecturer at Goldsmiths, University of London who was appointed as the Chairman of a panel that oversaw an antisemitism-related complaint at SOAS, said that SOAS could be institutionally antisemitic.

The incident related to a complaint from a former student at SOAS who sought to have his fees refunded after he was forced to leave the University due to a ”toxic antisemitic environment”.

The University has not adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The University has previously told Campaign Against Antisemitism that: “While SOAS has not adopted the IHRA definition, we are committed to maintaining a neutral platform and ensuring that all members of our diverse community are free to express their opinions in a mutually respectful and collegial environment.

“SOAS has a strong academic track record in research and teaching which relates to Israel Studies and Jewish Culture, including the UK’s first Professor of Israel Studies, an active Centre for Jewish Studies and a range of degree programmes including Hebrew with Arabic. The School is also home to the Jewish Music Institute. All of this is part of our leading role in the development of thinking on issues relating to the Middle East.

“We will continue to promote open and robust discussion on campus.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Image credit: JC

The National Union of Students (NUS) opened its conference earlier this week by apologising for its failings in tackling antisemitism.

The apology arrived in the wake of Rebecca Tuck KC’s damning report into the allegations of antisemitism within the NUS.

Nehaal Bajwa, NUS’ Vice President for Liberation and Equality, said at the conference: “[Rebecca Tuck’s] findings were truly shocking and showed us what Jewish students have been saying and have known for a long time; that antisemitism is real and it is happening in NUS spaces as well as in student unions and wider student politics.”

Chloe Field, Vice President for Higher Education, added: “So, we really want to open conference today with a moment of accountability for NUS and a moment of humanity towards our Jewish friends and members. On behalf of NUS today and the past, I am genuinely, truly sorry that it has taken us so long to address antisemitism head-on. You have been let down by the very organisation that you should have been able to trust the most. My team and I will do everything that we can do to make sure that you never have to fight this fight on your own again.

“Let us say this to anyone in doubt: antisemitism is real and it is happening in student politics today. Antisemitism is an attack not just on Jewish people, but on all of us and the shared values we hold.”

Ms Tuck’s report, which was released in January and followed an investigation into which Campaign Against Antisemitism, the Union of Jewish Students (UJS) and others provided input, observed that NUS allowed the development of a “hostile environment” for Jewish students, with instances in which Jewish students were “subjected to harassment” likely to be in breach of the Equality Act 2010, in addition to NUS’s own code of conduct. It rightly recognised that there had been a “poor relationship” between NUS and Jewish students for a long time. Ms Tuck drew on Campaign Against Antisemitism’s input and past research, including our annual Antisemitism Barometer survey of the Jewish community.

The report recommended improvements in NUS’s record-keeping, elections, due diligence of candidates, and code of conduct complaints. It also called for antisemitism training and the provision of educational materials, and a governance review. Ms Tuck also advised improvements in discussions about Israel, including the inclusion of an “experienced facilitator” in such debates.

Importantly, the report also called for the establishment of an advisory panel to ensure the implementation of the recommendations and for a survey of Jewish students to test that implementation, which were among the suggestions made to Ms Tuck by Campaign Against Antisemitism to ensure the durability of any recommendations that the report made. Indeed Ms Tuck observed how the recommendations of past reports relating to NUS have often not been implemented, a point that we stressed to her.

The announcement of Ms Tuck’s investigation last April came after Robert Halfon MP (then the Chair of the Education Select Committee) wrote together with Campaign Against Antisemitism to the Charity Commission calling for an investigation into the union’s charitable arm, which the Commission agreed to launch. The full dossier on NUS, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, can be read here.

After the investigation was announced, Shaima Dallali, the then-President of NUS, was removed from her position amidst allegations of antisemitism. This was the first time in the Union’s 100-year history that a President has been removed.

There have been numerous controversies involving NUS over the past twelve months. In one scandal, the rapper Kareem Dennis, known as Lowkey, was due to headline NUS’s centenary conference but, after initially dismissing the concerns of Jewish students, who pointed out the rapper’s inflammatory record, the Union came under media scrutiny and eventually Mr Dennis withdrew from the event. As the scandal erupted, Robert Halfon MP excoriated NUS for failing to send a representative to attend a hearing held by the Education Select Committee, which he chairs.

This scandal was immediately followed by the election of Shaima Dallali as NUS’s new President, despite her history of antisemitic tweets and other inflammatory social media posts. Ms Dallali was forced to apologise for tweeting the words of an antisemitic chant. In 2012, during an escalation of tensions between Israel and the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group Hamas, Ms Dallali tweeted the words “Khaybar Khaybar, ya yahud, Jaish Muhammad, sa yahud.” Translated into English, this chant means “Jews, remember the battle of Khaybar, the army of Muhammad is returning.” It is a classic Arabic battle cry referencing the massacre and expulsion of the Jews of the town of Khaybar in northwestern Arabia, now Saudi Arabia, in the year 628 CE.

These scandals come after decades of atrocious relations between NUS and Jewish students. Ms Tuck’s investigation is at least the third major such inquiry into NUS’s relations with Jewish students in the last twenty years.

It was reported today that, claiming that her dismissal was discriminatory, Ms Dallali is taking legal action against NUS.  

It was also reported that Manchester Students’ Union is set to hold a referendum on whether it should disaffiliate from NUS, citing concerns over antisemitism and Islamophobia.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Image credit: NUS via Twitter

Middlesex University is reportedly cutting ties with the Islamic College.

The University is terminating its partnership with the Brondesbury Park-based institution, whose degrees are validated by Middlesex University and which has received hundreds of thousands of pounds in taxpayer funds, according to the JC.

The Islamic College is alleged to be the British affiliate of Al-Mustafa International University, which is controlled by Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khamenei and which was sanctioned by the United States in 2020 because it is allegedly “a recruiting platform for the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC) Quds Force.”

Earlier this year, Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to all MPs supporting the Government’s mooted ban on the IRGC terror group.

There is no evidence that the Islamic College itself is involved in terrorism. A staff member, however, reportedly claimed that mass-murderer Anders Breivik was an “ultra-Zionist, freemason, Islamophobic who claims to belong to the Templar order of the Rose-Cross.”

In addition, a former Principal of the College, Mohammad Saeed Bahmanpour, has reportedly been captured on video apparently urging the crowd at a rally in 2013 to chant their support for the antisemitic genocidal terrorist organisation Hizballah, which has since been proscribed by the British Government.

Another lecturer was reportedly captured on video comparing Israel’s policies to those of the Nazis. The JC has reported that, after it began investigating, this video is no longer available. According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis.”

The founder of the College, Saied Reza Ameli, who until 2006 was a trustee of the Irshad Trust, the charity that runs the College, is reportedly now a secretary to Iran’s Supreme Council for the Cultural Revolution.

The Islamic College runs courses on Arabic, Islamic studies and Islamic law at undergraduate and graduate levels. Its degrees are “validated” by Middlesex University, and, in addition to significant taxpayer funds received under the Covid furlough scheme, it is owned by a charity, enjoying the benefit of tax-incentivised donations.

The Islamic College is closely associated with the controversial Islamic Centre of England.

A spokesperson for Middlesex university reportedly said: “Following a review of our partnership with the Islamic College in London we have mutually agreed to terminate. Middlesex University has a statutory duty of care to students currently studying at the college and we are in close contact with the regulatory body, the Office of Students, to ensure a smooth transition. The end date of our partnership will be December 31, 2023.” 

In a further statement, spokesperson for the University said: “Middlesex University validates academic provision offered by the Islamic College and provides services related to oversight of academic quality and standards, in line with standard sector practice. All of our partnerships are regularly reviewed and we undertake thorough due diligence before formalising any collaborative relationship. We are grateful to the JC for bringing these serious allegations to our attention and we will be raising them with the Islamic College as a matter of urgency.”

The Islamic College denies affiliation to Al-Mustafa University. A spokesperson said that the College’s aim is to “offer programmes of the highest standards in Islamic studies, promulgate a rational and critical study of religion, enhance community cohesion and promote interfaith dialogue. It is not engaged in the dissemination of any ideology.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitismby universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Students at the University College London have been recorded chanting “From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free” in protest of activist Yoseph Haddad’s speech at the University. 

The chant of “From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free” only makes sense as a call for the destruction of the world’s only Jewish state — and its replacement with a State of Palestine — and is thus an attempt to deny Jews, uniquely, the right to self-determination, which is a breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Additionally, signs reading “From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free” were seen, while calls for an intifada were also heard.

An intifada is a rebellion or uprising, but the Palestinian intifadas were characterised by acts of terrorism targeting Jews. 

During an anti-Israel demonstration held last year, the UCL Students for Justice in Palestine Society, Saleem Nusseibeh, led the “from the river, to the sea” chant and warned the crowd of hundreds about “Zionist plotting”.

UCL adopted the Definition in 2019 but in 2021, its Academic Board passed an advisory resolution calling on the University to “retract and replace” the Definition. The Students’ Union also voted down a similar resolution. After the vote, one Jewish academic affiliated to the University resigned in disgust, calling UCL an “antisemitic cesspit”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the Definition by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Students at the University of Warwick have voted to disaffiliate the Students’ Union from the National Union of Students (NUS) “over failures of alleged bigotry”.

In an “all students vote”, 487 voted to disaffiliate from the campaigning body of NUS – albeit not from NUS’s charitable arm, which works with students’ unions – while 416 voted against and 253 abstained.

The motion asserted: “The NUS has failed to protect minorities from abuse through divisive rhetoric and lack of zero tolerance and condemnation for hate speech. Warwick SU, and any national student union it belongs to, must have zero tolerance against bigotry towards any individual, minority group and other protected characteristics, and require the same of elected individuals and guests…Warwick SU, and any national student union it belongs to, should prioritise the day-to-day issues students face, such as requesting financial support following increasing living costs…There are various alternative organisations which deal with national issues that have little direct relevance to students, including foreign affairs, which are more suitable for other causes and to which students are free to sign up to.”

The motion added: “The NUS’ constant failure over allegations of bigotry and their detachment from key student concerns, as shown by successive low turnout, has left the union without credibility to many students from various backgrounds and politicians from across the spectrum, endangering the success of any future lobbying by NUS UK…Collective power of students remains important, and a sustainable alternative model of national cooperation between student unions should be explored.”

The vote came after a damning report by Rebecca Tuck KC – following an investigation to which Campaign Against Antisemitism contributed – found that that NUS allowed the development of a “hostile environment” for Jewish students, with instances in which Jewish students were “subjected to harassment” likely to be in breach of the Equality Act 2010, in addition to NUS’s own code of conduct.

During the investigation, Shaima Dallali, the President of NUS, was removed from her position amidst allegations of antisemitism. This was the first time in the Union’s 100-year history that a President has been removed.

The University of Oxford’s Students’ Union has also announced that it will be holding a vote on disaffiliation later this month.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitismby universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

The prospective director for free speech on university campuses, a new role to be implemented by the Government, was discovered to have denounced the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Arif Ahmed, a philosophy professor at the University of Cambridge, reportedly issued a blog post in February 2021 in which he sharply criticised the Definition.

He wrote: “I am strongly against Gavin Williamson’s requirement that universities adopt the IHRA definition of antisemitism….This ‘definition’ is nothing of the kind; adopting it obstructs perfectly legitimate defence of Palestinian rights.”

He added: “As such it chills free speech on a matter of the first importance. I hope the Secretary of State reconsiders the need for it; but these new free speech duties ought to rule it out in any case.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

A journalist who reportedly called the Holocaust a “myth” mentored students at the University of Westminster, according to the JC.

Motasem Ahmed Dalloul, who works as the Gaza correspondent of Middle East Monitor, a news site backed by the Qatari Government, reportedly provided career advice to students in the 2021-22 academic year.

In November 2014, Mr Dalloul allegedly shared an article about Germany’s decision not to recognise a state of Palestine, writing: “They nurtured the myth of the Holocaust and then they continue supporting the Zionists!!”

In 2014, he reportedly claimed: “Israeli occupation is crueller on Palestinians than Hitler persecution to Jews.”

In June 2016, he reportedly shared a link to an article published by a website called Days of Palestine, which he apparently co-founded. The page was titled “A 91-year-old Jew admits telling lies about Holocaust” and recounted the story of Joseph Hirt, who in 2016 admitted that he had lied about escaping Auschwitz. The article claimed that “This adds more reasons to review the facts about the Holocaust,” and Mr Dalloul shared the article on Twitter with a photo of Mr Hirt and allegedly wrote: “This adds more question marks ahead of what is called a Holocaust.”

In 2017, two days after three Israeli civilians were stabbed to death, Mr Dalloul allegedly wrote on social media: “Resisting occupation with all available means, including armed struggle is legitimate based on inte’l law. #ResistanceIsNotTerrorism.” When another user responded, “Walking into a home and stabbing three innocent people in the middle of dinner is not remotely equal to ‘resistance’. Terrorism is terrorism,” Mr Dalloul reportedly replied: “No, they live in occupied land, they’ve served in army, killed Palestinians, innocent Jews live in their home countries, not others’ countries.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Calling for, aiding, or justifying the killing or harming of Jews in the name of a radical ideology or an extremist view of religion,” “Accusing the Jews as a people, or Israel as a state, of inventing or exaggerating the Holocaust,” and “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” are all examples of antisemitism.

The University of Westminster has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Mr Dalloul graduated from the University of Westminster, following which he worked as a staff writer at Middle East Monitor and contributed to Middle East Eye and TRT World. He was awarded a certificate of participation signed by Vice-Chancellor Dr Peter Bonfield and Caroline Lloyd, the University’s Director of Student Services, in spite of his history of inflammatory statements.

Motasem Dalloul reportedly told the JC: “All what you said is fake. I’m actually against the Zionist-Israeli occupation of Palestine, but don’t deny anyone’s pain and suffering.”

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “It is deplorable that the wellbeing of Jewish students at the University of Westminster seems to be playing second fiddle to a desire to tolerate those whose rhetoric has been so inflammatory.

“According to our 2021 Antisemitism Barometer, a staggering 92% of British Jews believe that antisemitism in British universities is a problem, with 84% believing that it is a ‘very big problem’ or ‘quite a big problem’. One need only to look at the example set by the University of Westminster to see why.

“The University has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism. Now it is time to enforce it and prove that it is serious about protecting its Jewish students.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitismby universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Image credit: JC

Rebecca Tuck KC has published her much-anticipated report, providing the clearest assessment of antisemitism at the National Union of Students (NUS) to date.

The report, which follows an investigation into which Campaign Against Antisemitism, the Union of Jewish Students (UJS) and others provided input, observes that NUS allowed the development of a “hostile environment” for Jewish students, with instances in which Jewish students were “subjected to harassment” likely to be in breach of the Equality Act 2010, in addition to NUS’s own code of conduct. It rightly recognises that there has been a “poor relationship” between NUS and Jewish students for a long time.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Rebecca Tuck KC’s report is exceptionally important in vindicating the experiences of Jewish students over many years, finding that NUS has created a ‘hostile environment’ for Jewish students. The Tuck Report draws heavily on CAA’s research and our extensive contributions to the investigation. It is scathing and clearly evidenced. It must become NUS’s roadmap.

“If the removal of Shaima Dallali as NUS President was an encouraging first step, this report is a second. We support the recommendations that the report proposes, which, if implemented, will help steer NUS down a better path.

“However, we have been here before: this is at least the third major report into NUS’s relations with Jewish students in twenty years, and, whatever their merits, those reports failed to overcome the personnel and institutional problems that have plagued NUS, with Jewish students bearing the impact. NUS must not only implement the Tuck Report’s specific recommendations but must introduce measures to monitor and assess progress. We will continue to help Jewish students, including by providing them with free legal representation, and hold NUS to account to ensure that the body that is meant to represent all students finally recognises that that includes Jews.”

Ms Tuck drew on Campaign Against Antisemitism’s input and past research, including our annual Antisemitism Barometer survey of the Jewish community.

The report recommends improvements in NUS’s record-keeping, elections, due diligence of candidates, and code of conduct complaints. It also calls for antisemitism training and the provision of educational materials,,  and a governance review. Ms Tuck also advises improvements in discussions about Israel, including the inclusion of an “experienced facilitator” in such debates.

Importantly, the report also calls for the establishment of an advisory panel to ensure the implementation of the recommendations and for a survey of Jewish students to test that implementation, which were among the suggestions made to Ms Tuck by Campaign Against Antisemitism to ensure the durability of any recommendations that the report made. Indeed Ms Tuck observed how the recommendations of past reports relating to NUS have often not been implemented, a point that we stressed to her.

The announcement of Ms Tuck’s investigation in April came after Robert Halfon MP (then the Chair of the Education Select Committee) wrote together with Campaign Against Antisemitism to the Charity Commission calling for an investigation into the union’s charitable arm, which the Commission agreed to launch. The full dossier on NUS, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, can be read here.

In addition, over twenty former NUS Presidents wrote a letter expressing their “serious concerns about antisemitism”, and another letter, organised by UJS and signed by over 1,000 Jewish students and allies, called for NUS to launch an independent investigation.

Since the investigation was announced, Shaima Dallali, the President of NUS, has been removed from her position amidst allegations of antisemitism. This was the first time in the Union’s 100-year history that a President has been removed.

In a letter to Campaign Against Antisemitism, NUS confirmed that its own investigation — which is independent of Ms Tuck’s and is still ongoing — had “found that significant breaches of NUS’ policies have taken place” and that consequently “we have terminated the President’s contract.” Ms Dallali is still able to appeal this decision.

There have been numerous controversies involving NUS over the past twelve months. In one scandal, the rapper Kareem Dennis, known as Lowkey, was due to headline NUS’s centenary conference last month. After initially dismissing the concerns of Jewish students, who pointed out the rapper’s inflammatory record, the union came under media scrutiny and eventually Mr Dennis withdrew from the event. As the scandal erupted, Robert Halfon MP excoriated NUS for failing to send a representative to attend a hearing held by the Education Select Committee, which he chairs.

This scandal was immediately followed by the election of Shaima Dallali as NUS’s new President, despite her history of antisemitic tweets and other inflammatory social media posts. Ms Dallali was forced to apologise for tweeting the words of an antisemitic chant. In 2012, during an escalation of tensions between Israel and the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group Hamas, Ms Dallali tweeted the words “Khaybar Khaybar, ya yahud, Jaish Muhammad, sa yahud.” Translated into English, this chant means “Jews, remember the battle of Khaybar, the army of Muhammad is returning.” It is a classic Arabic battle cry referencing the massacre and expulsion of the Jews of the town of Khaybar in northwestern Arabia, now Saudi Arabia, in the year 628 CE.

These scandals come after decades of atrocious relations between NUS and Jewish students. Ms Tuck’s investigation is at least the third major such inquiry into NUS’s relations with Jewish students in the last twenty years.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

An event organised by a society at the University of Nottingham which was set to feature a controversial cleric, who had previously described Jews as “a cowardly nation”, has been postponed

Nottingham University Islamic Society invited Sheikh Asrar Rashid, a controversial cleric in Birmingham, to give a talk on “The End of Times”.

Mr Rashid, who is reported to have said that Hitler did Jews “a favour”, was initially advertised by the Society in a Facebook post on 7th December, scheduled to appear at the University’s Law and Social Science building.

However, on 10th December, a further announcement was made stating that the event would instead be held at the Lenton Muslim Centre. 

The next day, the Society wrote that the event was “postponed until further notice due to unforeseen circumstances”.

A spokesperson for the University of Nottingham Students Union said that it had been “made aware of an invitation issued by the Islamic Society to Asrar Rashid to address its members. The Students’ Union has requested a postponement of the event to ensure that the agreed process for issuing such speaker invitations has been followed and allows us to determine whether the event can be held peacefully and safely for all those concerned,” adding: “Our priority is, and always will be, for all of our student members and it is of the utmost importance to us that we make sure all Students’ Union activity is safe, inclusive, dignified, respectful, and responsible.”

However, a Nottingham Jewish Society spokesperson said that its members were “appalled” by the invitation of Mr Rashid, and said that “This invitation should never have been approved in the first place, and our complaints should have been taken seriously and been treated discretely by the University and Students’ Union. Speakers who seek to incite hatred should not be invited to speak at our university.”

Mr Rashid has reportedly claimed that “By the 1940s, Hitler did a favour for the Jews that the Jews now were favoured by Europe.” Last year, the cleric stood by his description of Jews as “a cowardly nation” and call for a “jihad” on Israel.

Whilst commenting on last year’s violence in Israel and Gaza during a panel discussion, Mr Rashid was quoted as saying: “Personally, I believe the only solution is jihad, and a call for jihad, and an announcement for jihad by Muslim majority states that we have.

“Even surgical strikes or wallpaper strikes, the type that Saddam Hussein did in the early Nineties, I believe. Thirty-nine rockets he fired into Tel Aviv and every Jew was running into his shelter. Those with a European passport would be running back to Europe.”

“You see the way they react to Katyusha missiles or Qassam missiles that do not even kill anyone, they run into their shelters so the Jews are known as…a cowardly nation.”

Following criticism from the JC, which Mr Rashid described as a “Zionist newspaper”, he defended his comments on Facebook and Twitter, writing that the term “Jews” was “used in the same vein as the mainstream media regularly employ ‘Muslim’, ‘Arabs’, or ‘Palestinian’.”

He went on to say: “This context also reflects my statements that the ‘Jews are known as a cowardly nation’, pertaining to the State of Israel and its actions against the Palestinians where women and children are indiscriminately killed.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Calling for, aiding, or justifying the killing or harming of Jews in the name of a radical ideology or an extremist view of religion” is an example of antisemitism, as is “Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective.”

Students at the University of Bristol have been recorded chanting “From the river to the sea” in protest of a speaker at the University’s union. 

The chant of “From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free” only makes sense as a call for the destruction of the world’s only Jewish state — and its replacement with a State of Palestine — and is thus an attempt to deny Jews, uniquely, the right to self-determination, which is a breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Last night’s event, where the speaker was Charlotte Korchak, the Senior Educator at StandWithUs, was protested by members of the University’s Friends of Palestine society.

Ms Korchak wrote on her Instagram story how the society were invited to partake in the event but declined, only to arrive later to protest. She added how, following the event, she had to be escorted out of the premises by six security guards.

The University adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism in 2019, following a controversial debate.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the Definition by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Queen Mary University Students’ Union has passed a motion to disaffiliate from the National Union of Students (NUS) following its removal of Shaima Dallali earlier this month.

Ms Dallali was removed from her position as NUS President amidst investigations into her conduct following allegations of antisemitism.

However, nowhere in yesterday’s motion was there any mention of the antisemitism allegations.

Ms Dallali’s removal came after she became the first President in the Union’s 100-year history to have been suspended. The decision to remove Ms Dallali is subject to appeal.

The removal follows an internal investigation conducted by NUS, while an independent investigation is underway, led by Rebecca Tuck KC. Campaign Against Antisemitism has provided input into the latter investigation.

The investigations arose following a string of controversies surrounding the NUS and its leadership, and were announced after Robert Halfon MP wrote together with Campaign Against Antisemitism to the Charity Commission calling for an investigation into the Union’s charitable arm. The full dossier on NUS, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, can be read here. In addition, over twenty former NUS Presidents wrote a letter expressing their “serious concerns about antisemitism”, and another letter, organised by the Union of Jewish Students (UJS) and signed by over 1,000 Jewish students and allies, called for NUS to launch an independent investigation.

The Queen Mary University Students’ Union motion accused the NUS of having “spread of anti-Palestinian racism” which was a “part of a wider pattern of endemic and systematic bigotry and prejudice,” calling the removal of Ms Dallali is a “direct attack on pro-Palestine student activism.”

Another motion was also proposed which endorsed the BDS movement to boycott Israel, the tactics of which an overwhelming majority of British Jews find intimidating.

In a statement on Friday, Queen Mary Jewish and Israel Society criticised both the proposal to disaffiliate and the fact that the Society had not been informed by the Students’ Union of the motion.

In a joint statement with the Union of Jewish Students, Queen Mary Jewish and Israel Society addressed the motion, stating Jewish students at the University “feel betrayed and let down by their Students’ Union, with many Jewish students now feeling unsafe in their own Students’ Union which shrugs its shoulders at the expense of Jewish students.”

Last year, Queen Mary University Students’ Union failed to represent and show solidarity with their Jewish members by adopting the Jerusalem Declaration, which is a wrecking document intended to undermine the globally-recognised International Definition of Antisemitism. The University’s decision to repeal the Definition was reportedly not discussed with Jewish students, who reacted with disgust.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Of all the reasons that there may be to disaffiliate from NUS, it is revealing that QMUL Students’ Union did so because of the sacking of Shaima Dallali as NUS President. Her inflammatory social media activity alienated Jewish students even more from NUS, which already had an atrocious record on Jewish issues. Yet this first remedial step that the Union has taken to affirm that Jewish concerns do actually matter was too much for QMUL’s SU. This motion, which did not even include reference to antisemitism, comes after QMUL adoption of the ‘Jerusalem Declaration’ earlier this year. QMUL has made it abundantly clear what it thinks of the views of Jewish students.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Students at the University of Cambridge have been recorded chanting “From the river to the sea” in protest of a speaker at the University’s union. 

The chant of “From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free” only makes sense as a call for the destruction of the world’s only Jewish state — and its replacement with a State of Palestine — and is thus an attempt to deny Jews, uniquely, the right to self-determination, which is a breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Wednesday evening’s event, which was organised by the Pinsker Centre, a British think-tank with a focus on international policy, and where the speaker was Dan Meridor, Israel’s former Deputy Prime Minister, was protested by approximately 50 students.

A spokesperson for the University’s union reportedly told the Varsity student newspaper that “the Cambridge Union is strongly committed to our founding principle of promoting Free Speech. The Union’s role is to create a safe space in which to discuss difficult topics and provide members with the opportunity to cross examine them. The format of our speaker events offers members a unique opportunity to directly question powerful and high profile figures”.

Earlier this year, the University was rocked by antisemitic chanting and graffiti in connection with a visit by the Israeli ambassador.

The University of Cambridge adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism in 2020.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

An academic who believes that “Zionist lobbies…buy presidents”, defended the phrase “Stop the Palestinian Holocaust” and shared a video called “Truth About Zionist Jews Talmud” is no longer employed by Sheffield Hallam University, according to the JC

Shahd Abusalama, who was studying for a PhD in cinema at the University, reportedly shared tweets defending a first-year student who had made a poster that said “Stop the Palestinian Holocaust” and who was accused by a Jewish student of antisemitism.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, which Sheffield Hallam has adopted, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

On social media, Ms Abusalama defended the student by citing Jewish individuals who have made the same analogy, and also wrote: “I understand why a first-year university student used #Holocaust when thinking of Israel’s repeated bombardment of Gaza”, adding: “Maybe she thought she’d garner European sympathy for Palestine by evoking ‘Never Again’ slogan.”

She noted of the term “Holocaust” that she herself would not “use such a politicised word often used to justify the racist state of Israel” because it “distracts attention from the Zionist practices of settler-colonialism and ethnic cleansing against the Palestinians.” However, she proceeded to use other inflammatory terms and claimed that the suggestion that the University’s Palestine Society should undertake antisemitism training in light of the incident was indicative of a “hierarchy of racisms” asking: “Are Islamophobia & Xenophobia insignificant? Prioritising one form of racism over others is itself racist and divisive.”

This was not the first time that Ms Abusalama has courted controversy. She is active in the BDS movement to boycott Israel, the tactics of which an overwhelming majority of British Jews find intimidating, and in the past she reportedly urged people to watch a video on YouTube called “Truth About Zionist Jews Talmud”, which presented numerous antisemitic myths about the Talmud. The video’s description asked “Why the Zionist don’t want us to know what’s in Talmud? [sic],” adding: “Why they want the teaching of the Talmud to be known only to Jews.” Ms Abusalama wrote on Twitter: “Must watch this video that tells you the truth about #zionist #Jews. They take their legitimacy from #Talmud.” In another post, she reportedly wrote that the “Zionist lobbies control all this for their interest,” adding: “They buy presidents/slaves.” The video and tweets have since been deleted.

Ms Abusalama has also asserted that “Zionism is one of the worst forms of antisemitism,” described the BBC as part of the “Zionist propaganda machine”, claimed that the Jewish Chronicle newspaper is so named in order to “cement the analogy between anti-Zionism and antisemitism” and has further claimed that “Germany was always one of the greatest supporters and Zionists managed to mobilise German guilt for Nazism to normalise and enable their oppression and dispossession of the Palestinians.” She has also reportedly posted: “Barak Hussein Obama is b*stard! Those racists should be happy now & re-elect him as he’s anti-Arabs and anti-Muslims & #Zionists’ puppet [sic].”

In 2013, Ms Abusalama reportedly appeared at the 46th anniversary of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP), an antisemitic genocidal terrorist organisation. The event was addressed via video by the convicted terrorist, Leila Khaled, with Ms Abusalama reportedly singing in front of a PFLP banner. In a blog post, Ms Abusalama has also reportedly described Kozo Okamoto, the Japanese Red Army terrorist who participated in the PFLP’s 1971 Lod Airport massacre, as a “freedom fighter”, and described six terrorists who escaped from an Israeli jail last year as “heroes”. She has previously referred to Akram Rikhawi, who was sentenced to nine years in prison for transporting suicide bombers, as “legendary”.

During the University’s short-lived investigation into Ms Abusalama’s posts, she claimed that “Zionist racist publications/trolls have renewed online #bullying to discredit my academic reputation,” and she was suspended by the University. She declared: “Family, friends, and followers, I am under renewed attack by Zionist publications protesting my recent appointment as an Associate Lecturer at Sheffield Hallam University, where I also recently submitted a PhD dissertation on the historical representation of Palestinian refugees in colonial, humanitarian and Palestinian documentary films, from 1917 and 1993. The Zionist defamation campaign by Jewish News, Campaign Against Antisemitism and Jewish Chronicle joins a historical pattern where the Zionist colonial narrative is consistently privileged over the narratives of the oppressed.” She also claimed that “Zionists are still targeting me.”

She was then reinstated to her teaching duties, and it is understood that the investigation by the University was then dropped entirely and she was given a full-time position at Sheffield Hallam. Campaign Against Antisemitism corresponded with the University over the fiasco.

However, the JC has now stated that shortly after, a second investigation took place following a complaint from a Jewish student. The investigation was reportedly carried out by human rights barrister Akua Reindorf.

According to Sheffield Hallam’s Deputy Vice Chancellor, Richard Calvert, Ms Abusalama “chose to leave the university” after the second investigation.

Among Ms Abusalama’s supporters was the controversial former President of the National Union of Students, Malia Bouattia, who was found by her own institution to have made antisemitic comments.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Police in Providence, Rhode Island have arrested a suspect following an alleged antisemitic incident involving a threatening note at Brown University.

The note, which included violent threats against Jewish people, was discovered in the Hillel reception area of the Ivy League college. It followed two incidents of antisemitic graffiti found over the summer.

Rabbi Josh Bolton, executive director of Hillel, said he was “encouraged” that the Providence Police Department had conducted “a full investigation” into the incident and that an arrest had been made. Rabbi Bolton noted that the case had now been passed to the Attorney General’s office.

The threatening antisemitic message was reported to Brown’s Department of Public Safety (DPS). The matter, including the previous incidents of antisemitic graffiti, was referred to Providence police. 

Noting that the suspect was not a member of the Brown community, Rabbi Bolton expressed thanks to the DPS and police for their “swift and thorough handling” of the situation and his gratitude to the “many voices” who had expressed support for Hillel and Jewish students at Brown. 

University spokesperson Brian Clark said the college was “grateful” that “with assistance from Brown DPS and Hillel” the Providence police were able to “successfully investigate this incident” and make an arrest.

“While we hope this offers some level of reassurance,” added Mr Clark, “it remains deeply distressing that members of the Jewish community on campus… continue to face antisemitic acts like this, which should have no place in any community.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the United States.

It has been reported that Shaima Dallali accepted an award from a group that allegedly claimed that Jewish-Muslim interfaith work is a ‘Zionist plot’ days prior to being removed as President of the National Union of Students (NUS).

Images of her on-stage alongside the Palestinian Forum in Britain surfaced on Twitter. The group previously held a meeting at an art gallery in London entitled “How interfaith groups are being used to normalise Israeli apartheid”.

Earlier this week, Ms Dallali was removed from her position as NUS President amidst investigations into her conduct following allegations of antisemitism.

In a letter to Campaign Against Antisemitism, NUS confirmed that its investigation — which is still ongoing — had “found that significant breaches of NUS’ policies have taken place” and that consequently “we have terminated the President’s contract.”

The letter continued: “We are sorry for the harm that has been caused and we hope to rebuild the NUS in an inclusive way – fighting for all students as we have done for the past 100 years.”

It came after Ms Dallali last month became the first President in the Union’s 100-year history to have been suspended. The decision to remove Ms Dallali is subject to appeal.

The removal follows an internal investigation conducted by NUS, while an independent investigation is underway, led by Rebecca Tuck KC. Campaign Against Antisemitism has provided input into the latter investigation.

The investigations arose following a string of controversies surrounding the NUS and its leadership, and were announced after Robert Halfon MP wrote together with Campaign Against Antisemitism to the Charity Commission calling for an investigation into the Union’s charitable arm. The full dossier on NUS, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, can be read here. In addition, over twenty former NUS Presidents wrote a letter expressing their “serious concerns about antisemitism”, and another letter, organised by the Union of Jewish Students (UJS) and signed by over 1,000 Jewish students and allies, called for NUS to launch an independent investigation.

There have been numerous controversies involving NUS this year. In one recent scandal, the rapper Kareem Dennis, known as Lowkey, was due to headline NUS’s centenary conference last month. After initially dismissing the concerns of Jewish students, who pointed out the rapper’s inflammatory record, the union came under media scrutiny and eventually Mr Dennis withdrew from the event. As the scandal erupted, Robert Halfon MP excoriated NUS for failing to send a representative to attend a hearing held by the Education Select Committee, which he chairs.

This scandal was immediately followed by the election of Shaima Dallali as NUS’s new President, despite her history of antisemitic tweets and other inflammatory social media posts. 

Ms Dallali was forced to apologise for tweeting the words of an antisemitic chant. In 2012, during an escalation of tensions between Israel and the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group Hamas, Ms Dallali tweeted the words “Khaybar Khaybar, ya yahud, Jaish Muhammad, sa yahud.”

Translated into English, this chant means “Jews, remember the battle of Khaybar, the army of Muhammad is returning.” It is a classic Arabic battle cry referencing the massacre and expulsion of the Jews of the town of Khaybar in northwestern Arabia, now Saudi Arabia, in the year 628 CE.

Ms Dallali issued a statement on 23rd March, saying: “Earlier today I was made aware of a tweet I posted ten years ago. During Israel’s assault on Gaza I referenced the battle of Khaybar in which Jewish and Muslim armies fought. I was wrong to see the Palestine conflict as one between Muslims and Jews. The reference made as a teenager was unacceptable and I sincerely and unreservedly apologise.”

It also came to light that Ms Dallali’s output on Twitter also included other inflammatory messages, including one last May allegedly saying that “organisations like UJS [the Union of Jewish Students] have a history of bullying pro-Palestine sabbs [sabbatical officers] and activists. You speak one word of solidarity and they’re after you. UJS and their likes need to be called out.”

Another alleged tweet from 2018 read: “So your special forces invade the Gaza Strip, attempt to kidnap a Hamas commander, kill him and others. Then cry about Hamas being the terrorists. Makes perfect sense. #GazaUnderAttack.” Hamas is an antisemitic genocidal terrorist organisation that is proscribed in the UK.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Ms Dallali’s election and the duration of her term, both in spite of the public history of her comments and the limited remorse that she has shown, bolster concerns over the culture of student politics and the institutional problems at NUS. 

“For an NUS President to have apparently appeared on stage to accept an award from a group that reportedly claimed Jewish-Muslim interfaith is a ‘Zionist plot’ is appalling, but worse still is the fact that it was not surprising. The task of rebuilding NUS’s relations with Jewish students is colossal and urgent.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Shaima Dallali, the President of the National Union of Students (NUS), has been removed from her position amidst investigations into her conduct following allegations of antisemitism.

In a letter to Campaign Against Antisemitism, NUS confirmed that its investigation — which is still ongoing — had “found that significant breaches of NUS’ policies have taken place” and that consequently “we have terminated the President’s contract.”

The letter continued: “We are sorry for the harm that has been caused and we hope to rebuild the NUS in an inclusive way – fighting for all students as we have done for the past 100 years.”

It came after Ms Dallali last month became the first President in the Union’s 100-year history to have been suspended. The decision to remove Ms Dallali is subject to appeal.

The removal follows an internal investigation conducted by NUS, while an independent investigation is underway, led by Rebecca Tuck KC. Campaign Against Antisemitism has provided input into the latter investigation.

The investigations arose following a string of controversies surrounding the NUS and its leadership, and were announced after Robert Halfon MP wrote together with Campaign Against Antisemitism to the Charity Commission calling for an investigation into the Union’s charitable arm. The full dossier on NUS, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, can be read here. In addition, over twenty former NUS Presidents wrote a letter expressing their “serious concerns about antisemitism”, and another letter, organised by the Union of Jewish Students (UJS) and signed by over 1,000 Jewish students and allies, called for NUS to launch an independent investigation.

There have been numerous controversies involving NUS this year. In one recent scandal, the rapper Kareem Dennis, known as Lowkey, was due to headline NUS’s centenary conference last month. After initially dismissing the concerns of Jewish students, who pointed out the rapper’s inflammatory record, the union came under media scrutiny and eventually Mr Dennis withdrew from the event. As the scandal erupted, Robert Halfon MP excoriated NUS for failing to send a representative to attend a hearing held by the Education Select Committee, which he chairs.

This scandal was immediately followed by the election of Shaima Dallali as NUS’s new President, despite her history of antisemitic tweets and other inflammatory social media posts. 

Ms Dallali was forced to apologise for tweeting the words of an antisemitic chant. In 2012, during an escalation of tensions between Israel and the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group Hamas, Ms Dallali tweeted the words “Khaybar Khaybar, ya yahud, Jaish Muhammad, sa yahud.”

Translated into English, this chant means “Jews, remember the battle of Khaybar, the army of Muhammad is returning.” It is a classic Arabic battle cry referencing the massacre and expulsion of the Jews of the town of Khaybar in northwestern Arabia, now Saudi Arabia, in the year 628 CE.

Ms Dallali issued a statement on 23rd March, saying: “Earlier today I was made aware of a tweet I posted ten years ago. During Israel’s assault on Gaza I referenced the battle of Khaybar in which Jewish and Muslim armies fought. I was wrong to see the Palestine conflict as one between Muslims and Jews. The reference made as a teenager was unacceptable and I sincerely and unreservedly apologise.”

It also came to light that Ms Dallali’s output on Twitter also included other inflammatory messages, including one last May allegedly saying that “organisations like UJS [the Union of Jewish Students] have a history of bullying pro-Palestine sabbs [sabbatical officers] and activists. You speak one word of solidarity and they’re after you. UJS and their likes need to be called out.”

Another alleged tweet from 2018 read: “So your special forces invade the Gaza Strip, attempt to kidnap a Hamas commander, kill him and others. Then cry about Hamas being the terrorists. Makes perfect sense. #GazaUnderAttack.” Hamas is an antisemitic genocidal terrorist organisation that is proscribed in the UK.

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “The removal of Shaima Dallali as NUS President is an encouraging first step, and may represent the first acknowledgement by NUS of how dreadful its relations with Jewish students have become.

“Nobody with a history of expressing antisemitic sentiments has a place in student leadership, and while her removal is certainly the right decision, the culture in NUS and student politics that allowed somebody like Ms Dallali to rise so high must still be addressed.

“This is hardly the first time that we have had to raise concerns about antisemitism at the top of NUS. That is why Rebecca Tuck KC’s investigation into antisemitism in NUS more widely, to which we have contributed, is so important.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

The Principal of a leading Canadian university has said there was “no place” for “antisemitism or for hate or violence of any kind” after racist symbols and graffiti were found on campus.

Patrick Deane, Principal and Vice-Chancellor of Queen’s University, Ontario, issued a statement after swastika graffiti and “heinous” “messages of violence“ were found “at various locations on campus” and reported through social media.

In a presumed reference to comments by the rapper Ye, Mr Deane said a “platform” for “antisemitic hatred by public personalities had had “a chilling effect across the country and the world,” adding that “sadly, Queen’s has also seen the emergence of this sentiment with swastika graffiti and messages of violence” on its campus.

He said the University had “acted as swiftly as possible” to condemn these “violent and discriminatory acts,” that “these heinous messages” had done damage to our community” and that they had “a responsibility to investigate and wherever necessary take action.”

“I want to be very clear,” he declared, “that there is no place at Queen’s for antisemitism or for hate or violence of any kind against any member of our community. We will not tolerate it and we will speak against it and take action whenever and wherever we can.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout Canada, which have dramatically increased according to a recent audit.

The University of Edinburgh is set to host an academic who has previously stated that “only Jews are immune from vilification or even criticism” and made reference to “Jewish financial power”.

Salman Abu Sitta is set to deliver a seminar at the University in November.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy or of Jews controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions” is an example of antisemitism.

Additionally, Mr Sitta referred to the antisemitic former Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn as “a great, honourable man”, who was “unseated” by “the enemy” after they used their “money” and “political influence”.

Mr Sitta’s comments, which were captured on video, were unearthed and uploaded to Twitter on Monday.

The University has adopted the Definition in full, including all of its examples.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

The president of Tufts University has said an alleged antisemitic incident involving members of a sports team was “appalling” and “diminishes every single member of our community.”

In an email, Anthony Monaco, President of the Boston-based university said that the “alleged conduct” relating to a sports team travelling to another college for a match “is appalling  and goes against our values as an institution.”

He added that “those values do not end at the borders of our campus” and that when “any member of our community leaves our campus, they represent each of us. This alleged act diminishes every single member of our community.”

The activities of the Tufts club have been suspended for the duration of the investigation while Tufts and the college to which the students were travelling jointly conduct a formal investigation. 

According to Mr Monaco, the alleged incident – which occurred during the Jewish High Holy Days – follows a two-year effort by the university to “fight antisemitism on campus.”

In his email, the university president said he wanted to “express my solidarity” with Jewish students, faculty, staff, and alumni. “We strive to create a community in which all members can express their beliefs and identities free from fear or intimidation,” he wrote.

Last year, an investigation took place at Tufts University after a student’s mezuzah was removed from his dormitory.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the United States.

In a shameful decision, the University of Aberdeen has adopted the Jerusalem Declaration, a wrecking document intended to undermine the globally-recognised International Definition of Antisemitism

The University finalised its decision after consulting for a reported two years, following concerns raised at the University’s senate which alleged that the Definition “impinged too heavily on academic freedom and the work of academics” and posed a “threat to academic freedom”.

The advice of the University’s Race Definitions Task and Finish Group was apparently ignored after it unsuccessfully proposed that the Definition should be adopted in May 2021, and have since noted that the Jerusalem Declaration was “developed largely as a response to the [Definition]”. 

A spokesperson for the Scottish Council of Jewish Communities said: “If the critics of the [Definition] had taken the trouble to read it, they would see that far from ‘defining antisemitism as any critique of the state of Israel’, it explicitly says the opposite – the second paragraph begins ‘criticism of Israel similar to that leveled against any other country cannot be regarded as antisemitic.’

“Unfortunately however there is no shortage of antisemitism of all kinds on campuses, and universities and their staff should be at the forefront of stamping it out. If they claim to oppose racism but tolerate antisemitism of any kind, they are simply proving David Baddiel’s thesis that ‘Jews don’t count’ and indulging in second-order antisemitism.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The Jerusalem Declaration is a wrecking document intended to undermine the globally-recognised International (IHRA) Definition of Antisemitism. The University is the only such institution in the country to take this scandalous position. In rejecting the Definition that has consensus support across the Jewish community in favour of the fringe and controversial Jerusalem Declaration, the University has done the opposite of standing with British Jews and Jewish students.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Birkbeck professor appeared to agree with the spurious claim that the International Definition of Antisemitism “restricts” debate on Israel.

Responding to a claim by an audience member that the Definition “does restrict what people can say about the Israel/Palestine conflict” and other assertions, Eric Kaufmann said: “I totally agree with you”.

Prof. Kaufmann made the comment while sitting on a panel organised by the Taxpayers Alliance and Institute of Economic Affairs in a fringe event at Conservative Party conference in Birmingham.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has shown that the claim that the International Definition of Antisemitism conflict with freedom of expression is wrong as a matter of law.

Birkbeck, University of London has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

A visiting fellow at the London School of Economics (LSE) is reported to have posted several inflammatory tweets about the Holocaust.

Saqib Iqbal Qureshi, whose Twitter account now appears to be deactivated, reportedly tweeted: “6m Jews died in the Nazi holocaust, which had more non Jewish than Jewish victims. There is no minimizing [sic]. You simply want to appropriate “holocaust” exclusively for Jews so that Israel can continue its dismantling of all things Palestine. Why else are you fretting?”

Mr Qureshi also asserted that “German Jews murdered ordinary German civilians to protect fellow Jews” and that “Nazim wrecked the Jews. Israel wrecked Judaism,” before using the hashtag ‘zionazi’.

Also posted on the Twitter account was a meme which features an antisemitic quote falsely attributed to Albert Einstein that reads: “It would be my greatest sadness to see Zionists do to Palestinian Arabs much of what Nazis did to Jews.” 

Other tweets seemingly posted from Mr Quereshi’s Twitter account included “Israel is committing a holocaust against Palestinians” and “As far as I can tell, the only reason the holocaust matters today is to help justify the decimation of Palestine. I can’t see what other purpose it serves. It’s not about “never again”. It’s about “we got decimated, so let us decimate in turn, turn a blind eye please.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the State of Israel” and “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” are both examples of antisemitism. 

Following a request under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 that was submitted by Campaign Against Antisemitism, LSE has told us that it has adopted the Definition in full, including all its examples, but it has not provided evidence to support its claim.

A concerned party has contacted Campaign Against Antisemitism informing us that they have found two stickers at Swansea University which make inflammatory accusations about Jews.

The stickers were reportedly found at the University’s Singleton Park entrance.

One sticker contains grainy black and white imagery that apparently documents the circumcision of a baby Jewish boy and contains accusations of paedophilia, a common antisemitic trope.

Underneath the images, the caption advertises the online domain GoyimTV, a video-sharing site operated by Jon Minadeo II, who is understood to be the leader of the Goyim Defence League.

The GDL has been described as an antisemitic hate group whose membership reportedly contains several neo-Nazis. In the United States, the group is divided into regional branches and regularly distributes antisemitic flyers. Last year, Mr Minadeo II created t-shirts carrying antisemitic slogans such as the Holocaust was “a hoax” and more recently, they hung a banner from a bridge in Austin, Texas that read “Vax the Jews”.

The source told Campaign Against Antisemitism that, on an earlier date, they had also found a sticker that contains a version of the “smirking merchant” image along with the caption “Jews have been kicked out of 109 countrieds [sic] over 1300 times”.

The smirking merchant meme depicts a hook-nosed man with a nefarious grin wearing a head covering and holding banknotes. The meme is thought by many to be a classically antisemitic representation of a Jewish person.

The source went on to state that they saw the stickers when they were walking to work at around 8:00 on 1st September, and they were still there when they were walking home around 15:30 the same day, prompting them to take photographs of the images. However, when they returned to the office on 6th September, the flyers appeared to have been removed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism closely monitors the far-right, which remains a dangerous threat to the Jewish community and other minority groups.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

The Charity Commission has opened an “ongoing case” into City, University of London’s Students’ Union regarding attempts to abandon the International Definition of Antisemitism during the tenure of the previous President, Shaima Dallali. Ms Dallali has recently been suspended from her current role as President of the National Union of Students (NUS).

It was reported that the Commission received a complaint after the Students’ Union’s Board of Trustees announced in March 2021 that they would hold a referendum about whether the University should refuse to continue to adopt the Definition. The Board of Trustees was, at the time, chaired by Ms Dallali.

A spokesperson for the Charity Commission told Jewish News: “We are aware of these concerns and have an ongoing case into City, University of London Students’ Union. We are engaging with the trustees.”

Ms Dallali was suspended as NUS President at the start of September, apparently pursuant to an investigation of antisemitism allegations at NUS.

During her election campaign, Ms Dallali was forced to apologise for tweeting the words of an antisemitic chant. In 2012, during an escalation of tensions between Israel and the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group Hamas, Ms Dallali tweeted the words “Khaybar Khaybar, ya yahud, Jaish Muhammad, sa yahud.” Translated into English, this chant means “Jews, remember the battle of Khaybar, the army of Muhammad is returning.” It is a classic Arabic battle cry referencing the massacre and expulsion of the Jews of the town of Khaybar in northwestern Arabia, now Saudi Arabia, in the year 628 CE. She also had a history of other inflammatory tweets and it also emerged that Ms Dallali had been in a group shouting aggressively at Jewish students attending an Israel Society event at Kings College London in 2018, at which it was reported that the “Khaybar” chant was heard.

It is said that this is the first time in the century-long history of the NUS that its President has faced suspension.

The announcement of Ms Dallali’s suspension came after Robert Halfon MP wrote together with Campaign Against Antisemitism to the Charity Commission calling for an investigation into the union’s charitable arm. The full dossier on NUS, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, can be read here. In addition, over twenty former NUS Presidents wrote a letter expressing their “serious concerns about antisemitism”, and another letter, organised by the Union of Jewish Students (UJS) and signed by over 1,000 Jewish students and allies, called for NUS to launch an independent investigation.

An NUS spokesperson said: “We cannot comment at this time as we are in the middle of an independent QC-led investigation into allegations of antisemitism. But as we have said before, we are prepared to take any and all actions recommended by Rebecca Tuck QC’s investigation.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Shaima Dallali, the President of the National Union of Students (NUS), has been suspended amidst investigations into her conduct following allegations of antisemitism, according to LBC’s Political Editor.

It is reportedly the first time in the Union’s 100-year history that a President has been suspended.

The investigation, which is concerned with allegations against both the Union and Ms Dallali specifically, arose following a string of controversies surrounding the NUS and its leadership. 

The announcement came after Robert Halfon MP wrote together with Campaign Against Antisemitism to the Charity Commission calling for an investigation into the union’s charitable arm. The full dossier on NUS, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, can be read here. In addition, over twenty former NUS Presidents wrote a letter expressing their “serious concerns about antisemitism”, and another letter, organised by the Union of Jewish Students (UJS) and signed by over 1,000 Jewish students and allies, called for NUS to launch an independent investigation.

The investigation came in the wake of numerous controversies involving NUS. In one recent scandal, the rapper Kareem Dennis, known as Lowkey, was due to headline NUS’s centenary conference last month. After initially dismissing the concerns of Jewish students, who pointed out the rapper’s inflammatory record, the union came under media scrutiny and eventually Mr Dennis withdrew from the event. As the scandal erupted, Robert Halfon MP excoriated NUS for failing to send a representative to attend a hearing held by the Education Select Committee, which he chairs.

This scandal was immediately followed by the election of Shaima Dallali as NUS’s new President, despite her history of antisemitic tweets and other inflammatory social media posts. 

Ms Dallali was forced to apologise for tweeting the words of an antisemitic chant. In 2012, during an escalation of tensions between Israel and the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group Hamas, Ms Dallali tweeted the words “Khaybar Khaybar, ya yahud, Jaish Muhammad, sa yahud.”

Translated into English, this chant means “Jews, remember the battle of Khaybar, the army of Muhammad is returning.” It is a classic Arabic battle cry referencing the massacre and expulsion of the Jews of the town of Khaybar in northwestern Arabia, now Saudi Arabia, in the year 628 CE.

Ms Dallali issued a statement on 23rd March, saying: “Earlier today I was made aware of a tweet I posted ten years ago. During Israel’s assault on Gaza I referenced the battle of Khaybar in which Jewish and Muslim armies fought. I was wrong to see the Palestine conflict as one between Muslims and Jews. The reference made as a teenager was unacceptable and I sincerely and unreservedly apologise.”

It also came to light that Ms Dallali’s output on Twitter also included other inflammatory messages, including one last May allegedly saying that “organisations like UJS [the Union of Jewish Students] have a history of bullying pro-Palestine sabbs [sabbatical officers] and activists. You speak one word of solidarity and they’re after you. UJS and their likes need to be called out.”

Another alleged tweet from 2018 read: “So your special forces invade the Gaza Strip, attempt to kidnap a Hamas commander, kill him and others. Then cry about Hamas being the terrorists. Makes perfect sense. #GazaUnderAttack.” Hamas is an antisemitic genocidal terrorist organisation that is proscribed in the UK.

An NUS spokesperson said: “We cannot comment at this time as we are in the middle of an independent QC-led investigation into allegations of antisemitism. But as we have said before, we are prepared to take any and all actions recommended by Rebecca Tuck QC’s investigation.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “While the details of this unprecedented reported suspension of Shaima Dallali are not yet clear, it may be a very promising first step by NUS as the investigation by Rebecca Tuck QC, to which we have contributed, progresses. We hope that this suspension represents the first acknowledgement by NUS of how dreadful its relations with Jewish students have become, and augurs real change at the union, but it is too early to tell. We will continue to ensure that NUS is held to account for its record and is supported if it shows, for the first time, a real good faith effort to reform.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Isaac de Castro, an activist and journalist who was integral to the creation of the ‘Jewish on Campus’ movement, appeared on the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism where he spoke openly about the challenges Jewish students in the United States are facing.

Mr de Castro said that “‘Jewish on Campus’ started with just a bunch of Jewish students who were fed up and were meeting on the internet at the very beginning, and height of, [COVID-19]. We were all stuck at home online yelling into the void about what was happening to us on college campuses and how difficult that was and at the same time, everyone was turning to social media to do activism in which they were dragging in antisemitism.

“That, I think, was very fresh and very stressful to everyone. We thought of the stakes of speaking out on antisemitism and how it became so taboo to talk about it because Jews are not perceived as an oppressed group or because supporting Israel is seen as a very, very negative thing on college campuses.”

He explained that the way the organisation managed to convince students to say what was happening to them was to anonymise it.

“[The movement] grew exponentially…thousands of followers a day,” he said. “It was really special, and it was a catalyst for understanding antisemitism on college campuses in the United States. I think people were not really getting the scope of it and these stories put a face to it because it wasn’t just numbers of how many Jewish students have faced antisemitism in which campuses, it was ‘this is my story, this is what I went through, this is what my professor said to me, this is what my peers said to me.’ There was no way of denying how powerful that was.”

When asked what advice he would offer to Jewish students experiencing antisemitism, the activist said: “Find community, whether its a Hillel House or the Jewish student union or confiding in ‘Jewish on Campus’, confiding in Jewish friends. I think it’s very, very important to not isolate yourself and to have like-minded people in which you can confide in because dealing with that by yourself is not great. You’re stronger when you’re united.”

Mr de Castro’s work also looks at the stories of Latino Jews of Sephardic descent, which is the focus of his newest project.

Mr de Castro, himself a Panamanian Jew of both Ashkenazi and Sephardi descent who now lives in the United States, said that his work has been inspired by speaking to people who “have no idea what these communities are like.” 

Speaking on some of the many generations of Latino Jews now living in the United States, Mr de Castro said that “There is a difference in terms of outspokenness, in terms of antisemitism or even understanding antisemitism…there is a difference for sure.”

Throughout the interview, Mr de Castro touched upon a variety of other issues which included his own story of moving to the United States and Jewcy, the Jewish magazine at which he is the editor.

The podcast with Mr de Castro can be listened to here, or watched here.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, talks to a different guest about antisemitism each week. It streams every Thursday and is available through all major podcast apps and YouTube. You can also subscribe to have new episodes sent straight to your inbox.

Previous guests have included comedian David Baddiel, television personality Robert Rinder, writer Eve Barlow, Grammy-Award-winning singer-songwriter Autumn Rowe, and actor Eddie Marsan.

After three years, a Jewish student at the University of Bristol has finally received an apology and financial compensation for the handling of an antisemitism complaint that they submitted.

The student’s vindication follows a decision by the Office of the Independent Adjudicator (OIA).

This is not the first time that a university has apparently resisted recognising that it may be at fault. In 2016, the OIA also upheld an appeal in respect of a complaint of antisemitic hostile environment harassment under the Equality Act 2010 at Sheffield Hallam University. The complainant received financial compensation, reportedly partly due to the delay in deciding their complaint.

Both the University of Bristol and Sheffield Hallam University have adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism but have recently been embroiled in high-profile antisemitism controversies.

In a statement, UJS said: “This situation should never have reached this point. Universities must respond to complaints of antisemitism in a timely, professional and considerate manner. Bristol University has committed to improving its complaints procedures. This decision vindicates the complainant and sends a clear message to universities across the country that they must respect and protect their Jewish students.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The resistance by some universities to recognising their shortcomings when it comes to how their tackle antisemitism is another example of how adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism is only a first step. It is not enough merely to express solidarity with Jewish students; universities have an obligation to take action to protect them as well.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

A California university has decided to rename a library building named after a former librarian who held antisemitic and pro-Nazi views.

The Board of Trustees at the California State University in Fresno voted to remove the name of the long-serving former librarian, Henry Miller Madden, based on statements found in his personal papers.

Upon visiting New York City in 1934, Mr Madden wrote in a letter to his mother that “I spent a good twenty minutes walking, looking all the time for an honest gentile face, and I don’t think I saw one. And such Jews! Noisy, dirty, smelly, ugly – Jews such as you have never seen before, absolutely different from S.F. Jews.”

In a letter to a friend, Mr Madden wrote: “The Jews: I am developing a violent and almost uncontrollable phobia against them. Whenever I see one of those predatory noses, or those roving and leering eyes, or those slobbering lips, or those flat feet, or those nasal and whiny voices I tremble with rage and hatred.”

On another occasion, Mr Madden wrote of his fantasies about driving Jews “barefoot to some remote spot in Texas” to camps “closed in by electrically charged barbed wire.”

The University President, Saúl Jiménez-Sandoval, said that a task force looked into the 53 boxes of material that Madden donated to the library in 1980 with the aim of looking at “the trajectory of his thoughts, whether later in life he had come to some sort of reckoning and displayed remorse or regret over the views that he held in his 20s or 30s. What we found is that there was really no evidence that he renounced the views at all.”

A University Media Professor, Bradley Hart, who conducted research into Henry Miller Madden for his book Hitler’s American Friends, wrote that “This is a great moment for Fresno State. Today we have rectified a historic wrong.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the United States.

A University of Warwick professor who praised a comment linking Zionism with Nazis as “a good point” has been cleared of antisemitism by the University. 

In a video clip of an online lecture organised by the Institute for Palestinian Studies, Professor Virinder Kalra appears to read out a comment that states: “It is important to point out that Zionists were the only group that broke the Jewish boycott of the Nazis, that many Nazis called themselves Zionists since that would accomplish their ideology of cleansing Europe of Jews.”

Prof. Kalra described this remark as “a good point” and “an important comment”.

Additionally, he remarked that the International Definition of Antisemitism is “opening a very slippery slope in terms of any criticism of state violence suddenly becomes a criticism of a particular group.”

This incident is particularly troubling given that Prof. Kalra was the individual assigned to lead the antisemitism investigation into the controversial Warwick lecturer Dr Goldie Osuri, whom he cleared of any wrongdoing.

In a lecture on 11th November 2019, Dr Osuri posited in a recording obtained by Campaign Against Antisemitism that “the next time they say that the Labour Party is antisemitic, you know there are some people that are possibly antisemitic, but this idea that the Labour Party is antisemitic is very much an Israeli lobby kind of idea.”

Her conspiratorial comments, alluding to supposed outsized Israeli power and interference in British politics, and dismissal of antisemitism in Labour as a smear, left Jewish students outraged.

Dr Osuri was challenged over her remarks by the Warwick Jewish Israeli Society who said in a statement released jointly with the Union of Jewish Students, said that “there can be no excuse from an academic at such a prestigious university to spread conspiracy theories associated with classic antisemitism.” They went on to point out that Dr Onsuri’s comment “belittles and diminishes the fears, experiences and concerns of the Jewish community and spreads the antisemitic conspiracy that Jews control the media”. 

In an e-mail to students shown to Campaign Against Antisemitism, Dr Osuri doubled down on her claims, promoting the work of the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, Jewish Voice for Labour, as well as bemoaning that she was “saddened” that “none of these issues were raised in the seminars.”

Following the news of Prof. Kalra’s remarks, calls have been made to reopen the investigation into Dr Osuri.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

A member of staff at a private Massachusetts college campus has been dismissed following an investigation into antisemitic graffiti and racist vandalism.

The vandalism at Curry College included swastikas, antisemitic graffiti and messages threatening black students.

Graffiti was found in residence halls and athletic facilities around campus. On International Holocaust Remembrance Day in January, a laundry room in a residential hall was defaced with swastikas and what the college called “discriminatory and hateful language.”

According to a message to the campus community from school President Kenneth Quigley, the vandalism appeared to be the work of one person.

Following earlier incidents, the private school in Milton, just south of Boston, contacted the FBI and local police. Mr Quigley said that evidence gathered by law enforcement was used as the basis of an internal investigation which had “resulted in an employee being terminated and removed from our community.”

He added that the College regretted the impact of “these bias acts” on “students, families, faculty and staff throughout the spring semester.”

According to the FBI, over 60 percent of hate crimes against a religious minority are motivated by antisemitism. Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on antisemitic incidents throughout the United States.

The professor who cleared the controversial University of Warwick lecturer Dr Goldie Osuri of antisemitism linked Zionism with Nazis, prompting calls for the investigation to be reopened, it has been reported.

In a lecture on 11th November 2019, Dr Goldie Osuri posited in a recording obtained by Campaign Against Antisemitism that “the next time they say that the Labour Party is antisemitic, you know there are some people possibly that are possibly antisemitic, but this idea that the Labour Party is antisemitic is very much an Israeli lobby kind of idea.”

Her conspiratorial comments, alluding to supposed outsized Israeli power and interference in British politics, and dismissal of antisemitism in Labour as a smear, left Jewish students outraged.

Dr Osuri was challenged over her remarks by the Warwick Jewish Israeli Society who said in a statement released jointly with the Union of Jewish Students, said that “there can be no excuse from an academic at such a prestigious university to spread conspiracy theories associated with classic antisemitism.” They went on to point out that Dr Onsuri’s comment  “belittles and diminishes the fears, experiences and concerns of the Jewish community and spreads the antisemitic conspiracy that Jews control the media”. 

In an e-mail to students shown to Campaign Against Antisemitism, Dr Osuri doubled down on her claims, promoting the work of the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, Jewish Voice for Labour, as well as bemoaning that she was “saddened” that “none of these issues were raised in the seminars.”

However, it was reported yesterday that Professor Virinder Kalra, the person assigned to lead the investigation into Dr Osuri, was found to have made inflammatory remarks of his own relating to Zionism and Nazis.

In a video clip of an online lecture organised by the Institute for Palestinian Studies, Prof. Kalra appears to read out a comment that states: “It is important to point out that Zionists were the only group that broke the Jewish boycott of the Nazis, that many Nazis called themselves Zionists since that would accomplish their ideology of cleansing Europe of Jews.”

Prof. Kalra described this remark as “a good point” and “an important comment”.

Additionally, he remarked that the International Definition of Antisemitism is “opening a very slippery slope in terms of any criticism of state violence suddenly becomes a criticism of a particular group.”

Robert Halfon MP is said to be one of those calling for the investigation to be reopened.

A Warwick University Jewish Society spokesperson said: “The dismissal of the complaint is a sign that Jewish students cannot rely on the processes of the university to protect them.”

However, according to the JC, a Warwick University spokesperson said: “We are satisfied that this complaint was reviewed correctly at the time.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Larissa Kennedy, the outgoing President of the National Union of Students (NUS), has accused the Government of “jumping on the bandwagon” whilst discussing the antisemitism allegations against the Union, according to the Jewish News.

The comment was alleged to have been made during a Zoom meeting attended by 100 union officers in which recent antisemitism allegations and the subsequent investigation into NUS, in addition to the Government’s decision to cut ties with the NUS, was discussed.

Ms Kennedy was reported to have said: “I think our movement is capable of saying this needs to be dealt with seriously and that the government is jumping on the bandwagon in a bad faith way when their record on antisemitism and racism is so horrendous.

“Jewish students have been able to raise their voices, have been able to tell us what they want from us and we have been able to act accordingly. That is, if anything, the most important thing here. A lot has been drawn out by people who don’t necessarily know the facts.”

Last month, the Government reportedly demanded an investigation into the election of the new President of the National Union of Students (NUS) over an alleged failure to commit to the International Definition of Antisemitism.

According to the JC, Universities Minister Michelle Donelan wrote to Civica Election Services, which ran the recent election that was won by the controversial activist Shaima Dallali, despite her history of antisemitic tweets and other inflammatory social media posts. Prior to the election, Ms Dallali apologised for one such tweet, but later told The Guardian that it is “absolutely not true” that “I don’t like Jewish people,” nevertheless, “as a black Muslim woman, it [the allegation] is something that I expected.”

The move came just after the Government announced that it is sanctioning NUS, removing it from all official groups and committees and refusing to engage with it, which came following calls for such measures by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others in the Jewish community. Last month, for example, Robert Halfon MP wrote together with Campaign Against Antisemitism to the Charity Commission calling for an investigation into the union’s charitable arm. The full dossier on NUS, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, can be read here. The Government has now also added its voice to calls for an investigation by the Charity Commission. Campaign Against Antisemitism also made representations to the Government on the matter, including at a campus antisemitism summit organised by Education Secretary Nadhim Zahawi. In addition to Campaign Against Antisemitism, UJS, CST and others have also called for action.

The Government’s announcement came after a string of controversies surrounding NUS and its leadership, including over Jewish opposition to an appearance by the rapper Kareen Dennis, known as Lowkey, at NUS’s centenary conference. The outgoing NUS President, Larissa Kennedy, has now insisted that claims that she suggested that Jewish students who were uncomfortable with the performance could self-segregate in an area intended for those who do not like loud music are false.

After the numerous controversies, NUS announced that it was launching an independent investigation into antisemitism in the organisation, which would be at least the third in two decades after similar investigations in 2005 and 2017. NUS has now announced that the new investigation will be led by Rebecca Tuck QC.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Goldsmiths, University of London has announced an “independent review into antisemitism at the College” after Professor David Hirsh was reportedly called a “far right white supremacist” by its then-Students’ Union President.

Initially, the Students’ Union apparently refused to investigate Sara Bafo, its now-former President, following allegations of antisemitism, despite being requested to do so by the University.

Ms Bafo’s alleged tweet was said to have been written in response to a tweet from Prof. Hirsh, a prominent and highly-respected antisemitism expert, which said: “There is an antisemitic edge to official, institutional, university campaigns to ‘decolonise’ education.”

In response to the University’s request for the investigation, Ms Bafo tweeted that the University “has tried to get the SU trustee board to investigate me for a tweet I made in response to a Zionist Goldsmiths academic’s explicit racist history & his delegitimisation of ‘Decolonisation’ campaigns,” adding: “This was a dirty tactic from the institution to silence me further as I was leaving.”

However, despite the Student’s Union denying the investigation on grounds of “free speech”, the University has announced that an independent probe will take place.

Frances Corner, the Warden of Goldsmiths, said: “We are supporting Dr Hirsh after unwarranted messages about him were posted on social media which I believe are utterly without foundation. These kinds of behaviours are completely unacceptable and will always be challenged.

“As Warden I want to make it clear that this kind of conduct is not in line with the College’s values and that it brings harm to individuals as well as our good reputation as a place of learning.”

However, in a move that undermines the announcement of its review by disregarding the preferences of the majority of the Jewish community, including Prof. Hirsh, around whom Goldsmith’s own antisemitism probe is centred around, the University has said that it will adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism but “without the case studies.” 

In addition, it will also adopt the Jerusalem Declaration, which is a wrecking document intended to undermine the globally-recognised Definition, owing to the fact that the University’s “academic community” favoured it. 

Shortly after the University’s announcement of its antisemitism probe, Prof. Hirsh released a statement of his own, stating that he initially thought that “Things are turning around,” before continuing: “And then I remember that affirming that I’m not a Nazi is quite a low bar. The authorities feeling the need to put out a public statement that I’m not a Nazi is pretty humiliating in itself, really.”

Prof. Hirsh added that last week was the first time that anybody in authority at Goldsmiths had “ever publicly supported me against those who exclude me from the community of scholarship. It is the first time that the institution itself has affirmed that the claim that my work is racist is false.”

Speaking on the University’s decision not to adopt the Definition in full, Prof. Hirsh suggested that the University’s preference for the Jerusalem Declaration over the globally-recognised Definition could indicate “evidence of the antisemitic academic culture at Goldsmiths.” He went on to say that by not adopting the Definition in full, the University, rather than acknowledging the “seriousness of the kind of antisemitism” present, instead decided to cite “the advice of those who support and legitimate” it.

He added: “The task of seriously addressing the antisemitic hostile environment at a place like Goldsmiths is formidable. Anything that might be done would, in the short term at least, be met by significant antisemitic opposition. One of the predictable effects of taking antisemitism seriously would be to increase the hostility of the environment for Jewish scholars and students. This is not a justification for inaction, it is a statement of the embeddedness of the problem.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

The Charity Commission has confirmed that it has opened an investigation into the National Union of Students’ (NUS) charitable arm, following a letter calling on the regulator to do so from Robert Halfon MP and Campaign Against Antisemitism.

In his letter, Mr Halfon, who is the Chair of the Education Select Committee, wrote to “voice my dismay at the actions and behaviour of the National Union of Students and its trustees, in regards to their treatment of Jewish students and the Jewish community’s concerns regarding antisemitism. Together with Campaign Against Antisemitism…I politely request that the Commission launch a Section 46 inquiry, pursuant to the 2011 Charities Act into the NUS and look forward to receiving your response.”

Mr Halfon enclosed a dossier of evidence by Campaign Against Antisemitism detailing how NUS has failed Jewish students. He wrote that he is “particularly concerned about the enclosed dossier of antisemitic events that have taken place within the NUS over the past several years — and which come following decades of concerning trends — which was prepared by CAA.”

Mr Halfon made particular reference in his letter to the recent scandal involving the rapper Kareem Dennis, known as Lowkey, who was due to headline NUS’s centenary conference last month. After initially dismissing the concerns of Jewish students, who pointed out the rapper’s inflammatory record, the union came under media scrutiny and eventually Mr Dennis withdrew from the event.

As the scandal erupted, Mr Halfon excoriated NUS for failing to send a representative to attend a hearing held by his committee.

This scandal was immediately followed by the election of Shaima Dallali as NUS’s new President, despite her history of antisemitic tweets and other inflammatory social media posts. Prior to the election, she apologised for one such tweet.

As the dossier produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism observes, “Despite [its] ostensible and much-vaunted commitment to anti-racism, NUS has a long record of controversy in relation to Jewish students and antisemitism, dating back decades.

The dossier notes that antisemitism on campus has surged to record levels, with CST recording a 191% increase in antisemitic incidents on campus in 2021, and that Campaign Against Antisemitism’s latest Antisemitism Barometer found that an overwhelming 92% of British Jews believe that antisemitism in universities is a problem.

“NUS’s blind spot when it comes to inclusion of Jewish students and openness to their concerns is significant, giving rise not only to a failure of representation but also to a toleration of hostility to the needs of Jewish students within NUS and even instances of outright antisemitism. The result is tangible harm to Jewish students,” the dossier explains. “As an organisation, NUS is failing in its objective to represent and advocate for all students, and, as a charity, it is failing to act for the benefit of the public.”

Since the letter and dossier were published, UJS organised a mass open letter, over twenty former NUS Presidents called for action, NUS announced its own internal investigation (its third relating to antisemitism in the last two decades) and the Government severed relations with NUS, questioned the new President’s election and also called for an investigation by the Charity Commission.

A spokesperson for NUS reportedly said: “We proactively contacted the Commission on 8th April to discuss how we should best keep them informed of the allegations surrounding NUSUK, which is a separate legal entity, and any action taken by NUSUK to address them. The Charity Commission have engaged with us, since 13th April, via the compliance visits and inspections team. We are still in the process of responding to any further questions the regulator may have and note their statement that they have ‘made no finding of wrongdoing at this time’.”

A spokesperson for the Charity Commission told Civil Society News: “We have opened a compliance case into NUS Students’ Union Charitable Services in relation to the recent allegations made about the National Union of Students and the impact on the charity. We are engaging with the trustees and assessing all of the available information to inform any next steps.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

San Diego Community College District has cancelled an investiture planned for 31st May that was meant to be held in honour of the new Chancellor, Carlos O. Cortez. The district announced the cancellation last week due to concerns about the presence of author Alice Walker at the event.

Ms Walker is best known for her novel The Colour Purple, which won the Pulitzer Prize in 1983, but is also known to have made inflammatory comments about Jews. One example comes from her poem “To Study the Talmud”, which reads:

“Are Goyim (us) meant to be slaves of Jews, and not only
That, but to enjoy it?
Are three year old (and a day) girls eligible for marriage and intercourse?
Are young boys fair game for rape?
Must even the best of the Goyim (us, again) be killed?”

Ms Walker has also voiced her support for the antisemitic hate preacher David Icke, citing with approval his books Human Race Get off Your Knees: The Lion Sleeps No More, which states that the world is secretly run by shape-shifting reptilian humanoids and “Rothschild Zionists”, and And the Truth Shall Set You Free, which promotes the antisemitic conspiracy theories contained in The Protocols of the Elders of Zion and questions whether the Holocaust happened.

The author reportedly described Mr Icke’s work as “a curious person’s dream come true” and denied that there was anything antisemitic or anti-Jewish about its content.

Mr Icke uses social media, his books and his stage performances to incite hatred. His preaching is so absurd that since the 1990s he has been dismissed as a crank, but because he is dismissed, there has been no major opposition to him and he has built up a following of thousands upon thousands of disciples whom he has persuaded to adamantly believe that the world is in the grip of a conspiracy run by the “Rothschild Zionists”. His repertoire includes conspiracy myths and tropes classified as antisemitic according to the International Definition of Antisemitism, adopted by the British Government. Campaign Against Antisemitism has successfully persuaded some venues to pull out of hosting his events.

After years of pressure from Campaign Against Antisemitism, Mr Icke was banned from most social media platforms.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The Government has reportedly demanded an investigation into the election of the new President of the National Union of Students (NUS) over an alleged failure to commit to the International Definition of Antisemitism.

According to the JC, Universities Minister Michelle Donelan has written to Civica Election Services, which ran the recent election that was won by the controversial activist Shaima Dallali, despite her history of antisemitic tweets and other inflammatory social media posts. Prior to the election, Ms Dallali apologised for one such tweet, but later told The Guardian that it is “absolutely not true” that “I don’t like Jewish people,” nevertheless, “as a black Muslim woman, it [the allegation] is something that I expected.”

The Minister has called for an investigation by Civica on the basis that Rule 8 of NUS’s “core rules” states that any candidate for office “must have a commitment to anti-racism…and antisemitism as per the IHRA [International] definition”. In the past, Ms Dallali has campaigned against the International Definition of Antisemitism at City University London, where she also served as President of the Students’ Union.

The move comes just after the Government announced that it is sanctioning NUS, removing it from all official groups and committees and refusing to engage with it, which came following calls for such measures by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others in the Jewish community. Last month, for example, Robert Halfon MP wrote together with Campaign Against Antisemitism to the Charity Commission calling for an investigation into the union’s charitable arm. The full dossier on NUS, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, can be read here. The Government has now also added its voice to calls for an investigation by the Charity Commission. Campaign Against Antisemitism also made representations to the Government on the matter, including at a campus antisemitism summit organised by Education Secretary Nadhim Zahawi. In addition to Campaign Against Antisemitism, UJS, CST and others have also called for action.

The Government’s announcement came after a string of controversies surrounding NUS and its leadership, including over Jewish opposition to an appearance by the rapper Kareen Dennis, known as Lowkey, at NUS’s centenary conference. The outgoing NUS President, Larissa Kennedy, has now insisted that claims that she suggested that Jewish students who were uncomfortable with the performance could self-segregate in an area intended for those who do not like loud music are false.

After the numerous controversies, NUS announced that it was launching an independent investigation into antisemitism in the organisation, which would be at least the third in two decades after similar investigations in 2005 and 2017. NUS has now announced that the new investigation will be led by Rebecca Tuck QC.

In recent weeks, over twenty former NUS Presidents wrote a letter expressing their “serious concerns about antisemitism”, and another letter, organised by UJS and signed by over 1,000 Jewish students and allies, called for NUS to launch its ‘independent’ investigation.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

It has been reported that the Goldsmiths, University of London Students’ Union has refused to investigate its President following allegations of antisemitism, despite being requested to do so by the University.

Sara Bafo, the President of the Students’ Union at Goldsmiths, is alleged to have tweeted: “D*vid H*rsch is a far right white supremacist. All you have to do is read his work and tweets and that’s all the confirmation needed.” 

Ms Bafo’s alleged tweet was said to have been written in response to a tweet from Prof. Hirsch, a prominent and highly-respected antisemitism expert, which said: “There is an antisemitic edge to official, institutional, university campaigns to ‘decolonise’ education.”

Yesterday, a spokesperson for the University said that on 10th May, it had requested the Union to investigate whether online messages that had been posted were “antisemitic in nature,” adding: “Goldsmiths Students’ Union is an independent charity which has its own policies and processes for investigating and we expect them to follow these. Goldsmiths remains committed to supporting all members of our inclusive community and demonstrating there is no place for prejudice on our campus.”

In response to the request for the investigation, Ms Bafo tweeted that the University “has tried to get the SU trustee board to investigate me for a tweet I made in response to a Zionist Goldsmiths academic’s explicit racist history & his delegitimisation of ‘Decolonisation’ campaigns,” adding: “This was a dirty tactic from the institution to silence me further as I was leaving.”

Larissa Kennedy, President of the embattled National Union of Students (NUS), came to the defence of Ms Bafo, describing the call for an investigation as a “disgusting move” before labelling it “concerted suppression” and offering “Masses of solidarity to @SaraBafo1”.

However, it has been reported this afternoon that the request for the investigation has been denied on grounds of “free speech”.

Ed Nedjari, Head of the Student’s Union, reportedly said: “Goldsmiths Student Union is an independent charity that believes in justice and inclusivity, as well as freedom of expression. In her tweets, Sara was expressing her opinion about David Hirsh, formed via the experience of attending his lectures as a Black Muslim student.

“Sara’s term as SU President has ended. For that reason – but most importantly, because her comments are protected as free speech – we won’t be investigating this matter retrospectively.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Following a string of controversies surrounding the National Union of Students (NUS) and its leadership, the Government has decided to sanction the organisation, removing it from all official groups and committees and refusing to engage with it. The move follows calls for the measures by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others.

A Government announcement said that “NUS will be removed from all Department for Education groups and replaced with alternative student representation…The Department for Education has also confirmed that the NUS will not receive any government funding…The allegations of antisemitism, which have been well-documented and span several years, have prompted a feeling of insecurity amongst Jewish students across the country and a worry systemic antisemitism within the organisation is not being properly addressed.”

The news comes despite NUS promising to ‘independently’ investigate itself in the wake of numerous antisemitism scandals. In one recent scandal, the rapper Kareem Dennis, known as Lowkey, was due to headline NUS’s centenary conference. After initially dismissing the concerns of Jewish students and telling them to stand in a segregation away from Mr Dennis, the union came under media scrutiny and eventually Mr Dennis withdrew from the event.

This scandal was immediately followed by the election of Shaima Dallali as NUS’s new President, despite her history of antisemitic tweets and other inflammatory social media posts. Prior to the election, she apologised for one such tweet, but later told The Guardian that it is “absolutely not true” that “I don’t like Jewish people,” nevertheless, “as a black Muslim woman, it [the allegation] is something that I expected.”

In a tweet about the new sanctions, Michelle Donelan, Minister of State for Higher Education, wrote: “Enough is enough. I’ve prepared a package of sanctions against NUS following concerning incidents over many years. Disappointed it has come to this but proud to stand up for Jewish students. NUS will not have a seat at the table until we see real change.”

In a tweet backing his colleague, Nadhim Zahawi, Secretary of State for Education, wrote: “Jewish students need to have confidence that they are being represented, and student bodies must speak fairly for everyone. This will remain until issues are suitably addressed.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The Government has taken a firm stand shoulder to shoulder with Jewish students and the Jewish community at large after years of antisemitism scandals at NUS. We have found the Government to be very receptive to the concerns that we and others have expressed and these sanctions are precisely the measures that we had hoped to see implemented. We will now see whether these sanctions jolt NUS into action, or consign it to irrelevance. Student organisations are supposed to be filled with voices of hope, not bigotry. Those at NUS who have allowed matters to degenerate this far should be deeply ashamed that it has come to this.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism and others had been calling for the measures. Last month, Robert Halfon MP wrote together with Campaign Against Antisemitism to the Charity Commission calling for an investigation into the union’s charitable arm. The full dossier on NUS, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, can be read here. The Government has now also added its voice to calls for an investigation by the Charity Commission.

Campaign Against Antisemitism also made representations to the Government on the matter, including at a campus antisemitism summit organised by Mr Zahawi. In addition to Campaign Against Antisemitism, UJS, CST and others have also called for action.

In recent weeks, over twenty former NUS Presidents wrote a letter expressing their “serious concerns about antisemitism”, and another letter, organised by the Union of Jewish Students (UJS) and signed by over 1,000 Jewish students and allies, called for NUS to launch its ‘independent’ investigation.

In a statement NUS repeated its assurance that it would undertake its own investigation and lamented that “the universities minister [sic] has press released that they will be disengaging with NUS rather than seeking to engage with us directly.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to the University of Leeds to point out that its website links to a Twitter account with numerous tweets that breach the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Ray Bush, who holds the Emeritus Professor of African Studies and Development Politics, has a profile page  on the University’s website that links to his Twitter account.

Last year, Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to the University regarding Prof. Bush, who was then a Professor of African Studies and Development Politics. Prof. Bush appeared to have tweeted from the Twitter handle “@raymondobush” a large number of tweets that breach the Definition.

There were three types of breaches.

First, the tweets stated that Israel’s existence itself is unacceptable, using the exact language of the Definition in referring to Jewish self-determination as “a racist endeavour”. The Definition states that “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour)” is antisemitic. This claim was repeated on numerous occasions:

  • “#DefyIHRA the state of #Israel is a #racist endeavour” 
  • “#defyIHRA the state of Israel is a racist endeavour. The IHRA definition of antisemitism is a threat to free expression | Ash Sarkar https://theguardian.com/commentisfree/”
  • “#racistendeavour #warcrimes #Israel join the dots and understand why Israel is a zionist entity and settler colonial regime that exists solely because of US money and European guilt. #endtheoccupation”
  • “#Labourparty #NEC big mistake with #IHRA #Israel is a racist endeavour and what about other discrimination? Is NEC recognising defined discrimination and racism of #BAME ? #Corbyn got outflanked by #Zionists time to recalibrate and take offensive against occupation of #Palestine”
  • “So, @Keir_Starmer prefers a #LabourParty without @RLong_Bailey. Shane [sic] on him and all the other #labourparty members failing to recognise #zionism as a pernicious #racist ideology promoted by zealots to dehumanise #Palestinians” 
  • “So it continues, use an anti Semite smear, stop progressive politics #Zionism is #racism amongst other things ….”
  • “Of course @MarkSerwotka is right #Israel #hasbara #zionism #racism”

Second, the tweets breached the Definition by comparing Israelis and Zionists to Nazis. According to the Definition: “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is antisemitic. For example, the following was tweeted:

  • “Does it take a nazi to recognise a #nazi #Israel #racism ?”
  • #nazi-zionistalliance #zionism #settlercolonialism hold onto power whoever you align with”

Third, the tweets contravened the Definition by claiming that concerns about institutional antisemitism in the Labour Party, which were vindicated by the report of the Equality and Human Rights Commission, were due to a campaign run by the “Israeli embassy.” The tweets thus supported one of the oldest tropes used to justify acts of antisemitism: the discredited myth of a Jewish conspiracy in which Jews are disloyal and act as a fifth column against the interests of their home countries. The Definition states that: “Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as a collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions” is antisemitic. This was done in tweets including:

  • “The reason they hate Corbyn of course is because he is anti #Zionist and the antisemitic campaign is ran by the #Israeli embassy among others
  • “Always rely on @guardian to get it right on #antisemitism thanks for all your help demonising #Corbyn and #Labour the #Israeli embassy will be delighted. Who is next in your mediocre target?”

The University acknowledged receipt of our letter and pledged to revert to us, but not only did the institution fail to do so, but there is no evidence that any investigation into Prof. Bush and the Twitter account bearing his name ever took place. In the meantime, Prof. Bush has retired, and now holds the prestigious position of Emeritus Professor, which means that he is still connected to the University, and the University’s website links to his offending Twitter account.

Neither the University of Leeds nor Prof. Bush responded to requests for comment when approached in April.

As we recently observed, the University’s apparent failure to take any meaningful action against a professor with a record of tweets that breach the Definition laid bare the emptiness of its adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Not only did the University of Leeds apparently fail to take any meaningful action against a professor whose twitter handle appeared to post tweets in breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism, which the University has adopted, but the offending twitter handle is still linked to by the University’s website page. It is bad enough not to apply the Definition when a complaint is made, but it is altogether worse for the University’s official platforms to link to material in breach of the Definition. It is difficult to see how the adoption was anything but a tick-box exercise.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

It has been reported that a student at Temple University in Philadelphia is suing the University after she claimed that administrators did not do enough after she made her complaint about her roommate’s antisemitism.

Sasha Westrick, 18, alleges that Temple rejected her complaints about her roommate’s alleged repeated antisemitic outbursts. They included abuse over the social media platform Snapchat, in which Ms Westrick was sent an image of herself with the caption “I hate Jews” underneath.

Ms Westrick was given the alleged perpetrator as a roommate during the autumn 2021 semester because they were both on the rowing team. However, their relationship quickly soured, with the roommate allegedly mocking Ms Westrick for the way she was dressed before attending a Shabbat dinner. The roommate then asked Ms Westrick for money on the grounds that all Jews are wealthy. It is also alleged that Westrick’s other roommate participated in the antisemitic bullying.

Though the University acknowledged in a written statement that the roommate did indeed make antisemitic remarks, Ms Westrick claims that the administration did nothing to help her.

Ms Westrick’s lawyer, Robert Mozenter, said in a press release that his client was “being bullied by two of her roommates and crew teammates and Temple University did nothing to help her and eventually used the University’s own policies and procedures to make Sasha’s situation worse.”

In a statement, a spokesperson for Temple University said: “Temple University is aware of the lawsuit filed by Sasha Westrick. We disagree with the manner in which much of the information in the complaint is presented and characterised. We will respond at the appropriate time through the legal process. While the University does not ordinarily comment on pending litigation, we can say that Temple fully investigated, reviewed and addressed this matter pursuant to University policies, and appropriate remedies were implemented.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Pulitzer prize-winning author Alice Walker, who has previously garnered media attention for her inflammatory comments and support for conspiracy theories, is set to speak at San Diego Community College for the investiture ceremony for its new chancellor.

Ms Walker won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1983 for her novel The Colour Purple. She is, however, also known to have made inflammatory comments about Jews, one example of which can be seen in her poem “To Study the Talmud”. Excerpts from Ms Walker’s poem reads:

“Are Goyim (us) meant to be slaves of Jews, and not only
“That, but to enjoy it?
“Are three year old (and a day) girls eligible for marriage and intercourse?
“Are young boys fair game for rape?
“Must even the best of the Goyim (us, again) be killed?”

While also receiving little scrutiny from the press about her views due to the forthcoming publication of her journals, Ms Walker has been asked to speak at the investiture of San Diego Community College’s new chancellor, Carlos O. Cortez.

Ms Walker has also voiced her support for the antisemitic hate preacher David Icke, citing with approval his books Human Race Get off Your Knees: The Lion Sleeps No More, which states that the world is secretly run by shape-shifting reptilian humanoids and “Rothschild Zionists”, and And the Truth Shall Set You Free, which promotes the antisemitic conspiracy theories contained in The Protocols of the Elders of Zion and questions whether the Holocaust happened.

The author reportedly described Mr Icke’s work as “a curious person’s dream come true” and denied that there was anything antisemitic or anti-Jewish about its content.

Mr Icke uses social media, his books and his stage performances to incite hatred. His preaching is so absurd that since the 1990s he has been dismissed as a crank, but because he is dismissed, there has been no major opposition to him and he has built up a following of thousands upon thousands of disciples whom he has persuaded to adamantly believe that the world is in the grip of a conspiracy run by the “Rothschild Zionists”. His repertoire includes conspiracy myths and tropes classified as antisemitic according to the International Definition of Antisemitism, adopted by the British Government. Campaign Against Antisemitism has successfully persuaded some venues to pull out of hosting his events.

After years of pressure from Campaign Against Antisemitism, Mr Icke was banned from most social media platforms.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Rutgers University and local police are investigating a series of antisemitic incidents involving a fraternity at the University.

Members of the Alpha Epsilon Pi fraternity were commemorating Yom HaShoah, Holocaust Remembrance Day, in their annual 24-hour-long event, which involved reading the names of people who were murdered during the Holocaust, when they were reportedly pelted with eggs.

This closely follows a separate apparently antisemitic incident that took place a few days before, when several cars full of people carrying and waving Palestinian flags stopped outside the fraternity’s residence on Sicard Street, shouting antisemitic remarks, spitting, and throwing things at the house.

The latter incident apparently took place after a local chapter of Students for Justice in Palestine held a “Defend Al-Aqsa, Defend Palestine” rally. The perpetrators are reported to have called fraternity members “baby killers” and “terrorists”.

Rutgers University-New Brunswick Chancellor-Provost, Francine Conway, sent a letter to Rutgers students and faculty about the incident, saying: “Initial representations regarding the incident are disturbing. We understand and are sensitive to the concerns of those who were targeted, and stand by our Jewish students, faculty and staff. Harassment based on religious belief, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, or for any reason, is antithetical to our values at Rutgers University.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

It has been reported that an Oregon university that fired a Jewish professor after he accused its president of making antisemitic remarks violated the professor’s academic freedom.

Linfield University in McMinnville, 38 miles south of Portland, fired English professor Daniel Pollack-Pelzner in 2021 after he accused president Miles K. Davis of making comments about the supposed size of Jewish noses and jokes about sending Jews to gas chambers. Prof Pollack-Pelzner also suggested that the university had covered up reports of swastika graffiti and other instances of hate speech, as well as sexual assault allegations.

Prof Pollack-Pelzner also recalls not only that President Davis withheld his reports, fearing that they would bring the University into disrepute and accusing Prof Pollack-Pelzner of “harbouring a secret agenda to grab power”, but that the President warned of “disloyalty from within” in a meeting. Prof Pollack-Pelzner also claims that President Davis said that “people like him were destroying Linfield University from within”.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy or of Jews controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions” is an example of antisemitism.

The American Association of University Professors (AAUP) has now decided that Linfield violated Prof Pollack-Pelzner’s academic freedom when they fired him, stating that the University “contributed to a culture of abuse” in the way it treated the professor.

The AAUP report holds that Linfield forced Prof Pollack-Pelzner out of his job and ensured he was unable to use his e-mail account without holding an initial disciplinary hearing (a requirement for charges against a tenured professor).

Linfield University itself did not take part in the AAUP investigation, and university spokespeople indicated in their interactions with faculty and local media that they did not accept the report’s allegations and were ready to fight them in court.

Prof Pollack-Pelzner is now reportedly a visiting scholar at Portland State University.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The emptiness of the University of Leeds’ adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism has been laid bare, after the institution failed to take any meaningful action against a professor with a record of tweets that breach the Definition.

Last year, Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to the University regarding Ray Bush, who was then a Professor of African Studies and Development Politics. Prof. Bush appeared to have tweeted from the Twitter handle “@raymondobush” a large number of tweets that breach the Definition. Prof. Bush’s profile page on the University’s website links to the offending Twitter handle.

There were three types of breaches.

First, the tweets stated that Israel’s existence itself is unacceptable, using the exact language of the Definition in referring to Jewish self-determination as “a racist endeavour”. The Definition states that “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour)” is antisemitic. This claim was repeated on numerous occasions:

  • “#DefyIHRA the state of #Israel is a #racist endeavour” 
  • “#defyIHRA the state of Israel is a racist endeavour. The IHRA definition of antisemitism is a threat to free expression | Ash Sarkar https://theguardian.com/commentisfree/”
  • “#racistendeavour #warcrimes #Israel join the dots and understand why Israel is a zionist entity and settler colonial regime that exists solely because of US money and European guilt. #endtheoccupation”
  • “#Labourparty #NEC big mistake with #IHRA #Israel is a racist endeavour and what about other discrimination? Is NEC recognising defined discrimination and racism of #BAME ? #Corbyn got outflanked by #Zionists time to recalibrate and take offensive against occupation of #Palestine”
  • “So, @Keir_Starmer prefers a #LabourParty without @RLong_Bailey. Shane [sic] on him and all the other #labourparty members failing to recognise #zionism as a pernicious #racist ideology promoted by zealots to dehumanise #Palestinians” 
  • “So it continues, use an anti Semite smear, stop progressive politics #Zionism is #racism amongst other things ….”
  • “Of course @MarkSerwotka is right #Israel #hasbara #zionism #racism”

Second, the tweets breached the Definition by comparing Israelis and Zionists to Nazis. According to the Definition: “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is antisemitic. For example, the following was tweeted:

  • “Does it take a nazi to recognise a #nazi #Israel #racism ?”
  • #nazi-zionistalliance #zionism #settlercolonialism hold onto power whoever you align with”

Third, the tweets contravened the Definition by claiming that concerns about institutional antisemitism in the Labour Party, which were vindicated by the report of the Equality and Human Rights Commission, were due to a campaign run by the “Israeli embassy.” The tweets thus supported one of the oldest tropes used to justify acts of antisemitism: the discredited myth of a Jewish conspiracy in which Jews are disloyal and act as a fifth column against the interests of their home countries. The Definition states that: “Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as a collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions” is antisemitic. This was done in tweets including:

  • “The reason they hate Corbyn of course is because he is anti #Zionist and the antisemitic campaign is ran by the #Israeli embassy among others
  • “Always rely on @guardian to get it right on #antisemitism thanks for all your help demonising #Corbyn and #Labour the #Israeli embassy will be delighted. Who is next in your mediocre target?”

The University acknowledged receipt of our letter and pledged to revert to us, but not only did the institution fail to do so, but there is no evidence that any investigation into Prof. Bush and the Twitter account bearing his name ever took place. In the meantime, Prof. Bush has retired, and now holds the prestigious position of Emeritus Professor of African Studies and Development Politics, which means that he is still connected to the University. Indeed, his profile page on the University’s website links to his offending Twitter account.

Neither the University of Leeds nor Prof. Bush responded to requests for comment.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We have always been clear that adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism is only a first step. What is vital is that universities actually apply the Definition when allegations of antisemitism arise. In this case, not only has the University of Leeds apparently failed to do so, but there is no indication that it launched any investigation at all. Instead, it has allowed Ray Bush to retire quietly and assume the prestigious position of emeritus professor, while continuing to advertise the offending Twitter account on its website.

“These tweets are clearly in breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism. Anyone airing and disseminating dangerous antisemitic views is not fit to be entrusted with the responsibility of teaching young people. For this reason, it was important for the matter to be properly investigated and for consequences to follow. Leeds missed this opportunity to demonstrate that it takes the safety of its Jewish students seriously. Now, the University must explain why it failed to take action.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

The incoming President of the National Union of Students (NUS) has again stirred controversy, claiming in an interview published today that, although it is “absolutely not true” that “I don’t like Jewish people,” nevertheless, “as a black Muslim woman, it [the allegation] is something that I expected.”

Shaima Dallali’s comments were reported in The Guardian, which interviewed the union’s already embattled President-elect.

Last week, NUS announced that it was launching an independent investigation into antisemitism, including allegations facing Ms Dallali. Ms Dallali, 27, told the newspaper that “The investigation is the right thing to do,” adding: “I know quite a few Jewish students feel alienated. This is the first step to start bridging the gap and reaching out to Jewish students and ensuring that Jewish students feel like they have a place in NUS, so I do welcome it.”

Ms Dallali, who has a history of inflammatory tweets, including one for which she apologised, reportedly compared herself to a notorious former NUS President, Malia Bouattia. According to the newspaper, Ms Dallali said that “the backlash against her election was part of pattern, seen with previous student leaders including Malia Bouattia, who in 2016 became the first black Muslim woman to become NUS president.”

“Unfortunately, as a black Muslim woman, it is something that I expected because I’ve seen it happen to other black Muslim women when they take up positions in the student union or the NUS, where they are attacked based on their political beliefs or their pro-Palestinian stance,” Ms Dallali said.

She also claimed that she had received a lot of racist and anti-Muslim abuse online: “I’ve had private messages of people calling me a raghead, people telling me to go and kill myself, calling me a Jew hater and an antisemite. That has been difficult to read. And so many threats as well – if I continue to do this then things will happen to me. I just try to delete, to block, I try not to let it get to my head. It’s something I receive every day and I’m continuing to receive. It’s affected me mentally and physically. Sometimes I don’t feel safe.”

Ms Bouattia was also investigated by NUS during her tenure and found to have made antisemitic statements, but no action was taken against her in what was one of many instances of the union appearing to brush racism against Jews under the carpet.

During her election campaign, Ms Dallali, who will assume her position as President in July, was forced to apologise for tweeting the words of an antisemitic chant. In 2012, during an escalation of tensions between Israel and the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group Hamas, Ms Dallali tweeted the words “Khaybar Khaybar, ya yahud, Jaish Muhammad, sa yahud.” Translated into English, this chant means “Jews, remember the battle of Khaybar, the army of Muhammad is returning.” It is a classic Arabic battle cry referencing the massacre and expulsion of the Jews of the town of Khaybar in northwestern Arabia, now Saudi Arabia, in the year 628 CE. She also had a history of other inflammatory tweets, and last week, it also emerged that Ms Dallali had been in a group shouting aggressively at Jewish students attending an Israel Society event at Kings College London in 2018, at which it was reported that the “Khaybar” chant was heard.

Ms Dallali reportedly told The Guardian that, as the newspaper put it, “Muslims were not allowed room for growth.” She said: “It genuinely is really difficult to have to see these horrible things being said about me. They are not true. This idea that I don’t like Jewish people, or I’m hateful towards the Jewish community is absolutely not true. During my time as a sabbatical officer, I’ve worked with the Jewish community to support them, for example to commemorate Holocaust memorial day. My door has always been open to all students regardless of who they are. I want to reiterate my willingness to work with Jewish students to combat antisemitism, to address their concerns. I want to represent all students and their concerns are important. I may at times disagree with people politically. Everyone has the right to have their own political ideas, but I don’t hate anyone. I definitely don’t hate the Jewish community. I do believe I can bridge the gap and build bridges.”

NUS’s announcement of an investigation into antisemitism came after Robert Halfon MP wrote together with Campaign Against Antisemitism to the Charity Commission calling for an investigation into the union’s charitable arm. The full dossier on NUS, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, can be read here.

In addition, over twenty former NUS Presidents wrote a letter expressing their “serious concerns about antisemitism”, and another letter, organised by the Union of Jewish Students (UJS) and signed by over 1,000 Jewish students and allies, called for NUS to launch an independent investigation.

The Universities Minister also called for an investigation into NUS by the Charity Commission, and it has been further suggested that the Government’s grant to NUS should be withdrawn, and that the Government should cease to recognise NUS as the voice of British students, if concerns over antisemitism are not addressed.

It has also been reported that the Department for Education is looking at its relationship with NUS and at its charitable status, after Education Secretary Nadhim Zahawi reportedly accused the union of “systemic antisemitism”.

The calls came following revelations about Ms Dallali and the recent Lowkey scandal, where Jewish concerns were reportedly brushed aside as the controversial rapper and activist was invited to headline the union’s centenary conference. He eventually withdrew as NUS came under media pressure.

After the circulation of the letter by former NUS Presidents, another letter has reportedly been published in support of Ms Dallali and calling for a simultaneous NUS investigation into Islamophobia and racist, as well as antisemitism.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Drew Matthews, a police officer at the University of Colorado Boulder has been put on administrative leave following accusations of racism and antisemitism.

Safe Access for Everyone (SAFE), which has been described as “an anti-police organisation”, found tweets allegedly posted by Mr Matthews under the account /u/BocoRam18 on the Boulder and CUBoulder subreddit boards, as well as on the ProtectandServe board for police officers, on which he reportedly verified his identity as a campus police officer.

According to SAFE, Mr Matthews is alleged to have compared a private business’ vaccine mandate to the Holocaust, reportedly writing: “If people told you to wear a star on your shirt you’d do it.” In a post referencing homeless people, Mr Matthews is claimed to have written: “I say call in fire with the police and just spray the hoses at them till they leave”. Mr Matthews also allegedly wrote, in another comment, that he stopped “every black male” at a house party that he broke up after receiving a report of sexual assault, where the suspect was black with an average height and build wearing a white T-shirt and jeans.

Mr Matthews was placed on paid administrative leave on 11th April due to allegedly “offensive and reprehensible” posts.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Following a string of controversies surrounding the National Union of Students (NUS) and its leadership, the union has called for an independent investigation into recent antisemitism allegations raised by concerned members of the Jewish community and its allies.

The announcement comes after Robert Halfon MP wrote together with Campaign Against Antisemitism to the Charity Commission calling for an investigation into the union’s charitable arm. The full dossier on NUS, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, can be read here. In addition, over twenty former NUS Presidents wrote a letter expressing their “serious concerns about antisemitism”, and another letter, organised by the Union of Jewish Students (UJS) and signed by over 1,000 Jewish students and allies, called for NUS to launch an independent investigation.

The Universities Minister also called for an investigation into NUS by the Charity Commission, and it has been further suggested that the Government’s grant to NUS should be withdrawn, and that the Government should cease to recognise NUS as the voice of British students, if concerns over antisemitism are not addressed.

In its statement today, NUS said that it is “very concerned about the pain and hurt being expressed” and has revealed that an independent investigation will be launched, which will “cover all public allegations made between March – April 2022 about NUS and the President Elect.” Regarding President-elect Shaima Dallali, the statement confirmed that the investigation would cover “a range of comments and actions that are alleged to have taken place over the last decade.”

It added that the investigation would also specifically examine the concern surrounding NUS’s booking of Lowkey for its centenary conference and would also include “a review of allegations of a wider culture of antisemitism within NUS.”  

NUS has said that the Union of Jewish Students (UJS) would be consulted in arranging the investigation and that regular meetings with UJS would be taking place.

The announcement comes in the wake of numerous controversies involving NUS. In one recent scandal, the rapper Kareem Dennis, known as Lowkey, was due to headline NUS’s centenary conference last month. After initially dismissing the concerns of Jewish students, who pointed out the rapper’s inflammatory record, the union came under media scrutiny and eventually Mr Dennis withdrew from the event. As the scandal erupted, Robert Halfon MP excoriated NUS for failing to send a representative to attend a hearing held by the Education Select Committee, which he chairs.

This scandal was immediately followed by the election of Shaima Dallali as NUS’s new President, despite her history of antisemitic tweets and other inflammatory social media posts. Prior to the election, she apologised for one such tweet.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Following a string of controversies surrounding the National Union of Students (NUS) and its leadership, over twenty former Presidents of the union have written to its current President to press her to deal with the concerns of Jewish students.

Signatories to the letter include Shadow Health Secretary Wes Streeting, former Foreign Secretary Jack Straw, former Education Secretary Charles Clarke, former Labour MP Stephen Twigg and columnist David Aaronovitch.

In their letter to current NUS President Larissa Kennedy, they express their “serious concerns about antisemitism”.

“We are writing to you privately as former presidents with serious concerns about antisemitism, the safety and treatment of Jewish students at NUS events and within your democracy, and the way in which NUS is responding to these concerns,” the letter says.

It is clear, the letter observes, that NUS has “a serious and significant problem.”

The letter comes as NUS faces scrutiny over its record in relation to Jewish students and amidst a series of controversies in connection with antisemitism. In one recent scandal, the rapper Kareem Dennis, known as Lowkey, was due to headline NUS’s centenary conference last month. After initially dismissing the concerns of Jewish students, who pointed out the rapper’s inflammatory record, the union came under media scrutiny and eventually Mr Dennis withdrew from the event. As the scandal erupted, Robert Halfon MP excoriated NUS for failing to send a representative to attend a hearing held by the Education Select Committee, which he chairs.

This scandal was immediately followed by the election of Shaima Dallali as NUS’s new President, despite her history of antisemitic tweets and other inflammatory social media posts. Prior to the election, she apologised for one such tweet.

Earlier this week, Mr Halfon wrote to the Charity Commission calling together with Campaign Against Antisemitism for a statutory inquiry into NUS. The full dossier on NUS, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, can be read here.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

The University of Essex has inexplicably determined that protestors who chanted the “from the river to the sea” slogan as part of campus anti-Israel protests were not engaging in antisemitic conduct.

The slogan was chanted by activists opposed to a speaking engagement in October 2021 at the University’s Conservative Society by the former head of British armed forces in Afghanistan, Col. Richard Kemp.

Joe Wigoder, a third year politics student at the University of Essex, lodged an official complaint with the University about the chanting outside the event, but his complaint was rejected. University Registrar and Secretary Bryn Morris, on behalf of the Office of the Vice-Chancellor, wrote in an e-mail to Mr Wigoder that “it was not found that antisemitic behaviour took place” during the protest, and that “no evidence was found that chants had been used to specifically deny the state of Israel…or express hatred of Jews.”

The chant of “From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free” only makes sense as a call for the destruction of the world’s only Jewish state — and its replacement with a State of Palestine — and is thus an attempt to deny Jews, uniquely, the right to self-determination, which is a breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Education Secretary Nadhim Zahawi has previously said that the slogan “from the river to the sea” is antisemitic and, given its popularity with Hamas and its supporters, its use could be reported to the police.

Mr Wigoder said: “It is incredibly disappointing to read this disheartening news and see the University yet again abandoning their promises to Jewish students. Time after time, the university attempts to sweep antisemitism under the rug, and it leaves us feeling completely unsafe on campus. I have been chasing this complaint for months and this is an upsetting conclusion.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

An investigation into the conduct of an Ohio State University professor who allegedly used an antisemitic slur in one of her classes has resulted in no long-term disciplinary consequences for the academic.

Jackie Buell, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences specialising in sports nutrition, was accused of using the phrase “Jew down” in an October 2021 class discussion about haggling over prices while making purchases in Mexico. The phrase alludes to an antisemitic stereotype of Jewish people as excessively frugal.

Though the University suspended Prof. Buell from teaching classes in the Spring 2022 semester and directed her to take anti-discrimination training for the next twelve months, the investigation found that she did not breach the University’s non-discrimination and harassment policy. Her conduct has instead been officially described as “inappropriate”.

The University’s Office of Institutional Equity reportedly found Prof. Buell’s behaviour “offensive, concerning and inappropriate,” but decided that her comments did not interfere with or deny any student’s ability to access educational facilities at the University.

Prof. Buell is expected to demonstrate a certain level of growth following her training before she is permitted to begin teaching again.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The Union of Jewish Students of France (UEJF) has condemned antisemitic messages discovered written in the bathroom of the law building at the Paris Nanterre University.

The graffiti includes a Star of David with “MEDIA” written on top, phrases such as “Hitler, you’re the best”, and other slogans that evoke the concept of Jewish control over the media.

“This antisemitism, unabashed, assumed, in front of thousands of students and in the total indifference, it is every day,” reported the UEJF president Samuel Lejoyeux to Le Figaro Étudiant. “It’s complicated to be a Jewish student…we are constantly brought back to the question of Israel, to the conspiracy that whites dominate everything, and that Jews are ‘super whites”.

“We condemn in the strongest terms and in an absolute manner”, responded Philippe Gervais-Lambony, president of the university “any antisemitic and racist act”. The university then reported that it was cleaning the graffiti and launching an investigation.

According to a survey commissioned by UEJF in 2019, 45% of Jewish and non-Jewish respondents have witnessed antisemitism at school.

In February, a report by France’s Jewish Community Security Service said that antisemitic incidents in France had skyrocketed by 75% in 2021.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Robert Halfon MP, Chair of the House of Commons Education Select Committee, has today written to the Charity Commission calling together with Campaign Against Antisemitism for a statutory inquiry into the National Union of Students (NUS).

In his letter, Mr Halfon wrote to “voice my dismay at the actions and behaviour of the National Union of Students and its trustees, in regards to their treatment of Jewish students and the Jewish community’s concerns regarding antisemitism. Together with Campaign Against Antisemitism…I politely request that the Commission launch a Section 46 inquiry, pursuant to the 2011 Charities Act into the NUS and look forward to receiving your response.”

Mr Halfon enclosed a dossier of evidence by Campaign Against Antisemitism detailing how NUS has failed Jewish students. He wrote that he is “particularly concerned about the enclosed dossier of antisemitic events that have taken place within the NUS over the past several years — and which come following decades of concerning trends — which was prepared by CAA.”

The full dossier on NUS, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, can be read below.

Mr Halfon made particular reference in his letter to the recent scandal involving the rapper Kareem Dennis, known as Lowkey, who was due to headline NUS’s centenary conference last month. After initially dismissing the concerns of Jewish students, who pointed out the rapper’s inflammatory record, the union came under media scrutiny and eventually Mr Dennis withdrew from the event.

As the scandal erupted, Mr Halfon excoriated NUS for failing to send a representative to attend a hearing held by his committee.

This scandal was immediately followed by the election of Shaima Dallali as NUS’s new President, despite her history of antisemitic tweets and other inflammatory social media posts. Prior to the election, she apologised for one such tweet.

As the dossier produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism observes, “Despite [its] ostensible and much-vaunted commitment to anti-racism, NUS has a long record of controversy in relation to Jewish students and antisemitism, dating back decades.

The dossier notes that antisemitism on campus has surged to record levels, with CST recording a 191% increase in antisemitic incidents on campus in 2021, and that Campaign Against Antisemitism’s latest Antisemitism Barometer found that an overwhelming 92% of British Jews believe that antisemitism in universities is a problem.

“NUS’s blind spot when it comes to inclusion of Jewish students and openness to their concerns is significant, giving rise not only to a failure of representation but also to a toleration of hostility to the needs of Jewish students within NUS and even instances of outright antisemitism. The result is tangible harm to Jewish students,” the dossier explains. “As an organisation, NUS is failing in its objective to represent and advocate for all students, and, as a charity, it is failing to act for the benefit of the public.”

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Shaima Dallali’s election as NUS President only a week after the Lowkey scandal is the last straw. It follows decades of similar indications that this union does not even aspire to represent Jewish students. At a time of surging racism against Jews on campus and almost universal concern in the Jewish community about antisemitism in universities, we are grateful to Robert Halfon for referring NUS to the Charity Commission for a statutory inquiry on the strength of our dossier of evidence. NUS must now answer for failing to represent Jewish students and failing to live up to its legal commitment to act for the public benefit.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Students’ unions at Lancaster University and Durham University have taken action to sustain pressure on the National Union of Students (NUS) after a series of scandals rocked the national student body.

In an open letter to the NUS leadership this week, the Lancaster University Students’ Union said that it was “deeply disappointed and hurt by the way the Jewish community have been engaged with and treated this year,” making specific reference to the recent scandal involving the inflammatory rapper and activity Kareem Dennis, known as Lowkey.

The letter went on to say that “Our Jewish students have legitimate issues and questions about decisions made by the NUS leadership, which we feel need to be addressed,” in regard to the Lowkey affair, in which the controversial figure was invited to headline the NUS’s centenary conference and the concerns of Jewish students’ were dismissed before media pressure brought about Mr Dennis’ withdrawal from the event.

The letter further noted that “NUS has an uncomfortable history with antisemitism,” and that it is “disconcerting” that individuals who have in the past been “embroiled in allegations of antisemitism” and were disqualified from office “ever felt welcome at all.”

Observing that “Antisemitism is a major issue within the student movement” and that NUS “keep[s] failing the Jewish community,” the letter lamented that “Too many Jewish activists have been pushed out of the student movement, from fear, anxiety, hostility, an environment that encourages antisemitic dialogue, and blatant antisemitic comments and/or actions.”

“The Jewish community,” the letter continued, “has been let down time and time again,” and its authors “look forward to seeing a clear communication of the changes you will make,” as “the Lancaster University Students’ Union Full Time Officer team will not sit back and watch the community go through endless trauma caused by NUS.”

Meanwhile, at Durham University, the Students’ Union put out a statement at the end of March affirming that “Jewish students have legitimate questions about decisions made by NUS in planning their National Conference, and the poor response that came when those decisions were challenged. There has been, unambiguously, a failure to recognise the risk and the reality of antisemitism.”

The statement insisted that “We can only bring about the changes we want to education and society if we do it collectively, through NUS. We’re stronger together. But when some students are excluded from NUS, we are all made weaker.” It concluded by saying that “When we’re at NUS Conference this week, we’ll insist that the NUS leadership recognise the problems they’ve created. We trust in their ability to reflect, and to make changes in partnership with Jewish students and their representatives. We’ll hold them accountable for making our national student movement welcoming for Jewish students.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

The University of Connecticut has been forced to deal with an incident in which a Jewish student received antisemitic abuse for removing anti-Zionist material that she found in the University library.

Natalie Shclover discovered a series of illustrations of the map of Israel contrasted with the image of a strangled child and a photograph of University President Radenka Maric placed on the walls and strewn on the floor of the Homer Babbidge Library at the University’s Storrs campus. 

The flyers were reportedly produced as part of ongoing criticism of Ms Maric for taking a trip to Israel to support Connecticut’s collaboration with higher education institutions there. Soon after the trip was announced, the University’s social media channels were overwhelmed with comments calling Israelis “greedy” and calls for “another Intifada”.

When Ms Shclover and her boyfriend Zacharia El-Tayyeb learned that, because the flyers were on the ground, they are legally thought of as “public property”, the couple went back to the library to dispose of them. This led to an altercation with four other students.

One of the students filmed the exchange on her cellphone and is reported to have said “Even though you’re a Jew, you still have to respect us.” It is alleged that the other students called her a “f***ing b****”, a “f***ing Zionist”, and a “white supremacist”.

Both Ms Shclover and Mr El-Tayyeb were harrassed on the University’s Yik Yak feed – a social media platform that allows users to post messages anonymously to anyone within a five mile radius – and Ms Shclover was dismissed from The Chordials, a student a capella society of which she was President.

Radenka Maric condemned the antisemitic remarks and wrote a message to the University community contextualising the incident in terms of “the combustible combination of religion, cultural identity, politics, history, and the ongoing conflict in the Middle East.”

Ms Shclover said: “I think it fell painfully short of addressing the harassment that Zach and I endured, and calling it the ‘library incident’ is very arbitrary. We’ve had emails and communications from administrative bodies at UConn condemning acts of racism, Islamophobia, and even acts of antisemitism in years past, and I don’t understand why an issue surrounding Israel or Palestine would be treated any differently.

“I know that this is a greater issue, one that the Jews and Zionist on this campus are afraid to talk about because they fear what happened to me might happen to them, and I don’t blame them. UConn is not going to thrive if every Jewish student on this campus feels the way they do now, which is unsafe, unprotected, and unheard. UConn will not thrive as a space that is inclusive for everyone but the Jews.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Further concerns have been raised after more troubling tweets from the newly-elected President of the National Union of Students (NUS), Shaima Dallali, have surfaced

This most recent batch of tweets has come to light mere days after we reported that Ms Dallali was forced to apologise when, in 2012, during an escalation of tensions between Israel and the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group Hamas, the then-hopeful NUS candidate tweeted the words “Khaybar Khaybar, ya yahud, Jaish Muhammad, sa yahud.” 

Translated into English, this chant means “Jews, remember the battle of Khaybar, the army of Muhammad is returning.” It is a classic Arabic battle cry referencing the massacre and expulsion of the Jews of the town of Khaybar in northwestern Arabia, now Saudi Arabia, in the year 628 CE.

Ms Dallali issued a statement on 23rd March, saying: “Earlier today I was made aware of a tweet I posted ten years ago. During Israel’s assault on Gaza I referenced the battle of Khaybar in which Jewish and Muslim armies fought. I was wrong to see the Palestine conflict as one between Muslims and Jews. The reference made as a teenager was unacceptable and I sincerely and unreservedly apologise.”

Shortly after her apology, it came to light that Ms Dallali’s output on Twitter reportedly included other inflammatory messages as well, including one from 2018 in which she said: “So your special forces invade the Gaza Strip, attempt to kidnap a Hamas commander, kill him and others. Then cry about Hamas being the terrorists. Makes perfect sense. #GazaUnderAttack.” Hamas is an antisemitic genocidal terrorist organisation that is proscribed in the UK.

Other alleged tweets expressed support for Jeremy Corbyn, the antisemitic former leader of the Labour Party. On 17th November 2020, Ms Dalalli wrote a response to Mr Corbyn’s readmission to the Labour Party, saying that “He should never have been suspended in the first place.” A few months later, on 5th January 2021, Ms Hallami tweeted that “Jeremy Corbyn was too good for this godforsaken country.” At present, these tweets have not yet been deleted, though it has been reported that several others have.

However, a new set of historic tweets from Ms Dallali has now come to light, one of which includes the antisemitic “From the river to the sea” chant. The chant of “From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free” only makes sense as a call for the destruction of the world’s only Jewish state — and its replacement with a State of Palestine — and is thus an attempt to deny Jews, uniquely, the right to self-determination, which is a breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Additionally, Ms Dallali reportedly referred to a preacher who condemned actions taken by Hamas as a “dirty Zionist” and has also raised money for the controversial activist group CAGE which, while it does not advocate violence, has previously been criticised for promoting problematic or extreme views, which they deny.

Ms Dallali also allegedly said that the cleric Yusuf al-Qaradawi, who has been described as an “Islamist theologian”, was the “moral compass for the Muslim community at large”. In January 2009, Mr al-Qaradawi said on Al-Jazeera TV that he would “shoot Allah’s enemies, the Jews.” In a sermon that took place in that same month, he again spoke of Jewish people and called upon God to “kill them, down to the very last one.”

In a 2010 interview on BBC Arabic, Mr Yusuf al-Qaradawi reportedly said: “Throughout history, Allah has imposed upon the [Jews] people who would punish them for their corruption. The last punishment was carried out by Hitler. By means of all the things he did to them – even though they exaggerated this issue – he managed to put them in their place. This was divine punishment for them. Allah willing, the next time will be at the hand of the believers.”

Replying to UJS’s tweet about the “bridges broken” over the past few weeks in regard to NUS’ booking of the controversial rapper Lowkey, Ms Dallali said that her hands “are outstretched to all students and staff that work in our movement, including Jewish students, and would love to arrange a meeting once I’m in office,” though in the past, she has lashed out at UJS over Twitter, accusing them of having “a history of bullying pro-Palestine sabbs [sabbatical officers] and activists.” In that same tweet, she added: “You speak one word of solidarity and they’re after you. UJS and their likes need to be called out.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

It has now been reported publicly that, last month, the University of Bristol’s Appeal Panel upheld the University’s decision last year to terminate the employment of David Miller, which took place one month after Campaign Against Antisemitism brought a lawsuit on behalf of current students against the institution, amidst an outcry from the Jewish community and its institutions.

Our legal case against the University concerned alleged unlawful harassment on the basis of Jewish ethnicity and Judaism, amounting to breaches of the Equality Act 2010, as well as breaches of contract. We launched proceedings in late August and the University swiftly realised that it was putting itself in legal jeopardy by sustaining Prof. Miller’s employment at the institution.

A number of brave students at the University stepped forward to act as complainants in the litigation. We also wish to thank Asserson Law Offices, led by senior partner Trevor Asserson, and barristers Derek Spitz of One Essex Court and Benjamin Gray of Littleton Chambers.

The lawsuit related to Prof. Miller’s speech on a Zoom webinar in February last year in which he said that the “Zionist Movement” is “the enemy” that must be engaged, that it is “the enemy of world peace,” and that those associated with Zionism, including Jewish students on Bristol campus, “must be directly targeted”. Taken together, the implication of Prof. Miller’s remarks is that all decent people who support “world peace” should view Bristol Jewish Society and the Union of Jewish Students, and Jewish people, including those who identify with those bodies, and the vast majority of Jewish students as an “enemy” that must be “directly targeted”.

He also said that interfaith work between Jewish and Muslim groups is “a trojan horse for normalising Zionism in the Muslim community”. He also claimed that Jewish students, by virtue of being Zionist, “encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”.

Prof. Miller has a long record of inflammatory statements about the Jewish community. 

Bristol had come under increasing pressure from the Jewish community, which was united in its disgust at Prof. Miller’s comments and the drawn-out investigation that the University was conducting with no apparent end in sight. But the University failed to act for months. Prof. Miller’s statements and the University’s failure to condemn them and take swift action against him were the subject of a great deal of attention from the Jewish community as well as hundreds of academics and Parliament, including a written question by Lord Austin and an intervention from Robert Halfon MP. Prof. Miller was also defended by an array of controversial ‘usual suspects’ whose interventions did nothing for his collapsing credibility.

We thank others in the Jewish community, MPs and academics for the pressure that they brought to bear on the University of Bristol.

The legal claim that we spearheaded contended that Prof. Miller’s statements sought to create a hostile environment for Jewish students. It further alleged that the University was liable for Prof. Miller’s conduct, and was further liable in its own right, for unlawful conduct in breach of the Equality Act, and for its breach of its contract with students.

Other than a final call for prospective claimants, we minimised the public profile of the case in order to protect the identities of the brave student claimants who not only believed that enough is enough but that, in order for things to change, they must also act on that belief. We are enormously grateful to them for their courage. Despite the lower public profile of the case, the University was in no doubt about our intentions and resolve. A month after the launch of the lawsuit, Prof. Miller was fired for gross misconduct.

In a statement exemplifying just why Prof. Miller has no place on a university campus, the Support David Miller campaign said this week: “Support David Miller – a volunteer-led anti-racism campaign, composed of academics, students and independent researchers – has repeatedly expressed concerns that the University of Bristol’s disciplinary processes have been compromised by assets of a hostile foreign state. The State of Israel and its assets in the UK seek to eliminate all critics of Zionism from UK university campuses. Zionism is the racist ideology that professes a G-d-given right of European and other Jewish colonisers to occupy and seize Palestinian land, homes and resources.  Professor Miller has been subjected to this censorship campaign because of his research showing that Zionist campaign groups have funded and promoted Islamophobia in the UK and abroad.”

Prof. Miller, who has indicated his intention to appeal the University’s latest decision to the Employment Tribunal, said: “I’ve been targeted by a pernicious witch-hunt, led by known assets of the State of Israel in the UK and funded by the dirty money of pro-Israel oligarchs. This is an attempt at entryism and political intimidation. The University of Bristol has wilted under this new wave of McCarthyism. The University treated this appeal as a mere formality, with a pre-determined outcome. I’ll be challenging the University’s perverse decision at an Employment Tribunal, to help stop our fundamental rights of free expression and academic freedom being further corroded at the behest of a hostile and illegitimate foreign regime.”

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “This ruling is a further vindication of the courageous Jewish students on whose behalf we brought proceedings against the University of Bristol last year. Following the launch of our lawsuit and an outcry from across the Jewish community, it was clear to the University that it would be held to account in court and had to act to protect Jewish students in accordance with the law, and David Miller was fired within a month. Universities across the country should be warned that we will do whatever it takes to defend Jewish students from racists on campus by upholding their rights in court where necessary.”

The case was the latest step by Campaign Against Antisemitism to defend the rights of individual Jewish students. We believe that universities and students’ unions must be robustly held to account when they fail to defend Jewish students or when they allow their lecturers to discriminate against or harass them.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

A student politician who was forced to apologise for tweeting an Islamist chant threatening Jews has been elected President of the National Union of Students (NUS).

Last week, it was revealed that the then-hopeful NUS candidate Shaima Dallali was forced to apologise for tweeting the words of an antisemitic chant. In 2012, during an escalation of tensions between Israel and the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group Hamas, Ms Dallali tweeted the words “Khaybar Khaybar, ya yahud, Jaish Muhammad, sa yahud.”

Translated into English, this chant means “Jews, remember the battle of Khaybar, the army of Muhammad is returning.” It is a classic Arabic battle cry referencing the massacre and expulsion of the Jews of the town of Khaybar in northwestern Arabia, now Saudi Arabia, in the year 628 CE.

Ms Dallali issued a statement on 23rd March, saying: “Earlier today I was made aware of a tweet I posted ten years ago. During Israel’s assault on Gaza I referenced the battle of Khaybar in which Jewish and Muslim armies fought. I was wrong to see the Palestine conflict as one between Muslims and Jews. The reference made as a teenager was unacceptable and I sincerely and unreservedly apologise.”

Ms Dallali is currently the President of the City, University of London students’ union. Last year, prior to Ms Dallali’s tenure as President, the union organised a controversial campus-wide referendum on the International Definition of Antisemitism after reportedly failing to consult Jewish students.

It has now come to light that Ms Dallali’s output on Twitter also included other inflammatory messages, including one last May allegedly saying that “organisations like UJS [the Union of Jewish Students] have a history of bullying pro-Palestine sabbs [sabbatical officers] and activists. You speak one word of solidarity and they’re after you. UJS and their likes need to be called out.”

Another alleged tweet from 2018 read: “So your special forces invade the Gaza Strip, attempt to kidnap a Hamas commander, kill him and others. Then cry about Hamas being the terrorists. Makes perfect sense. #GazaUnderAttack.” Hamas is an antisemitic genocidal terrorist organisation that is proscribed in the UK.

Other alleged tweets expressed support for Jeremy Corbyn, the antisemitic former leader of the Labour Party. On 17th November 2020, Ms Dalalli wrote a response to Mr Corbyn’s readmission to the Labour Party, saying that “He should never have been suspended in the first place.” A few months later, on 5th January 2021, Ms Hallami tweeted that “Jeremy Corbyn was too good for this godforsaken country.” At present, these tweets have not yet been deleted, though it has been reported that several others have.

Last week, the Chair of the Education Select Committee, Robert Halfon MP, excoriated NUS for failing to send a representative to attend his recent hearing, particularly given that the hearing took place just days after a scandal involving the rapper Kareem Dennis, known as Lowkey, who was due to headline the union’s centenary conference. After initially dismissing the concerns of Jewish students, who pointed out the rapper’s inflammatory record, the union came under media scrutiny and eventually Mr Dennis withdraw from the event.

In an attempt at an apology, NUS grotesquely alleged that “Whilst we welcome genuine political debate, we’ve been sad to see the use of harassment and misinformation against Lowkey.” Swiping at Mr Halfon, NUS has asserted that “MPs and education leaders are accountable to us not the other way round,” declared that “Old school bullying culture is never acceptable including at Government committees [sic],” and that “Elected student leaders aren’t required to take endless levels of abuse in their roles.”

Concerns were also raised about the outgoing President of NUS and one of her Vice Presidents.

NUS’s handling of Jewish concerns over the booking of Lowkey was discussed on the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism.

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Shaima Dallali’s election as NUS President only a week after the Lowkey scandal is just the latest indication that this union does not even aspire to represent Jewish students. She has not even taken office and has already had to apologise for one historic antisemitic tweet while rapidly deleting many other inflammatory social media posts. If she wishes to show that she personally has learned a lesson and seeks to lead a truly inclusive union, she should commit to meeting with Jewish students and educate herself on their concerns and also announce that NUS under her leadership will recommit to the International Definition of Antisemitism. If she cannot bring herself to do that in short order, the Government should end its enormous grant to NUS.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

After a representative from the National Union of Students (NUS) failed to attend a hearing of the House of Commons Education Select Committee, the controversial union is coming under fire on several fronts.

The Chair of the Committee, Robert Halfon MP, excoriated NUS for failing to send a representative to attend his hearing on Tuesday, particularly given that the hearing took place just days after a scandal involving the rapper Kareem Dennis, known as Lowkey, who was due to headline the union’s centenary conference. After initially dismissing the concerns of Jewish students, who pointed out the rapper’s inflammatory record, the union came under media scrutiny and eventually Mr Dennis withdraw from the event.

In an attempt at an apology, NUS grotesquely alleged that, “Whilst we welcome genuine political debate, we’ve been sad to see the use of harassment and misinformation against Lowkey.” Swiping at Mr Halfon, NUS has asserted that “MPs and education leaders are accountable to us not the other way round,” declared that “Old school bullying culture is never acceptable including at Government committees [sic],” and that “Elected student leaders aren’t required to take endless levels of abuse in their roles.”

Mr Halfon has expressed his deep dissatisfaction with NUS’s handling of this crisis and its record.

However, fresh revelations about NUS are prompting yet more concern.

An investigation by the Jewish News has concluded that “NUS leaders have quietly dropped a commitment to the International Definition of Antisemitism.” The investigation noted that the outgoing NUS President, Larissa Kennedy, ‘liked’ a tweet celebrating the passage of a resolution calling on Queen Mary University of London and its students’ union to adopt the Jerusalem Declaration, which is a wrecking document intended to undermine the globally-recognised Definition. It also observed that references to the Definition on the NUS website have all but disappeared, despite a statement by the union in 2020 declaring that “NUS is in full support of all efforts to tackle antisemitism and has adopted the [International] Definition of Antisemitism.”

The newspaper also claimed that Sara Khan, an ally of Ms Kennedy’s who was promoted to the new Vice-President Liberation and Equality position, allegedly posted on Twitter: “Is it kind of… antisemitic to homogenise all Jews into an ‘ethnoreligion’? like, both erasing Palestinian Jews, & letting white supremacist/settler Jews off the hook?” In a further post, she allegedly said that she “did some learning” and had concluded that “Judaism as an ethnoreligion refers to the shared heritage of all Jews as identity is passed down through maternal lineage but this is not the same as being a single ethnic group.” She then reportedly wondered: “Imagine thinking the billions of Muslims whether South Asian or Arabic or Eastern European were the same ethnic group. I can’t.” According to the report, Ms Khan also regularly spells “Israel” as “Isra*l”.

Ms Kennedy and Ms Khan allegedly also “played a leading role” in “facilitating” a launch event for last year’s online NUS Decolonialise Education campaign at which Mr Dennis delivered the keynote speech. The report points out numerous inflammatory aspects of this campaign.

Approached by the Jewish News for comment on the allegations in its report and for clarification on whether NUS was still committed to the International Definition of Antisemitism, a spokesperson for the union reportedly said: “Thanks for e-mailing. We won’t be commenting on this.”

Meanwhile, an NUS presidential candidate favoured to win the election to replace Ms Kennedy has been forced to apologise for tweeting the words of an antisemitic chant. Shaima Dallali tweeted the words ““Khaybar Khaybar, ya yahud, Jaish Muhammad, sa yahud” in 2012.

The “Khaybar Khaybar, ya yahud, Jaish Muhammad, sa yahud” chant, translated in English as “Jews, remember the battle of Khaybar, the army of Muhammad is returning”, is a classic Arabic battle cry referencing the massacre and expulsion of the Jews of the town of Khaybar in northwestern Arabia, now Saudi Arabia, in the year 628 CE.

Ms Dallali, who is the President of the City University London students’ union, issued a statement yesterday, saying: “Earlier today I was made aware of a tweet I posted ten years ago. During Israel’s assault on Gaza I referenced the battle of Khaybar in which Jewish and Muslim armies fought. I was wrong to see the Palestine conflict as one between Muslims and Jews. The reference made as a teenager was unacceptable and I sincerely and unreservedly apologise.”

Last year, prior to Ms Dallali’s enture as President, City University students’ union organised a controversial campus-wide referendum on the International Definition of Antisemitism after reportedly failing to consult Jewish students.

These NUS scandals come after Campaign Against Antisemitism published polling earlier this month in its latest Antisemitism Barometer showing that a staggering 92% of British Jews believe that antisemitism in universities is a problem.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

The Prime Minister has called for “irreversible change” after branding British universities too “tolerant of casual or indeed systematic antisemitism”.

Boris Johnson was responding to a question by Andrew Percy MP in the House of Commons during Prime Minister’s Questions.

Mr Percy, who is the co-Chair of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Antisemitism, said: “Sadly, in my role as chair of the all-party group against antisemitism, the news is not so positive. We have recently heard from Jewish students who are suffering record antisemitic attacks on university campuses, including allegations of their work being marked down by their own professors. This is completely outrageous, and one would expect the National Union of Students to be on their side, but instead of helping the students it has been inviting somebody who is engaged in antisemitic conspiracy theories—a rapper—to a conference. Will the Prime Minister do everything in his power to ensure that campuses are a safe place for British Jewish students?”

Mr Johnson responded: “Our universities have, for far too long, been tolerant of casual or indeed systematic antisemitism. I hope that everybody understands the need for change—for rapid and irreversible change—but it is also important that we have an antisemitism taskforce devoted to rooting out antisemitism in education at all levels.”

We commend Mr Percy for drawing attention to this issue, and the Prime Minister for his commitment to tackling the problem.

The exchange comes shortly after Campaign Against Antisemitism published polling in its latest Antisemitism Barometer showing that a staggering 92% of British Jews believe that antisemitism in universities is a problem.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Following the revelation by LBC’s Theo Usherwood that the rapper Kareem Dennis, known as Lowkey, would be headlining the National Union of Students’ (NUS) centenary conference, Campaign Against Antisemitism and other Jewish groups expressed outrage that a union meant to represent all students, including Jews, would consider the inflammatory activist to be a suitable keynote speaker. NUS has now reportedly confirmed that Mr Dennis will not be appearing at the conference.

Mr Dennis is a patron of the Palestine Solidarity Campaign (PSC). A month-long investigation by Campaign Against Antisemitism in 2017 exposed extensive antisemitic bigotry amongst PSC supporters on social media. Mr Dennis has previously described Israel as a “racist endeavour” in direct and deliberate contravention of the International Definition of Antisemitismdescribed Zionism as “antisemitic”, spoken of the “Zionist lobby” in the context of global capitalism, has reportedly backed the disgraced former Labour MP Chris Williamsondefended the disgraced academic David Miller, and has repeatedly supported the antisemite Jeremy Corbyn.

More recently, Mr Dennis has reportedly claimed that the “mainstream media” has “weaponised the Jewish heritage” of Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy to “stave off” inquiries about far-right groups in Ukraine. He has also appeared on the disgraced former MP Chris Williamson’s show on Press TV, an Iranian state-owned news network whose British broadcasting licence was revoked by Ofcom in 2012. Mr Dennis has appeared alongside the disgraced academic David Miller.

When Jewish students raised concerns about the choice of act for the union’s conference, NUS reportedly advised them that they could use an “existing safe space” which was to be “designated for students who are sensitive to loud noise” during Mr Dennis’ performance. In response to worries about how Jewish students would react if the performance went ahead, NUS reportedly replied that it was more concerned about the reaction from other students if it were cancelled.

However, after pressure, NUS insisted that Mr Dennis would only be headlining the “Liberation Conference”, due to run for two days immediately following the National Conference and intended to “bring together Black*, Disabled, LGBT+, Trans and Women Students together to build communities of activists and plan our campaigning work.” After further pressure, NUS has reportedly removed Ms Dennis from the programme completely.

The controversial Labour Party MP, Zarah Sultana, will still be appearing at NUS’s National Conference. Labour has yet to investigate an outstanding complaint against Ms Sultana by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

When Mr Dennis’ appearance was first publicised, Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “NUS knows exactly what it is doing by headlining Lowkey. He has previously described Israel as a ‘racist endeavour’ in direct and deliberate contravention of the International Definition of Antisemitism, described Zionism as ‘antisemitic’, spoken of the ‘Zionist lobby’ in the context of global capitalism, reportedly backed the disgraced former Labour MP Chris Williamson and has repeatedly supported the antisemite Jeremy Corbyn as well as Jew-baiting conspiracists including David Miller.

“Headlining such a person is bad enough, but telling appalled Jews to go and stand in the corner whilst everyone else dances is segregationist and disgusting. Instead of showing solidarity with Jews, NUS is literally casting Jews aside. This is sickening hypocrisy from a union that proclaims itself to be ‘anti-racist’.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expressed outrage after it was reported that the National Union of Students (NUS) responded to Jewish complaints about an inflammatory rapper headlining the union’s centenary conference by suggesting that the Jewish students literally segregate themselves.

Jewish students reportedly expressed concern after learning that the rapper Kareem Dennis, known as Lowkey, would be headlining a conference of a union ostensibly meant to represent them.

Mr Dennis is a patron of the Palestine Solidarity Campaign (PSC). A month-long investigation by Campaign Against Antisemitism in 2017 exposed extensive antisemitic bigotry amongst PSC supporters on social media. Mr Dennis has previously described Israel as a “racist endeavour” in direct and deliberate contravention of the International Definition of Antisemitismdescribed Zionism as “antisemitic”, spoken of the “Zionist lobby” in the context of global capitalism, has reportedly backed the disgraced former Labour MP Chris Williamsondefended the disgraced academic David Miller, and has repeatedly supported the antisemite Jeremy Corbyn.

More recently, Mr Dennis has reportedly claimed that the “mainstream media” has “weaponised the Jewish heritage” of Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy to “stave off” inquiries about far-right groups in Ukraine. He has also appeared on the disgraced former MP Chris Williamson’s show on Press TV, an Iranian state-owned news network whose British broadcasting licence was revoked by Ofcom in 2012. The disgraced academic David Miller has appeared alongside Mr Dennis.

When Jewish students raised concerns about the choice of act for the union’s conference, NUS reportedly advised them that they could use an “existing safe space” which was to be “designated for students who are sensitive to loud noise” during Mr Dennis’ performance. In response to worries about how Jewish students would react if the performance went ahead, NUS reportedly replied that it was more concerned about the reaction from other students if it were cancelled.

The controversial Labour Party MP, Zarah Sultana, will also be appearing at the event, it has been reported. Labour has yet to investigate an outstanding complaint against Ms Sultana by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

 Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “NUS knows exactly what it is doing by headlining Lowkey. He has previously described Israel as a ‘racist endeavour’ in direct and deliberate contravention of the International Definition of Antisemitism, described Zionism as ‘antisemitic’, spoken of the ‘Zionist lobby’ in the context of global capitalism, reportedly backed the disgraced former Labour MP Chris Williamson and has repeatedly supported the antisemite Jeremy Corbyn as well as Jew-baiting conspiracists including David Miller.

“Headlining such a person is bad enough, but telling appalled Jews to go and stand in the corner whilst everyone else dances is segregationist and disgusting. Instead of showing solidarity with Jews, NUS is literally casting Jews aside. This is sickening hypocrisy from a union that proclaims itself to be ‘anti-racist’.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

The University of Reading has reportedly adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Late last year, a spokesperson, when asked why the University had not yet adopted the Definition, said that the University “takes an active and vocal lead in countering racism and discrimination,” and that a working group considering the findings of a race equality review conducted in May was due to report at the end of 2021.

The adoption comes as Campaign Against Antisemitism publishes polling in its latest Antisemitism Barometer showing that a staggering 92% of British Jews believe that antisemitism in universities is a problem.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

The University of Wisconsin-Madison has released a statement condemning antisemitism.

The statement comes after several recent incidents, including swastika graffiti found in the bathrooms in University accommodation; public harassment in which antisemitic slurs were allegedly shouted at a student on Langdon Street, where many of the University’s fraternity houses and student residences are located; and a student who claims to have been harassed for their supposedly “Jewish” appearance.

These are not the only incidents to have taken place on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus, however. Recent years have seen University authorities investigate several instances of antisemitic graffiti on campus, including one occasion in which the University of Wisconsin Police Department is reported to have investigated antisemitic graffiti on the popular Robert E. Gard Storyteller’s Circle, and another where neo-Nazi symbols were daubed in green paint on the walls of a University bookstore.

In their statement, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Lori Reesor and Chief Diversity Officer LaVar Charleston said: “Antisemitism is wrong and it will not be tolerated at UW-Madison. We are working to support all community members and increasing our educational efforts to prevent bias incidents from happening in the future. We are committed to creating a campus where everyone feels valued and knows they belong.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The University of South Florida (USF) has temporarily suspended one of its fraternities amid antisemitism allegations.

The news comes shortly after the University released a statement condemning alleged antisemitic behaviour from its students.

One reported incident included the drawing of a swastika on the head of the Jewish fraternity pledge by members of the senior leadership of the Pi Kappa Phi fraternity.

The statement also reported a social media post minimising the Holocaust.

The letter, sent by Dean Danielle McDonald, said that “Actions such as these are reprehensible and deserve our condemnation,” adding that “Student Conduct and Ethical Development (SCED) is investigating and will act in accordance with the due process standards outlined in the Student Code of Conduct.”

“USF embraces and celebrates diversity in all its forms. Antisemitism, racism, hate, and prejudice have no place here. We remain strong and united in our commitment to the Principles of Community in our pursuit of excellence,” Dean McDonald added.

Pi Kappa Phi’s suspension is to be reviewed tomorrow at an Informational Meeting between the fraternity’s President and a Hearing Officer.

The fraternity also released a statement on Instagram in which they denied that an antisemitic post was made by a member of the group and that the antisemitic action in question, in which a swastika was drawn on a Jewish fraternity pledge, was carried out by a “non-member guest”. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: StopAntisemitism.org

The University of South Florida (USF) has released a statement condemning alleged antisemitic behaviour from its students.

One reported incident included the drawing of a swastika on the head of the Jewish fraternity pledge by members of the senior leadership of the Pi Kappa Phi fraternity.

The statement also reported a social media post minimising the Holocaust.

The letter, sent by Dean Danielle McDonald, said that “Actions such as these are reprehensible and deserve our condemnation,” adding that “Student Conduct and Ethical Development (SCED) is investigating and will act in accordance with the due process standards outlined in the Student Code of Conduct.”

“USF embraces and celebrates diversity in all its forms. Antisemitism, racism, hate, and prejudice have no place here. We remain strong and united in our commitment to the Principles of Community in our pursuit of excellence,” Dean McDonald added.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: StopAntisemitism.org