The Government has reportedly demanded an investigation into the election of the new President of the National Union of Students (NUS) over an alleged failure to commit to the International Definition of Antisemitism.

According to the JC, Universities Minister Michelle Donelan has written to Civica Election Services, which ran the recent election that was won by the controversial activist Shaima Dallali, despite her history of antisemitic tweets and other inflammatory social media posts. Prior to the election, Ms Dallali apologised for one such tweet, but later told The Guardian that it is “absolutely not true” that “I don’t like Jewish people,” nevertheless, “as a black Muslim woman, it [the allegation] is something that I expected.”

The Minister has called for an investigation by Civica on the basis that Rule 8 of NUS’s “core rules” states that any candidate for office “must have a commitment to anti-racism…and antisemitism as per the IHRA [International] definition”. In the past, Ms Dallali has campaigned against the International Definition of Antisemitism at City University London, where she also served as President of the Students’ Union.

The move comes just after the Government announced that it is sanctioning NUS, removing it from all official groups and committees and refusing to engage with it, which came following calls for such measures by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others in the Jewish community. Last month, for example, Robert Halfon MP wrote together with Campaign Against Antisemitism to the Charity Commission calling for an investigation into the union’s charitable arm. The full dossier on NUS, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, can be read here. The Government has now also added its voice to calls for an investigation by the Charity Commission. Campaign Against Antisemitism also made representations to the Government on the matter, including at a campus antisemitism summit organised by Education Secretary Nadhim Zahawi. In addition to Campaign Against Antisemitism, UJS, CST and others have also called for action.

The Government’s announcement came after a string of controversies surrounding NUS and its leadership, including over Jewish opposition to an appearance by the rapper Kareen Dennis, known as Lowkey, at NUS’s centenary conference. The outgoing NUS President, Larissa Kennedy, has now insisted that claims that she suggested that Jewish students who were uncomfortable with the performance could self-segregate in an area intended for those who do not like loud music are false.

After the numerous controversies, NUS announced that it was launching an independent investigation into antisemitism in the organisation, which would be at least the third in two decades after similar investigations in 2005 and 2017. NUS has now announced that the new investigation will be led by Rebecca Tuck QC.

In recent weeks, over twenty former NUS Presidents wrote a letter expressing their “serious concerns about antisemitism”, and another letter, organised by UJS and signed by over 1,000 Jewish students and allies, called for NUS to launch its ‘independent’ investigation.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

It has been reported that the Goldsmiths, University of London Students’ Union has refused to investigate its President following allegations of antisemitism, despite being requested to do so by the University.

Sara Bafo, the President of the Students’ Union at Goldsmiths, is alleged to have tweeted: “D*vid H*rsch is a far right white supremacist. All you have to do is read his work and tweets and that’s all the confirmation needed.” 

Ms Bafo’s alleged tweet was said to have been written in response to a tweet from Prof. Hirsch, a prominent and highly-respected antisemitism expert, which said: “There is an antisemitic edge to official, institutional, university campaigns to ‘decolonise’ education.”

Yesterday, a spokesperson for the University said that on 10th May, it had requested the Union to investigate whether online messages that had been posted were “antisemitic in nature,” adding: “Goldsmiths Students’ Union is an independent charity which has its own policies and processes for investigating and we expect them to follow these. Goldsmiths remains committed to supporting all members of our inclusive community and demonstrating there is no place for prejudice on our campus.”

In response to the request for the investigation, Ms Bafo tweeted that the University “has tried to get the SU trustee board to investigate me for a tweet I made in response to a Zionist Goldsmiths academic’s explicit racist history & his delegitimisation of ‘Decolonisation’ campaigns,” adding: “This was a dirty tactic from the institution to silence me further as I was leaving.”

Larissa Kennedy, President of the embattled National Union of Students (NUS), came to the defence of Ms Bafo, describing the call for an investigation as a “disgusting move” before labelling it “concerted suppression” and offering “Masses of solidarity to @SaraBafo1”.

However, it has been reported this afternoon that the request for the investigation has been denied on grounds of “free speech”.

Ed Nedjari, Head of the Student’s Union, reportedly said: “Goldsmiths Student Union is an independent charity that believes in justice and inclusivity, as well as freedom of expression. In her tweets, Sara was expressing her opinion about David Hirsh, formed via the experience of attending his lectures as a Black Muslim student.

“Sara’s term as SU President has ended. For that reason – but most importantly, because her comments are protected as free speech – we won’t be investigating this matter retrospectively.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]mitism.org.

Following a string of controversies surrounding the National Union of Students (NUS) and its leadership, the Government has decided to sanction the organisation, removing it from all official groups and committees and refusing to engage with it. The move follows calls for the measures by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others.

A Government announcement said that “NUS will be removed from all Department for Education groups and replaced with alternative student representation…The Department for Education has also confirmed that the NUS will not receive any government funding…The allegations of antisemitism, which have been well-documented and span several years, have prompted a feeling of insecurity amongst Jewish students across the country and a worry systemic antisemitism within the organisation is not being properly addressed.”

The news comes despite NUS promising to ‘independently’ investigate itself in the wake of numerous antisemitism scandals. In one recent scandal, the rapper Kareem Dennis, known as Lowkey, was due to headline NUS’s centenary conference. After initially dismissing the concerns of Jewish students and telling them to stand in a segregation away from Mr Dennis, the union came under media scrutiny and eventually Mr Dennis withdrew from the event.

This scandal was immediately followed by the election of Shaima Dallali as NUS’s new President, despite her history of antisemitic tweets and other inflammatory social media posts. Prior to the election, she apologised for one such tweet, but later told The Guardian that it is “absolutely not true” that “I don’t like Jewish people,” nevertheless, “as a black Muslim woman, it [the allegation] is something that I expected.”

In a tweet about the new sanctions, Michelle Donelan, Minister of State for Higher Education, wrote: “Enough is enough. I’ve prepared a package of sanctions against NUS following concerning incidents over many years. Disappointed it has come to this but proud to stand up for Jewish students. NUS will not have a seat at the table until we see real change.”

In a tweet backing his colleague, Nadhim Zahawi, Secretary of State for Education, wrote: “Jewish students need to have confidence that they are being represented, and student bodies must speak fairly for everyone. This will remain until issues are suitably addressed.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The Government has taken a firm stand shoulder to shoulder with Jewish students and the Jewish community at large after years of antisemitism scandals at NUS. We have found the Government to be very receptive to the concerns that we and others have expressed and these sanctions are precisely the measures that we had hoped to see implemented. We will now see whether these sanctions jolt NUS into action, or consign it to irrelevance. Student organisations are supposed to be filled with voices of hope, not bigotry. Those at NUS who have allowed matters to degenerate this far should be deeply ashamed that it has come to this.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism and others had been calling for the measures. Last month, Robert Halfon MP wrote together with Campaign Against Antisemitism to the Charity Commission calling for an investigation into the union’s charitable arm. The full dossier on NUS, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, can be read here. The Government has now also added its voice to calls for an investigation by the Charity Commission.

Campaign Against Antisemitism also made representations to the Government on the matter, including at a campus antisemitism summit organised by Mr Zahawi. In addition to Campaign Against Antisemitism, UJS, CST and others have also called for action.

In recent weeks, over twenty former NUS Presidents wrote a letter expressing their “serious concerns about antisemitism”, and another letter, organised by the Union of Jewish Students (UJS) and signed by over 1,000 Jewish students and allies, called for NUS to launch its ‘independent’ investigation.

In a statement NUS repeated its assurance that it would undertake its own investigation and lamented that “the universities minister [sic] has press released that they will be disengaging with NUS rather than seeking to engage with us directly.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to the University of Leeds to point out that its website links to a Twitter account with numerous tweets that breach the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Ray Bush, who holds the Emeritus Professor of African Studies and Development Politics, has a profile page  on the University’s website that links to his Twitter account.

Last year, Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to the University regarding Prof. Bush, who was then a Professor of African Studies and Development Politics. Prof. Bush appeared to have tweeted from the Twitter handle “@raymondobush” a large number of tweets that breach the Definition.

There were three types of breaches.

First, the tweets stated that Israel’s existence itself is unacceptable, using the exact language of the Definition in referring to Jewish self-determination as “a racist endeavour”. The Definition states that “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour)” is antisemitic. This claim was repeated on numerous occasions:

  • “#DefyIHRA the state of #Israel is a #racist endeavour” 
  • “#defyIHRA the state of Israel is a racist endeavour. The IHRA definition of antisemitism is a threat to free expression | Ash Sarkar https://theguardian.com/commentisfree/”
  • “#racistendeavour #warcrimes #Israel join the dots and understand why Israel is a zionist entity and settler colonial regime that exists solely because of US money and European guilt. #endtheoccupation”
  • “#Labourparty #NEC big mistake with #IHRA #Israel is a racist endeavour and what about other discrimination? Is NEC recognising defined discrimination and racism of #BAME ? #Corbyn got outflanked by #Zionists time to recalibrate and take offensive against occupation of #Palestine”
  • “So, @Keir_Starmer prefers a #LabourParty without @RLong_Bailey. Shane [sic] on him and all the other #labourparty members failing to recognise #zionism as a pernicious #racist ideology promoted by zealots to dehumanise #Palestinians” 
  • “So it continues, use an anti Semite smear, stop progressive politics #Zionism is #racism amongst other things ….”
  • “Of course @MarkSerwotka is right #Israel #hasbara #zionism #racism”

Second, the tweets breached the Definition by comparing Israelis and Zionists to Nazis. According to the Definition: “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is antisemitic. For example, the following was tweeted:

  • “Does it take a nazi to recognise a #nazi #Israel #racism ?”
  • #nazi-zionistalliance #zionism #settlercolonialism hold onto power whoever you align with”

Third, the tweets contravened the Definition by claiming that concerns about institutional antisemitism in the Labour Party, which were vindicated by the report of the Equality and Human Rights Commission, were due to a campaign run by the “Israeli embassy.” The tweets thus supported one of the oldest tropes used to justify acts of antisemitism: the discredited myth of a Jewish conspiracy in which Jews are disloyal and act as a fifth column against the interests of their home countries. The Definition states that: “Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as a collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions” is antisemitic. This was done in tweets including:

  • “The reason they hate Corbyn of course is because he is anti #Zionist and the antisemitic campaign is ran by the #Israeli embassy among others
  • “Always rely on @guardian to get it right on #antisemitism thanks for all your help demonising #Corbyn and #Labour the #Israeli embassy will be delighted. Who is next in your mediocre target?”

The University acknowledged receipt of our letter and pledged to revert to us, but not only did the institution fail to do so, but there is no evidence that any investigation into Prof. Bush and the Twitter account bearing his name ever took place. In the meantime, Prof. Bush has retired, and now holds the prestigious position of Emeritus Professor, which means that he is still connected to the University, and the University’s website links to his offending Twitter account.

Neither the University of Leeds nor Prof. Bush responded to requests for comment when approached in April.

As we recently observed, the University’s apparent failure to take any meaningful action against a professor with a record of tweets that breach the Definition laid bare the emptiness of its adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Not only did the University of Leeds apparently fail to take any meaningful action against a professor whose twitter handle appeared to post tweets in breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism, which the University has adopted, but the offending twitter handle is still linked to by the University’s website page. It is bad enough not to apply the Definition when a complaint is made, but it is altogether worse for the University’s official platforms to link to material in breach of the Definition. It is difficult to see how the adoption was anything but a tick-box exercise.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

It has been reported that a student at Temple University in Philadelphia is suing the University after she claimed that administrators did not do enough after she made her complaint about her roommate’s antisemitism.

Sasha Westrick, 18, alleges that Temple rejected her complaints about her roommate’s alleged repeated antisemitic outbursts. They included abuse over the social media platform Snapchat, in which Ms Westrick was sent an image of herself with the caption “I hate Jews” underneath.

Ms Westrick was given the alleged perpetrator as a roommate during the autumn 2021 semester because they were both on the rowing team. However, their relationship quickly soured, with the roommate allegedly mocking Ms Westrick for the way she was dressed before attending a Shabbat dinner. The roommate then asked Ms Westrick for money on the grounds that all Jews are wealthy. It is also alleged that Westrick’s other roommate participated in the antisemitic bullying.

Though the University acknowledged in a written statement that the roommate did indeed make antisemitic remarks, Ms Westrick claims that the administration did nothing to help her.

Ms Westrick’s lawyer, Robert Mozenter, said in a press release that his client was “being bullied by two of her roommates and crew teammates and Temple University did nothing to help her and eventually used the University’s own policies and procedures to make Sasha’s situation worse.”

In a statement, a spokesperson for Temple University said: “Temple University is aware of the lawsuit filed by Sasha Westrick. We disagree with the manner in which much of the information in the complaint is presented and characterised. We will respond at the appropriate time through the legal process. While the University does not ordinarily comment on pending litigation, we can say that Temple fully investigated, reviewed and addressed this matter pursuant to University policies, and appropriate remedies were implemented.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Pulitzer prize-winning author Alice Walker, who has previously garnered media attention for her inflammatory comments and support for conspiracy theories, is set to speak at San Diego Community College for the investiture ceremony for its new chancellor.

Ms Walker won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1983 for her novel The Colour Purple. She is, however, also known to have made inflammatory comments about Jews, one example of which can be seen in her poem “To Study the Talmud”. Excerpts from Ms Walker’s poem reads:

“Are Goyim (us) meant to be slaves of Jews, and not only
“That, but to enjoy it?
“Are three year old (and a day) girls eligible for marriage and intercourse?
“Are young boys fair game for rape?
“Must even the best of the Goyim (us, again) be killed?”

While also receiving little scrutiny from the press about her views due to the forthcoming publication of her journals, Ms Walker has been asked to speak at the investiture of San Diego Community College’s new chancellor, Carlos O. Cortez.

Ms Walker has also voiced her support for the antisemitic hate preacher David Icke, citing with approval his books Human Race Get off Your Knees: The Lion Sleeps No More, which states that the world is secretly run by shape-shifting reptilian humanoids and “Rothschild Zionists”, and And the Truth Shall Set You Free, which promotes the antisemitic conspiracy theories contained in The Protocols of the Elders of Zion and questions whether the Holocaust happened.

The author reportedly described Mr Icke’s work as “a curious person’s dream come true” and denied that there was anything antisemitic or anti-Jewish about its content.

Mr Icke uses social media, his books and his stage performances to incite hatred. His preaching is so absurd that since the 1990s he has been dismissed as a crank, but because he is dismissed, there has been no major opposition to him and he has built up a following of thousands upon thousands of disciples whom he has persuaded to adamantly believe that the world is in the grip of a conspiracy run by the “Rothschild Zionists”. His repertoire includes conspiracy myths and tropes classified as antisemitic according to the International Definition of Antisemitism, adopted by the British Government. Campaign Against Antisemitism has successfully persuaded some venues to pull out of hosting his events.

After years of pressure from Campaign Against Antisemitism, Mr Icke was banned from most social media platforms.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Rutgers University and local police are investigating a series of antisemitic incidents involving a fraternity at the University.

Members of the Alpha Epsilon Pi fraternity were commemorating Yom HaShoah, Holocaust Remembrance Day, in their annual 24-hour-long event, which involved reading the names of people who were murdered during the Holocaust, when they were reportedly pelted with eggs.

This closely follows a separate apparently antisemitic incident that took place a few days before, when several cars full of people carrying and waving Palestinian flags stopped outside the fraternity’s residence on Sicard Street, shouting antisemitic remarks, spitting, and throwing things at the house.

The latter incident apparently took place after a local chapter of Students for Justice in Palestine held a “Defend Al-Aqsa, Defend Palestine” rally. The perpetrators are reported to have called fraternity members “baby killers” and “terrorists”.

Rutgers University-New Brunswick Chancellor-Provost, Francine Conway, sent a letter to Rutgers students and faculty about the incident, saying: “Initial representations regarding the incident are disturbing. We understand and are sensitive to the concerns of those who were targeted, and stand by our Jewish students, faculty and staff. Harassment based on religious belief, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, or for any reason, is antithetical to our values at Rutgers University.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

It has been reported that an Oregon university that fired a Jewish professor after he accused its president of making antisemitic remarks violated the professor’s academic freedom.

Linfield University in McMinnville, 38 miles south of Portland, fired English professor Daniel Pollack-Pelzner in 2021 after he accused president Miles K. Davis of making comments about the supposed size of Jewish noses and jokes about sending Jews to gas chambers. Prof Pollack-Pelzner also suggested that the university had covered up reports of swastika graffiti and other instances of hate speech, as well as sexual assault allegations.

Prof Pollack-Pelzner also recalls not only that President Davis withheld his reports, fearing that they would bring the University into disrepute and accusing Prof Pollack-Pelzner of “harbouring a secret agenda to grab power”, but that the President warned of “disloyalty from within” in a meeting. Prof Pollack-Pelzner also claims that President Davis said that “people like him were destroying Linfield University from within”.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy or of Jews controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions” is an example of antisemitism.

The American Association of University Professors (AAUP) has now decided that Linfield violated Prof Pollack-Pelzner’s academic freedom when they fired him, stating that the University “contributed to a culture of abuse” in the way it treated the professor.

The AAUP report holds that Linfield forced Prof Pollack-Pelzner out of his job and ensured he was unable to use his e-mail account without holding an initial disciplinary hearing (a requirement for charges against a tenured professor).

Linfield University itself did not take part in the AAUP investigation, and university spokespeople indicated in their interactions with faculty and local media that they did not accept the report’s allegations and were ready to fight them in court.

Prof Pollack-Pelzner is now reportedly a visiting scholar at Portland State University.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The emptiness of the University of Leeds’ adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism has been laid bare, after the institution failed to take any meaningful action against a professor with a record of tweets that breach the Definition.

Last year, Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to the University regarding Ray Bush, who was then a Professor of African Studies and Development Politics. Prof. Bush appeared to have tweeted from the Twitter handle “@raymondobush” a large number of tweets that breach the Definition. Prof. Bush’s profile page on the University’s website links to the offending Twitter handle.

There were three types of breaches.

First, the tweets stated that Israel’s existence itself is unacceptable, using the exact language of the Definition in referring to Jewish self-determination as “a racist endeavour”. The Definition states that “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour)” is antisemitic. This claim was repeated on numerous occasions:

  • “#DefyIHRA the state of #Israel is a #racist endeavour” 
  • “#defyIHRA the state of Israel is a racist endeavour. The IHRA definition of antisemitism is a threat to free expression | Ash Sarkar https://theguardian.com/commentisfree/”
  • “#racistendeavour #warcrimes #Israel join the dots and understand why Israel is a zionist entity and settler colonial regime that exists solely because of US money and European guilt. #endtheoccupation”
  • “#Labourparty #NEC big mistake with #IHRA #Israel is a racist endeavour and what about other discrimination? Is NEC recognising defined discrimination and racism of #BAME ? #Corbyn got outflanked by #Zionists time to recalibrate and take offensive against occupation of #Palestine”
  • “So, @Keir_Starmer prefers a #LabourParty without @RLong_Bailey. Shane [sic] on him and all the other #labourparty members failing to recognise #zionism as a pernicious #racist ideology promoted by zealots to dehumanise #Palestinians” 
  • “So it continues, use an anti Semite smear, stop progressive politics #Zionism is #racism amongst other things ….”
  • “Of course @MarkSerwotka is right #Israel #hasbara #zionism #racism”

Second, the tweets breached the Definition by comparing Israelis and Zionists to Nazis. According to the Definition: “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is antisemitic. For example, the following was tweeted:

  • “Does it take a nazi to recognise a #nazi #Israel #racism ?”
  • #nazi-zionistalliance #zionism #settlercolonialism hold onto power whoever you align with”

Third, the tweets contravened the Definition by claiming that concerns about institutional antisemitism in the Labour Party, which were vindicated by the report of the Equality and Human Rights Commission, were due to a campaign run by the “Israeli embassy.” The tweets thus supported one of the oldest tropes used to justify acts of antisemitism: the discredited myth of a Jewish conspiracy in which Jews are disloyal and act as a fifth column against the interests of their home countries. The Definition states that: “Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as a collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions” is antisemitic. This was done in tweets including:

  • “The reason they hate Corbyn of course is because he is anti #Zionist and the antisemitic campaign is ran by the #Israeli embassy among others
  • “Always rely on @guardian to get it right on #antisemitism thanks for all your help demonising #Corbyn and #Labour the #Israeli embassy will be delighted. Who is next in your mediocre target?”

The University acknowledged receipt of our letter and pledged to revert to us, but not only did the institution fail to do so, but there is no evidence that any investigation into Prof. Bush and the Twitter account bearing his name ever took place. In the meantime, Prof. Bush has retired, and now holds the prestigious position of Emeritus Professor of African Studies and Development Politics, which means that he is still connected to the University. Indeed, his profile page on the University’s website links to his offending Twitter account.

Neither the University of Leeds nor Prof. Bush responded to requests for comment.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We have always been clear that adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism is only a first step. What is vital is that universities actually apply the Definition when allegations of antisemitism arise. In this case, not only has the University of Leeds apparently failed to do so, but there is no indication that it launched any investigation at all. Instead, it has allowed Ray Bush to retire quietly and assume the prestigious position of emeritus professor, while continuing to advertise the offending Twitter account on its website.

“These tweets are clearly in breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism. Anyone airing and disseminating dangerous antisemitic views is not fit to be entrusted with the responsibility of teaching young people. For this reason, it was important for the matter to be properly investigated and for consequences to follow. Leeds missed this opportunity to demonstrate that it takes the safety of its Jewish students seriously. Now, the University must explain why it failed to take action.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

The incoming President of the National Union of Students (NUS) has again stirred controversy, claiming in an interview published today that, although it is “absolutely not true” that “I don’t like Jewish people,” nevertheless, “as a black Muslim woman, it [the allegation] is something that I expected.”

Shaima Dallali’s comments were reported in The Guardian, which interviewed the union’s already embattled President-elect.

Last week, NUS announced that it was launching an independent investigation into antisemitism, including allegations facing Ms Dallali. Ms Dallali, 27, told the newspaper that “The investigation is the right thing to do,” adding: “I know quite a few Jewish students feel alienated. This is the first step to start bridging the gap and reaching out to Jewish students and ensuring that Jewish students feel like they have a place in NUS, so I do welcome it.”

Ms Dallali, who has a history of inflammatory tweets, including one for which she apologised, reportedly compared herself to a notorious former NUS President, Malia Bouattia. According to the newspaper, Ms Dallali said that “the backlash against her election was part of pattern, seen with previous student leaders including Malia Bouattia, who in 2016 became the first black Muslim woman to become NUS president.”

“Unfortunately, as a black Muslim woman, it is something that I expected because I’ve seen it happen to other black Muslim women when they take up positions in the student union or the NUS, where they are attacked based on their political beliefs or their pro-Palestinian stance,” Ms Dallali said.

She also claimed that she had received a lot of racist and anti-Muslim abuse online: “I’ve had private messages of people calling me a raghead, people telling me to go and kill myself, calling me a Jew hater and an antisemite. That has been difficult to read. And so many threats as well – if I continue to do this then things will happen to me. I just try to delete, to block, I try not to let it get to my head. It’s something I receive every day and I’m continuing to receive. It’s affected me mentally and physically. Sometimes I don’t feel safe.”

Ms Bouattia was also investigated by NUS during her tenure and found to have made antisemitic statements, but no action was taken against her in what was one of many instances of the union appearing to brush racism against Jews under the carpet.

During her election campaign, Ms Dallali, who will assume her position as President in July, was forced to apologise for tweeting the words of an antisemitic chant. In 2012, during an escalation of tensions between Israel and the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group Hamas, Ms Dallali tweeted the words “Khaybar Khaybar, ya yahud, Jaish Muhammad, sa yahud.” Translated into English, this chant means “Jews, remember the battle of Khaybar, the army of Muhammad is returning.” It is a classic Arabic battle cry referencing the massacre and expulsion of the Jews of the town of Khaybar in northwestern Arabia, now Saudi Arabia, in the year 628 CE. She also had a history of other inflammatory tweets, and last week, it also emerged that Ms Dallali had been in a group shouting aggressively at Jewish students attending an Israel Society event at Kings College London in 2018, at which it was reported that the “Khaybar” chant was heard.

Ms Dallali reportedly told The Guardian that, as the newspaper put it, “Muslims were not allowed room for growth.” She said: “It genuinely is really difficult to have to see these horrible things being said about me. They are not true. This idea that I don’t like Jewish people, or I’m hateful towards the Jewish community is absolutely not true. During my time as a sabbatical officer, I’ve worked with the Jewish community to support them, for example to commemorate Holocaust memorial day. My door has always been open to all students regardless of who they are. I want to reiterate my willingness to work with Jewish students to combat antisemitism, to address their concerns. I want to represent all students and their concerns are important. I may at times disagree with people politically. Everyone has the right to have their own political ideas, but I don’t hate anyone. I definitely don’t hate the Jewish community. I do believe I can bridge the gap and build bridges.”

NUS’s announcement of an investigation into antisemitism came after Robert Halfon MP wrote together with Campaign Against Antisemitism to the Charity Commission calling for an investigation into the union’s charitable arm. The full dossier on NUS, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, can be read here.

In addition, over twenty former NUS Presidents wrote a letter expressing their “serious concerns about antisemitism”, and another letter, organised by the Union of Jewish Students (UJS) and signed by over 1,000 Jewish students and allies, called for NUS to launch an independent investigation.

The Universities Minister also called for an investigation into NUS by the Charity Commission, and it has been further suggested that the Government’s grant to NUS should be withdrawn, and that the Government should cease to recognise NUS as the voice of British students, if concerns over antisemitism are not addressed.

It has also been reported that the Department for Education is looking at its relationship with NUS and at its charitable status, after Education Secretary Nadhim Zahawi reportedly accused the union of “systemic antisemitism”.

The calls came following revelations about Ms Dallali and the recent Lowkey scandal, where Jewish concerns were reportedly brushed aside as the controversial rapper and activist was invited to headline the union’s centenary conference. He eventually withdrew as NUS came under media pressure.

After the circulation of the letter by former NUS Presidents, another letter has reportedly been published in support of Ms Dallali and calling for a simultaneous NUS investigation into Islamophobia and racist, as well as antisemitism.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Drew Matthews, a police officer at the University of Colorado Boulder has been put on administrative leave following accusations of racism and antisemitism.

Safe Access for Everyone (SAFE), which has been described as “an anti-police organisation”, found tweets allegedly posted by Mr Matthews under the account /u/BocoRam18 on the Boulder and CUBoulder subreddit boards, as well as on the ProtectandServe board for police officers, on which he reportedly verified his identity as a campus police officer.

According to SAFE, Mr Matthews is alleged to have compared a private business’ vaccine mandate to the Holocaust, reportedly writing: “If people told you to wear a star on your shirt you’d do it.” In a post referencing homeless people, Mr Matthews is claimed to have written: “I say call in fire with the police and just spray the hoses at them till they leave”. Mr Matthews also allegedly wrote, in another comment, that he stopped “every black male” at a house party that he broke up after receiving a report of sexual assault, where the suspect was black with an average height and build wearing a white T-shirt and jeans.

Mr Matthews was placed on paid administrative leave on 11th April due to allegedly “offensive and reprehensible” posts.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Following a string of controversies surrounding the National Union of Students (NUS) and its leadership, the union has called for an independent investigation into recent antisemitism allegations raised by concerned members of the Jewish community and its allies.

The announcement comes after Robert Halfon MP wrote together with Campaign Against Antisemitism to the Charity Commission calling for an investigation into the union’s charitable arm. The full dossier on NUS, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, can be read here. In addition, over twenty former NUS Presidents wrote a letter expressing their “serious concerns about antisemitism”, and another letter, organised by the Union of Jewish Students (UJS) and signed by over 1,000 Jewish students and allies, called for NUS to launch an independent investigation.

The Universities Minister also called for an investigation into NUS by the Charity Commission, and it has been further suggested that the Government’s grant to NUS should be withdrawn, and that the Government should cease to recognise NUS as the voice of British students, if concerns over antisemitism are not addressed.

In its statement today, NUS said that it is “very concerned about the pain and hurt being expressed” and has revealed that an independent investigation will be launched, which will “cover all public allegations made between March – April 2022 about NUS and the President Elect.” Regarding President-elect Shaima Dallali, the statement confirmed that the investigation would cover “a range of comments and actions that are alleged to have taken place over the last decade.”

It added that the investigation would also specifically examine the concern surrounding NUS’s booking of Lowkey for its centenary conference and would also include “a review of allegations of a wider culture of antisemitism within NUS.”  

NUS has said that the Union of Jewish Students (UJS) would be consulted in arranging the investigation and that regular meetings with UJS would be taking place.

The announcement comes in the wake of numerous controversies involving NUS. In one recent scandal, the rapper Kareem Dennis, known as Lowkey, was due to headline NUS’s centenary conference last month. After initially dismissing the concerns of Jewish students, who pointed out the rapper’s inflammatory record, the union came under media scrutiny and eventually Mr Dennis withdrew from the event. As the scandal erupted, Robert Halfon MP excoriated NUS for failing to send a representative to attend a hearing held by the Education Select Committee, which he chairs.

This scandal was immediately followed by the election of Shaima Dallali as NUS’s new President, despite her history of antisemitic tweets and other inflammatory social media posts. Prior to the election, she apologised for one such tweet.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Following a string of controversies surrounding the National Union of Students (NUS) and its leadership, over twenty former Presidents of the union have written to its current President to press her to deal with the concerns of Jewish students.

Signatories to the letter include Shadow Health Secretary Wes Streeting, former Foreign Secretary Jack Straw, former Education Secretary Charles Clarke, former Labour MP Stephen Twigg and columnist David Aaronovitch.

In their letter to current NUS President Larissa Kennedy, they express their “serious concerns about antisemitism”.

“We are writing to you privately as former presidents with serious concerns about antisemitism, the safety and treatment of Jewish students at NUS events and within your democracy, and the way in which NUS is responding to these concerns,” the letter says.

It is clear, the letter observes, that NUS has “a serious and significant problem.”

The letter comes as NUS faces scrutiny over its record in relation to Jewish students and amidst a series of controversies in connection with antisemitism. In one recent scandal, the rapper Kareem Dennis, known as Lowkey, was due to headline NUS’s centenary conference last month. After initially dismissing the concerns of Jewish students, who pointed out the rapper’s inflammatory record, the union came under media scrutiny and eventually Mr Dennis withdrew from the event. As the scandal erupted, Robert Halfon MP excoriated NUS for failing to send a representative to attend a hearing held by the Education Select Committee, which he chairs.

This scandal was immediately followed by the election of Shaima Dallali as NUS’s new President, despite her history of antisemitic tweets and other inflammatory social media posts. Prior to the election, she apologised for one such tweet.

Earlier this week, Mr Halfon wrote to the Charity Commission calling together with Campaign Against Antisemitism for a statutory inquiry into NUS. The full dossier on NUS, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, can be read here.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

The University of Essex has inexplicably determined that protestors who chanted the “from the river to the sea” slogan as part of campus anti-Israel protests were not engaging in antisemitic conduct.

The slogan was chanted by activists opposed to a speaking engagement in October 2021 at the University’s Conservative Society by the former head of British armed forces in Afghanistan, Col. Richard Kemp.

Joe Wigoder, a third year politics student at the University of Essex, lodged an official complaint with the University about the chanting outside the event, but his complaint was rejected. University Registrar and Secretary Bryn Morris, on behalf of the Office of the Vice-Chancellor, wrote in an e-mail to Mr Wigoder that “it was not found that antisemitic behaviour took place” during the protest, and that “no evidence was found that chants had been used to specifically deny the state of Israel…or express hatred of Jews.”

The chant of “From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free” only makes sense as a call for the destruction of the world’s only Jewish state — and its replacement with a State of Palestine — and is thus an attempt to deny Jews, uniquely, the right to self-determination, which is a breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Education Secretary Nadhim Zahawi has previously said that the slogan “from the river to the sea” is antisemitic and, given its popularity with Hamas and its supporters, its use could be reported to the police.

Mr Wigoder said: “It is incredibly disappointing to read this disheartening news and see the University yet again abandoning their promises to Jewish students. Time after time, the university attempts to sweep antisemitism under the rug, and it leaves us feeling completely unsafe on campus. I have been chasing this complaint for months and this is an upsetting conclusion.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

An investigation into the conduct of an Ohio State University professor who allegedly used an antisemitic slur in one of her classes has resulted in no long-term disciplinary consequences for the academic.

Jackie Buell, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences specialising in sports nutrition, was accused of using the phrase “Jew down” in an October 2021 class discussion about haggling over prices while making purchases in Mexico. The phrase alludes to an antisemitic stereotype of Jewish people as excessively frugal.

Though the University suspended Prof. Buell from teaching classes in the Spring 2022 semester and directed her to take anti-discrimination training for the next twelve months, the investigation found that she did not breach the University’s non-discrimination and harassment policy. Her conduct has instead been officially described as “inappropriate”.

The University’s Office of Institutional Equity reportedly found Prof. Buell’s behaviour “offensive, concerning and inappropriate,” but decided that her comments did not interfere with or deny any student’s ability to access educational facilities at the University.

Prof. Buell is expected to demonstrate a certain level of growth following her training before she is permitted to begin teaching again.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The Union of Jewish Students of France (UEJF) has condemned antisemitic messages discovered written in the bathroom of the law building at the Paris Nanterre University.

The graffiti includes a Star of David with “MEDIA” written on top, phrases such as “Hitler, you’re the best”, and other slogans that evoke the concept of Jewish control over the media.

“This antisemitism, unabashed, assumed, in front of thousands of students and in the total indifference, it is every day,” reported the UEJF president Samuel Lejoyeux to Le Figaro Étudiant. “It’s complicated to be a Jewish student…we are constantly brought back to the question of Israel, to the conspiracy that whites dominate everything, and that Jews are ‘super whites”.

“We condemn in the strongest terms and in an absolute manner”, responded Philippe Gervais-Lambony, president of the university “any antisemitic and racist act”. The university then reported that it was cleaning the graffiti and launching an investigation.

According to a survey commissioned by UEJF in 2019, 45% of Jewish and non-Jewish respondents have witnessed antisemitism at school.

In February, a report by France’s Jewish Community Security Service said that antisemitic incidents in France had skyrocketed by 75% in 2021.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Robert Halfon MP, Chair of the House of Commons Education Select Committee, has today written to the Charity Commission calling together with Campaign Against Antisemitism for a statutory inquiry into the National Union of Students (NUS).

In his letter, Mr Halfon wrote to “voice my dismay at the actions and behaviour of the National Union of Students and its trustees, in regards to their treatment of Jewish students and the Jewish community’s concerns regarding antisemitism. Together with Campaign Against Antisemitism…I politely request that the Commission launch a Section 46 inquiry, pursuant to the 2011 Charities Act into the NUS and look forward to receiving your response.”

Mr Halfon enclosed a dossier of evidence by Campaign Against Antisemitism detailing how NUS has failed Jewish students. He wrote that he is “particularly concerned about the enclosed dossier of antisemitic events that have taken place within the NUS over the past several years — and which come following decades of concerning trends — which was prepared by CAA.”

The full dossier on NUS, produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism, can be read below.

Mr Halfon made particular reference in his letter to the recent scandal involving the rapper Kareem Dennis, known as Lowkey, who was due to headline NUS’s centenary conference last month. After initially dismissing the concerns of Jewish students, who pointed out the rapper’s inflammatory record, the union came under media scrutiny and eventually Mr Dennis withdrew from the event.

As the scandal erupted, Mr Halfon excoriated NUS for failing to send a representative to attend a hearing held by his committee.

This scandal was immediately followed by the election of Shaima Dallali as NUS’s new President, despite her history of antisemitic tweets and other inflammatory social media posts. Prior to the election, she apologised for one such tweet.

As the dossier produced by Campaign Against Antisemitism observes, “Despite [its] ostensible and much-vaunted commitment to anti-racism, NUS has a long record of controversy in relation to Jewish students and antisemitism, dating back decades.

The dossier notes that antisemitism on campus has surged to record levels, with CST recording a 191% increase in antisemitic incidents on campus in 2021, and that Campaign Against Antisemitism’s latest Antisemitism Barometer found that an overwhelming 92% of British Jews believe that antisemitism in universities is a problem.

“NUS’s blind spot when it comes to inclusion of Jewish students and openness to their concerns is significant, giving rise not only to a failure of representation but also to a toleration of hostility to the needs of Jewish students within NUS and even instances of outright antisemitism. The result is tangible harm to Jewish students,” the dossier explains. “As an organisation, NUS is failing in its objective to represent and advocate for all students, and, as a charity, it is failing to act for the benefit of the public.”

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Shaima Dallali’s election as NUS President only a week after the Lowkey scandal is the last straw. It follows decades of similar indications that this union does not even aspire to represent Jewish students. At a time of surging racism against Jews on campus and almost universal concern in the Jewish community about antisemitism in universities, we are grateful to Robert Halfon for referring NUS to the Charity Commission for a statutory inquiry on the strength of our dossier of evidence. NUS must now answer for failing to represent Jewish students and failing to live up to its legal commitment to act for the public benefit.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Students’ unions at Lancaster University and Durham University have taken action to sustain pressure on the National Union of Students (NUS) after a series of scandals rocked the national student body.

In an open letter to the NUS leadership this week, the Lancaster University Students’ Union said that it was “deeply disappointed and hurt by the way the Jewish community have been engaged with and treated this year,” making specific reference to the recent scandal involving the inflammatory rapper and activity Kareem Dennis, known as Lowkey.

The letter went on to say that “Our Jewish students have legitimate issues and questions about decisions made by the NUS leadership, which we feel need to be addressed,” in regard to the Lowkey affair, in which the controversial figure was invited to headline the NUS’s centenary conference and the concerns of Jewish students’ were dismissed before media pressure brought about Mr Dennis’ withdrawal from the event.

The letter further noted that “NUS has an uncomfortable history with antisemitism,” and that it is “disconcerting” that individuals who have in the past been “embroiled in allegations of antisemitism” and were disqualified from office “ever felt welcome at all.”

Observing that “Antisemitism is a major issue within the student movement” and that NUS “keep[s] failing the Jewish community,” the letter lamented that “Too many Jewish activists have been pushed out of the student movement, from fear, anxiety, hostility, an environment that encourages antisemitic dialogue, and blatant antisemitic comments and/or actions.”

“The Jewish community,” the letter continued, “has been let down time and time again,” and its authors “look forward to seeing a clear communication of the changes you will make,” as “the Lancaster University Students’ Union Full Time Officer team will not sit back and watch the community go through endless trauma caused by NUS.”

Meanwhile, at Durham University, the Students’ Union put out a statement at the end of March affirming that “Jewish students have legitimate questions about decisions made by NUS in planning their National Conference, and the poor response that came when those decisions were challenged. There has been, unambiguously, a failure to recognise the risk and the reality of antisemitism.”

The statement insisted that “We can only bring about the changes we want to education and society if we do it collectively, through NUS. We’re stronger together. But when some students are excluded from NUS, we are all made weaker.” It concluded by saying that “When we’re at NUS Conference this week, we’ll insist that the NUS leadership recognise the problems they’ve created. We trust in their ability to reflect, and to make changes in partnership with Jewish students and their representatives. We’ll hold them accountable for making our national student movement welcoming for Jewish students.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Further concerns have been raised after more troubling tweets from the newly-elected President of the National Union of Students (NUS), Shaima Dallali, have surfaced

This most recent batch of tweets has come to light mere days after we reported that Ms Dallali was forced to apologise when, in 2012, during an escalation of tensions between Israel and the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group Hamas, the then-hopeful NUS candidate tweeted the words “Khaybar Khaybar, ya yahud, Jaish Muhammad, sa yahud.” 

Translated into English, this chant means “Jews, remember the battle of Khaybar, the army of Muhammad is returning.” It is a classic Arabic battle cry referencing the massacre and expulsion of the Jews of the town of Khaybar in northwestern Arabia, now Saudi Arabia, in the year 628 CE.

Ms Dallali issued a statement on 23rd March, saying: “Earlier today I was made aware of a tweet I posted ten years ago. During Israel’s assault on Gaza I referenced the battle of Khaybar in which Jewish and Muslim armies fought. I was wrong to see the Palestine conflict as one between Muslims and Jews. The reference made as a teenager was unacceptable and I sincerely and unreservedly apologise.”

Shortly after her apology, it came to light that Ms Dallali’s output on Twitter reportedly included other inflammatory messages as well, including one from 2018 in which she said: “So your special forces invade the Gaza Strip, attempt to kidnap a Hamas commander, kill him and others. Then cry about Hamas being the terrorists. Makes perfect sense. #GazaUnderAttack.” Hamas is an antisemitic genocidal terrorist organisation that is proscribed in the UK.

Other alleged tweets expressed support for Jeremy Corbyn, the antisemitic former leader of the Labour Party. On 17th November 2020, Ms Dalalli wrote a response to Mr Corbyn’s readmission to the Labour Party, saying that “He should never have been suspended in the first place.” A few months later, on 5th January 2021, Ms Hallami tweeted that “Jeremy Corbyn was too good for this godforsaken country.” At present, these tweets have not yet been deleted, though it has been reported that several others have.

However, a new set of historic tweets from Ms Dallali has now come to light, one of which includes the antisemitic “From the river to the sea” chant. The chant of “From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free” only makes sense as a call for the destruction of the world’s only Jewish state — and its replacement with a State of Palestine — and is thus an attempt to deny Jews, uniquely, the right to self-determination, which is a breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Additionally, Ms Dallali reportedly referred to a preacher who condemned actions taken by Hamas as a “dirty Zionist” and has also raised money for the controversial activist group CAGE which, while it does not advocate violence, has previously been criticised for promoting problematic or extreme views, which they deny.

Ms Dallali also allegedly said that the cleric Yusuf al-Qaradawi, who has been described as an “Islamist theologian”, was the “moral compass for the Muslim community at large”. In January 2009, Mr al-Qaradawi said on Al-Jazeera TV that he would “shoot Allah’s enemies, the Jews.” In a sermon that took place in that same month, he again spoke of Jewish people and called upon God to “kill them, down to the very last one.”

In a 2010 interview on BBC Arabic, Mr Yusuf al-Qaradawi reportedly said: “Throughout history, Allah has imposed upon the [Jews] people who would punish them for their corruption. The last punishment was carried out by Hitler. By means of all the things he did to them – even though they exaggerated this issue – he managed to put them in their place. This was divine punishment for them. Allah willing, the next time will be at the hand of the believers.”

Replying to UJS’s tweet about the “bridges broken” over the past few weeks in regard to NUS’ booking of the controversial rapper Lowkey, Ms Dallali said that her hands “are outstretched to all students and staff that work in our movement, including Jewish students, and would love to arrange a meeting once I’m in office,” though in the past, she has lashed out at UJS over Twitter, accusing them of having “a history of bullying pro-Palestine sabbs [sabbatical officers] and activists.” In that same tweet, she added: “You speak one word of solidarity and they’re after you. UJS and their likes need to be called out.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

It has now been reported publicly that, last month, the University of Bristol’s Appeal Panel upheld the University’s decision last year to terminate the employment of David Miller, which took place one month after Campaign Against Antisemitism brought a lawsuit on behalf of current students against the institution, amidst an outcry from the Jewish community and its institutions.

Our legal case against the University concerned alleged unlawful harassment on the basis of Jewish ethnicity and Judaism, amounting to breaches of the Equality Act 2010, as well as breaches of contract. We launched proceedings in late August and the University swiftly realised that it was putting itself in legal jeopardy by sustaining Prof. Miller’s employment at the institution.

A number of brave students at the University stepped forward to act as complainants in the litigation. We also wish to thank Asserson Law Offices, led by senior partner Trevor Asserson, and barristers Derek Spitz of One Essex Court and Benjamin Gray of Littleton Chambers.

The lawsuit related to Prof. Miller’s speech on a Zoom webinar in February last year in which he said that the “Zionist Movement” is “the enemy” that must be engaged, that it is “the enemy of world peace,” and that those associated with Zionism, including Jewish students on Bristol campus, “must be directly targeted”. Taken together, the implication of Prof. Miller’s remarks is that all decent people who support “world peace” should view Bristol Jewish Society and the Union of Jewish Students, and Jewish people, including those who identify with those bodies, and the vast majority of Jewish students as an “enemy” that must be “directly targeted”.

He also said that interfaith work between Jewish and Muslim groups is “a trojan horse for normalising Zionism in the Muslim community”. He also claimed that Jewish students, by virtue of being Zionist, “encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”.

Prof. Miller has a long record of inflammatory statements about the Jewish community. 

Bristol had come under increasing pressure from the Jewish community, which was united in its disgust at Prof. Miller’s comments and the drawn-out investigation that the University was conducting with no apparent end in sight. But the University failed to act for months. Prof. Miller’s statements and the University’s failure to condemn them and take swift action against him were the subject of a great deal of attention from the Jewish community as well as hundreds of academics and Parliament, including a written question by Lord Austin and an intervention from Robert Halfon MP. Prof. Miller was also defended by an array of controversial ‘usual suspects’ whose interventions did nothing for his collapsing credibility.

We thank others in the Jewish community, MPs and academics for the pressure that they brought to bear on the University of Bristol.

The legal claim that we spearheaded contended that Prof. Miller’s statements sought to create a hostile environment for Jewish students. It further alleged that the University was liable for Prof. Miller’s conduct, and was further liable in its own right, for unlawful conduct in breach of the Equality Act, and for its breach of its contract with students.

Other than a final call for prospective claimants, we minimised the public profile of the case in order to protect the identities of the brave student claimants who not only believed that enough is enough but that, in order for things to change, they must also act on that belief. We are enormously grateful to them for their courage. Despite the lower public profile of the case, the University was in no doubt about our intentions and resolve. A month after the launch of the lawsuit, Prof. Miller was fired for gross misconduct.

In a statement exemplifying just why Prof. Miller has no place on a university campus, the Support David Miller campaign said this week: “Support David Miller – a volunteer-led anti-racism campaign, composed of academics, students and independent researchers – has repeatedly expressed concerns that the University of Bristol’s disciplinary processes have been compromised by assets of a hostile foreign state. The State of Israel and its assets in the UK seek to eliminate all critics of Zionism from UK university campuses. Zionism is the racist ideology that professes a G-d-given right of European and other Jewish colonisers to occupy and seize Palestinian land, homes and resources.  Professor Miller has been subjected to this censorship campaign because of his research showing that Zionist campaign groups have funded and promoted Islamophobia in the UK and abroad.”

Prof. Miller, who has indicated his intention to appeal the University’s latest decision to the Employment Tribunal, said: “I’ve been targeted by a pernicious witch-hunt, led by known assets of the State of Israel in the UK and funded by the dirty money of pro-Israel oligarchs. This is an attempt at entryism and political intimidation. The University of Bristol has wilted under this new wave of McCarthyism. The University treated this appeal as a mere formality, with a pre-determined outcome. I’ll be challenging the University’s perverse decision at an Employment Tribunal, to help stop our fundamental rights of free expression and academic freedom being further corroded at the behest of a hostile and illegitimate foreign regime.”

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “This ruling is a further vindication of the courageous Jewish students on whose behalf we brought proceedings against the University of Bristol last year. Following the launch of our lawsuit and an outcry from across the Jewish community, it was clear to the University that it would be held to account in court and had to act to protect Jewish students in accordance with the law, and David Miller was fired within a month. Universities across the country should be warned that we will do whatever it takes to defend Jewish students from racists on campus by upholding their rights in court where necessary.”

The case was the latest step by Campaign Against Antisemitism to defend the rights of individual Jewish students. We believe that universities and students’ unions must be robustly held to account when they fail to defend Jewish students or when they allow their lecturers to discriminate against or harass them.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

A student politician who was forced to apologise for tweeting an Islamist chant threatening Jews has been elected President of the National Union of Students (NUS).

Last week, it was revealed that the then-hopeful NUS candidate Shaima Dallali was forced to apologise for tweeting the words of an antisemitic chant. In 2012, during an escalation of tensions between Israel and the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group Hamas, Ms Dallali tweeted the words “Khaybar Khaybar, ya yahud, Jaish Muhammad, sa yahud.”

Translated into English, this chant means “Jews, remember the battle of Khaybar, the army of Muhammad is returning.” It is a classic Arabic battle cry referencing the massacre and expulsion of the Jews of the town of Khaybar in northwestern Arabia, now Saudi Arabia, in the year 628 CE.

Ms Dallali issued a statement on 23rd March, saying: “Earlier today I was made aware of a tweet I posted ten years ago. During Israel’s assault on Gaza I referenced the battle of Khaybar in which Jewish and Muslim armies fought. I was wrong to see the Palestine conflict as one between Muslims and Jews. The reference made as a teenager was unacceptable and I sincerely and unreservedly apologise.”

Ms Dallali is currently the President of the City, University of London students’ union. Last year, prior to Ms Dallali’s tenure as President, the union organised a controversial campus-wide referendum on the International Definition of Antisemitism after reportedly failing to consult Jewish students.

It has now come to light that Ms Dallali’s output on Twitter also included other inflammatory messages, including one last May allegedly saying that “organisations like UJS [the Union of Jewish Students] have a history of bullying pro-Palestine sabbs [sabbatical officers] and activists. You speak one word of solidarity and they’re after you. UJS and their likes need to be called out.”

Another alleged tweet from 2018 read: “So your special forces invade the Gaza Strip, attempt to kidnap a Hamas commander, kill him and others. Then cry about Hamas being the terrorists. Makes perfect sense. #GazaUnderAttack.” Hamas is an antisemitic genocidal terrorist organisation that is proscribed in the UK.

Other alleged tweets expressed support for Jeremy Corbyn, the antisemitic former leader of the Labour Party. On 17th November 2020, Ms Dalalli wrote a response to Mr Corbyn’s readmission to the Labour Party, saying that “He should never have been suspended in the first place.” A few months later, on 5th January 2021, Ms Hallami tweeted that “Jeremy Corbyn was too good for this godforsaken country.” At present, these tweets have not yet been deleted, though it has been reported that several others have.

Last week, the Chair of the Education Select Committee, Robert Halfon MP, excoriated NUS for failing to send a representative to attend his recent hearing, particularly given that the hearing took place just days after a scandal involving the rapper Kareem Dennis, known as Lowkey, who was due to headline the union’s centenary conference. After initially dismissing the concerns of Jewish students, who pointed out the rapper’s inflammatory record, the union came under media scrutiny and eventually Mr Dennis withdraw from the event.

In an attempt at an apology, NUS grotesquely alleged that “Whilst we welcome genuine political debate, we’ve been sad to see the use of harassment and misinformation against Lowkey.” Swiping at Mr Halfon, NUS has asserted that “MPs and education leaders are accountable to us not the other way round,” declared that “Old school bullying culture is never acceptable including at Government committees [sic],” and that “Elected student leaders aren’t required to take endless levels of abuse in their roles.”

Concerns were also raised about the outgoing President of NUS and one of her Vice Presidents.

NUS’s handling of Jewish concerns over the booking of Lowkey was discussed on the most recent episode of Podcast Against Antisemitism.

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Shaima Dallali’s election as NUS President only a week after the Lowkey scandal is just the latest indication that this union does not even aspire to represent Jewish students. She has not even taken office and has already had to apologise for one historic antisemitic tweet while rapidly deleting many other inflammatory social media posts. If she wishes to show that she personally has learned a lesson and seeks to lead a truly inclusive union, she should commit to meeting with Jewish students and educate herself on their concerns and also announce that NUS under her leadership will recommit to the International Definition of Antisemitism. If she cannot bring herself to do that in short order, the Government should end its enormous grant to NUS.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

After a representative from the National Union of Students (NUS) failed to attend a hearing of the House of Commons Education Select Committee, the controversial union is coming under fire on several fronts.

The Chair of the Committee, Robert Halfon MP, excoriated NUS for failing to send a representative to attend his hearing on Tuesday, particularly given that the hearing took place just days after a scandal involving the rapper Kareem Dennis, known as Lowkey, who was due to headline the union’s centenary conference. After initially dismissing the concerns of Jewish students, who pointed out the rapper’s inflammatory record, the union came under media scrutiny and eventually Mr Dennis withdraw from the event.

In an attempt at an apology, NUS grotesquely alleged that, “Whilst we welcome genuine political debate, we’ve been sad to see the use of harassment and misinformation against Lowkey.” Swiping at Mr Halfon, NUS has asserted that “MPs and education leaders are accountable to us not the other way round,” declared that “Old school bullying culture is never acceptable including at Government committees [sic],” and that “Elected student leaders aren’t required to take endless levels of abuse in their roles.”

Mr Halfon has expressed his deep dissatisfaction with NUS’s handling of this crisis and its record.

However, fresh revelations about NUS are prompting yet more concern.

An investigation by the Jewish News has concluded that “NUS leaders have quietly dropped a commitment to the International Definition of Antisemitism.” The investigation noted that the outgoing NUS President, Larissa Kennedy, ‘liked’ a tweet celebrating the passage of a resolution calling on Queen Mary University of London and its students’ union to adopt the Jerusalem Declaration, which is a wrecking document intended to undermine the globally-recognised Definition. It also observed that references to the Definition on the NUS website have all but disappeared, despite a statement by the union in 2020 declaring that “NUS is in full support of all efforts to tackle antisemitism and has adopted the [International] Definition of Antisemitism.”

The newspaper also claimed that Sara Khan, an ally of Ms Kennedy’s who was promoted to the new Vice-President Liberation and Equality position, allegedly posted on Twitter: “Is it kind of… antisemitic to homogenise all Jews into an ‘ethnoreligion’? like, both erasing Palestinian Jews, & letting white supremacist/settler Jews off the hook?” In a further post, she allegedly said that she “did some learning” and had concluded that “Judaism as an ethnoreligion refers to the shared heritage of all Jews as identity is passed down through maternal lineage but this is not the same as being a single ethnic group.” She then reportedly wondered: “Imagine thinking the billions of Muslims whether South Asian or Arabic or Eastern European were the same ethnic group. I can’t.” According to the report, Ms Khan also regularly spells “Israel” as “Isra*l”.

Ms Kennedy and Ms Khan allegedly also “played a leading role” in “facilitating” a launch event for last year’s online NUS Decolonialise Education campaign at which Mr Dennis delivered the keynote speech. The report points out numerous inflammatory aspects of this campaign.

Approached by the Jewish News for comment on the allegations in its report and for clarification on whether NUS was still committed to the International Definition of Antisemitism, a spokesperson for the union reportedly said: “Thanks for e-mailing. We won’t be commenting on this.”

Meanwhile, an NUS presidential candidate favoured to win the election to replace Ms Kennedy has been forced to apologise for tweeting the words of an antisemitic chant. Shaima Dallali tweeted the words ““Khaybar Khaybar, ya yahud, Jaish Muhammad, sa yahud” in 2012.

The “Khaybar Khaybar, ya yahud, Jaish Muhammad, sa yahud” chant, translated in English as “Jews, remember the battle of Khaybar, the army of Muhammad is returning”, is a classic Arabic battle cry referencing the massacre and expulsion of the Jews of the town of Khaybar in northwestern Arabia, now Saudi Arabia, in the year 628 CE.

Ms Dallali, who is the President of the City University London students’ union, issued a statement yesterday, saying: “Earlier today I was made aware of a tweet I posted ten years ago. During Israel’s assault on Gaza I referenced the battle of Khaybar in which Jewish and Muslim armies fought. I was wrong to see the Palestine conflict as one between Muslims and Jews. The reference made as a teenager was unacceptable and I sincerely and unreservedly apologise.”

Last year, prior to Ms Dallali’s enture as President, City University students’ union organised a controversial campus-wide referendum on the International Definition of Antisemitism after reportedly failing to consult Jewish students.

These NUS scandals come after Campaign Against Antisemitism published polling earlier this month in its latest Antisemitism Barometer showing that a staggering 92% of British Jews believe that antisemitism in universities is a problem.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

The Prime Minister has called for “irreversible change” after branding British universities too “tolerant of casual or indeed systematic antisemitism”.

Boris Johnson was responding to a question by Andrew Percy MP in the House of Commons during Prime Minister’s Questions.

Mr Percy, who is the co-Chair of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Antisemitism, said: “Sadly, in my role as chair of the all-party group against antisemitism, the news is not so positive. We have recently heard from Jewish students who are suffering record antisemitic attacks on university campuses, including allegations of their work being marked down by their own professors. This is completely outrageous, and one would expect the National Union of Students to be on their side, but instead of helping the students it has been inviting somebody who is engaged in antisemitic conspiracy theories—a rapper—to a conference. Will the Prime Minister do everything in his power to ensure that campuses are a safe place for British Jewish students?”

Mr Johnson responded: “Our universities have, for far too long, been tolerant of casual or indeed systematic antisemitism. I hope that everybody understands the need for change—for rapid and irreversible change—but it is also important that we have an antisemitism taskforce devoted to rooting out antisemitism in education at all levels.”

We commend Mr Percy for drawing attention to this issue, and the Prime Minister for his commitment to tackling the problem.

The exchange comes shortly after Campaign Against Antisemitism published polling in its latest Antisemitism Barometer showing that a staggering 92% of British Jews believe that antisemitism in universities is a problem.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Following the revelation by LBC’s Theo Usherwood that the rapper Kareem Dennis, known as Lowkey, would be headlining the National Union of Students’ (NUS) centenary conference, Campaign Against Antisemitism and other Jewish groups expressed outrage that a union meant to represent all students, including Jews, would consider the inflammatory activist to be a suitable keynote speaker. NUS has now reportedly confirmed that Mr Dennis will not be appearing at the conference.

Mr Dennis is a patron of the Palestine Solidarity Campaign (PSC). A month-long investigation by Campaign Against Antisemitism in 2017 exposed extensive antisemitic bigotry amongst PSC supporters on social media. Mr Dennis has previously described Israel as a “racist endeavour” in direct and deliberate contravention of the International Definition of Antisemitismdescribed Zionism as “antisemitic”, spoken of the “Zionist lobby” in the context of global capitalism, has reportedly backed the disgraced former Labour MP Chris Williamsondefended the disgraced academic David Miller, and has repeatedly supported the antisemite Jeremy Corbyn.

More recently, Mr Dennis has reportedly claimed that the “mainstream media” has “weaponised the Jewish heritage” of Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy to “stave off” inquiries about far-right groups in Ukraine. He has also appeared on the disgraced former MP Chris Williamson’s show on Press TV, an Iranian state-owned news network whose British broadcasting licence was revoked by Ofcom in 2012. Mr Dennis has appeared alongside the disgraced academic David Miller.

When Jewish students raised concerns about the choice of act for the union’s conference, NUS reportedly advised them that they could use an “existing safe space” which was to be “designated for students who are sensitive to loud noise” during Mr Dennis’ performance. In response to worries about how Jewish students would react if the performance went ahead, NUS reportedly replied that it was more concerned about the reaction from other students if it were cancelled.

However, after pressure, NUS insisted that Mr Dennis would only be headlining the “Liberation Conference”, due to run for two days immediately following the National Conference and intended to “bring together Black*, Disabled, LGBT+, Trans and Women Students together to build communities of activists and plan our campaigning work.” After further pressure, NUS has reportedly removed Ms Dennis from the programme completely.

The controversial Labour Party MP, Zarah Sultana, will still be appearing at NUS’s National Conference. Labour has yet to investigate an outstanding complaint against Ms Sultana by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

When Mr Dennis’ appearance was first publicised, Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “NUS knows exactly what it is doing by headlining Lowkey. He has previously described Israel as a ‘racist endeavour’ in direct and deliberate contravention of the International Definition of Antisemitism, described Zionism as ‘antisemitic’, spoken of the ‘Zionist lobby’ in the context of global capitalism, reportedly backed the disgraced former Labour MP Chris Williamson and has repeatedly supported the antisemite Jeremy Corbyn as well as Jew-baiting conspiracists including David Miller.

“Headlining such a person is bad enough, but telling appalled Jews to go and stand in the corner whilst everyone else dances is segregationist and disgusting. Instead of showing solidarity with Jews, NUS is literally casting Jews aside. This is sickening hypocrisy from a union that proclaims itself to be ‘anti-racist’.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expressed outrage after it was reported that the National Union of Students (NUS) responded to Jewish complaints about an inflammatory rapper headlining the union’s centenary conference by suggesting that the Jewish students literally segregate themselves.

Jewish students reportedly expressed concern after learning that the rapper Kareem Dennis, known as Lowkey, would be headlining a conference of a union ostensibly meant to represent them.

Mr Dennis is a patron of the Palestine Solidarity Campaign (PSC). A month-long investigation by Campaign Against Antisemitism in 2017 exposed extensive antisemitic bigotry amongst PSC supporters on social media. Mr Dennis has previously described Israel as a “racist endeavour” in direct and deliberate contravention of the International Definition of Antisemitismdescribed Zionism as “antisemitic”, spoken of the “Zionist lobby” in the context of global capitalism, has reportedly backed the disgraced former Labour MP Chris Williamsondefended the disgraced academic David Miller, and has repeatedly supported the antisemite Jeremy Corbyn.

More recently, Mr Dennis has reportedly claimed that the “mainstream media” has “weaponised the Jewish heritage” of Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy to “stave off” inquiries about far-right groups in Ukraine. He has also appeared on the disgraced former MP Chris Williamson’s show on Press TV, an Iranian state-owned news network whose British broadcasting licence was revoked by Ofcom in 2012. The disgraced academic David Miller has appeared alongside Mr Dennis.

When Jewish students raised concerns about the choice of act for the union’s conference, NUS reportedly advised them that they could use an “existing safe space” which was to be “designated for students who are sensitive to loud noise” during Mr Dennis’ performance. In response to worries about how Jewish students would react if the performance went ahead, NUS reportedly replied that it was more concerned about the reaction from other students if it were cancelled.

The controversial Labour Party MP, Zarah Sultana, will also be appearing at the event, it has been reported. Labour has yet to investigate an outstanding complaint against Ms Sultana by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

 Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “NUS knows exactly what it is doing by headlining Lowkey. He has previously described Israel as a ‘racist endeavour’ in direct and deliberate contravention of the International Definition of Antisemitism, described Zionism as ‘antisemitic’, spoken of the ‘Zionist lobby’ in the context of global capitalism, reportedly backed the disgraced former Labour MP Chris Williamson and has repeatedly supported the antisemite Jeremy Corbyn as well as Jew-baiting conspiracists including David Miller.

“Headlining such a person is bad enough, but telling appalled Jews to go and stand in the corner whilst everyone else dances is segregationist and disgusting. Instead of showing solidarity with Jews, NUS is literally casting Jews aside. This is sickening hypocrisy from a union that proclaims itself to be ‘anti-racist’.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

The University of Reading has reportedly adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Late last year, a spokesperson, when asked why the University had not yet adopted the Definition, said that the University “takes an active and vocal lead in countering racism and discrimination,” and that a working group considering the findings of a race equality review conducted in May was due to report at the end of 2021.

The adoption comes as Campaign Against Antisemitism publishes polling in its latest Antisemitism Barometer showing that a staggering 92% of British Jews believe that antisemitism in universities is a problem.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

The University of Wisconsin-Madison has released a statement condemning antisemitism.

The statement comes after several recent incidents, including the discovery of swastika graffiti in the bathrooms of a University accommodation building, public harassment in which antisemitic slurs were shouted at a student on Langdon Street, where many of the University’s fraternity houses and student residences are located, and a student who claimed to have been harassed for their supposedly “Jewish” appearance.

These are not the only incidents to have taken place at the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus, in recent years. University authorities have investigated several instances of antisemitic graffiti on campus, including one occasion on which the University’s Police Department is reported to have investigated antisemitic graffiti on the popular Robert E. Gard Storyteller’s Circle, and another when neo-Nazi symbols were daubed in green paint on the walls of a university bookstore.

In the University’s statement, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Lori Reesor and Chief Diversity Officer LaVar Charleston said: “Antisemitism is wrong and it will not be tolerated at UW-Madison. We are working to support all community members and increasing our educational efforts to prevent bias incidents from happening in the future. We are committed to creating a campus where everyone feels valued and knows they belong.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The University of South Florida (USF) has temporarily suspended one of its fraternities amid antisemitism allegations.

The news comes shortly after the University released a statement condemning alleged antisemitic behaviour from its students.

One reported incident included the drawing of a swastika on the head of the Jewish fraternity pledge by members of the senior leadership of the Pi Kappa Phi fraternity.

The statement also reported a social media post minimising the Holocaust.

The letter, sent by Dean Danielle McDonald, said that “Actions such as these are reprehensible and deserve our condemnation,” adding that “Student Conduct and Ethical Development (SCED) is investigating and will act in accordance with the due process standards outlined in the Student Code of Conduct.”

“USF embraces and celebrates diversity in all its forms. Antisemitism, racism, hate, and prejudice have no place here. We remain strong and united in our commitment to the Principles of Community in our pursuit of excellence,” Dean McDonald added.

Pi Kappa Phi’s suspension is to be reviewed tomorrow at an Informational Meeting between the fraternity’s President and a Hearing Officer.

The fraternity also released a statement on Instagram in which they denied that an antisemitic post was made by a member of the group and that the antisemitic action in question, in which a swastika was drawn on a Jewish fraternity pledge, was carried out by a “non-member guest”. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: StopAntisemitism.org

The University of South Florida (USF) has released a statement condemning alleged antisemitic behaviour from its students.

One reported incident included the drawing of a swastika on the head of the Jewish fraternity pledge by members of the senior leadership of the Pi Kappa Phi fraternity.

The statement also reported a social media post minimising the Holocaust.

The letter, sent by Dean Danielle McDonald, said that “Actions such as these are reprehensible and deserve our condemnation,” adding that “Student Conduct and Ethical Development (SCED) is investigating and will act in accordance with the due process standards outlined in the Student Code of Conduct.”

“USF embraces and celebrates diversity in all its forms. Antisemitism, racism, hate, and prejudice have no place here. We remain strong and united in our commitment to the Principles of Community in our pursuit of excellence,” Dean McDonald added.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: StopAntisemitism.org

It has been reported that Dutch universities have denied an anti-Israel group’s request in which they asked universities to reveal any ties they may have with Israeli and Jewish organisations.

Universiteiten van Nederland (UNL), an umbrella group that represents fourteen Dutch universities, said last week that the request had caused “considerable unrest” but under freedom of information rules, they were obligated to reply. 

The request was made by The Rights Forum, an organisation founded in 2009 by former Dutch Prime Minister Andreas van Agt, after alleging that pro-Israel university groups were stifling debates concerning Israel.

The organisation said that it had requested the universities to reveal their ties with Israeli academic institutions and companies, and other groups “known for their active and unconditional support for Israel’s domination of the Palestinians”.

Binyomin Jacobs, the Chief Rabbi of the Netherlands, remarked that the request “reeks of antisemitism” and that it implied a “shadowy Zionist/Jewish cabal is operating in the Dutch university system”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Indiana University has condemned antisemitic comments made on a Greek life website, a website for people to discuss matters concerning fraternities and sororities. 

According to one screenshot, one post said: “The truth is that their huge noses, afros, and smelliness prevent them from being attractive so they rape and justify it with their sick way of looking at the world…Their families are in positions of power therefore they get away with everything and are not scared.”

On Monday, Indiana University Hillel released a statement of support on Instagram in which it said: “Please know that you can reach out to us at any time for support. Your Jewish Home Away From Home is always here for you. We are working with the University and IU Student Leaders to combat this horrible antisemitism. We are stronger together.”

The University’s Executive Vice President, Rahul Shrivastav, confirmed that a police investigation was underway, adding: “This attempt to anonymously spread hate is cowardly, horrific, and simply unacceptable in the IU community.”

In November, it was reported that at least a dozen mezuzahs had been stolen from Jewish students at Indiana University.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

In response to a spree of antisemitic vandalism in recent weeks at Curry College, a private college in Massachusetts, the College has decided to hold remote classes today, in addition to its offer of a $10,000 reward for information.

According to officials at the College, twenty swastikas have been discovered on the premises so far, in addition to a note targeting Black people.

In a statement released at the time that the initial act of vandalism was discovered, the College said: “Our support and care go out to everyone in our community, but particularly to our fellow Jewish and Black community members affected by this act…The College has both clear policies against hostile or hateful speech and a full commitment to creating a safe, welcoming, and diverse campus.”

Last week, however, after further incidents of antisemitism were discovered in the laundry room and a bathroom of a residence hall, the College in the town of Milton said that it would give a $10,000 reward to anyone who could provide information on the incident. 

The College has also decided to host its classes remotely today after a note threatening Black people was discovered which mentioned the date of 22nd February. 

Curry College President Kenneth Quigley Jr. said that “These disgusting acts of racism and antisemitism will not be tolerated on our campus,” adding: “The person or persons responsible for this must be identified, removed from our campus, and brought to justice.”

In December, we reported that Mount Holyoke College, a prestigious women’s college in South Hadley, Massachusetts, has seen its third report of an antisemitic incident that semester after a swastika and an antisemitic slur were allegedly found in the bathroom.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A reader in international politics at Queen Mary University in London has claimed that the International Definition of Antisemitism is “harmful to anti-racism and even to Jews.”

Clive Gabay made the comments in relation to an event that he organised against the Definition, which has been adopted by the University. The event took place at the picket line during unrelated strike action.

Dr Gabay, a long-time campaigner against the Definition, asserted that the University has “adopted the IHRA [Definition] without consultation,” even though it is widely supported by Jewish students and the Jewish community.

He described his talk as arguing that the Definition “is a bad conceptual definition…harmful to Palestinians, to anti-racism and even to Jews,” and reportedly suggested that “antisemitism is taken more seriously than other forms of racism.” Last October, he tweeted: “It’s a question about why Jewish student voices are taken so much more seriously than trans, black and/or Muslim student voices. To come closer to home, at my university all it took was for *2* students to meet with our senior management for the university to adopt the IHRA [Definition].”

The event attracted criticism from academics and students. The President of the Queen Mary University Jewish Society said: “This event should not have taken place on the picket line and damages the relationship between [Queen Mary] and Jewish students. However, as one of the Jewish students who secured the IHRA definition at Queen Mary, it was necessary to attend this teach-out event and respond to the panel’s discourse. I certainly rebutted their comments and demonstrated, giving first hand evidence, why the IHRA Definition of Antisemitism is the definition which protects Jewish students on and off campus and it is here to stay.”

Late last year, the Queen Mary University Students’ Union repealed its previous adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism and replaced it with the Jerusalem Declaration, which is a wrecking document intended to undermine the globally-recognised Definition. The measure was reportedly not discussed with Jewish students, who reacted with disgust.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

It has been reported that Dutch universities have requested more time from a pro-Palestinian group’s request in which they asked universities to reveal any ties they may have with Israeli and Jewish organisations.

Universiteiten van Nederland (UNL), an umbrella group that represents fourteen Dutch universities, said that the request had caused “considerable unrest” but under freedom of information rules, they were obligated to reply. 

The request was made by The Rights Forum, an organisation founded in 2009 by former Dutch Prime Minister Andreas van Agt, after alleging that pro-Israel university groups were stifling debates concerning Israel.

The organisation said that it had requested the universities to reveal their ties with Israeli academic institutions and companies, and other groups “known for their active and unconditional support for Israel’s domination of the Palestinians”.

Binyomin Jacobs, the Chief Rabbi of the Netherlands, remarked that the request “reeks of antisemitism” and that it implied a “shadowy Zionist/Jewish cabal is operating in the Dutch university system”.

Rabbi Jacobs added that he was concerned by “the number of universities that were so compliant with such a transparently antisemitic request. It reminds us that most mayors cooperated during the occupation to pass on the names of their Jewish citizens to the Germans.”

UNL has said that it has asked the Rights Forum for a delay “so that they have time to process it”, and added: “The request is for the disclosure of institutional partnerships between Dutch universities and the organisations specified in the request. It specifically excludes partnerships between individual academics.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

The University of Cambridge has been rocked by antisemitic chanting and graffiti in connection with a visit by the Israeli ambassador.

The event on Tuesday was greeted by antisemitic chanting from a mob of around 100, who gathered outside the Cambridge Union shouting “from the river to the sea, Palestine will be free.”

The chant of “From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free” only makes sense as a call for the destruction of the world’s only Jewish state — and its replacement with a State of Palestine — and is thus an attempt to deny Jews, uniquely, the right to self-determination, which is a breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Signs were held reading “Zionist scum not welcome here,” while graffiti was discovered also reading: “From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free.”

Andrew Percy, the Conservative MP and Chairman of the All Party Parliamentary Group Against Antisemitism, said: “Cambridge University needs to investigate the use of this to determine if any of their students were involved and, if so, what action they plan to take against students using a slogan so beloved of terrorists.”

In a statement, the University of Cambridge said: “The University of Cambridge supports the right to freedom of speech and protest, but does not tolerate racism or harassment. The police attended the protest and are therefore best placed to determine if laws were broken. We would encourage anyone with evidence of criminality to report it to them. If there is evidence that students have broken the University’s code of discipline then this will be investigated.”

The University of Cambridge has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

A federal investigation has been launched following complaints by two Jewish students at Brooklyn College that they have been subjected to “severe and persistent harassment” on a Masters’ programme.

The ten-page complaint was filed on behalf of the students by the Louis D. Brandeis Centre for Human Rights Under Law. A senior figure at the Brandeis Centre  described the alleged harassment campaign against the unnamed students as “part of an effort to erase and misunderstand Jewish identity.”

The Office for Civil Rights of the US Department of Education has confirmed that it is investigating. Part of the City University of New York, Brooklyn College has 2,841 graduate students on its roll, of whom around 500 identify as Jewish. The case could cost the college its federal funding if the allegations are confirmed.

The complaint alleges that Jewish students on the Mental Health Counselling course had been “bullied and harassed in class discussions and on social media” and that Jewish students were targeted using the same “ethnic stereotypes, antisemitic tropes and divisive concepts that faculty members promote in their courses.”

The complaint cites examples such as a professor who claimed that Ashkenazi Jews in America had become “oppressors”, while another professor allegedly rebuked a Jewish student for ranking his/her Jewish identity before his/her white identity, suggesting that the student “did not understand oppression.”

After telling The New York Jewish Week that the harassment was “part of an effort to erase and misunderstand Jewish identity,” Denise Katz-Prober, the Director of Legal Initiatives at the Brandeis Centre said that this was “dangerous” because of the misunderstanding demonstrated by the recent comments made by with Whoopi Goldberg. She added: “It is an attempt to whitewash the Jewish historical experience, which results in the downplaying of antisemitism.”

Ms Katz-Prober said that colleges and universities had an obligation under the Civil Rights Act 1964 to prohibit discrimination on the basis of race, colour or national origin in any programme or activity that receives federal financial assistance. 

The complaint, specifically citing the actions of two unnamed professors and two unnamed administrators, alleges that since the beginning of the 2020-2021 academic year, professors “maligned Jews on the basis of race and ethnic identity” by advancing the narrative that “all Jews are white and privileged and therefore contribute to the systemic oppression of people of colour.”

When the Jewish students complained to administrators, they were allegedly told to “get your whiteness in check” and to “keep your head down.”

The complaint also asserts that Jewish students were bullied on a WhatsApp chat group and that after a female student expressed a desire to “strangle a Jewish student” and others showed support, a Jewish student who objected was accused of being racist. 

One of the students who filed the complaint told The New York Jewish Week it was “the hardest thing” that they had ever done and that they would not be doing it “if it wasn’t so blatant.”

The student said that this was “a very Jewish school” and that Jews should not “have to be scared; this shouldn’t happen.”

They added that class participation was “a very big part of your grade and the fact I have been told by a white teacher to keep my head down and to ‘get your whiteness in check’… really upset me.”

The student added that in a classroom discussion on how people of colour feel vulnerable in public, fellow students downplayed the accounts of Jews who expressed fear of being targeted.

They also said that two other Jewish students had dropped out of the programme – including one due to stress.

In a statement Brooklyn College said that it “unequivocally denounces antisemitism in any form” and does not tolerate it on its campus. The College said it could not comment on ongoing investigations, but was “committed to working cooperatively and fully with the US Department of Education.” The statement also noted its “We Stand Against Hate” initiative, which features lectures, workshops, concerts and other events “that reflect the school’s ongoing commitment to celebrate the voices that make up our diverse campus community” and also served as a “platform to denounce antisemitism.”

The Office of Civil Rights has investigated several complaints against universities alleging antisemitic harassment following which all have entered resolution agreements promising to take steps to combat antisemitic harassment and discrimination against Jewish students on campus.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

Sheffield Hallam University has reportedly dropped an investigation into an academic who believes that “Zionist lobbies…buy presidents”, defended the phrase “Stop the Palestinian Holocaust” and shared a video called “Truth About Zionist Jews Talmud”.

Shahd Abusalama, who has been studying for a PhD in cinema at the University, reportedly shared tweets defending a first-year student who had made a poster that said “Stop the Palestinian Holocaust” and who was accused by a Jewish student of antisemitism.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, which Sheffield Hallam has adopted, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

On social media, Ms Abusalama defended the student by citing Jewish individuals who have made the same analogy, and also wrote: “I understand why a first-year university student used #Holocaust when thinking of Israel’s repeated bombardment of Gaza”, adding: “Maybe she thought she’d garner European sympathy for Palestine by evoking ‘Never Again’ slogan.”

She noted of the term “Holocaust” that she herself would not “use such a politicised word often used to justify the racist state of Israel” because it “distracts attention from the Zionist practices of settler-colonialism and ethnic cleansing against the Palestinians.” However, she proceeded to use other inflammatory terms and claimed that the suggestion that the University’s Palestine Society should undertake antisemitism training in light of the incident was indicative of a “hierarchy of racisms” asking: “Are Islamophobia & Xenophobia insignificant? Prioritising one form of racism over others is itself racist and divisive.”

This was not the first time that Ms Abusalama has courted controversy. She is active in the BDS movement to boycott Israel, the tactics of which an overwhelming majority of British Jews find intimidating, and in the past she reportedly urged people to watch a video on YouTube called “Truth About Zionist Jews Talmud”, which presented numerous antisemitic myths about the Talmud. The video’s description asked “Why the Zionist don’t want us to know what’s in Talmud? [sic],” adding: “Why they want the teaching of the Talmud to be known only to Jews.” Ms Abusalama wrote on Twitter: “Must watch this video that tells you the truth about #zionist #Jews. They take their legitimacy from #Talmud.” In another post, she reportedly wrote that the “Zionist lobbies control all this for their interest,” adding: “They buy presidents/slaves.” The video and tweets have since been deleted.

Ms Abusalama has also asserted that “Zionism is one of the worst forms of antisemitism,” described the BBC as part of the “Zionist propaganda machine”, claimed that the Jewish Chronicle newspaper is so named in order to “cement the analogy between anti-Zionism and antisemitism” and has further claimed that “Germany was always one of the greatest supporters and Zionists managed to mobilise German guilt for Nazism to normalise and enable their oppression and dispossession of the Palestinians.” She has also reportedly posted: “Barak Hussein Obama is b*stard! Those racists should be happy now & re-elect him as he’s anti-Arabs and anti-Muslims & #Zionists’ puppet [sic].”

In 2013, Ms Abusalama reportedly appeared at the 46th anniversary of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP), an antisemitic genocidal terrorist organisation. The event was addressed via video by the convicted terrorist, Leila Khaled, with Ms Abusalama reportedly singing in front of a PFLP banner. In a blog post, Ms Abusalama has also reportedly described Kozo Okamoto, the Japanese Red Army terrorist who participated in the PFLP’s 1971 Lod Airport massacre, as a “freedom fighter”, and described six terrorists who escaped from an Israeli jail last year as “heroes”. She has previously referred to Akram Rikhawi, who was sentenced to nine years in prison for transporting suicide bombers, as “legendary”.

Last month, during the University’s short-lived investigation, Ms Abusalama claimed that “Zionist racist publications/trolls have renewed online #bullying to discredit my academic reputation,” and she was suspended by the University. She declared: “Family, friends, and followers, I am under renewed attack by Zionist publications protesting my recent appointment as an Associate Lecturer at Sheffield Hallam University, where I also recently submitted a PhD dissertation on the historical representation of Palestinian refugees in colonial, humanitarian and Palestinian documentary films, from 1917 and 1993. The Zionist defamation campaign by Jewish News, Campaign Against Antisemitism and Jewish Chronicle joins a historical pattern where the Zionist colonial narrative is consistently privileged over the narratives of the oppressed.” She also claimed that “Zionists are still targeting me.”

She was then reinstated to her teaching duties, and it is understood that the investigation by the University was then dropped entirely and she was given a full-time position at Sheffield Hallam.

Celebrating the University’s capitulation, Ms Abusalama has once again turned her sights to the International Definition of Antisemitism, and is seeking to sustain the pressure on the University that appears to have enabled her return.

Ms Abusalama was assisted in her negotiations with the University by a representative from the University and College Union (UCU). On 2nd February, the UCU branch at Sheffield Hallam also passed an emergency motion supporting Ms Abusalama. Ms Absulama’s Director of Studies reportedly told the meeting that “black and brown people have had to justify what they have said for many centuries” and that “it is not by chance that the IHRA [International] definition has been used against a young Palestinian scholar.” Last year, the branch was condemned for passing a motion of solidarity with the disgraced Bristol University professor, David Miller.

Among Ms Abusalama’s supporters was the controversial former President of the National Union of Students, Malia Bouattia, who was found by her own institution to have made antisemitic comments.

A spokesperson for Sheffield Hallam University said: “After some specific concerns were raised in relation to an individual’s proposed appointment as an Associate Lecturer, we had a duty to fully consider the matters brought to our attention. An appointment has now been made following the conclusion of a robust HR process. As a university we uphold the principles of free speech and academic freedom. We are proud that our staff and students come from a diverse range of backgrounds, with a wide range of views and beliefs. We do not tolerate discrimination or hate speech, and are committed to creating a welcoming and inclusive culture for all our students and staff.”

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “This is just the latest example of a university that has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism and failed properly to apply it in the case of an academic who has repeatedly and unrepentantly breached it, with the academic overcoming an investigation that apparently imposed no sanction and even getting a promotion. It is clear that Sheffield Hallam University has little interest in the welfare of its Jewish students and staff, but at the very least one might have hoped that, as a university, the institution would not wish to tar its reputation by hiring a conspiracist who believes dangerous nonsense such as that ‘Zionist lobbies buy presidents’ and writes from prejudiced ignorance about the Talmud.

“As usual, the University and Colleges Union has run to the defence of anyone who breaches the Definition, proving itself once again to be a very unsafe place for its Jewish members.

“We shall be writing to the University to make our views known and shall be reviewing options for further action.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

It has been reported that on 3rd February, a swastika was found drawn into the condensation on a window in Ithaca College.

Ithaca College Interim President La Jerne Cornish e-mailed the campus community on 4th February, writing: “The vision of this institution is to build thriving communities, rooted in the values of equity, accountability, and respect, among others. We cannot achieve this goal in an environment that tolerates antisemitic, racist, or other threatening symbols, words, behaviors, or ideologies.”

In the statement, it was also confirmed that an investigation was underway after an incident report had been filed with the Office of Public Safety.

Ithaca’s Hillel house released a statement of its own in which it said that “The swastika is often used to incite violence against Jews and can threaten Jewish students’ sense of safety,” adding: “We are grateful to Ithaca College’s leadership for the seriousness of their response.” 

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Ryerson University has apologised for appearing to omit Jews and antisemitism, alone among minorities and forms of discrimination, from a programme about the intersection of charitable giving and inclusion.

The Winter 2022 issue of Ryerson University Magazine, distributed to alumni and friends of the Canadian university, featured an advertisement for a webinar seminar programme run jointly between the University and TD Bank, called “Generous Futures: Power and Politics in Charitable Giving”.

The webinar series has featured discussions about combatting anti-Muslim hatred, anti-Asian racism and ageism, as well as panels on promoting the LGBT and black communities. The only seminar yet to take place is on advancing disability rights.

There was a conspicuous lack in the agenda, however, of any reference to antisemitism or promoting Jewish voices, despite the otherwise apparently comprehensive attempt to include minority groups. This is despite skyrocketing antisemitic incidents in Canada.

HonestReporting reports that it commended the inclusion of all of these minority groups in the series, but urged the inclusion of Jewish voices and combatting antisemitism as part of the programme.

Within hours of the HonestReporting report, the University wrote to the advocacy group, saying: “The University had planned to include antisemitism as a topic in the fall [autumn] of 2021 and had invited both moderator and panellists. Unfortunately, these plans fell through. We are currently in the process of developing an alternative opportunity to address this topic. Ryerson University recognises the importance of addressing antisemitism, particularly in the context of rising rates of antisemitic hate crimes. And we sincerely apologise for the implication of the ad, and the upset and disappointment it has caused. We remain committed to covering this important topic.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism joined several Jewish communal organisations and University Vice Chancellors in a meeting today with the Education Secretary, Nadhim Zahawi.

At the meeting, which comes two days before Holocaust Memorial Day, Mr Zahawi spoke of his experience visiting the Nazi death camps and expressed his horror at recently receiving a letter from a student at the University of Edinburgh relating how she was given a set of striped pyjamas as an anonymous ‘secret Santa’ gift. “It makes my blood boil,” he said. “After all this time, the same vile behaviour is taking place.” He pledged to take up the issue with the University’s administration and his Scottish counterparts.

Gideon Falter, the Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, expressed concern at the meeting about the promotion of the Jerusalem Declaration on Antisemitism, a wrecking document designed to undermine the International Definition of Antisemitism. He also echoed remarks by Lord Pickles, an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism, emphasising the need for Universities not only to adopt the Definition but to apply it in cases of antisemitism.

It was agreed at the summit to share case studies and best practice, and universities were urged to engage with Jewish communal groups.

Just in the past week, controversies relating to academics have arisen at the University of Cambridge and the University of Glasgow, and in relation to a student at UCL. All three universities have adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “I would like to thank Nadhim Zahawi for leading this summit and for his steadfast support for Jewish students and our community. It was clear from the contributions of all participants that much more work needs to be done.

“Several Vice Chancellors spoke of the efforts made by their universities to combat antisemitism, but we are aware of antisemitic incidents on some of their own campuses that have remained unresolved for some time now. We continue to work with and support Jewish students and staff who feel that their institutions’ administrations are not living up to their commitments to keep Jewish people on campus safe, and that remains a very serious concern for all of us who are fighting to clean up antisemitism on campuses.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

A student society at the University of Warwick has apologised after inviting a climate activist who called the Holocaust “just another f***ery in human history”.

The event with Extinction Rebellion co-founder Roger Hallam, titled “Our Responsibilities at This Time”, was due to take place today, but was cancelled by the University after an outcry from Jewish students, who said that the society failed to “recognise the concerns with inviting Roger Hallam, founder of XR [Extinction Rebellion], who has a history of Holocaust minimisation and trivialisation.”

Mr Hallam made the inflammatory comment in an interview to the German newspaper, Die Zeit. He told the paper, “the extremity of a trauma can create a paralysis in actually learning the lessons from it. The fact of the matter is, millions of people have been killed in vicious circumstances on a regular basis throughout history, ” adding: “They went to the Congo in the late 19th century and decimated it,” before adding that contextually, the Holocaust was “almost a normal event … just another f***ery in human history.”

Mr Hallam claimed that his comments, which appeared to minimise and downplay the Nazis’ systematic murder of six millions Jews, were taken out of context: “I want to fully acknowledge the unimaginable suffering caused by the Nazi Holocaust that led to all of Europe saying ‘never again’. But it is happening again, on a far greater scale and in plain sight. The ‘global north’ is pumping lethal levels of CO2 into the atmosphere and simultaneously erecting ever greater barriers to immigration, turning whole regions of the world into death zones. That is the grim reality. We are allowing our governments to willingly, and in full knowledge of the science, engage in genocide of our young people and those in the ‘global south’ by refusing to take emergency action to reduce carbon emissions.”

Yesterday, Climate Reality Warwick, which organised the event, said: “We have made the decision as a society to cancel the talk tomorrow. When we were approached about the guest speaker, we were not aware who he was until after confirming the event, and of course this is a mistake on our part for not checking. As a society we strongly condemn some of Roger’s statements in the past, especially regarding the Holocaust, and we don’t feel that he represents us as a society. We apologise for any potential harm caused.”

The University of Warwick has a history of incidents in relation to Jewish students and antisemitism. Last year, academic staff passed a motion challenging the International Definition of Antisemitism, which the University had reluctantly adopted. Previously, dubious disciplinary charges against a Jewish student who complained about antisemitism were dropped by the University; the University’s official Twitter account ‘liked’ a tweet endorsing inflammatory comments by the disgraced academic David Miller, with the University subsequently deleting the ‘like’ and blaming “unauthorised access” to the account; and a controversial Warwick lecturer reportedly claimed that the Definition is part of a Conservative plot to “legitimate racist speech and de-legitimate anti-racist and anti-colonial research, teaching and activism”.

In the past, other concerns have been raised over the University’s failure to address a scandal over a group chat which gained national attention, in which antisemitic, misogynistic, abusive and threatening messages, including rape threats, were uncovered.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Sheffield Hallam University has reportedly suspended a PhD student who defended the phrase “Stop the Palestinian Holocaust”.

Shahd Abusalama, who is studying for a PhD in cinema at the University, reportedly shared tweets defending a first-year student who had made a poster that said “Stop the Palestinian Holocaust” and who was accused by a Jewish student of antisemitism.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, which Sheffield Hallam has adopted, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

On social media, Ms Abusalama defended the student by citing Jewish individuals who have made the same analogy, and also wrote: “I understand why a first-year university student used #Holocaust when thinking of Israel’s repeated bombardment of Gaza”, adding: “Maybe she thought she’d garner European sympathy for Palestine by evoking ‘Never Again’ slogan.”

She noted of the term “Holocaust” that she herself would not “use such a politicised word often used to justify the racist state of Israel” because it “distracts attention from the Zionist practices of settler-colonialism and ethnic cleansing against the Palestinians.” However, she proceeded to use other inflammatory terms and claimed that the suggestion that the University’s Palestine Society should undertake antisemitism training in light of the incident was indicative of a “hierarchy of racisms” asking: “Are Islamophobia & Xenophobia insignificant? Prioritising one form of racism over others is itself racist and divisive.”

This was not the first time that Ms Abusalama has courted controversy. She is active in the BDS movement to boycott Israel, the tactics of which an overwhelming majority of British Jews find intimidating, and in the past she reportedly urged people to watch a video on YouTube called “Truth About Zionist Jews Talmud”, which presented numerous antisemitic myths about the Talmud. The video’s description asked “Why the Zionist don’t want us to know what’s in Talmud? [sic],” adding: “Why they want the teaching of the Talmud to be known only to Jews.”

Ms Abusalama wrote on Twitter: “Must watch this video that tells you the truth about #zionist #Jews. They take their legitimacy from #Talmud.” In another post, she reportedly wrote that the “Zionist lobbies control all this for their interest,” adding: “They buy presidents/slaves.”

The video and tweets have since been deleted.

Last week, Ms Abusalama claimed that “Zionist racist publications/trolls have renewed online #bullying to discredit my academic reputation,” and over the weekend, it was reported that she had been suspended by the University from her teaching duties.

She declared: “Family, friends, and followers, I am under renewed attack by Zionist publications protesting my recent appointment as an Associate Lecturer at Sheffield Hallam University, where I also recently submitted a PhD dissertation on the historical representation of Palestinian refugees in colonial, humanitarian and Palestinian documentary films, from 1917 and 1993. The Zionist defamation campaign by Jewish News, Campaign Against Antisemitism and Jewish Chronicle joins a historical pattern where the Zionist colonial narrative is consistently privileged over the narratives of the oppressed.”

She added: “I’m shocked that my academic community seems more interested in protecting its reputation than my academic freedom & wellbeing.”

Recently, the University and College Union (UCU) branch at Sheffield Hallam University was condemned for passingmotion of solidarity with the disgraced professor, David Miller.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

An academic at the University of Glasgow whose tweets breached the International Definition of Antisemitism has dismissed a Jewish student who challenged him as being part of “the Lobby”, according to the JC.

Dr Muir Houston, a senior education lecturer, reportedly claimed that the Jewish former Labour Party MP, Dame Louise Ellman, was “a liar and a fraud – and responsible for vexatious attacks on Corbyn at the behest of a foreign power.”

After he signed a letter of support for the disgraced academic David Miller last year, a Jewish politics student asked Dr Houston why he did so, for an article for a student newspaper.

According to the JC, less than an hour after the student sent the e-mail request, a Twitter account believed to belong to the academic posted “email received from the Lobby” and quoted directly from her message. Later in the day, the account posted: “After signing letter in support of David Miller – a member of the student lobby asked me for statement – given their previous reporting I will decline.”

The student submitted a complaint to the University’s Complaints Resolution Office. In April 2021, the University reportedly upheld the complaint, writing that University officials could “understand why the statements made by Dr Houston have caused offence to you and other members of the Jewish community” and adding: “We are deeply sorry about this. We would like to assure you that, as a result of your complaint, the School is actively pursuing this issue.” However, the letter did not commit to disciplinary action against Dr Houston.

Since then, the student has uncovered multiple social media posts, allegedly from Dr Houston, that breach the International Definition of Antisemitism, and still the University has apparently taken no formal action. The University of Glasgow has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Dr Houston is alleged to have replied to a tweet by European Council President Charles Michel that the lesson of the Holocaust was that “silence is the first step to acceptance”, saying: “#FreePalestine”.

Meanwhile, when another Twitter user asked, “Why have the Scottish government, Nicola Sturgeon, or the SNP not uttered a single word condemning Israeli murder. Have they been captured?” Dr Houston’s handle replied, “Yes”, and posted a link to a public policy document issued by a Scottish Jewish representative group.

The student met with the University of Glasgow Chief Operating Officer David Duncan in October to discuss her concerns. In an e-mail sent later that day, he replied: “the matter was dealt with informally; Dr Houston has not been the subject of formal disciplinary action.” When the student sent further tweets in November, he replied the following week: “Following further investigation of the twitter feed you complained about, I have concluded that some of the contents are problematic.” He said that the matter had been referred to the Head of School.

The student apparently asked Mr Duncan which tweets he considered “problematic”, and Mr Duncan pointed to one that reacted to news that the former Labour MP Mary Creagh had received an MBE, despite attacking Jeremy Corbyn, saying: “She got her 30 pieces of silver then?” He also pointed to another tweet that called “Modern Hebrew” a “synthetic language”.

Mr Duncan mused that some of the tweets “simply take a political perspective on developments in the Middle East – that to my mind is not problematic.” But the student was outraged, citing the claim that Dame Louise operated “at the behest of a foreign power” and writing: “I am in disbelief as to how you cannot see how these are problematic? The impunity granted to Muir is disgusting.”

According to the JC, the e-mail trail suggests numerous delays on the part of the University.

A spokesperson for the University of Glasgow said: “The complaint has been upheld and action is ongoing. We are unable to comment further at this time.” In a separate statement, the University reportedly added: “In no way does the University of Glasgow or Dr Duncan find racism or racial discrimination acceptable.”

Mr Duncan reportedly insisted that he was confident he had handled the complaint “appropriately and fairly”, saying: “I examined all the social media comments made by the subject of the complaint since the previous action by his School. I also drew on informal advice from Jewish colleagues.”

Dr Houston reportedly told the JC: “The Israel lobby is an actually existing phenomenon composed of witting and unwitting assets of a hostile and illegitimate foreign state. That state, Israel, can only continue to exist because of a slow genocide being committed against the Palestinian people. Britons should be deeply concerned that the Jewish Chronicle, whose funders remain secret, is seeking to lead the largest political witch-hunt in British history. We should all ask on whose behalf this onslaught of censorship and intimidation is being conducted.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Several of these social media posts appear to breach the International Definition of Antisemitism, including claiming that antisemitism allegations against Labour were vexatious or at the behest of a foreign power. The posts warrant urgent action by the University, as does Dr Houston’s reported reaction to complaints, which appear to have invoked yet another trope. Universities have a duty of care towards Jewish students and an obligation to students to present lecturers who are grounded in reality rather than conspiracy. If the University continues to fail to take action or obfuscate, we shall be reporting it to the Office for Students.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

A professor at the University of Cambridge has been accused of conspiratorial attacks by both the University’s Jewish society and a fellow academic.

Priyamvada Gopal, a professor of Postcolonial Studies at the University, reportedly accused Samuel Rubinstein, a Jewish student at Cambridge who wrote an article criticising her tweets of fellow academic David Abulafia, of being motivated by her stance on the International Definition of Antisemitism, despite Mr Rubinstein’s article not mentioning the Definition.

Ms Gopal stated that she was “the subject of a concocted story eagerly picked up by tabloids and Murdoch press”, adding: “They make the news, they write it up, they target, they assault, they win.” 

She also accused Mr Rubinstein of having “quite powerful familial connections to the liberal media.” 

In response, the University’s Jewish society released a statement in which it said that the society “Stands in solidarity with our members who have been subject to unfounded conspiracy theories and online intimidation.

“In an inflammatory Twitter thread [Ms Gopal] echoes historic tropes about media control, and goes on to insinuate that the Jewish journalists are acting out of fidelity to the IHRA [International] Definition of Antisemitism.”

Mr Rubinstein told the JC: “Prof. Gopal had every right to respond to my piece, and could have done so by taking issue with the substance of my argument, but it is regrettable that her response – a tissue of falsehoods and rancid conspiracy theories, getting progressively unhinged as the day progressed – vindicated every single claim I made in my original article.”

Professor Abulafia, the academic originally criticised by Ms Gopal, said: “I’m not trying to get Gopal sacked but she’s clearly completely out of control. In a series of tweets she claimed that the student newspaper journalist I spoke to was part of a conspiracy. Both he and I are Jewish and we are all familiar with the antisemitic Jewish conspiracy trope — she even referenced guidelines designed to stop hate speech around the Holocaust.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Sheffield Hallam University is reportedly investigating a PhD student who defended the phrase “Stop the Palestinian Holocaust”.

Shahd Abusalama, who is studying for a PhD in cinema at the University, reportedly shared tweets defending a first-year student who had made a poster that said “Stop the Palestinian Holocaust” and who was accused by a Jewish student of antisemitism.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, which Sheffield Hallam has adopted, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

On social media, Ms Abusalama defended the student by citing Jewish individuals who have made the same analogy, and also wrote: “I understand why a first-year university student used #Holocaust when thinking of Israel’s repeated bombardment of Gaza”, adding: “Maybe she thought she’d garner European sympathy for Palestine by evoking ‘Never Again’ slogan.”

She noted of the term “Holocaust” that she herself would not “use such a politicised word often used to justify the racist state of Israel” because it “distracts attention from the Zionist practices of settler-colonialism and ethnic cleansing against the Palestinians.” However, she proceeded to use other inflammatory terms and claimed that the suggestion that the University’s Palestine Society should undertake antisemitism training in light of the incident was indicative of a “hierarchy of racisms” asking: “Are Islamophobia & Xenophobia insignificant? Prioritising one form of racism over others is itself racist and divisive.”

The University reportedly said that its student conduct team is investigating the PhD student’s social media posts.

This is not the first time that Ms Abusalama has courted controversy. She is active in the BDS movement to boycott Israel, the tactics of which an overwhelming majority of British Jews find intimidating, and in the past she reportedly urged people to watch a video on YouTube called “Truth About Zionist Jews Talmud”, which presented numerous antisemitic myths about the Talmud. The video’s description asked “Why the Zionist don’t want us to know what’s in Talmud? [sic],” adding: “Why they want the teaching of the Talmud to be known only to Jews.”

Ms Abusalama wrote on Twitter: “Must watch this video that tells you the truth about #zionist #Jews. They take their legitimacy from #Talmud.” In another post, she reportedly wrote that the “Zionist lobbies control all this for their interest,” adding: “They buy presidents/slaves.”

The video and tweets have since been deleted.

Recently, the University and College Union (UCU) branch at Sheffield Hallam University was condemned for passingmotion of solidarity with the disgraced professor, David Miller.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Campaign Against Antisemitism has launched a new weekly podcast. New episodes of Podcast Against Antisemitism are available every Thursday and can be streamed here or downloaded wherever you get your podcasts.

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds Oak Hill College for adding an explanatory note to its editions of Kittel following a request from us.

The Theological Dictionary of the New Testament, edited in part by Gerhard Kittel and known colloquially as “Kittel”, is a reference book openly available in Christian seminaries. While we recognise that it is a useful resource, we are also acutely aware that its editor and some early contributors, for example K.G. Kuhn, were supporters and propagators of Nazi ideology. Mr Kittel and Mr Kuhn were particularly engaged with the “Jewish Question” and actively developed and encouraged antisemitic ideology and conduct. The former claimed that Christianity should act “not as a protector of the Jew but as an effective anti-Jewish force”, while the latter, who supported Hitler’s SS, was a member of the Committee for Jewish Atrocity Propaganda, which arranged the 1933 boycott of Jews. There is no shortage of evidence of their worldview.

The particular issue with Kittel is not merely the views of its editors and contributors, but that their views subtly but significantly impact its content, and therefore it behoves educational institutions to make their students aware of this influence when they consult the resource.

As Prof. Maurice Casey warns in his article, Some Antisemitic Assumptions in the Theological Dictionary of the New Testament (1999): “The frames of reference never lie on the surface of the articles: they are buried in apparently historical statements. It follows that this dictionary should be used only with the utmost care. Students should be warned of this hidden menace, and all readers should consult it only with their critical wits sharpened to the highest degree.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has accordingly written to numerous seminaries to inquire as to whether they make Kittel available to their students and, if so, urge them to include an explanatory note, which will assist both their students’ wider awareness of the historical influences on the resources that they use and also contribute to positive communal relations between Christians and Jews in the next generation.

Oak Hill has confirmed to us that it holds one copy of the multi-volume dictionary in its library and will insert an explanatory note into the volume. The College has advised us that it actively promotes engagement by its students with the more recent New International Dictionary of New Testament Theology and Exegesis by Moises Silva.

The College says that it positively engages the issue of early Jewish and Christian relations and tackles and addresses antisemitic interpretations.

Oak Hill’s welcome addition of the explanatory note follows the same decision by Moorlands College, as part of wider calls by Campaign Against Antisemitism for Christian seminaries to provide students with the full background and context of Kittel’s dictionary.

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We are delighted that Oak Hill College has taken this step, which is a testament to the importance of working towards positive relations between faith communities. At Campaign Against Antisemitism, we try to act by the same principles, and I am indebted to our Christian colleagues for leading on this project. We now call on other seminaries to follow the example set by Moorlands College and Oak Hill College and add similar explanatory notes to their editions of Kittel.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism works to raise awareness of antisemitism among all faith and minority communities.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has launched a new weekly podcast. New episodes of Podcast Against Antisemitism are available every Thursday and can be streamed here or downloaded wherever you get your podcasts.

The University of Oxford is under fire for inviting a defender of the disgraced academic David Miller and critic of the International Definition of Antisemitism to deliver lecture on “equality and diversity”.

Tariq Modood, the founder and Director of the University of Bristol’s Research Centre for the Study of Ethnicity and Citizenship, delivered the Oxford Law Faculty’s Annual Equality and Diversity Lecture, titled “Islamophobia and the Struggle for Recognition,” last week.

In March, Prof. Modood defended his then-Bristol colleague, David Miller, reportedly saying: “I think the empirical research that David is doing is not antisemitic and is valuable for hunting down evidence that displays the linkages between various organisations and funders in this country, the U.S. and Israel that are not just promoting their own views. Of course they have a right to do that, but they’re having the effect of making it difficult for people in this country, including academics, to speak up at conferences for the Palestinian cause without incurring the charge of antisemitism and therefore putting one’s career and reputation at risk.”

He also reportedly criticised the International Definition of Antisemitism, asserting that it was “mixing up anti-Zionism and anti-Israel with antisemitism”.

David Miller was fired by the University of Bristol over comments he had made about Jewish students, a month after Campaign Against Antisemitism commenced a lawsuit on behalf of current students against the institution.

The incident came just weeks after Oxford became embroiled in controversy after it was revealed that the University had accepted a donation from the Mosley family trust and was intending to honour the family name.

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “It is extraordinary that a vocal supporter of the disgraced academic David Miller and an opponent of the International Definition of Antisemitism should be invited to lecture on equality and diversity. In the midst of the deep controversy surrounding the acceptance of donations from the Mosley family trust and attempts to honour the name of Britain’s foremost fascist family, one would have expected the University of Oxford to be particularly sensitive to Jewish concerns at this time. Instead, the University has yet again shown contempt towards Jewish students.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

There are fears at the University of Toronto that a resolution passed by one of its student unions could be used to prevent Jewish caterers from supplying goods or services.

A motion passed by Scarborough Campus Student Union (SCSU) at the University of Toronto pledged to buy kosher food “only” from kosher caterers who “do not normalise Israeli apartheid.”

Given the central role that the Jewish state plays in contemporary Jewish identity, the notion of excluding Jewish institutions that have connections to Israel potentially means untenable restrictions on other Jewish practices, including the provision of kosher food, much of which is produced in Israel.

Consequently, the resolution has led to fears among some Jewish students and student groups that they will not be able to have a kosher diet on campus.

Scarborough campus student Gabriela Rosenblum said that “even for something as simple” as ordering jam doughnuts for Chanukah, Jewish students at SCSU would “now be forced to prove that kosher caterers do not support their Jewish homeland” which, she added, was “basically impossible.”

A spokesperson for the University’s Hillel said it was “deeply disappointed” by the union’s position and called for the union executive to “reverse this shameful resolution.”

Daniel Koren, Executive Director of Hasbara Canada, said in a statement: “Whether the SCSU likes it or not, Israel is an essential part of Jewish identity. They do not have the right to tell Jewish students how to practice Judaism on campus.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

The Cardiff University Students’ Union has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The welcome move will add pressure to Cardiff University, which earlier this year declined to adopt the Definition, ludicrously fearing “a potentially divisive situation.”

The motion was passed at the Students’ Union’s Annual General Meeting on 25th November, following unsuccessful efforts by student groups over the past year to pressure the University into doing so as well.

Elsewhere, Students’ Unions at the University of East Anglia (UEA) and Queen Mary University of London, failed to represent and show solidarity with their Jewish members by adopting the Jerusalem Declaration, which is a wrecking document intended to undermine the globally-recognised Definition.

Both Universities have themselves adopted the Definition, even as their students unions have now failed to do so.

It is understood that at the UEA Students’ Union, the measure passed amid controversy over the extent to which Jewish representatives would be able to contribute to the debate. The UEA Jewish Society said in an e-mail to the Union Council that “it is disgusting that this is even being debated and that non-Jewish people feel they have the right to tell us, the Jewish community, what antisemitism is.” The motion expressly repudiated the International Definition of Antisemitism, even though it is supported by Jewish students, the wider Jewish community and national governments around the world.

It is understood that the campaign to adopt the wrecking document has been underway for months at the campus. Jewish students are reportedly reviewing appeal options.

At Queen Mary University, the Students’ Union repealed its previous adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism and replaced it with the Jerusalem Declaration. The measure was reportedly not discussed with Jewish students, who reacted with disgust.

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We commend Cardiff Students’ Union for adopting the International Definition of Antisemitism and urge the University to follow the inspired lead of its students. We also call on the UEA and Queen Mary’s Students’ Unions to listen to Jewish students and think again.

“With efforts to water down the International Definition of Antisemitism increasingly failing, campus groups are now seeking to adopt the so-called ‘Jerusalem Declaration’ instead, which can only sabotage efforts to fight antisemitism.

“This week, we have seen students’ unions take the opposite approach to their universities: where the university has adopted the Definition, the students’ union adopts the Jerusalem Declaration, and where the university has failed to adopt the Definition, the students’ union does so.

“It is extraordinary that fighting racism should be so controversial: all universities and students’ unions, if they truly care about Jewish students, should be adopting the Definition in full and without caveat or substitutes.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

The University and College Union (UCU) branch at Sheffield Hallam University has been condemned for passing a motion of solidarity with the disgraced professor, David Miller.

Prof. Miller, an academic obsessed with anti-Jewish conspiracy theories, was fired last month by the University of Bristol one month after Campaign Against Antisemitism commenced a lawsuit on behalf of current students against the institution, amid pressure from the Jewish community and leading politicians.

On 17th November, the inflammatory motion was passed by a vote of eighteen for and sixteen against, with eleven abstentions.

The motion says that the branch learned “with dismay” that Prof. Miller had been fired, calling the allegations against the disgraced academic “malicious and unfounded”. Deploying a familiar trope, the motion baselessly claimed that “Miller had been accused of antisemitism because of his criticisms of Israel and Zionism,” an antisemitic notion known today as the “Livingstone Formulation”, a phrase named by Prof. David Hirsch after the former Mayor of London.

The motion also insisted that there was nothing wrong in Prof. Miller’s claim that the Bristol University Jewish Society was “acting in the interests of a foreign state, Israel,” even though this too is a classic antisemitic trope.

The motion went on to suggest that Prof. Miller’s dismissal was somehow evidence of the “inadequacy” of the “discredited” International Definition of Antisemitism, even though this Definition enjoys the consensus support of the Jewish community and has been adopted by all major political parties and numerous national governments around the world.

The motion resolved to send an “expression of solidarity” to Prof. Miller; call on the University of Bristol to rescind its decision to sack him; call on the National Executive Committee of UCU to “consider the imposition of ‘greylisting’ on Bristol until Miller is reinstated”; and call on the leadership of UCU to write to the Vice Chancellor, Senate and Trustees of the University of Bristol to express UCU’s “condemnation of this assault on academic freedom”.

An amendment urging caution was reportedly delayed until after the motion was passed, and the amendment itself was then voted down.

Sheffield Jewish Society said in a statement that “Miller created a hostile for Jewish students at Bristol” and accused the local UCU branch of “importing this hostility to Sheffield by accusing those same students of being malicious actors and claiming that their accusations of antisemitism are unfounded.” The statement observed that the UCU branch chose not to speak to Jewish students and their representative bodies to understand their concerns, and noted that “when claims of antisemitism are dismissed as being ‘malicious and unfounded’, and assumed to be dishonest tools to silence criticism of Israel, Jewish students are not being safeguarded from antisemitism, but rather antisemitism is safeguarded and nurtured.”

The statement ended by calling on the Sheffield Hallam University UCU to “rescind the motion, which does harm to Jewish academic staff and students, and for the hundreds of [local UCU]  members who did not attend this meeting, and allowed this motion to be passed in their name, to take seriously their responsibility to stand against antisemitism within their university.”

Earlier this year, UCU Scotland also issued a statement defending Prof. Miller.

UCU has a horrendous reputation in the Jewish community.

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “David Miller is a conspiracy theorist who believes that Bristol’s Jewish Society and the entire nationwide Jewish student body ‘encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism’. His teachings have been going on for years and, after a long, community-wide campaign and a lawsuit by Campaign Against Antisemitism on behalf of Jewish students, Bristol University finally made a decision to fire him.

“Rather than reflect on this episode, Sheffield Hallam UCU has maligned Jewish students, alienating them and Jewish staff and adding to a litany of insults to the Jewish community from UCU over the years. It is little wonder that UCU’s reputation in the Jewish community is in the gutter.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities. Sheffield Hallam University has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

An Oxford Dean involved in a bitter dispute at Christ Church College has been criticised for comparing his plight to the Holocaust.

The Very Rev. Prof. Martyn Percy is currently suspended after an allegation of sexual harassment was made against him, which he denies. The claim reportedly comes in the midst of his three-year battle with college academics over his modernisation plans.

In a 2,800-word blog post titled “The Red Triangle” and illustrated with a photograph of the concentration camp striped pyjamas uniform, a Star of David and a “P” symbol, used to denote political prisoners, Prof. Percy compared his case also to that of the anti-Nazi activist and pastor Dietrich Bonhoeffer. He wrote: “My experience of the last three years has given me a tiny taste of what it may have been like to be forced to wear the red triangle that the Nazis made political prisoners wear on the streets, and later in the camps.”

He went on to write: “Over the course of these three years, I have been subjected to public impugning of my reputation, and personal attacks resulting in severe trauma and life-changing injury. I am expected to live and act as though I am a convicted sex-offender, and subjected to draconian restrictions that would have raised eyebrows had I been a paedophile on bail. Few of my colleagues raised a voice in protest. Those that have were quickly taken aside, bullied, victimised and threatened. A good friend summed up the apparent hopelessness of my position. She said, ‘they won’t let you be Dean, much as Bonhoeffer was not allowed to be a Lutheran Pastor or the theologian he was called to be’.”

He also insisted, however: “I am not comparing myself to a victim of Auschwitz here – please don’t get me wrong. I am, rather, the victim of sustained, vicious, localised non-violent hatred, with elements in the community turning on me and those who support me.”

Prof. Percy was condemned by the undergraduate Christ Church Junior Common Room and the Graduate Common Room, which described his post as “abhorrent” and claimed that he was trivialising “the suffering of victims of Nazi persecution, including the Jewish community, the Polish community, people with disabilities, people of colour, and the LGBTQ+ community, groups to which the Dean refers in his essay.” The statement insisted that it was referring only to the blog post and was not taking a position on the wider issues surrounding Prof. Percy.

Prof. Percy has removed the blog post.

Last year, he stepped down from his post while the sexual harassment claims that he stroked the hair of a woman in the cathedral vestry were investigated by the Church of England in a Church Disciplinary Measure (CDM) inquiry.

Three years ago, he was suspended following claims of “behaviour of an immoral, scandalous or disgraceful nature” in a dispute relating to his salary. He refused to resign and a retired High Court judge rejected 27 charges against him after an internal tribunal, but Christ Church refused to reimburse his legal fees.

Last year, e-mails from Prof. Percy’s colleagues disparaging him were uncovered by the media.

A spokesman for the Diocese of Oxford said of the Red Triangle article: “The article posted on Martyn Percy’s personal website is a misappropriation of the Holocaust and is unacceptable. Whatever his complaints about an investigation of a sexual harassment complaint made against him, the Dean should not compare it to genocide. We fully acknowledge the complexity and pain of the present situation for the Dean and the complainant also. Despite his claims otherwise, significant support continues to be provided for all of those involved. Meanwhile, the ongoing legal processes must be allowed to take their course, and Dean Percy remains suspended from cathedral and college duties. We are glad to see the link to the article has now been removed from his website.”

A joint open letter from a coalition of Jewish charities, including Campaign Against Antisemitism, has demanded that the University of Oxford and St Peter’s College, Oxford, do not “honour or use the Mosley family name” amid a donation scandal engulfing the institution.

The University was reportedly given a £6 million donation from a charitable trust established by Max Mosley, the Formula One tycoon. His fortune originated as an inheritance from his father, Sir Oswald Mosley, who was leader of the antisemitic British Union of Fascists and who wedded his wife in Joseph Goebbels’ house in the presence of Adolf Hitler. Mr Mosley is believed to have supported his father’s cause — and the Union Movement, which succeeded the British Union of Fascists — during the late 1950s and 1960s.

The £6 million donation to the University was to endow the Alexander Mosley Professor of Biophysics Fund. In addition, St Peter’s College was due to receive a £5 million donation to build a new block of student accommodation named Alexander Mosley House. Mr Mosley, who died earlier this year, set up the trust ten years ago in the name of his son, Alexander, who was an alumnus of St Peter’s College and died of a drug overdose.

Writing together, the charities told the University and College: “We find it extraordinary that, at a time when the university and its colleges are reviewing their legacies and making more efforts to be inclusive of minorities, your institutions could readily accept contributions from a notorious fascist family that has caused immense pain to the Jewish community within living memory and whose fortune derives from a man who strove to see the antisemitic policies of Adolf Hitler implemented in this country,” the letter said.

“We are at a loss to understand how you imagine a present or future Jewish student will react to being taught by a professor, or having to live in accommodation, that celebrates a family whose patriarch led violent marches through Jewish neighbourhoods, and who was married at Joseph Goebbels’s house in Berlin in the presence of Adolf Hitler.”

Signed by ten national and local charities, the letter concluded by urging Oxford’s vice-chancellor, Prof. Louise Richardson, and the master of St Peter’s College, Prof. Judith Buchanan, “in the strongest possible terms” to “apply a portion of the funds to education about antisemitism, delivered by a credible organisation; dedicate some of the funds to supporting Jewish life at the University, and at St Peter’s in particular; and confirm that no project, including the endowed chair and the student accommodation, will honour or use the Mosley family name.”

The letter is signed by AJEX, The Jewish Military Association; Campaign Against Antisemitism; the Community Security Trust; Generation 2 Generation, which helps the children and grandchildren of Holocaust survivors to tell their family stories; the Holocaust Educational Trust; the Jewish Leadership Council; Oxford Chabad Society; Oxford Jewish Society; the Simon Wiesenthal Centre, Europe; and the Union of Jewish Students.

It has also emerged that Imperial College London received almost £2.5 million and University College London received half a million pounds from the trust, even as both universities have been reviewing the names and legacies of their buildings in sensitivity toward other minorities.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities. The University of Oxford has adopted the Definition.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Campaign Against Antisemitism is calling for arrests over scenes last night at the London School of Economics (LSE).

A mob of students was filmed shouting an antisemitic chant in a protest against a talk by the Israeli ambassador at their university, before trying to intimidate her as she left campus.

A rally of some 500 students were caught on film chanting “from the river to the sea, Palestine will be free”, a refrain that only makes sense as a call for the destruction of the world’s only Jewish state – and its replacement with a State of Palestine – and is thus an attempt to deny Jews, uniquely, the right to self-determination, which is a breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism. The LSE has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

In deeply disturbing online posts, an Instagram account titled “@lseclasswar”, which is believed to be associated with the protesters, posted calls for violence, writing: “Whoever smashes the Ambassador [sic] car window (Lincoln’s Inn Field), gets pints. Let’s f***in frighten her.” They also posted: “18:25, we’re storming in. let’s make her shake. F*** the old bill.”

It is a criminal offence to incite violence or to aid, abet, counsel or procure the commission of criminal damage.

The mob was prevented from reaching the ambassador by police officers, however her security team had to move quickly to keep her safe. Jewish students left safely from the main entrance under the protection of CST.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “These were extremely disturbing scenes which reflect the tenor that discourse has descended to at LSE. Those responsible for the criminality that we witnessed must be arrested. If they are students, LSE must bring disciplinary action against them in accordance with the International Definition of Antisemitism, which it has adopted. LSE already has a poor reputation when it comes to protecting Jewish students, so when a mob shouts antisemitic chants and online there are calls for violence, it has a duty to act and cooperate with the police.” 

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

https://twitter.com/PoliticsForAlI/status/1458218239247405056

The University of Cambridge has banned a speaker after he impersonated Adolf Hitler during a debate. 

Art historian Andrew Graham-Dixon, 60, performed the act as a part of his argument against the motion entitled “this house believes there is no such thing as good taste”. 

In his impersonation, which the University Union’s President called the “longest Hitler impression” that the chamber had ever heard, Mr Graham-Dixon said: “This modern, horrible art that was promoted by the Jews.. and the modern art, it was cubist – inspired by the art of the ne***s. This tribal art, urgh, how horrible is that? We must expunge this from our Deutschland. We are the pure, Aryan people. Our genetics is pure, our hearts must be pure, our tastes must be pure.”

Mr Graham-Dixon later apologised for the impression and claimed that he was trying to “underline the utterly evil nature of Hitler.”

He added: “I apologise sincerely to anyone who found my debating tactics and use of Hitler’s own language distressing; on reflection I can see that some of the words I used, even in quotation, are inherently offensive.” 

However, Mr Graham-Dixon has now been banned from speaking at the University after Union President Keir Bradwell said that they “will create a blacklist of speakers never to be invited back” that would also be shared with other unions, adding that “Andrew will be on that list.”

Mr Bradwell issued an apology of his own after he failed to speak out against the impersonation at the time, stating: “I would like to offer my unreserved apology for the comments made by a speaker in our debate on Thursday night. Neither I nor the society condones the thoughtless and grotesque language used by the individual in question, and I am sorry for my failure to intervene at the time.

“The speaker in question employed a crass and deeply insensitive impression of Hitler to make the point in opposition that there is such a thing as bad taste […] It was inexcusable, and I regret not intervening.”

The University adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism last year.

The University of Oxford has become mired in controversy over a donation from the Mosley family.

The University was reportedly given a £6 million donation from a charitable trust established by Max Mosley, the Formula One tycoon. His fortune originated as an inheritance from his father, Sir Oswald Mosley, who was leader of the antisemitic British Union of Fascists and who wedded his wife in Joseph Goebbels’ house in the presence of Adolf Hitler. Mr Mosley is believed to have supported his father’s cause – and the Union Movement, which succeeded the British Union of Fascists – during the late 1950s and 1960s.

The £6 million donation to the University was to endow the Alexander Mosley Professor of Biophysics Fund.

In addition, St Peter’s College was due to receive a £5 million donation to build a new block of student accommodation named Alexander Mosley House. Mr Mosley, who died earlier this year, set up the trust ten years ago in the name of his son, Alexander, who was an alumnus of St Peter’s College and died of a drug overdose.

Prof. Lawrence Goldman, Emeritus Fellow in History, wrote to St Peter’s College urging it to refuse the donation, saying that it came from the “most infamous fascist dynasty in the English-speaking world.” Since the controversy, the College has reportedly decided to consult over the name of the proposed accommodation building.

It is understood that Lady Margaret Hall has also accepted a donation of around £260,000 from the trust.

The donations are particularly notable because the University and its colleges have become increasingly sensitive to the concerns of other minorities over the University’s past.

Oxford University and both colleges insist that the donations were reviewed and cleared by an independent committee in a “robust” manner, taking “legal, ethical and reputational issues into consideration.”

It has since emerged that Imperial College London received almost £2.5 million and University College London received half a million pounds from the trust, even as both universities have been reviewing the names and legacies of their buildings in sensitivity toward other minorities.

A spokesperson for the University of Oxford said: “We can confirm that donations to the department of physics from the Alexander Mosley Charitable Trust, including endowment of a chair in biophysics named after Alexander Mosley, a graduate of the university, were all considered and approved by the university’s committee to review donations and research funding.”

St Peter’s College said that the trust’s “generous” donation will make a “transformative” difference to students, adding: “Alexander Mosley was a student at the college and is warmly remembered by tutors and fellow students. He died in tragic circumstances and the [trust] was set up to remember him.”

A spokesperson for Lady Margaret Hall said that the donation “enabled a cohort of students from very diverse and low-income backgrounds to attend Oxford and participate in Lady Margaret Hall’s pioneering foundation year,” adding that there was no attempt to “rehabilitate” the Mosley family name and that the trust “did not ask for and were not given any public acknowledgement of the donation”.

A spokesman for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The Mosley family has an infamous record in relation to antisemitism. Oxford University should think hard about accepting a donation from the family’s trust, ensuring that a portion of the money funds education about antisemitism or supports Jewish life at the university.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities. The University of Oxford has adopted the Definition.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

In a vile act of vandalism, a Jewish fraternity, Tau Kappa Epsilon in Washington D.C.’s George Washington University, reportedly had hot sauce poured all over its house and its Torah scroll torn up and covered in detergent.

The fraternity posted a statement to Instagram on Sunday in which it said its “entire chapter is outraged and saddened by this blatant act of antisemitism and violence.”

Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students at George Washington University, Dr Cissy Petty, called the incident “horrific”, adding that an investigation will be undertaken by the university. “I know this has frightened and hurt many in our community. I am angry and saddened by this disgusting, self-centered act,” she said.

This is not the first instance this year of anti-Jewish hate taking place on American university campuses. In April, the University of North Florida was vandalised with stickers that bore QR codes, which, when scanned, lead to a white supremacy website displaying antisemitic content, and in September, a student reportedly woke up to the sound of laughing on a Saturday – the day of the Jewish Sabbath – to find that his mezuzah had been removed.

Students at the University of Essex reportedly protested against a speech on Afghanistan by calling for the destruction of Israel.

Col. Richard Kemp, the former commander of British forces in Afghanistan, spoke to the University’s Conservative Society while protestors outside chanted “From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free,” a chant that only makes sense as a call for the destruction of the world’s only Jewish state – and its replacement with a State of Palestine – and is thus an attempt to deny Jews, uniquely, the right to self-determination, which is a breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The talk was about Britain’s withdrawal from Afghanistan and had nothing to do with Israel.

The student body at the University of Essex has a history of controversy relating to antisemitism. Two years ago, more than 200 students at the University voted against the creation of a Jewish society, which are commonplace on British campuses as a home for Jewish students, facilitating their religious observance and cultural and social life as well as representing them to university authorities.

The vote came amidst a row over antisemitism, with one academic dismissed from the University after asserting on social media that “the Zionists next want to create a society here at our university.” The motion did ultimately pass.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities. The University of Essex has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

A Toronto law professor has apologised for changing his Twitter profile photo to an image of a Jewish judge with a quote attributed to a well-known Nazi written over it. 

Professor Mohammad Fadel, who teaches Business Organisations at the University of Toronto Faculty of Law, changed his Twitter profile photo last week to that of Justice David Spiro, a Jewish member of Canada’s Tax Court, with the words “The sovereign is he who decides the exceptions” written below. This is a quote from Carl Schmitt, who was an active member of the Nazi Party. Prof. Fadel also changed his Twitter name to “Schmitt lives in Toronto.”

Prof. Fadel has since released an apology in which he said that although he “never intended to compare Justice Sprio to a Nazi,” he understood in retrospect why people accused him of making the connection. He went on to say that he was “deeply sorry for the pain” that he “unintentionally caused them.” 

In August, the University of California Merced launched a formal investigation into the alleged antisemitism of Prof. Abbas Ghassemi after he reportedly tweeted that “Zionists” controlled the American economy, government policy, banking, and media.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

It was reported that the antisemitic rapper Wiley performed at a freshers’ event in Preston on Saturday despite protest from the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) Students’ Union beforehand.

On 24th July 2020, the rapper Richard Kylea Cowie, who is known as Wiley, spent days engaged in an escalating rant on social media against Jews. After likening Jews to the Ku Klux Klan and claiming that Jews had cheated him and were “snakes”, Wiley tweeted that Jews should “hold some corn”, a slang expression meaning that they should be shot. He added: “Jewish community you deserve it”. He then also called on “black people” to go to “war” with Jews.

Wiley repeatedly evoked conspiracy theories that Jews were responsible for the slave trade and that modern-day Jews are in fact imposters who usurped black people — a conspiracy theory that has incited acts of terrorism against Jews, such as a shooting in Jersey City and a stabbing attack in Monsey, NY during the festival of Chanukah last December.

In the days that followed, Wiley continued to rail against Jews on Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. Following discussions with Campaign Against Antisemitism, a major 48-hour boycott of Twitter and Instagram in which we participated, and our projection of antisemitic tweets onto Twitter’s London headquarters, which then went viral, TwitterFacebook (which owns Instagram), Google (which owns YouTube) and TikTok agreed to remove Wiley from their platforms, depriving him of access to his nearly one million social media followers.

On Friday, it emerged that UCLan Students’ Union released a statement condemning the news of Wiley’s scheduled performance at Preston’s Switch nightclub. The statement read: “UCLan Students’ Union sometimes signposts students to external events being run across the city, but we are always clear that these events are external to us and are not run by us. We are also able to confirm that this Switch club night was not one of these events. We condemn all forms of antisemitism and given the previous actions of Wiley, which include a series of antisemitic social media posts, we strongly encourage Switch to cancel this event and reconsider any further ties with Wiley and his management.”

The University adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism last November.

However, despite the students’ wishes, Switch persisted in hosting the rapper and has since uploaded a series of photos and videos of his performance to its Facebook page.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is continuing its response to Wiley’s antisemitic tirade, including:

  • Filing our criminal complaint against Wiley in the Netherlands;
  • Continuing to meet with executives from Twitter, Facebook and Google to address their response to antisemitism on their platforms;
  • Working with the Cabinet Office’s Honours Forfeiture Committee to ensure that Wiley’s MBE is revoked;
  • Seeking a change in policy so that racists are automatically stripped of their honours in future;
  • Urging the Government to bring forward legislation to regulate social networks and force them to remove racist incitement which has recently borne fruit; and
  • Working with the music industry to remove Wiley’s awards and ensure that he is shunned for his racism.

David Miller, an academic obsessed with anti-Jewish conspiracy theories, has been fired by the University of Bristol one month after Campaign Against Antisemitism commenced a lawsuit on behalf of current students against the institution.

Our legal case against the University concerned alleged unlawful harassment on the basis of Jewish ethnicity and Judaism, amounting to breaches of the Equality Act 2010, as well as breaches of contract. We launched proceedings in late August and the University swiftly realised that it was putting itself in legal jeopardy by sustaining Prof. Miller’s employment at the institution.

A number of brave students at the University stepped forward to act as complainants in the litigation. We also wish to thank Asserson Law Offices, led by senior partner Trevor Asserson, and barristers Derek Spitz of One Essex Court and Benjamin Gray of Littleton Chambers.

Having failed to act over Prof. Miller since his comments in February, in a statement released today by the University, it said that “following a full investigation”, Prof. Miller is “no longer employed by the University of Bristol,” explaining that “We have a duty of care to all students and the wider University community, in addition to a need to apply our own codes of conduct consistently and with integrity.” The statement admitted that “Prof. Miller did not meet the standards of behaviour we expect from our staff” and that accordingly, “the University has concluded that Professor Miller’s employment should be terminated with immediate effect.”

The lawsuit related to Prof. Miller’s speech on a Zoom webinar in February this year in which he said that the “Zionist Movement” is “the enemy” that must be engaged, that it is “the enemy of world peace,” and that those associated with Zionism, including Jewish students on Bristol campus, “must be directly targeted”.

Taken together, the implication of Prof. Miller’s remarks is that all decent people who support “world peace” should view Bristol Jewish Society and the Union of Jewish Students, and Jewish people, including those who identify with those bodies, and the vast majority of Jewish students as an “enemy” that must be “directly targeted”.

He also said that interfaith work between Jewish and Muslim groups is “a trojan horse for normalising Zionism in the Muslim community”. He also claimed that Jewish students, by virtue of being Zionist, “encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”.

Prof. Miller has a long record of inflammatory statements about the Jewish community. 

Bristol had come under increasing pressure from the Jewish community, which was united in its disgust at Prof. Miller’s comments and the drawn-out investigation that the University was conducting with no apparent end in sight.

Prof. Miller’s statements and the University’s failure to condemn them and take swift action against him have been the subject of a great deal of attention from the Jewish community as well as hundreds of academics and Parliament, including a written question by Lord Austin, as well as a recent intervention from Robert Halfon MP. Prof. Miller was also defended by an array of controversial ‘usual suspects’ whose interventions did nothing for his collapsing credibility.

The legal claim that we spearheaded contended that Prof. Miller’s statements sought to create a hostile environment for Jewish students. It further alleged that the University was liable for Prof. Miller’s conduct, and was further liable in its own right, for unlawful conduct in breach of the Equality Act, and for its breach of its contract with students.

Other than a final call for prospective claimants, we minimised the public profile of the case in order to protect the identities of the brave student claimants who not only believed that enough is enough but that, in order for things to change, they must also act on that belief. We are enormously grateful to them for their courage. Despite the lower public profile of the case, the University was in no doubt about our intentions and resolve.

We also wish to thank others in the Jewish community, MPs and academics for the pressure that they have brought to bear on the University of Bristol in recent months.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Within a month of us commencing proceedings against the University of Bristol on behalf of a group of courageous Jewish students, David Miller has been fired. We pay tribute to them for standing up against antisemitism and to our legal counsel for helping us secure this victory in the fight against anti-Jewish racism on campus.

“Following the launch of our lawsuit, it was clear to the University that it would be held to account in court and had to act to protect Jewish students in accordance with the law. Universities across the country should be warned that we will do whatever it takes to defend Jewish students from racists on campus by upholding their rights in court where necessary.”

The case was the latest step by Campaign Against Antisemitism to defend the rights of individual Jewish students. We believe that universities and students’ unions must be robustly held to account when they fail to defend Jewish students or when they allow their lecturers to discriminate against or harass them.

700 Muslims from around the world, led by the divisive British politician Salma Yaqoob, rapper Lowkey and leaders of the controversial CAGE activist group, have signed an open letter claiming that Prof. David Miller is being censored from criticising Israel.

The letter states that “as British Muslims” the supposed “orchestrated pile-on by pro-Israel groups, politicians and public figures against Professor David Miller is a tactic we recognise very well.”

Prof. Miller, a Professor of Political Sociology at the University of Bristol, is a conspiracy theorist with a history of controversy relating to Jewish students. In his latest outburst, which is under investigation, he asserted that “Zionism is racism”, declared his objective “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world” and accused the Bristol University Jewish Society of being part of a worldwide Zionist conspiracy, adding that it is “fundamental to Zionism to encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”. At the same online event, Prof. Miller also observed that the Jewish Society and the Union of Jewish Students are Zionist, thereby implying that Jewish students (and the wider Jewish community) inherently “encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”.

He also portrayed the International Definition of Antisemitism as an attack on free speech and accused the Israeli Government of engaging in an “all-out attack” on the global Left as part of an “attempt by the Israelis to impose their will all over the world”. In comments reminiscent of the darkest years of the United Nations, Prof. Miller insisted that “Zionism is racism” and asked how “we defeat the ideology of Zionism in practice”, “how is Zionism ended” and about the way “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world”.

The letter goes on delusionally to declare that Prof. Miller’s “work on Islamophobia is among the most highly respected in the world” and that “the campaign against Professor Miller is about censoring speech on Islamophobia and Israel. This campaign is carefully calibrated to muddy the waters between anti-Zionism (opposition to a dangerous, racist political ideology) and hatred of Jews. The attacks on Professor Miller are an example of how the IHRA Working [International] Definition of Antisemitism is being weaponised by supporters of Israel and by Islamophobes.”

The letter is a fine example of the ‘Livingstone Formulation’, by which allegations of antisemitism are dismissed as malevolent and baseless attempts to silence criticism of Israel. In its report on antisemitism in the Labour Party, the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) found that suggestions of this nature were part of the unlawful victimisation of Jewish people in the Party.

Moreover, according to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour)” is an example of antisemitism.

The letter ends by demanding that the University of Bristol releases a statement in support of Prof. Miller and meets with activist groups who back him. The letter comes in spite of (indeed because of) the united revulsion of the Jewish community towards Prof. Miller and the University’s failure to discipline him. The University insists that its investigation into Prof. Miller is ongoing.

The leading signatory of the letter is Ms Yaqoob, the former Respect Party leader and now member of the Labour Party who unsuccessfully ran for Mayor of the West Midlands this year. She has her own deeply troubling record in relation to the Jewish community. In a 2013 tweet that she has since deleted, Ms Yaqoob stated: “Iceland arrests 10 Rothschild bankers…wow”, and linked to an article making this false claim and featuring a prominent image of the banker and philanthropist Lord Jacob Rothschild. The article linked in turn to a longer piece on the “Political Vel Craft” website, which is known for disseminating extreme conspiracy theories.

Other signatories include staffers from the controversial groups Interpal, Muslim Engagement and Development (MEND) and CAGE, the latter two of which have previously been criticised for promoting problematic or extreme views, which they deny. They do not advocate violence.

Just last month, the Chief Executive of MEND was revealed to have compared Israel to Hitler in a Facebook post. According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

Another signatory is the rapper Kareem Dennis, known as Lowkey. Mr Dennis is a patron of the Palestine Solidarity Campaign (PSC). A month-long investigation by Campaign Against Antisemitism in 2017 exposed extensive antisemitic bigotry amongst PSC supporters on social media. Mr Dennis has previously described Israel as a “racist endeavour” in direct and deliberate contravention of the International Definition of Antisemitism, described Zionism as “antisemitic”, spoken of the “Zionist lobby” in the context of global capitalism, has reportedly backed the disgraced former Labour MP Chris Williamson and has repeatedly supported the antisemite Jeremy Corbyn.

A further signatory of the letter is Tariq Ali. It is not clear if it is the same Tariq Ali who has previously tried to link Israel to the killing of George Floyd and declared that some Israelis “have learnt nothing from what happened in to them in Europe. Nothing. They talk a lot about saying all those marching for Palestine are antisemites. This of course isn’t true, but I will tell you something, they don’t like hearing. Every time they bomb Gaza, every time they attack Jerusalem – that is what creates antisemitism. Stop the occupation, stop the bombing and casual antisemitism will soon disappear.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

An investigation is underway at Tufts University after a student’s mezuzah was removed from his dormitory, University President Anthony Monaco said on Wednesday.

A mezuzah is a decorative case containing a Jewish prayer that is traditionally fixed to the doorpost of a Jewish home. The student reportedly woke up to the sound of laughing on Saturday – the day of the Jewish Sabbath – to find that the mezuzah had been removed.

In an email, President Mocano wrote: “Regardless of intent, the removal of this important symbol of Jewish faith is antisemitic and has caused harm. All members of our community should feel comfortable displaying and expressing their faith, and all members of our community should respect those displays and expressions. We are all responsible to each other.” He added that Tufts University Police Department had launched an “extensive investigation” but that no suspects had been identified.

Rabbi Naftali Brawer of Tufts Hillel said that the Jewish campus organisation was “offering support to the student” and “liaising with Tufts university administration and police,” adding that the University had “responded swiftly, thoroughly, and empathetically.”

Rabbi Brawer added: “We are deeply concerned about this antisemitic act and will continue to forcefully call out any act of antisemitism on campus.”

Last month, a student’s mezuzah was ripped off its doorpost at the University of British Columbia.  

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The University of Victoria in the Canadian province of British Columbia is planning a course on antisemitism to be taught by academic Shamma Boyarin, who has allegedly posted tweets calling a former ADL President a “Zionist pig” and claiming that Jews had “actively contributed” to “ethnic cleansing and genocide.”

Mr Boyarin has taught religious studies and medieval studies at the University since 2008. The course description initially stated that “even the most fundamental aspects of antisemitism” were “controversial” and that students would “develop the ability to examine…instances of antisemitism with a critical eye.”

Following a protest by B’nai Brith Canada expressing concern that the course could become a “forum for antisemitic views” due to the academic teaching it, the course description was changed to state that students would “learn about antisemitism” through “key texts and moments,” and by exploring “the particular role” of Christianity in “developing and sustaining antisemitism in Europe.” However, the course was still being taught by Mr Boyarin.

In a Twitter post in May, Mr Boyarin allegedly called Abe Foxman, the former President of the ADL, a “Zionist pig.” In June, he allegedly tweeted that North American Jews had “actively contributed” to “ethnic cleansing and genocide” and had “raised our kids to take part in it.”

Mr Boyarin allegedly has a “protected” Twitter account under the name “Motley Jëw.” A protected account means that he can deny “follow” requests and that Tweets are only visible to his followers and cannot be retweeted.

In a letter posted on Twitter by B’nai Brith Canada (BBC) entitled “Academic Freedom Is No Excuse for Antisemitism,” BBC CEO Michael Mostyn wrote that moving the course away from modern antisemitism was “an important first step.” However, he added there was still concern “that instead of educating students on the scourge of Jew-hatred,” there was a small risk that “hostility toward Jews” would “be promoted.” He called on the university to “provide assurances to the Jewish community” that academic freedom would not be used as a “cover to falsely accuse Jews… of contributing to genocide” or “other antisemitic canards.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

A university in Spain has cancelled a course that would have looked at comparisons between Auschwitz concentration camp and Gaza.

The University of Santiago de Compostela’s philosophy faculty reportedly organised the course entitled “Auschwitz/Gaza. A testing ground for comparative literature”. However, after backlash from Action and Communication on the Middle East (ACOM), an independent organisation aimed at promoting relations between Israel and Spain, the University reportedly decided to cancel the course.

In the advertisement for the course, it compares images of children in a Nazi concentration camp standing behind barbed wire next to a photo of a woman and child.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: ACOM

The University of California Merced has launched a formal investigation into the alleged antisemitism of Professor Abbas Ghassemi.

As reported by Campaign Against Antisemitism in January, his tweets allegedly included a claim that “Zionists” controlled the American economy, government policy, banking, and media.

The extensive antisemitic content on the Twitter account also included a meme of “A Zionist brain” with areas labelled “frontal money lobe”, “Holocaust memory centre”, and “world domination lobe.”

Shortly after the antisemitic content was alleged, the University Chancellor Juan Sánchez Muñoz condemned the tweets, describing them as “abhorrent” and “repugnant.” Mr Ghassemi’s Twitter account was deleted, a preliminary inquiry was launched, and Mr Ghassemi was removed from the teaching roster.

In the formal investigation, Mr Ghassemi is being investigated for five possible infractions, including whether his tweets created a “hostile environment” and whether his tweets violated UC Merced’s discrimination and harassment policies. If Mr Ghassemi is found to have violated any of its codes of conduct, the University can pursue disciplinary action. He may also have violated the California education code by using the University’s name in his Twitter biography.

A Jewish student at the University, who wished to remain anonymous, said that if Mr Ghassemi wanted to express his political views, “he could have done it through an anonymous account” rather than one with the University’s name. Professors should not “actively bring politics in to the classroom in a way that is destructive to any sort of discourse.”

Commenting on a request by Mr Ghassemi to see the complaints and documents, the student pointed out that the small number of students at the college would make it “very easy” for Mr Ghassemi to identify complainants and “intimidate” them. “It is a very small campus. Everyone knows everyone,” noted the student.

A college spokesperson said Mr Ghassemi would not be teaching until the investigation was completed, and had filed “several grievances” against the University.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

Professor David Hirsh, a lecturer at Goldsmiths, University of London who was appointed as the Chairman of a panel that oversaw an antisemitism-related complaint at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), has said that SOAS could be institutionally antisemitic.

The incident relates to last year’s complaint from a former student at SOAS who sought to have his fees refunded after he was forced to leave the University due to a ”toxic antisemitic environment”.

Noah Lewis was called a “white supremacist Nazi” and accused of covering up war crimes when he proposed to write a dissertation on bias against Israel at the United Nations. He said that fellow students labelled him and other Jews pejoratively as “Zionists” and left antisemitic slurs on lockers, desks and toilet walls.

The student, originally from Canada, matriculated in 2018 but lodged a formal complaint in May 2019 after finding his mental health adversely affected by the stress and extreme discomfort caused by the “toxic antisemitic environment” which ultimately led him to quit the University and return home.

In July 2019, the University offered an apology for the “emotional trauma…experienced due to the perceived antisemitic discrimination which he had to endure” and recommended compensation of £500.

Mr Lewis appealed the decision with assistance from UK Lawyers for Israel (UKLFI), however, and in March 2020 the appeal panel determined that the original decision “had not been adequate” and recommended an external investigation, even if the University reached a settlement with Mr Lewis.

A settlement was reportedly reached, with Mr Lewis refunded £15,000 in full in December 2020. However, the panel’s recommendation for an external investigation has since been ignored, Prof. Hirsh laments.

In a recent open letter, Prof. Hirsh reportedly stated: “The panel I chaired made clear and unanimous determinations which have so far been completely ignored. This is further prima facie evidence that there is a problem of institutional antisemitism at SOAS. It is clear enough by now that SOAS does not take the claim that it has a problem with institutional antisemitism seriously enough to do anything about it. Good practice requires that an institution is not well placed to make that kind of determination about its own culture, but that is what SOAS has done.”

Prof. Hirsh said that he believed SOAS’ reluctance to carry out the external investigation was due to its belief that the student’s complaint was a “bad faith move relating to politics around the conflicts between Israel and Palestine”.

Professor Hirsh added: “Since the summer of 2019, two new cohorts of students, some of them Jewish students, will have been at SOAS for a considerable period of time. SOAS owes those students a duty of care. It has not been carrying out that duty. It is further true that SOAS has a reputation, deserved or not, in particular amongst Jews, for being a place that has a toxic antisemitic environment that is tolerated and protected by the institutional practice and culture of the School itself…I do not feel that it would be right for me to keep what I know about this issue at SOAS secret.”

The University issued a public response to Prof. Hirsh that both defended its current statement on antisemitism and criticised the lecturer for speaking out. The statement read: “The route we have chosen to take to tackle discrimination goes well beyond the requirements placed on universities and other public institutions. We have spent many months since January engaging with our staff and student community to develop a comprehensive and widely-supported response to these challenges in drawing up our Charter on Discrimination which is formally titled our ‘Charter on Racism, Antisemitism and All Forms of Cultural, Ethnic and Religious Chauvinism’.”

The Charter in question stands in place of the International Definition of Antisemitism, which the University refuses to adopt. The Charter says: “We stand for anti-racism, and against antisemitism and all other forms of cultural, ethnic and religious chauvinism…We therefore welcome the renewed attention to discriminatory practices and the multiple separate calls to take a stand against racism, antisemitism, religious and cultural intolerance, xenophobia and the like.”

However, the Charter also states that “advocates of political causes may use academic freedom to articulate hateful words against other human beings and to advance racism and ethnic and cultural chauvinisms of any kind. Political advocacy may use the legitimate demands of anti-racism and calls against antisemitism, religious and cultural intolerance, to deflect from critical academic and political scrutiny. This occurs across the political, cultural and religious divide. Religious fundamentalists may equate religion and state, and demand not only acquiescence from all those within their nations who oppose their agendas but also silence others including scholars and journalists who subject their actions and words to critical reflection and scrutiny.”

Continuing in its response to Prof. Hirsh, SOAS’ statement said: “This Charter is now a mandatory policy for all individuals and stakeholders at SOAS and it comprehensively addresses the issues which have been raised in relation to antisemitism and other forms of discrimination. We stand firm against antisemitism, as we do against all forms of discrimination. Most importantly, we do this in a manner which is consistent with the principles of academic freedom. Our student community – newly arriving students and returning – can be assured that this charter will be applied rigorously and without fear or favour so that we genuinely address and tackle antisemitism, alongside action to address all forms of racism.”

Addressing Prof. Hirsh’s letter that criticised the University, SOAS wrote: “We note this story has arisen now (August 2021) after the Chair of a complaints panel that was held last year shared publicly with the press an email to a fellow panel member. We are disappointed that the chair of a properly constituted confidential student complaints panel should seek to publicly press for a particular action to be taken forward, and in the process draw into the public domain fellow members of the panel. We have a robust investigation process into complaints which makes recommendations confidentially to be considered by SOAS. This process relies on due confidentiality and respect for the process and for fellow panel members. We are disappointed that the chair of panel has chosen to act in this manner.”

SOAS has long been a hotbed of antisemitism among UK campuses. Last September, a professor at the University labelled Israel as a “virus” and said that it “exploited the Holocaust” for its own political agenda.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Campaign Against Antisemitism is inviting Jewish students who studied at the University of Bristol in the academic year 2020-21 to join a lawsuit against the University over Prof. David Miller’s alleged harassment of Jewish students.

Lawyers working with Campaign Against Antisemitism have begun the pre-action process ahead of commencing litigation against the University.

The prospective lawsuit is being prepared over statements made by Prof. David Miller, who is employed by the University.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is issuing a call for additional students to come forward and add their names to the legal action by e-mailing [email protected].

The case against the University concerns alleged unlawful harassment on the basis of Jewish ethnicity and Judaism, amounting to breaches of the Equality Act 2010, as well as breaches of contract.

Much has been written about Prof. Miller, who has recently added to his record of inflammatory statements about the Jewish community, with the assertion earlier this year that “Zionism is racism” and a declaration that his objective is “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world”. Prof. Miller has also suggested that people associated with Zionism should not be engaged in dialogue but “must only be faced and defeated,” that the “Zionist Movement” is “the enemy” that must be engaged, that it is “the enemy of world peace,” and that those associated with Zionism, including Jewish students on Bristol campus, “must be directly targeted”. Taken together, the implication of Prof. Miller’s remarks is that all decent people who support “world peace” should view Bristol Jewish Society and the Union of Jewish Students, and Jewish people, including those who identify with those bodies, and the vast majority of Jewish students as an “enemy” that must be “directly targeted”.  Prof. Miller has said that interfaith work between Jewish and Muslim groups is “a trojan horse for normalising Zionism in the Muslim community”.  Perhaps equally egregiously, he also suggested that Jewish students, by virtue of being Zionist, “encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”.

Prof. Miller’s statements and the University’s failure to condemn them and take swift action against him have been the subject of a great deal of attention from the Jewish community as well as hundreds of academics and Parliament, including a written question by Lord Austin, as well as a recent intervention from Robert Halfon MP.

The legal claim contends that Prof. Miller’s statements sought to create a hostile environment for Jewish students. It further alleges that the University is liable for Prof. Miller’s conduct, and is further liable in its own right, for unlawful conduct in breach of the Equality Act, and for its breach of its contract with students.

We are asking additional students to step forward and add their names to the legal action to hold the University of Bristol to account for Prof. Miller’s conduct, and its own. If you are or were a student at the University of Bristol in the academic year 2020-21, please e-mail your name and telephone number to [email protected].

Pre-action correspondence has been exchanged with the University, which has refused even to set a date for completion of its already extended investigation of Prof. Miller.

A previous complaint against the University, concerning Prof. Miller’s conduct, did not report publicly and it is still unclear, two years later, what the outcome was.

Solicitors from Asserson Law Offices are acting, and have instructed barristers Derek Spitz of One Essex Court and Benjamin Gray of Littleton Chambers.

Asserson Law Offices and Derek Spitz were also instructed in our groundbreaking referral of the Labour Party to the Equality and Human Rights Commission. Benjamin Gray is an expert in employment and discrimination law who is currently instructed on workplace discrimination claims that Campaign Against Antisemitism is helping individuals to pursue.

The case is the latest step by Campaign Against Antisemitism to defend the rights of individual Jewish students. We believe that universities and students’ unions must be robustly held to account when they fail to defend Jewish students or when they allow their lecturers to discriminate against or harass them.

Middlesex University has refused to disclose what, if anything, it has done to discipline a course leader who likened Zionism to Nazism. The lecturer, Raza Kazim, remains in post.

Earlier this year, Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to the Vice-Chancellor of the University raising concerns about Mr Kazim, and the University confirmed that it was investigating.

Following a complaint from a member of the public, Campaign Against Antisemitism was able to confirm that on his WhatsApp profile, Mr Kazim likened Zionism to Nazism, writing: “World stopped Nazism. World stopped Apartheid. World must stop Zionism”. According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

Middlesex University has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Mr Kazim is also a spokesman for the Islamic Human Rights Commission (IHRC), an organisation known in the past for its pro-Hizballah “Al-Quds Day” parades. The IHRC has also previously been accused by a Holocaust education campaigner of “using false equivocations of the Holocaust and deliberately conflating, downgrading and revising the Holocaust.”

Additionally, Mr Kazim has appeared on Press TV, an Iranian state-owned news network whose British broadcasting licence was revoked by Ofcom in 2012. The network has a history of giving platforms to notorious antisemites and Holocaust deniers. In one appearance, Mr Kazim can be seen speaking on the ban of Hizballah in Britain and the impact that this will have on future Al-Quds Day parades. He states that “there’ll be surprises for the authorities and for the Zionists as there have been every year”. Mr Kazim can also be seen talking about the influence of Al-Quds Day parades whilst images of people burning an Israeli flag play in the background.

Middlesex University’s Code of Conduct states that staff “must conduct themselves outside of work in a manner which will not be reasonably regarded as bringing the University into disrepute.” It also states that the University “will not accept unlawful discrimination of any kind.”

However, in a response to Campaign Against Antisemitism, Vice-Chancellor Professor Nic Beech disclosed that the University “has now concluded its consideration of this matter and has taken appropriate steps in response to the issues raised”, but, citing “reasons of confidentiality” and “obligations under data protection legislation”, insisted that he is “not able to share with you details of the actions taken by the University.” Although Prof. Beech claimed that “the University is grateful to you for bringing this matter to our attention,” it is understood that Mr Kazim remains in post and has even gloated that he has not faced repercussions.

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Adopting the International Definition of Antisemitism is only step one. Step two is actually applying it in the event of breaches. Raza Kazim breached the Definition that Middlesex adopted yet the University refuses to disclose whether it has imposed any sanctions on the course leader whatsoever. Until it reveals what action, if any, it has taken, Middlesex University cannot be said to be honouring its commitment to apply the International Definition of Antisemitism.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected] 

The University of Kent has purported to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism but has done so by unconscionably adopting the controversial Jerusalem Declaration as well.

In an update from the Vice-Chancellor on the University’s website that was published on 30th June, it was confirmed that “following a formal Government request,” the University has adopted the Definition.

However, the University has also chosen to adopt the Jerusalem Declaration of its own volition, a wrecking document intended to undermine the globally recognised Definition.

The University stated that this adoption was “to support with interpretation after feedback from staff, students, Senate and wider legal advice” and described it as “an important step in ensuring our Jewish community feel safe on campus and we will be shortly sharing more information on implementation as part of our continued work to tackle discrimination and racism.”

The University must revisit its decision and adopt, exclusively, the International Definition of Antisemitism.

A spokesperson from Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “By undermining the International Definition of Antisemitism in this way, the University shows no regard for the wellbeing and consideration of its Jewish students. The Definition is widely accepted by the mainstream Jewish community and has been adopted by the British Government, public bodies and over half of British universities. To adopt alongside it a second definition, designed to contradict and sabotage the first, is entirely counterproductive.”

Following a speech to students at the University in 2016 in which journalist Amira Hass reportedly claimed that the “Elders of Zion” planned “colonial” hegemony over Palestinians, the Head of the Office of the Vice-Chancellor told Campaign Against Antisemitism that no action would be taken.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Jonathan Gullis, the Conservative MP for Stoke-on-Trent, has written a letter to the University of Warwick in which he has stated that the University’s academics have “sought to provoke Jewish students and prolong their suffering” by passing a motion to challenge the International Definition of Antisemitism

Mr Gullis wrote to Professor Stuart Croft, Vice Chancellor and President at the University, voicing his concern at the University Assembly’s motion to challenge the Definition. Mr Gullis labelled the motion “disgraceful” before alleging that the University’s delay in adopting to Definition, as well as its hesitancy in tackling on-campus antisemitism, had caused “extreme distress for both Jewish students and the wider Jewish community.” 

Mr Gullis went on to say that he was “appalled”, accusing the University’s academics of seeking to “provoke Jewish students and prolong their suffering.” Referring to the Macpherson principle on anti-racism, Mr Gullis reaffirmed the importance of allowing Jewish students to determine what constitutes antisemitism. 

The MP for Stoke-on-Trent concluded by highlighting the University’s own statement on the welfare of its Jewish students and asking whether or not Prof. Croft would condemn the Assembly’s motion. 

Mr Gullis’ letter comes after the University released a statement clarifying that the University’s Assembly is not a decision-making body, and that motions are not binding. It has also stated that the Definition will continue to be utilised in disciplinary matters relating to antisemitism.

Last month at an Education Select Committee, Mr Gullis asked the Secretary of State for Education, Gavin Williamson, about the adoption of the Definition by universities and whether those that failed to do so would be penalised financially. Mr Williamson said that he backs the campaign for widespread adoption of the Definition, and observed that “We’ve had an exceptionally large rise in the number of universities that have signed up”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Jewish students have been left feeling “disgusted” after academic staff at the University of Warwick passed a motion to challenge the International Definition of Antisemitism.

More than 200 members of the University of Warwick Assembly – the representative body of the University’s academic staff – voted to “overwhelmingly” pass the motion on 21st June.

Members of staff also called upon the University to create a working group designed to handle matters relating to all allegations of antisemitism and other forms of racism that might be made against staff and students.

As a result, an amendment that called for the application of the Definition to be suspended in disciplinary matters was also passed until the findings from the working group could be reported back at the end of the year.

Speaking in support of the motion, Professor Maureen Freely of the Warwick Writing Programme, School of Creative Arts, Performance, and Visual Cultures said: “We are thrilled that this motion passed…the [D]efinition is not fit for purpose.”

She added: “The working party will give us the chance to develop an integrated set of policies that will balance academic freedom with our statutory and moral duty to protect all members of our community.”

A spokesperson for the Warwick Jewish society spoke of their disappointment to the news, saying: “We are absolutely disgusted with Warwick University Assembly’s rejection of the [D]efinition of antisemitism…this sends a clear message that they are not willing to listen to Jewish students and, frankly, hold us in contempt for simply trying to define prejudice against us.”

However, they also said in a separate statement that they “welcomed the University Assembly’s overwhelming vote to establish a working party that will make recommendations on the handling of allegations of all forms of racism, including antisemitism.”

The University has since released a statement clarifying that the University’s Assembly is not a decision-making body, and that motions are not binding. They have also stated that the Definition will continue to be utilised in disciplinary matters relating to antisemitism.

Last December, dubious disciplinary charges against a Jewish student who complained about antisemitism were dropped by the University.

In March, the University’s official Twitter account ‘liked’ a tweet endorsing inflammatory comments by the academic and conspiracy theorist David Miller, with the University subsequently deleting the ‘like’ and blaming “unauthorised access” to the account.

Last month, a controversial Warwick lecturer reportedly claimed that the Definition is part of a Conservative plot to “legitimate racist speech and de-legitimate anti-racist and anti-colonial research, teaching and activism”.

In the past, other concerns have been raised over the University’s failure to address a scandal over a group chat which gained national attention, in which antisemitic, misogynistic, abusive and threatening messages, including rape threats, were uncovered.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Disgraced Bristol University professor David Miller has been accused of using a research grant of £401,552 to further his research on the “British Zionist scene.”

It was reported that between 2013 and 2016, Prof. Miller used this funding to produce a paper called “The Israel Lobby and the European Union”, in which he accused Israel “lobby groups” of coercing politicians and the public into looking favourably upon Israel.

He was also said to have made a map of the “British Zionist scene”, where he attempted to draw a link between the Israeli Government and pro-Zionist groups to political parties in Britain, and in an article that was based on his own research, Prof. Miller stated that the “Zionist movement” was one of the “five pillars of Islamophobia.”

Prof. Miller, a Professor of Political Sociology at the University of Bristol, is a conspiracy theorist with a history of controversy relating to Jewish students. In his latest outburst, which is being investigated by the University and the police, he asserted that “Zionism is racism”, declared his objective “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world” and accused the Bristol University Jewish Society of being part of a worldwide Zionist conspiracy, adding that it is “fundamental to Zionism to encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”. At the same online event, Prof. Miller also observed that the Jewish Society and the Union of Jewish Students are Zionist, thereby implying that Jewish students (and the wider Jewish community) inherently “encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”.

He also portrayed the International Definition of Antisemitism as an attack on free speech and accused the Israeli Government of engaging in an “all-out attack” on the global Left as part of an “attempt by the Israelis to impose their will all over the world”. In comments reminiscent of the darkest years of the United Nations, Prof. Miller insisted that “Zionism is racism” and asked how “we defeat the ideology of Zionism in practice”, “how is Zionism ended” and about the way “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world”.

Two months ago, it emerged that The University has permitted Prof. Miller to return to teaching, as it appears to drag its heels over its investigation.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities. Recently, we passed the threshold of over half of British universities having adopted the Definition.

Earlier this week, we reported that the Education Secretary, Gavin Williamson, said of the disgraced academic: “I do not expect universities to tolerate racists”.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

The Education Secretary, Gavin Williamson, has said of the disgraced academic David Miller: “I do not expect universities to tolerate racists”.

Mr Williamson made the comments at an Education Select Committee hearing last Wednesday after being asked for his position on the sociology professor by the Chair, Robert Halfon.

Mr Williamson responded: “I would never expect a university to tolerate racists and I would never expect a university to tolerate antisemitism. Where there is racism – whether that is manifested in antisemitic remarks – I would naturally expect there to be a proper and full employment procedure. I wouldn’t expect any form of racism to be tolerated and I would expect those people who are committing antisemitism to be dismissed from the staff.”

Prof. Miller, a Professor of Political Sociology at the University of Bristol, is a conspiracy theorist with a history of controversy relating to Jewish students. In his latest outburst, which is being investigated by the University and the police, he asserted that “Zionism is racism”, declared his objective “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world” and accused the Bristol University Jewish Society of being part of a worldwide Zionist conspiracy, adding that it is “fundamental to Zionism to encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”. At the same online event, Prof. Miller also observed that the Jewish Society and the Union of Jewish Students are Zionist, thereby implying that Jewish students (and the wider Jewish community) inherently “encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”.

He also portrayed the International Definition of Antisemitism as an attack on free speech and accused the Israeli Government of engaging in an “all-out attack” on the global Left as part of an “attempt by the Israelis to impose their will all over the world”. In comments reminiscent of the darkest years of the United Nations, Prof. Miller insisted that “Zionism is racism” and asked how “we defeat the ideology of Zionism in practice”, “how is Zionism ended” and about the way “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world”.

Also at the Committee hearing, Jonathan Gullis, the Conservative MP for Stoke-on-Trent, asked the Secretary of State about the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities and whether those that failed to do so would be penalised financially. Mr Williamson said that he backs the campaign for widespread adoption of the Definition, and observed that “We’ve had an exceptionally large rise in the number of universities that have signed up”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities. Recently, we passed the threshold of over half of British universities having adopted the Definition.

Mr Williamson continued: “Some [universities] have required a little bit of extra time, but if we’re in a position where there is a complete reluctance to be able to do this, we will look at taking other actions that may be available.”

According to the JC, a spokesperson for the Support David Miller campaign said: “Gavin Williamson and other Government ministers should find their backbone instead of repeatedly giving in to a vast censorship campaign being pushed by Israel lobbyists onto British schools and universities.”

The claim that combatting antisemitism is merely a cover for censoring debate about Israel or is conducted at the behest of the Jewish state are themselves antisemitic tropes.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Two Jewish mental health counsellors at Stanford University have alleged that antisemitic incidents occurred during meetings that were a part of an anti-racism programme at the University.

Dr Ronald Albucher and Sheila Levin felt as though their complaints of antisemitism were not taken seriously due to members of the meetings conflating Jewish people with “white identities.”

They said that when discussing an incident that took place in May 2020 where Zoombombers hijacked a Zoom call with racist epithets and swastikas, the racist abuse was talked about but not the swastikas.

When questioned as to why, the counsellors were allegedly told that it was because, as Jews, they could “hide behind their white identity.”

In addition to this, when swastikas were discovered on the University’s Memorial Church last July, they were also not addressed. Another complaint included that a speaker at one of the anti-racist meetings was said to have linked Jewish people with white supremacy.

They also alleged that they were pressured into attending the programme’s “whiteness accountability” group.

In their complaint to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing, Dr. Albucher and Ms Levin said that the programme, known as Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, “has created and fostered a hostile work environment for Jewish staff due to severe and persistent harassment.”

They went on to state that the programme “relies upon a narrative that presumes all white people are consciously or unconsciously to blame for system racism in the workplace and in society at large,” and “perceives all Jews as white.”

They also felt as though the members of the programme painted Jewish people as “wealthy and powerful business owners” – a common antisemitic trope – and when Dr Albucher stated in meetings that antisemitism was a real issue, he was accused of “derailing” the discussions.

A spokesperson for the University said: “Stanford forcefully rejects antisemitism in all its forms.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds Universities UK for releasing a guide on how to tackle antisemitism.

Universities UK represents 140 universities in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland and its mission is “to create the conditions for UK universities to be the best in the world; maximising their positive impact locally, nationally and globally.”

The guide was published on 11th June and is titled: “Tackling antisemitism: practical guidance for universities.” It was drafted to focus on three main issues: widespread limited understanding of antisemitism; an under-reporting of antisemitic incidents and issues with complaints processes; and online harassment.

The guide is a nineteen-page document which describes these problems, along with a section dedicated to “suggested actions and best practice” for each.

It also discusses the International Definition of Antisemitism. Notably, it recognises that the eleven examples that accompany the Definition are integral to it: “The definition is followed by 11 examples which demonstrate how antisemitism may manifest in practice.”

The guide also rightly emphasises that the Definition does not stifle freedom of expression: “The [D]efinition should not be seen as restricting free speech or academic freedom, and universities that choose to adopt the definition should make sure it is used and understood in combination with other duties and protections.” Campaign Against Antisemitism has also produced an accessible guide to why the Definition does not stifle freedom of expression.

The final section of the guide is dedicated to case studies and cites the University of Essex, Middlesex University, the University of Birmingham, and Buckinghamshire New University as examples. Here, the guide briefly details each university’s history of dealing with antisemitism, and its process of adopting the Definition.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

A controversial Warwick lecturer has reportedly claimed that the International Definition of Antisemitism is part of a Conservative plot to “legitimate racist speech and de-legitimate anti-racist and anti-colonial research, teaching and activism”.

Goldie Osuri, a sociology lecturer at the University of Warwick, made the comments at an event in April organised by the Universities and Colleges Union (UCU) called ‘Resisting the IHRA Working Definition of Antisemitism’ (also known as the International Definition of Antisemitism).

UCU has been at the forefront of efforts to oppose or revoke adoption of the Definition at British campuses, and its reputation in the Jewish community is in the gutter. The union recently included the Definition on a list of potential threats in a survey of members.

According to Hurry Up Harry, which this week released audio and a transcript of the event, Dr Osurie added that “Pressure to recognise or adopt the [Definition] with its examples should be understood as a racist move against Palestinians” and that the Definition “should be understood as a way of smearing as antisemitic and hence silencing critics of Israel and pro-Israel advocacy organisations” and “is part of a broader gamut of Tory moves to legitimate racist speech and de-legitimate anti-racist and anti-colonial research, teaching and activism.”

Dr Osuri is part of a coalition of Warwick academics disgracefully trying to pressure the University to retract its adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism, which the University only did after significant pressure.

In the past, the University backed Dr Osuri after she dismissed concerns over the Labour Party’s crisis of institutional antisemitism by saying that such concerns are “an Israeli lobby kind of idea.” The University rejected a complaint by the Warwick Jewish and Israel Society (JISoc) against Dr Osuri. Campaign Against Antisemitism shared the Jewish students’ conclusion that the University had committed “a shameful dereliction of its responsibility to protect Jewish students” and that “the University has chosen to side with antisemites and not Jewish students.”

Earlier this year, the University’s official Twitter account ‘liked’ a tweet endorsing recent inflammatory comments by the academic and conspiracy theorist David Miller, with the University subsequently deleting the ‘like’ and blaming“unauthorised access” to the account.

In the past, other concerns have been raised over the University’s failure to address a scandal over a group chat which gained national attention, in which antisemitic, misogynistic, abusive and threatening messages, including rape threats, were uncovered.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Cardiff University has refused to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism in order to avoid a “potentially divisive situation.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has seen a response by the University to a letter that was sent from the Cardiff University Conservative Association requesting that the University adopts the Definition, in which the University Council refused, stating in its reply that it had concerns about how other groups may react.

The response also said that “adopting selected religion- or race-specific definitions may have the unfortunate consequence of appearing to exclude other faith groups or races in relation to whom definitions are not adopted.” The letter went on to say: “Avoiding such a potentially divisive situation was key to Council’s decision not to adopt either definition.”

The Council stated that the University’s existing framework for tackling racism was sufficient, and that its policies would be subject to ongoing evaluation.

Despite deciding to not adopt the Definition, the University said that it refers to the Definition in its intranet guidance section within its Dignity at Work and Study policy.

The Vice-Chancellor of the University has recommended late last year that the University adopts the Definition. The Equality, Diversity and Inclusion Sub-committee of the Senate then voted in favour of adoption, but not unanimously, and so decided to “pause and engage in further discussion”, after which “the issue was…appropriately brought to University Council for advice.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism calls on Cardiff University to reconsider its decision and join the over half of British universities who have pledged their support to tackling antisemitism on campus by adopting the Definition, and we applaud the Cardiff University Conservative Association for valiantly leading on this issue on campus.

Recently, Campaign Against Antisemitism’s researchers recorded that half of all universities in the UK have now adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism. Widespread adoption of the Definition also shows that those universities in Britain that have yet to adopt the Definition will become increasingly isolated.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

A new study has suggested that one-quarter of the top universities in the United Kingdom released antisemitic statements during last month’s conflict between Israel and Hamas.

The report from the Pinsker Centre, a British think-tank with a focus on international policy, noted that out of the UK’s top 40 universities, student unions or faculty bodies at twelve of them released “highly partisan” statements that may have breached the International Definition of Antisemitism.

According to the Definition, “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour)” and “Applying double standards by requiring of Israel a behaviour not expected or demanded of any other democratic nation” are both examples of antisemitism.

Nine of the twelve universities mentioned in the study have adopted the Definition, leading Jonathan Hunter, the Chairman of the Pinsker Centre, to feel that the Definition may not be sufficient by itself without stricter measures from universities.

This is particularly concerning in view of the likely connection between inflammatory statements in connection with Israel by university bodies and campus antisemitism.

In the report, it was stated that there was “an extremely high possibility of a strong correlation between the publication of highly emotionally-charged statements on the Israel-Gaza conflict, and reports of antisemitism on campus.”

The report went on to suggest that Students’ Union officers should be provided with appropriate training in order properly to look after their Jewish students.

A Charity Commission spokesperson said: “It’s concerning to hear these reports. Our guidance makes clear our expectations of all trustees around political activity and campaigning. We will carefully assess the contents of this report in line with our risk and regulatory framework.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently reported on University College London’s one-sided Instagram post that Jewish students considered to be inflammatory.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to the Vice-Chancellor of Middlesex University raising concerns about one of its course leaders, Raza Kazim. The University has confirmed that it is investigating.

Following a complaint from a member of the public, Campaign Against Antisemitism was able to confirm that on his WhatsApp profile, Mr Kazim likened Zionism to Nazism. According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

Mr Kazim is also a spokesman for the Islamic Human Rights Commission (IHRC), an organisation known in the past for its pro-Hizballah “Al-Quds Day” parades. The IHRC has also previously been accused by a Holocaust education campaigner of “using false equivocations of the Holocaust and deliberately conflating, downgrading and revising the Holocaust.”

Additionally, Mr Kazim has appeared on Press TV, an Iranian state-owned news network whose British broadcasting licence was revoked by Ofcom in 2012. The network has a history of giving platforms to notorious antisemites and Holocaust deniers. In one appearance, Mr Kazim can be seen speaking on the ban of Hizballah in Britain and the impact that this will have on future Al-Quds Day parades. He states that “there’ll be surprises for the authorities and for the Zionists as there have been every year”. Mr Kazim can also be seen talking about the influence of Al-Quds Day parades whilst images of people burning an Israeli flag play in the background.

In 2017, Al Quds Day leader and pharmacist Nazim Ali shouted over a public address system: “Some of the biggest corporations who are supporting the Conservative Party are Zionists. They are responsible for the murder of the people in Grenfell, in those towers in Grenfell. The Zionist supporters of the Tory Party. Free, Free, Palestine…It is the Zionists who give money to the Tory Party to kill people in high-rise blocks. Free, Free, Palestine. From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently reported on our success after the Professional Standards Authority asked the High Court to quash a decision of the General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC), over its decision in relation to Mr Ali. The GPhC has subsequently confirmed to Campaign Against Antisemitism that it agrees that its decision was wrong, that Mr Ali’s comments were antisemitic and that it shall not be contesting the matter in the High Court.

Middlesex University’s Code of Conduct states that staff “must conduct themselves outside of work in a manner which will not be reasonably regarded as bringing the University into disrepute.” It also states that the University “will not accept unlawful discrimination of any kind.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

The University and College Union (UCU) has listed the International Definition of Antisemitism on a list of potential threats, prompting outrage from Jewish groups.

In a survey created by UCU, one question asked: “In your experience, what are the biggest current threats to or restrictions on academic freedom?”

Among a list of answers, which also included “censorship” and “no platforming”, “Imposition of IHRA definition and examples of antisemitism” was a possible option, referencing the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Last month, UCU Scotland defended Prof. David Miller over recent inflammatory comments that he had made, which included his assertion that “Zionism is racism”, a declaration of his objective “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world” and accusing the Bristol University Jewish Society of being part of a worldwide Zionist conspiracy, adding that it is “fundamental to Zionism to encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”.

UCU has also been at the forefront of efforts to oppose or revoke adoption of the Definition at British campuses.

Recently, the number of British universities that have adopted the Definition passed the halfway point.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Image credit: It’s No Game

Sheffield Students’ Union and the Sheffield Jewish Society, which represents Jewish students at both the University of Sheffield and Sheffield Hallam University, have passed a motion against antisemitism.

The motion, titled “Condemnation of Antisemitism and Solidarity with Jews”, begins by noting the “increase of domestic antisemitic incidents since the recent crisis in Gaza and Israel”, which includes death chants towards Jews, antisemitic social media trends, such as the hashtag “Hitler was right,” and the antisemitic convoy of cars where drivers shouted “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” through a megaphone.

It goes on to discuss Jewish students in Sheffield having reported feeling “uncomfortable and unsafe, and facing racist abuse online and in person.” Also mentioned is the recent incident in which the the National Union of Students (NUS) blamed antisemitism in Britain on Israel, for which the NUS has since apologised.

The motion goes on to state that “Jews are not responsible for the bad behaviour of some Jews,” and that “antisemitism is never a rational response.” It goes on to stress that “people who understand the world in an antisemitic way are responsible for their own antisemitism,” before adding that “the spike in antisemitism is therefore not caused by Israel, but caused by racism.”

The motion resolves to express solidarity with Jews on campus and around the world and for the Students’ Union to write to the NUS “explaining to them why antisemitism is caused by antisemites.”

Notably, the motion also promises to “ensure that all anti-racism training from the Students’ Union includes about antisemitism as defined by the [International Definition of Antisemitism].”

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds the Students’ Union for passing this motion of solidarity with Jewish students and against antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Police have arrested two people after an Israeli flag with a swastika was put up at Royal Holloway, University of London (RHUL). A Surrey Police spokesperson cofirmed that a man, 21, from Egham, and a woman, 19, from Englefield Green, were arrested in connection with the incident and then released on bail.

Last week, the President of RHUL Jewish Society tweeted a photo of an Israeli flag that had been placed on the RHUL’s library terrace, but with a swastika replacing the Star of David. The student wrote: “This was undeniably done by a student, as non-students don’t have access to the library. This is who we share a campus with. We see your attempts to intimidate us, but you will never succeed.”

In another tweet, the President shared a video recording that was sent to him. The video shows a protestor praising Hamas who can be heard saying: “If anyone ever tells you Hamas is, like, the real terrorists in this…no, it’s not. They’re actually defending their country.” Hamas is an antisemitic genocidal terrorist group.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

In a statement, the University’s Principal, Professor Paul Layzell, wrote: “Within our own community, we seek to uphold principles of respect for individuals, with an abhorrence of violence, and a belief that education can be used to make society better for all. We all have a role to play in maintaining a peaceful, respectful, inclusive and welcoming community, on and off campus. I ask that we all play our part. Individuals who fail to behave appropriately will be subject to our full disciplinary procedures.”

However, nowhere in the statement did it mention antisemitism or support for their Jewish students, despite RHUL having adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s researchers have recorded that half of all universities in the UK have now adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The University of Westminster, which is popular with Jewish students, has brought Britain’s Higher Education sector over the halfway line.

This is a major milestone for Jewish students, showing the strides being made to ensure that antisemitism is properly understood and tackled on campuses.

Widespread adoption of the Definition also shows that those universities in Britain that have yet to adopt the Definition will become increasingly isolated. Just this week, as antisemitism online, on our streets and on campuses has skyrocketed, the Communities Secretary, Robert Jenrick, has reiterated his and the Education Secretary’s calls on universities to adopt the Definition. It also comes in the same week as the National Union of Students (NUS) has apologised for a statement “in solidarity with Jewish students” in which it blamed antisemitism in Britain on Israel. In the past, it has been suggested by the Education Secretary, Gavin Williamson, that universities could face financial penalties if they fail to address antisemitism.

However, adoption of the Definition is not enough on its own, as shown by the appalling example of the University of Bristol, which has adopted the Definition but is yet to discipline Prof. David Miller. Most recently, Prof. Miller asserted that “Zionism is racism” and declared that his objective is “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world”. Most egregiously, he suggested that Jewish students, by virtue of being Zionist, “encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”.

Nevertheless, adoption of the Definition remains a powerfully symbolic act of solidarity with Jewish students, as well as a vital tool in the fight against antisemitism on campus. It is no coincidence that UCL has become ground zero for the campaign by academics against the Definition and has also seen death threats against Jewish students.

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “At a time of skyrocketing antisemitism online and on campuses, including death threats against Jewish students, that half of British universities have adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism offers some much-needed good news. This major milestone is the result of tireless work by politicians, Jewish students, Jewish community organisations, local activists and ourselves.

“Adopting the Definition is an institution’s first step in proving that it stands with its Jewish students. We applaud the half of British universities in the UK that have so far adopted the Definition, and call on the rest to follow suit. Those universities which are lagging must delay no longer and act now to pledge their commitment to stamping out antisemitism on their campus and show that they take the welfare of their Jewish students seriously. We support Government plans to impose penalties on those that fail to address hate against Jewish students.

“Our real-time monitoring on our website of adoption of the Definition by universities, as well as of reported antisemitic incidents, is a valuable resource for Jewish students, faculty and the community. As Jewish students suffer horrendous antisemitism on campus, there is no better time for Britain’s universities to show their students and the wider public where they stand.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

The National Union of Students (NUS) has apologised for a statement “in solidarity with Jewish students” in which it blamed antisemitism in Britain on Israel. The statement, which has now been deleted, was addressed to Jewish students, saying: “We are deeply concerned to hear of a spike in antisemitism on campuses as a result of Israeli forces’ violent attacks on Palestinians.”

The NUS then replaced the statement with a new one, which this time did not blame Israel, but did direct students to contact fringe Jewish group Na’amod, amongst whose supporters are activists who appalled the Jewish community in 2018 by reading a list of names of people who had recently been killed in Gaza, the vast majority of which belonged to dead Hamas terrorists according to Hamas itself, and then reciting the Jewish mourning prayer, Kaddish, for them. Hamas seeks the genocide of all Jews worldwide.

Many Jewish students feel increasingly abandoned by NUS, which in recent years even found that its own former President, Malia Bouattia, made comments that “could be reasonably capable of being interpreted as antisemitic”, but recommended that no disciplinary action be taken.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Even when supposedly showing solidarity with Jewish students, NUS has managed to blunder in ways that will leave Jewish students wondering how serious the organisation can be about representing and protecting them. It would almost have been better had they said nothing at all.”

Following a “one-sided” Instagram post about Israel by University College London (UCL)’s Students’ Union, Jewish students at UCL have been told on social media that “Hitler was right” and that when they come back to campus there will be people “waiting for you”.

There have been multiple death threats, with one Jewish student sent an image of her faced superimposed on a person being executed by a guillotine, whilst another was told: “I wish death upon you and curses for life and inshallah to your unborns. Your mother, your father and you will burn in this life and the life after.”

On Friday night, shortly before the Jewish sabbath began, UCL Students’ Union posted a message on Instagram that Jewish students considered to be inflammatory. UCL’s Jewish Society and Friends of Israel Society issued a joint statement, noting that antisemitism was surging and appealing for understanding, however, when they turned their smartphones back on after the sabbath ended on Saturday night, they discovered a slew of aggressive comments, some of which may constitute criminal offences.

The matter is being reported to UCL and the police, with assistance from Campaign Against Antisemitism.

A spokesperson for UCL’s Jewish Society and Friends of Israel Society said: “Jewish students across the country are under attack on social media. Our universities and students’ unions are not standing up for us. In response to UCL Students’ Union’s one-sided statement, we issued a call for understanding and tolerance on Friday night, but by Saturday night we were answered with praise for Hitler and threats to our physical security. The perpetrators must be swiftly identified and held to account. If they are students, they should be expelled.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Social media has become rife with antisemitic abuse, and Jewish students are being abandoned to face it alone. All of the recent talk of solidarity against racism is just talk if it does not extend to Jews too. We are appalled by the comments sent to Jewish students at UCL and will provide all necessary support, including legal assistance if necessary.”

Dr Michael Spence, President and Provost of UCL, said he was “particularly distressed that there have been a number of disturbing reports of antisemitic incidents and threats – online and in person – within the UCL community over the weekend. We unreservedly condemn abuse, harassment or bullying directed at Jewish and Israeli students. There can never be a justification for this behaviour, but most especially at a university such as UCL. Abuse, racism and hate speech have no place here. We will not hesitate to take disciplinary action against anyone who is found to have engaged in antisemitism, either by word or deed.”

There have been a number of antisemitic incidents at UCL, including violence. Whilst the University has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism, the Students’ Union has failed to confirm its stance and there has been a concerted effort by UCL’s chapter of the University and College Union to overturn adoption of the definition.

If you have experienced antisemitism at university, please contact [email protected].

St Anne’s College at the University of Oxford has removed a statement issued by the President of the College’s JCR and its MCR BAME representatives offering “support to the Muslim and Palestinian members of our community” but not to its Jewish members.

The statement related to ongoing violence in Jerusalem and said: “We want to sincerely support and send solidarity to St Anne’s Muslim and Palestinian members and the wider Oxford community. We would also like or remind students to reach out to the St Anne’s JCR & MCR Welfare and BAME Officers if they are struggling and would like somebody to talk to. In addition, you can also reach out to the Oxford University Islamic Society (ISOC) ‘Welfare Officers’ and/or the Oxford University Champaign for Racial Awareness Equality (CRAE) Officers.”

It went on to say: “We also encourage other Oxford colleges’ JCRs and MCRs to show solidarity with the wider Oxford Muslim and Palestinian community and combat the noticeable lack of support.”

Disgracefully, nowhere did the statement offer any support or resources to Jewish students. The “lack of support” to the College’s Jews was thus particularly “noticeable”.

The statement was shared on St Anne’s College’s official Instagram account. The College then prohibited comments on the statements before deleting the post entirely, without explanation or apology.

There are growing reports of Jewish students facing antisemitism on campus and online since violence in the Middle East has erupted in recent days.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].  

Campaign Against Antisemitism has provided training to the Oxford University Labour Club (OULC) after the campus group reached out to us to provide an online training session to fight antisemitism.

The training was particularly poignant given the OULC’s contribution to the scandal of institutional antisemitism in the Labour Party. The event, held last Tuesday, was very well received. 

In 2016, the OULC was investigated by the Labour Party following multiple allegations of antisemitism levelled by the Club’s co-Chair, who resigned in protest against the antisemitic conduct he witnessed. However, the investigation was dropped in January 2017.

Students testified that members of the OULC had called Auschwitz a “cash cow”; Jews were called “Zios”; Jewish members were asked to renounce Israel publicly before speaking; the dead Jewish victims of the Paris Hypercacher terrorist attack were mocked; terrorist acts against Jews in Europe were rationalised; and it was asserted that the banks were controlled by the “Paris-Tel Aviv axis” — all in clear breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Following this, Labour Students was sent to investigate, but its findings were suppressed. Baroness Royall was then commissioned to undertake her own investigation into alleged antisemitism in the OULC and in the Party more generally to her chagrin, only the executive summary of her report was published, providing a misleadingly positive account of the problem, and she later leaked the entire report to give the fuller picture. The Royall report was not officially published in full because it too was rolled into yet another inquiry, that of Shami Chakrabarti, who went on to produce a whitewash report that introduced a system of secrecy into the Party’s disciplinary process and thereby contributed significantly to the institutionalisation of Labour’s antisemitism problem.

As for the OULC, all accused students were cleared without censure.  

While the Club’s past cannot be undone, it is extremely encouraging to see its current members’ commitment to fighting antisemitism. In the description for the online event, the organisers wrote that the training was “mandatory for all committee members but strongly encouraged for other members – especially for those interested in running for OULC committee positions in future.”

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We provide antisemitism training to university groups, regulators, police forces and others, but this session was particularly poignant given the OULC’s prominent role in the Labour Party’s antisemitism scandal.

“This new generation of OULC members clearly grasps the importance of fighting antisemitism and has shown a commitment to restoring the reputation of the Club, and we are proud to have contributed to that noble effort. We encourage other university societies and public bodies to contact us to arrange antisemitism training and become allies in the fight against the world’s oldest hatred.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, or wish to arrange antisemitism training for their university society, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Canterbury Christ Church University has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Last year, the University acted to remove its brand from Urban Dictionary after Campaign Against Antisemitism alerted it to its advertisements featuring alongside antisemitic and offensive entries on the controversial website.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authoritiesuniversities and public bodies. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Eric Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

A Jordanian professor has reportedly stated that the risk of being “cancelled” for using the term “Jews” when abusing Jewish people was proof that Jews “control the world.”

Professor Ahmad Nofal of the University of Jordan also alleged that “Zionists” harvest organs illegally and “plant illnesses” when patients are unconscious.

According to the Middle East Media Research Institute (MEMRI), the Professor of Islamic Law delivered an antisemitic, anti-Western rant on Jordan’s Yarmouk TV channel on 2nd April in which he said, “If you dare to say one word” against the Jews, “they cancel you…See how they rule the world? They even monitor what words you use. What kind of power is this?”

He allegedly also described Freemasonry as a “Zionist movement”, stating: “Freemasonry, Masonic lodges’ and whatnot…these are all Zionist notions. Jewish notions…Call them whatever you like…it is forbidden to say ‘Jewish’ nowadays…We’ll say ‘Zionist.’ It is the same thing.”

Mr Nofal added: “We need to make sure that Western culture has not changed our notions and our tastes without us even noticing.”

He allegedly added that Zionists “harvest organs from our [Palestinian] patients” and they “sometimes plant illnesses in you when you are under anaesthesia.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Brunel University has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

In a statement the University said: “Brunel University London supports initiatives that seek to tackle prejudice and discrimination. It recognises the International Definition as supporting the University’s existing policies on Equality, Diversity and Inclusion, reinforcing the message that antisemitism will not be tolerated and will have due regard to the Definition when considering any allegation raised. Council upholds Brunel’s commitment to freedom of speech.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities and public bodies. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Eric Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Eggs were thrown at a New Jersey Jewish fraternity house, disrupting a solemn 24-hour reading of the names of Holocaust victims.

The incident took place at Rutgers-New Brunswick College during on event to mark Yom HaShoah (Holocaust Remembrance Day).

In a statement on social media, University Chancellor Dr Christopher Molloy said he was deeply disturbed by the harm caused to the Jewish community at the college. He expressed his “sincere support for our Jewish students, faculty and staff,” and his “full commitment to ensuring that all members of our community feel a sense of belonging.”

Dr Molloy also said that the Rutgers University Police Department (RUPD) were investigating the incident. John Cramer, Director of Public and Media Relations said that Rutgers was “committed to creating a campus environment in which all people are treated with respect.” He added that police patrols “have been increased in the area.”

The University’s Student Assembly also released a statement on Instagram saying that they “must be vigilant in our condemnation of such heinous acts” and “continue to hold those who perpetrate such hate accountable.”

However, the virtual organisation Jewish On Campus, which enables allows Jewish students across the United States to speak out against antisemitism, shared an anonymous claim from Rutgers alleging that antisemitism was an ongoing issue.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.