A professor at the University of California Merced will not be teaching in the upcoming semester after he was revealed to have allegedly posted antisemitic tweets.

Prof. Abbas Ghassemi, who teaches engineering at UC Merced, will not be teaching in the upcoming Spring semester, according to reports.

Prof. Ghassemi has deleted a Twitter account, dating from July 2019, from which he allegedly tweeted a drawing labelled “the Zionist Brain” that divided an image of a brain into sections that used antisemitic tropes such as avarice and “world domination”. Other areas of the brain were labelled “land usurpation” and “compulsive-lying”. The same image has been seen on a website dedicated to peddling antisemitic conspiracy theories.

Other tweets included wording such as “Surprise, surprise!! The entire system in America is controlled by [the] Zionist. Change of president is just a surface polish, change of veneer. Same trash different pile!” and “the Zionists and IsraHell interest have embedded themselves in every component of the American system, media, banking, policy, commerce…just a veneer of serving US interest and population – everyone pretends that is the case.”

When the tweets were first revealed, a spokesperson for UC Merced said:“As the now-inactive Twitter account made clear, these were the opinions of a private individual.” But since then it is understood that an investigation has been opened and is still ongoing while Prof. Ghassemi is apparently suspended.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to the University of Leeds regarding a politics professor with a history of antisemitic tweets.

Ray Bush, Professor of African Studies and Development Politics, appears to have tweeted from the Twitter handle @raymondobush a large number of tweets that breach the International Definition of Antisemitism, which the University of Leeds recently adopted.

There are three types of breaches.

First, Prof. Bush states that Israel’s existence itself is unacceptable, using the exact language of the Definition in referring to Jewish self-determination as “a racist endeavour”. The Definition states that “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour)” is antisemitic. Prof. Bush has, for example, made this claim herehereherehere (“#DefyIHRA the state of #Israel is a #racist endeavour”), herehere and here.

Second, Prof. Bush has breached the Definition by comparing Israelis and Zionists to Nazis. According to the Definition: “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is antisemitic. He has done so here (“Does it take a nazi to recognise a #nazi #Israel #racism ?”) and here, for example.

Third, Prof. Bush has contravened the Definition by claiming that concerns about institutional antisemitism in the Labour Party, which were vindicated by the recent report of the Equality and Human Rights Commission, were due to a campaign run by the “Israeli embassy.” He has thus supported one of the oldest tropes used to justify acts of antisemitism – the discredited myth of a Jewish conspiracy in which Jews are disloyal and act as a fifth column against the interests of their home countries. The Definition states that: “Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as a collective – such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions” is antisemitic. He has done so, for example, here (“The reason they hate Corbyn of course is because he is anti #Zionist and the antisemitic campaign is ran by the #Israeli embassy among others) and here.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “These posts are clearly in breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism. Anyone airing and disseminating dangerous antisemitic views such as those promoted by Prof. Ray Bush is not fit to be entrusted with the responsibility of teaching young people. For this reason, Prof. Bush must be held to account. Accordingly, we have written to the University of Leeds to request that it investigates and takes appropriate disciplinary action to protect Jewish students from Prof. Bush.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

A former student at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) has reportedly been refunded his fees after he was forced to leave the University due to a ”toxic antisemitic environment”.

Noah Lewis was called a “white supremacist Nazi” and accused of covering up war crimes when he proposed to write a dissertation on bias against Israel at the United Nations. He said that fellow students labelled him and other Jews pejoratively as “Zionists” and left antisemitic slurs on lockers, desks and toilet walls.

The student, originally from Canada, matriculated in 2018 but lodged a formal complaint in May 2019 after finding his mental health adversely affected by the stress and extreme discomfort caused by the ”toxic antisemitic environment” which ultimately led him to quit the University and return home.

In July 2019, the University offered an apology for the ”emotional trauma…experienced due to the perceived antisemitic discrimination which he had to endure” and recommended compensation of £500.

Mr Lewis appealed the decision with assistance from UK Lawyers for Israel (UKLFI), however, and in March 2020 the appeal panel determined that the original decision ”had not been adequate” and recommended an external investigation, even if the University reached a settlement with Mr Lewis.

A settlement has reportedly been reached, with Mr Lewis refunded £15,000 in full in December 2020.

Jonathan Turner, Executive Director of UKLFI Charitable Trust, said: ”The panel grasped the nettle and has set a benchmark for best practice which should be followed in other cases of an antisemitic environment. We hope that other students who experience antisemitism at universities will now be encouraged to object.”

A spokesperson for the University said: ”SOAS is extremely concerned about any allegations of antisemitism at our school. Diversity is key to the SOAS mission and we want all our students to feel welcome and supported in their studies. We cannot comment on any individual student case or the outcomes of any appeal. However, where we have established an independent panel as part of a complaints process, we would of course consider the findings of such a panel thoroughly and take appropriate action.”

SOAS has long been a hotbed of antisemitism among UK campuses and has not adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism. Last September, a professor at the University labelled Israel as a “virus” and said that it “exploited the Holocaust” for its own political agenda.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Members of a “fringe” academic-staff union at the City University of New York (CUNY) have “declared war on the Jewish community,” according to an advocacy group that fights anti-Jewish racism on campus.

The accusation came after CUNY’s Professional Staff Congress (PSC) International Committee passed a resolution last week condemning what it called the “censorship” of a virtual event with terrorist hijacker Leila Khaled.

As a member of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP), Ms Khaled took part in two terrorist hijackings in 1969 and 1970. The U.S. Government has designated the PFLP as a terrorist organisation.

Ms Khaled was due to take part in the virtual event entitled “Whose Narratives? Gender, Justice, & Resistance: A conversation with Leila Khaled”.  It had been widely promoted on social media and was due to have been live-streamed on Zoom. But the video-conferencing platform and social-media platforms, including YouTube and Facebook, withdrew.

The resolution also cited “a pressure campaign” by various anti-racism groups, which it blamed for the decisions by the platforms to drop the event.

The Lawfare Project stated that “this resolution was passed so that CUNY PSC could set up a committee and begin fundraising against our efforts to keep terrorists and Jew-hatred off campuses. In doing so, this fringe union has declared war on the Jewish community.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Dubious disciplinary charges against a Jewish student who complained about antisemitism have been dropped by Warwick University.

The President of the Warwick Jewish Israeli Society submitted a complaint on behalf of a member against Dr Goldie Osuri for saying, in a lecture on 11th November 2019, that “the next time they say that the Labour Party is antisemitic, you know there are some people possibly that are possibly antisemitic, but this idea that the Labour Party is antisemitic is very much an Israeli lobby kind of idea.”

However, the complaint was rejected by the University, which backed the controversial academic, who doubled down on her outrageous claims. She also apparently emailed the entire class about the complaint and was absurdly portrayed by allies as being victimised because she is a “lecturer of colour”.

Dr Osuri then made two counter-complaints against the President of the Jewish Israeli Society, the first relating to the recording and publishing of her lecture and the second with regard to the University’s ‘Dignity at Warwick’ policy, which had allegedly been breached by supposed “harassment” of an academic and the “submission of a vexatious complaint”.

Warwick has now dropped the complaints, however, following representations from the student.

Throughout this saga, Warwick, which only grudgingly adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism after considerable pressure, has shown itself unwilling to address antisemitism. On this occasion, it has at least stopped short of punishing the victims.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been working with the student.

Previously, concerns were raised over the University’s failure to address a scandal over a group chat which gained national attention, in which antisemitic, misogynistic, abusive and threatening messages, including rape threats, were uncovered.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

The University of Oxford has reiterated its 2016 adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The reiteration comes after a call from the Education Secretary for universities to adopt the Definition.

Recently, BirminghamLancasterCambridgeManchester Metropolitan and Buckingham New Universities have adopted the Definition.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities and public bodies. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Two colleagues of Prof. David Feldman’s at the Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism at Birkbeck have joined Campaign Against Antisemitism in slamming him for opposing the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Recently, our Chief Executive, Gideon Falter, documented how Prof. Feldman, who is the Director of the Pears Institute, “has been on the wrong side of the fight against antisemitism throughout the past several years,” including by dismissing concerns over rising antisemitism, participating in and defending the Chakrabarti Inquiry, allying with certain pro-Corbyn factions in the Labour Party and opposing the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Now, two of his colleagues at the Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism at Birkbeck have joined these criticisms. Writing for the JC, Prof. Philip Spencer and Dave Rich, respectively an Associate and an Associate Research Fellow at the Pears Institute, commented that Prof. Feldman’s article opposing the Definition “in our judgment not only does not take antisemitism seriously [and] may actually provide encouragement to those who have systematically denigrated Jews in this country”. They also accused their colleague of using a “line of argument [that] comes dangerously close to a classic antisemitic trope in which Jews are seen to be seeking to promote their own interests at the expense of others.”

Birkbeck University has recently confirmed to Campaign Against Antisemitism that it adopted the Definition on 27th November 2020. Evidently, even Prof. Feldman’s own institution is not convinced by his stale arguments.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, reiterated: “The Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism at Birkbeck should not be lending its credibility to a man who does so much to hinder the fight against antisemitism.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been at the forefront of the campaign for widespread adoption of the Definition, including by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

An antisemitism working group has been set up at the University of Toronto to “examine and address” campus antisemitism to help the university to be more “pro-active in creating a culture of inclusion” for Jewish students and staff .

The working will be led by senior academic Prof. Arthur Ripstein. As well as reviewing current practices to address antisemitism, it will recommend ways to improve education about antisemitism and propose initiatives to eliminate antisemitism on campus.

The recommendations will be made to the President and Vice-Presidents of the University as part of the University’s commitment to combating racism across its three campuses.

Prof. Ripstein said the aim was to ensure that the University “not only responds” to “incidents or allegations” of antisemitism, but was “pro-active in creating a culture of inclusion” so that “various forms of discrimination, including antisemitism,” were “tackled through education.”

Other members of the working group include doctoral students, senior academics and senior administrators with roles in human resources and anti-racism. Consultations with the Jewish staff and students would be vital in helping shape the recommendations, said Prof. Ripstein.

“No form of discrimination is tolerated at the University of Toronto,” the University Vice-President said, adding that antisemitism was a form of “discrimination, harassment and hatred that undermines our values.” The University recognised that it needed to be “more proactive and responsive” in addressing it on campus, she added.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A resolution seeking to combat campus antisemitism at Florida State University (FSU) has finally been passed following multiple “shameful attempts to derail and distort” it by opponents. 

The resolution, which included an acknowledgement of the International Definition of Antisemitism, was approved in the FSU Student Senate by 26 votes to fourteen.

The local chapter of Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP) and other groups reportedly campaigned heavily against the resolution.

According to one activist in favour of the resolution, Jewish students had been “disappointed” by the many “shameful attempts to derail and distort” the resolution. “Multiple amendments” had been put forward, he said, some of which had been adopted “without the consent” of Jewish students or the Jewish community.

“The worst” he said, was an amendment introduced by a non-Jewish student senator to replace the Definition with a definition put forward by Jewish Voice for Peace, a highly controversial and fringe American organisation.

“Fortunately, despite all of this, we got the resolution to pass and we’re looking forward to keeping this momentum moving forward,” he added.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The University of Birmingham has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The adoption comes after a call from the Education Secretary for universities to adopt the Definition.

Recently, LancasterCambridgeManchester Metropolitan and Buckingham New Universities have adopted the Definition.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities and public bodies. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

King’s College London’s (KCL) branch of the University and College Union (UCU) has passed a motion calling on the University to revoke its adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism two years ago.

The motion noted the call by Education Secretary Gavin Williamson on universities to adopt the Definition and said that the branch was “gravely concerned” that KCL allegedly adopted the Definition “without concern for its grave implications on critical education and the college’s declared commitment to diversity and inclusion”. It described the Government’s policy (and other Government positions) as “detrimental to academic autonomy, academic freedom” and claimed that they “intimidate and suppress speech of union members and college faculty who work on…Palestine and Israel”.

The motion resolved “to defend and protect academic freedom and reject any attempt at adopting and enforcing the deeply flawed [Definition] and its ‘illustrative examples’. Some of these examples require us to deny or suppress matters of historical record and contemporary reality, which is a breach of the UK’s Equality Act and Human Rights Act.”

The motion also resolved to “defend and protect academics…who teach on Palestine and Israel from any attacks on their academic freedom” and to “urge KCL management” to “reaffirm KCL’s commitment to academic freedom, including freedom of speech…critical of Zionism and Israel” and to “coordinate with other [Higher Education Institutions] in the UK to defend academic freedom and student activism from external and politically motivated attacks, including anti-democratic and top-down directives from Government.”

Finally, the motion resolved to urge KCL to “revoke its adoption” of the Definition and “to submit to the national UCU a motion along the same line as this motion.”

The motion was tabled and passed on Friday.

One Jewish member of the branch reportedly said that “I am so exhausted with having to emotionally respond to people questioning what constitutes antisemitism,” and “that members of my union would go to the trouble of putting forward a motion to reject [the Definition is] quite confronting.” The member added that the motion made them “uncomfortable”.

The member in question had previously left UCU almost twenty years ago over matters relating to Israel and antisemitism but had re-joined since then in order to be represented by the union during pension strikes. It is regrettable that a union, whose primary purpose is to ensure that its members receive equitable treatment at work, has repeatedly found itself making campuses unpleasant for Jewish academics, workers and students.

UCU has a long history of controversy in relation to antisemitism, and has a very poor reputation in the Jewish community.

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “UCU strikes again. For the umpteenth time, this union has found itself at the centre of an antisemitism controversy. Its reputation in the Jewish community is in the gutter, and this latest motion by one of its branches will do nothing but confirm it as a unwelcoming place for Jews.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Lancaster University’s Students’ Union’s Black and Minority Ethnic Officer was told to “stop being a Zionist shill” and ““stop being a gay n*****r” in a feedback form.

Last Wednesday, Max Kafula contacted students inviting them to provide feedback on his work in his capacity as an officer in the Students’ Union, but he was forced to shut down the online portal following a spate a antisemitic, racist and homophobic abuse.

The responses quoted above came in reply to a question on the form: “If you said that you did not have confidence in me, what could I do to improve it?”

In another question, Mr Kafula asked for suggestions of what he could do in the remainder of his term in office. One response was: “Stop selling out to the illegitimate state of Israel.”

In a statement on social media, Mr Kafula wrote: “This is not only outright homophobic, racist and antisemitic, but it is also absolutely disgusting,” adding: “No one should even have these views.”

He has reported the comments to the police as a hate crime, reportedly saying: “No ifs, no buts, it’s a textbook hate crime.”

In a statement, the Students’ Union said it is “shocked, disgusted and disappointed to have to report that a member of its officer team has been subjected to horrific racist and homophobic abuse,” adding: “We do not expect anyone associated with us, either through work or volunteering, to be exposed to such horrid vitriol. We also do not expect such hate within our university community, but it’s a stark reminder of why it’s so important that we keep pushing for equality.”

Lancaster University recently adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism after a campaign by Jewish students.

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Antisemitic, racist and homophobic abuse is absolutely unacceptable. The perpetrators behind these cruel obscenities must be identified and sanctioned. Lancaster University recently adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism; sadly, it now has an opportunity to apply it.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

A professor at a Michigan university has been placed on administrative leave after allegedly posting tweets which contained antisemitic tropes and conspiracy theories relating to the coronavirus pandemic.

The tweets by Thomas Brennan, a professor of physical science at Ferris State University (FSU), included references to a “Jewish mafia” and a claim that COVID-19 was “another Jewish revolution” and a “stunt” to create a “new world order.”

FSU President David Eisler announced on Monday that Prof. Brennan had been placed on administrative leave following his comments, and said that the University condemned the professor’s offensive statements. “We strongly reject these statements, condemn them and will not tolerate them,” Mr Eisler declared. The Board of Trustees also issued a statement backing the move to our Prof. Brennan on leave.

Prof. Brennan denied being an antisemite. In a statement he said: “I do not believe that middle-class Jews are involved in an international conspiracy, only that a small number of their elites are.” He continued: “Israel and the Jews should not be blamed for the crimes of a small number of mobsters like Jeffery Epstein or Ghislane Maxwell [sic] who used paedophile blackmail to control American politicians. I’m not an antisemite. I love and respect Jews just as I do all races, and I pray for Israel, just as I pray for America.”

Prof. Brennan went on to warn that the “entire world has fallen under the spell of a satanic, globalist elite” whose “end-goal is a technocratic, one-world government, where everyone, Jew and Gentile, will be micro-chipped and tracked 24/7.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The main student body of the University of Sydney has criticised the Labour Party in the UK for suspending Jeremy Corbyn, alleging that the measures were designed to “intimidate and silence” the political Left and criticism of Israel.

The Students Representative Council (SRC) of the University of Sydney passed a motion on 10th November condemning Labour for its suspension of Mr Corbyn. The resolution stated that through the suspension Labour was promoting a “cynical lie intended to intimidate and silence the Left” and its “criticism of Israel.”

The motion said that accusations against Corbyn represented “an attack upon the anti-racist and anti-imperialist Left.” It also claimed that there was “no evidence that he [Mr Corbyn] has ever done or said anything indicating prejudice against Jewish people.”

Opponents of the resolution described it as “drivel” and as “antisemitic gaslighting at its worst.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The US Department of Education Office for Civil Rights (OCR) announced on 17th November that it has officially launched a formal investigation into a complaint of antisemitic harassment, spanning over five years, at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC).

The federal investigation will examine the complaint, submitted on behalf of UIUC’s Jewish student body, into allegations of numerous antisemitic and anti-Zionist incidents at the University. Several instances include offensive graffiti, particularly swastikas, discovered across campus, the vandalism of religious items and frequent harassment and abuse by members of the student activist group, Supports for Justice in Palestine.

The recent complaint also outlined how administrators and UIUC leaders have continually allowed a hostile environment to develop, with University employees, on occasion, being complicit in the facilitation of a hateful atmosphere on campus in what was alleged to be a direct violation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act. The complaint maintains that all Jewish college students deserve the right to learn and live peacefully and freely in a safe, welcoming academic setting.

Various other higher education institutions agreed to implement steps to combat rising antisemitism and discrimination threatening the wellbeing and experiences of Jewish students.

In a public statement, the UIUC expressed a commitment to create and implement concrete solutions, alongside the Jewish community, to encourage Jewish students to express their heritage, faith and support for Zionism. Several Jewish groups involved in collating the complaint stated that they look forward to “ongoing collaborative work” with the Chancellor and his team to convert promises and objectives into successful action.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Manchester Metropolitan University and Buckingham New University have both reportedly adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Buckingham New University’s Vice-Chancellor Professor Nick Braisby reportedly said: “Antisemitism is repugnant. It is a form of racism, has no place within society and will not be tolerated at our University. Our decision to adopt the [International] Definition of Antisemitism demonstrates our commitment to be an inclusive community that welcomes and celebrates all of our members irrespective of their background or ethnicity. Adopting the Definition is an important step in our ongoing work towards eradicating racism, harassment, discrimination and prejudice.”

They join Lancaster University and the University of Cambridge as recent adopters of the Definition.

Recently, Gavin Williamson, the Education Secretary, called on universities to adopt the Definition.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities and public bodies. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Eric Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Lancaster University has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism after a campaign by Jewish students.

The University agreed to adopt the Definition at a meeting of the University Council on 20th November.

The University’s Vice Chancellor, Professor Andy Schofield, said: “This is one important element of the University’s wider commitment to ensure that the University is fair and inclusive. We will be continuing to work with our partners in both Israel and Palestine to increase our awareness and understanding of the major issues that affect our diverse community.”

Previously, Jewish students at Lancaster had protested perceived inaction by the University following a call from the Education Secretary for universities to adopt the Definition. The Jewish Society’s President had said: “We will not stop working until this Definition is adopted.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities and public bodies. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Eric Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

A series of lectures by a professor at Sofia University in Bulgaria have been roundly condemned for being “filled with racist, xenophobic and antisemitic content.”

Professor Mihail Mirchev recently uploaded a series of online lectures on Youtube that show him, among other inflammatory remarks, stating in response to his own question as to whether it is possible for Bulgaria to become a “Jewish state”, that it is indeed possible “if they [the Jews], less than one per cent, own the state and the capital, the media and the arts”.

The series of controversial lectures is titled “Social Work with Ethnic Groups”, and it has been taught for three years by the professor.

Numerous organisations and academics have written to the University’s administration calling for his dismissal.

Prof. Mirchev reportedly maintains that he will not resign and refuses to alter any of his teaching materials or online content, describing the allegations as “very exaggerated.”

Hours after students shared the letter on social media, an online petition was organised calling for Prof. Mirchev’s removal.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A swastika was found graffitied with red paint on a hall of residence popular with Jewish students at the University of Leeds.

The word “Nazi” was also painted beside the swastika on a wall in the Charles Morris Hall building.

The University confirmed that the graffiti, found over the weekend, has been removed.

A spokesperson for West Yorkshire Police reportedly said: “This is being treated as a hate crime and will be investigated accordingly. Officers are working with the university to identify suspects and anyone with information can contact police on 101, or by using the options on the West Yorkshire Police website. The crime reference is 13200552418.”

It is understood that the University suspects that this represented a “one-off indiscriminate act of vandalism by intruders” and that it was “unaware of any direct threats made to anyone living in the halls of residence”. Security patrols have apparently been increased at halls.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Antisemitic posters were placed around the Florida Gulf Coast University (FGCU) campus last weekend.

The University said that two posters were placed on Edwards Hall and one on Marieb Hall on 7th November. All three have been taken down.

According to FGCU President Mike Martin, the perpetrator has been identified. The University police department said that after identifying the alleged culprit through its licence plate recognition system, a “trespass warning” had been issued.

Students in the Alpha Epsilon Pi Jewish fraternity replaced the antisemitic posters with a message reading: “No place for hate.” They are urging college authorities to take legal action.

One Jewish fraternity member said that he was absolutely disgusted. “I’m appalled that something like this would happen on this campus,” he said.

In a statement about the incident President Martin stated: “We can and should all speak out to reject and condemn these hateful communications…

According to the statement, similar flyers have also been found on other campuses around Florida.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The University of Cambridge has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The adoption of the Definition was reportedly agreed at a meeting of the University’s General Board on 4th November.

Last month, the University appeared to be resisting adopting the Definition, despite reiterated calls by the Education Secretary, Gavin Williamson, for universities to do so. However, in a welcome move, the University now appears to have reversed itself.

The University’s Jewish Society has applauded the decision, and has stated that it is asking for clarifications on implementation. It has also called for the Students’ Union to adopt the Definition as well.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities and public bodies. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Eric Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

The student government of Pace University in New York City adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism on 28th October.

Within the resolution, the student government is described as a forum in which students can voice their concerns on issues presented by the administration and student body more widely, with aims to create a diverse, empowering and inclusive community. Referencing a recent spike in antisemitic incidents across the country, the resolution outlines how Jewish students constitute a significant part of the University’s community, while still remaining a distinct and important cultural and religious community which the University is determined to support and defend on campus.

Students noted the 2019 shooting at a kosher supermarket in Jersey City and a recent series of assaults against Jews in Brooklyn as key motivating factors for the adoption of the Definition. Furthermore, concerns have grown amongst the Jewish student body following the vandalism of a Pace University building when a wall was desecrated with a Star of David drawn in faeces in 2019.

The resolution also notes that Jews and Jewish institutions are increasingly the most targeted victims of hate crimes in the United States.

The resolution was introduced by a student at the school and the President of its chapter of Students Supporting Israel, and it was supported by other Jewish groups.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Jewish students at Lancaster University have pledged that they “will not stop” campaigning until their university adopts the International Definition of Antisemitism.

After the Education Secretary, Gavin Williamson, reiterated his call on universities to adopt the Definition, Lancaster University reportedly said: “Our University is committed to building a diverse, inclusive environment where people are able to reach their potential free from prejudice. Antisemitism, racism or hate speech of any form will not be tolerated. With the appointment of a new Vice Chancellor in May 2020, the university’s policies to support equality and diversity are under review as part of a wider Strategy update. A more formal consideration of the [International D]efinition of Antisemitism may take place as part of this. At this stage, no specific timetable relating to any consideration to adopt the [D]efinition has been set, however the matter will be discussed by University management in due course.”

However, the University’ Jewish Society has protested the University’s inaction, with its President saying “We would like it to be implemented. We have never said you can’t have valid criticisms or anything like that. Not adopting this Definition is in itself antisemitic. There is no disadvantage in adopting this Definition.”

The Jewish Society’s Campaigns Officer said: “It is shameful that people in 2020 can’t accept a definition that protects against hate…We love Lancaster, it’s an amazing place, we are heavily involved in campus life and the community. The work we are trying to do is relating to us improving the prospects of Lancaster students because the university can do better and we want them to do better.”

The President added: “We will not stop working until this Definition is adopted.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities and public bodies. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Eric Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Academics have reportedly protested a call by the Education Secretary for universities to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Gavin Williamson wrote a letter to university heads calling on their institutions to adopt the Definition after a study showed that a limited number had done so, despite urging from the Government over the past several years and threats of loss of funding.

He also said that the Office for Students, which regulates higher education in England, could be tasked with taking regulatory action against universities, including over funding, if they fail to adopt the Definition by the end of this year.

“If I have not seen the overwhelming majority of institutions adopting the Definition by Christmas then I will act,” Williamson wrote.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities and public bodies. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Eric Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

However, universities have protested the intervention, with a spokesperson for Universities UK saying: “We recommend universities do all they can to tackle antisemitism, including considering the [D]efinition, whilst also recognising their duty to promote freedom of speech within the law. UUK has set up a taskforce to consider what can be done to address all forms of harassment, violence and hate crime on campus, including on the basis of religion. We are in regular contact with Jewish community leaders and student groups to ensure that universities are supported to do all they can to tackle antisemitism.”

A spokesperson for the University of Oxford, which has not adopted the Definition, reportedly said:“Harassment and discrimination of any kind, including harassment on racial or religious grounds, are totally unacceptable at Oxford University and we have strong policies in place to guard against them.”

Similarly, a spokesperson for the University of Cambridge reportedly said: “The University of Cambridge does not tolerate discrimination in any form. We are an inclusive community that welcomes staff, students, alumni, collaborators and visitors from a wide variety of backgrounds, including people of all faiths and none. We have a student-facing webpage dedicated to resources on the disclosure and prevention of hate crime, which explicitly links to the International Definition of Antisemitism sanctioned by the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance as a reference point. Any behaviour that would fall within the [D]efinition would be covered by the University’s current Rules of Behaviour. The University keeps its Rules of Behaviour under review and therefore, will continue to monitor its approach.”

At SOAS, it has been reported that academics expressed their furious opposition to adoption of the Definition in an internal discussion thread, with one lecturer allegedly claiming that the Definition was a “Zionist” attempt to redefine antisemitism. Another academic defended the Definition and was apparently attacked by colleagues in the thread.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

The Hate Crimes Task Force for New York State is assisting in an investigation following a spate of antisemitic incidents on Long Island.

A swastika was carved into the driveway of a home in the suburb of Merrick on 9th October, and antisemitic graffiti was twice spray-painted at student residences belonging to the nearby Hofstra University.

Noting that he was “appalled and disgusted”, Governor Andrew Cuomo said: “Our state has zero-tolerance for antisemitism.”

“I want to assure the homeowner whose property was damaged and the Hofstra community that we will do everything in our power to bring the perpetrators to justice. That is why I am directing our Hate Crimes Task Force to assist the police in their investigations into these incidents,” he declared.

President Stuart Rabinowitz said that the University condemned “discrimination, bias, and prejudice in all its forms” and would hold accountable members who failed to live up to Hofstra’s core values of diversity and inclusion.

“Creating a welcoming supportive environment is a shared responsibility,” he said. “Incidents like these are a painful reminder that we must be vigilant.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

According to Columbia University’s Office of University Life, a swastika was discovered on 6th October on campus following the recent passage of an Israel divestment resolution.

The swastika was found by students on the steps of the Ivy League University’s main library, the Low Library. The administration condemned the act and has made a public commitment to investigate the antisemitic act to ensure that the campus remains a “welcoming and inclusive place where everyone is treated with dignity and respect.”

The swastika appeared days after the undergraduate student body voted in favour of a BDS resolution targeting Israel. Jewish communities have long contended that such measures are related to a rise in antisemitic incidents.

Students Supporting Israel (SSI) at Columbia University alleged, in an 8th October post on their social media page, that there was almost certainly a link between the vote and the swastika, described as a “despicable act of antisemitism”, and noted, as the group did before the vote, that it poses a threat to Jewish students.

Bryan Leib, chairman of Jewish millennial group HaShevet, drew parallels between the graffiti in Columbia and other on-campus incidents across the country, expressing concern that this may soon be “the new normal”. Last year a group of far-left students painted swastikas on the dorm room doors of Jewish students soon after a similar vote at the University of Indianapolis.

The SSI have expressed concern that the matter will not be taken seriously by the University administration and that the perpetrators will remain unpunished following previous failings to tackle antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism have expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

During an evening Yom Kippur service at Indiana University (IU) on 27th September, an individual drove passed a group of Jewish students and yelled antisemitic statements at the congregation.

According to the IU Police Department (IUPD) Deputy Chief, members of the student body IU Hillel were having an outdoor service on the lawn at the front of the building in line with local COVID-19 prevention measures. The perpetrator shouted “Heil Hitler!” out of the vehicle’s window during the service.

Several IU freshman students said that although leaders anticipated some form of confrontation with such a public service, the lack of security led to greater anxiety following the incident. One female freshman stated: “There’s been so many shootings and antisemitic acts. Even though it was just words, that doesn’t mean they can’t take action later.”

In response to the recent incident, IU Hillel leader Rabbi Sue Silberberg requested that IUPD patrol the site and the surrounding area to ensure that Jewish students are protected and can continue to connect with the centre and its activities without fear of abuse. In a social media post on 2nd October the organisation condemned the offensive act as evidence for the antisemitic beliefs “of a small minority.”

As a result of the incident, IU’s Dean of Students, Dave O’Guinn, encouraged all students to shine a light on the issue of antisemitism on campus in solidarity with the Jewish community. He said that he stands with the Jewish students, faculty and staff as they engage with cultural and religious customs in peace.

While IUPD took a case report of the incident, it is not actively investigating the act at present as the car description and license plate are currently unknown. If the IUPD receives further information from the public, however, the investigation would be opened to identify the suspect, according to the IUPD.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

New York University (NYU) has reached an agreement with the US Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights (OCR) to revise its Non-Discrimination and Anti-Harassment Policy following a legal complaint filed last year over campus antisemitism.

The administration was accused of failing to take steps to “prevent the discriminatory attack” or of acting “to prevent its reoccurrence,” following the arrest of two students who physically assaulted a celebrant at an Israel Independence Day party in April 2018 and trampled and set fire to an Israeli flag. The OCR opened the investigation into NYU last November.

Following the agreement reached with the OCR, NYU has said its updated policy would set out “the procedures for addressing and responding to … incidents and complaints of antisemitism.” The agreement also set out a description of “the forms of antisemitism that can manifest in the [NYU] university environment.”

It also pledged to issue a statement to all NYU students, faculty, and staff saying that the university does not tolerate acts of discrimination or harassment.

Among other requirements, the policy will make it mandatory for NYU to “train students, faculty and staff” about the issue of antisemitism. NYU also vowed to take disciplinary action against students who violate the policy and promised to report to the OCR on the implementation of the changes.

NYU’s settlement with the OCR was “ground-breaking,” declared attorney Neal Sher, one of those who filed the legal complaint. He hoped it would “send an important message to all colleges and universities,” he added.

The move was also welcomed by Alyza Lewin, president of the Louis D. Brandeis Centre: “This is a defeat of antisemitism that will undoubtedly improve the climate on NYU’s campus.”

Referring to the OCR’s requirement that colleges must use the International Definition of Antisemitism when addressing the issue, she added: “Other universities that are serious about combating antisemitism should follow suit and, similarly, incorporate the [Definition] into their university policies.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A professor at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) has called Israel a “Western virus” and accused the Jewish state of using the Holocaust as the “clincher argument” in its “presumed right over Palestine”.

Dr Haim Bresheeth, who is a Professorial Research Associate at SOAS’s Centre of Global Media and Communication, made the comments in a debate hosted by the controversial pro-Iranian charity Islamic Human Rights Commission (IHRC).

Dr Bresheeth reportedly claimed that “This form of Islamophobia [since the Crusades] has never disappeared from the West and explains the great centrality of Zionism to Western regimes Israeli presumed rights over Palestine are seen as, within Zionism, as exclusive and religious-based with the Holocaust deals at the clincher argument. This is very useful because no one seems to be able to say anything about this combination of, you know, Judeo-Christian and Holocaust arguments…The West had conceived of Zionism as the bulwark of Western capitalism against Islam and the Arab world and used it to open the Middle East for western interests, and this is continuing. Exactly along the lines developed by Herzl over a century ago. In this way Israel became the Western virus in the region during the Cold War, developing its political outlook as a Western/US outpost in the Near East – an agenda gradually adopted by the US, UK, Canada, Australia, Apartheid South Africa, and most importantly the EU.”

Also featuring in the debate, which was on the subject of the “normalisation” of Israel, was Dr Marwa Osma, a Lebanese commentator who has appeared on the Iranian-backed Press TV and has called for support for “armed resistance” along with “international pressure” against supposed “Zionist aggression”, according to the JC.

The chair of the charity, Massoud Shadjareh, also reportedly claimed that there was “huge concern the way that there has been a policy of the Zionists to normalise themselves in all different arenas,” apparently including interfaith programmes between Jews and Muslims. He is reported to have said: “the institution of interfaith was used as one of the tools for this and you know, you could ask yourself, you could look into it, why is it that all the Jewish organisations who are involved in interfaith are actually Zionists while we know there is a huge number of anti-Zionists, non-Zionists in the Jewish community and none of them are represented.”

A similar absurd argument has previously been advanced by the conspiratorial Bristol University academic, Dr David Miller.

It is understood that after the debate was uploaded onto the IHRC’s YouTube channel, the following disclaimer was provided: “All views are the speakers’ own and do not necessarily reflect the views of IHRC.”

SOAS has long been a hotbed of antisemitism among UK campuses.

SOAS reportedly told the JC: “One of SOAS’s core values is Freedom of Speech and we encourage the SOAS community to express themselves openly, with mutual tolerance and intellectual freedom. However, freedom of expression may not be exercised as hate speech or to threaten the safety or freedom of expression of others. We have a clear and explicit zero-tolerance policy in relation to antisemitism and all forms of racism. This particular event was not a SOAS organised event and we are not responsible for its content. Views that are expressed at such events by individuals are not views expressed on behalf of SOAS itself.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Image credit: SOAS

Numerous technology companies recently blocked a webinar featuring a convicted terrorist, plane hijacker and member of the violent Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP).

Following protests, Zoom refused to host a webinar featuring Leila Khaled held at San Francisco State University (SFSU) on 23rd September. As a member of the PFLP, Ms Khaled took part in two terrorist hijackings in 1969 and 1970. Opponents of the event noted that the U.S. Government has designated the PFLP as a terrorist organisation and claimed that by hosting Ms Khaled on its service, Zoom was exposing itself to criminal liability for providing “material support or resources” to a terrorist group.

In a statement confirming that it had cancelled the webinar, a Zoom spokesperson said that Ms Khaled’s participation in the webinar potentially breached its terms of service. In light of her membership of “a U.S. designated foreign terrorist organisation…we determined the meeting is in violation of Zoom’s Terms of Service and told SFSU they may not use Zoom for this particular event.”

After Zoom’s ruling, the event organisers turned to Facebook, which also blocked the webinar. YouTube, which is owed by Google, then terminated the live-streamed talk after 22 minutes when Ms Khaled referred to the “right of occupied peoples to fight their occupiers by any means possible, including weapons.” A message appeared stating: “This video is unavailable.” An attempt to stream the event on another YouTube channel was also blocked by the company.

That three of the most significant technology companies in the United States have finally moved to block antisemitic hatred online is a significant and welcome development, and shows the effect that enforcement of American regulations restricting the activities of antisemitic terrorist groups can have.

It is regrettable that SFSU was unrepentant, with the University’s President, Lynn Mahoney, saying in an open letter that the University disagreed with Zoom’s decision but recognised its right as a private company to enforce its policies. She had previously stated that she supported the right of her staff to invite controversial speakers, insisting that “an invitation to a public figure to speak to a class should not be construed as an endorsement of point of view.”

It is notable that the controversial far-left group, IfNotNow, also appeared to regret that the webinar was blocked.

Khaled was scheduled to speak as part of a roundtable discussion entitled “Whose Narratives? Gender, Justice and Resistance.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The University of Warwick has rejected a complaint by the Warwick Jewish and Israel Society (JISoc), against a sociology lecturer who described allegations of antisemitism in the Labour Party as “very much an Israeli lobby kind of idea”.

In a lecture on 11th November 2019, Dr Goldie Osuri posited in a recording obtained by Campaign Against Antisemitism that “the next time they say that the Labour Party is antisemitic, you know there are some people possibly that are possibly antisemitic, but this idea that the Labour Party is antisemitic is very much an Israeli lobby kind of idea, the idea that you want to discredit the Labour Party because there is support for Palestine among some members of the Labour Party.”

Her conspiratorial comments, alluding to supposed outsized Israeli power and interference in British politics, and dismissal of antisemitism in Labour as a smear, left Jewish students outraged.

At the time, in an email to students shown to Campaign Against Antisemitism, Dr Osuri doubled down on her claims, promoting the work of the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, Jewish Voice for Labour, as well as bemoaning that she was “saddened” that “none of these issues were raised in the seminars.”

However, the University stood by Dr Osuri earlier this year, finding that her comments “opened up the space for dialogue and discussion as would be expected in an academic environment and that the statement made in the lecture holds within the principles and values of tolerance and free speech.”

In a recent letter to the JISoc President, it is understood that the University’s Provost, Professor Christine Ennew, has now determined that there are “insufficient grounds to progress the complaint”, and therefore no action will be taken against the lecturer. Students have charged the University with having failed to investigate the matter properly and accused the decision-makers of a conflict of interest.

It is understood that they intend to escalate the complaint to the Office of the Independent Adjudicator for Higher Education.

The University of Warwick is also under pressure over its refusal to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism, a refusal that may well have had a bearing on this case.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The University of Warwick’s decision not to take action against a lecturer peddling antisemitic conspiracy theories about the ‘Israel lobby’ being behind the well-documented and indisputable institutional antisemitism in the Labour Party is an abdication of both its academic responsibility and its duties towards its minority students. Sadly, this determination is of a piece with Warwick’s decision not to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism. Had it done so, it might have recognised Dr Goldie Osuri’s remarks for what they were and taken appropriate action. It is little wonder that the University’s Jewish students are losing confidence in the administration.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

A tribunal has backed a university after it dismissed a professor for using “positive stereotypes” about racial groups, including Jews.

Stephen Lamonby, a 73-year-old professor, was dismissed by Solent University for making controversial statements in a private conversation with his course leader, including that “I believe that the Jewish are the cleverest people in the world [sic]. They are much maligned because of it. I asked if you were Jewish because of your ability with maths/physics etc. Which is a speciality of theirs.”

He later explained that “I was excited to think she might be one of them – excited to meet a Jewish physicist, who had been my heroes since boyhood.”

Prof Lamonby had also said that “Germans are good engineers” and made a similar comment about Japanese people and Americans. He further apparently said that he “had a soft spot” for young black men because “many are without fathers” and so “need all the help they can get.”

Prof Lamonby took the University to a tribunal, but the Judge C H O’Rourke said: “For the avoidance of doubt, I find that it is clearly at least potentially racist to group nationalities, races, ethnic or religious groups, by entire categories and to ascribe certain abilities or talents (or the opposite) to them, when, of course, as with any such group, talents or abilities will vary wildly from individual to individual…

“While Mr Lamonby sought to argue that his stereotyping (which it was) was positive, such ‘positivity’ is nonetheless potentially offensive to the recipient. A Jew told they are good at physics – because they are a Jew – may well consider that as demeaning their personal intellectual ability/hard work. Secondly, it could also be simply grossly offensive, as the person may not actually be Jewish, but feel some characteristic is being ascribed to them. Thirdly, even if they are Jewish, they may quite properly consider it none of Mr Lamonby’s business.”

The case has caused some controversy because many of Prof Lamonby’s comments were, in his view, complimentary “positive stereotypes”. However, after the judgment Prof Lamonby complained that “You can’t make any comments [in universities] now because they are totally obsessed with racism and to talk about Jews in the context of racism is crazy because they are not even a race, they are an ethnicity.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for universities to take action against academics who indulge in negative stereotypes and antisemitism. If a professor can be dismissed for promoting positive stereotypes, it stands to reason that those deliberately denigrating Jewish students or intimidating them should face the sack.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

The University of York has reportedly adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long urged widespread adoption of the Definition. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism and Lord Pickles worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

In recent months, other universities, including the University of Bristol and University College London also adopted the Definition, while the University of Warwick is mired in controversy for refusing to do so.

The development follows a call on universities to adopt the International Definition by the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government.

A professor at the University of Birmingham is on record claiming both that she is Jewish and also that she is not Jewish.

Prof. Rebecca Gould, who previously taught at the University of Bristol, was one of numerous signatories to a letter calling on the German Government not to equate the Boycott Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement with antisemitism. The signatories to the May 2019 letter all described themselves as “Jewish and Israeli scholars”.

Meanwhile, in a 2019 academic article titled ‘The Palestine Exception to Academic Freedom’, which she co-authored with fellow academic Malaka Shwaikh, Prof. Gould said: “I am not Jewish according to any widely accepted definition”.

Prof. Gould went on in that article to explain: “On my father’s side, I am of Jewish descent. My father’s ancestors were born in Lodz, in what was then the Pale of Settlement within the Russian empire and is now a part of Poland. They migrated to Australia in the nineteenth century, in search of new opportunities, before arriving in the US, where they became perfect capitalists, converted to Catholicism, and changed their name from the Jewish Goldstein to the gentile Gould to improve their economic prospects. Such is the extent of my ancestral link to Judaism.”

The discrepancy in Prof. Gould’s biography was brought to the attention of Campaign Against Antisemitism by a concerned member of the academic community. Prof. Gould has not responded to our request for comment.

Prof. Gould is apparently prepared to identify herself as Jewish in order to try to lend authority to a matter that impacts the Jewish community (an overwhelming majority of British Jews, for example, feel intimidated by tactics used to boycott Israel) but is much less certain of her Jewish identity on other occasions.

The academic article rightly notes that Campaign Against Antisemitism has criticised both Prof. Gould and her co-author, Dr Shwaikh, in the past. We previously exposed Prof. Gould as having written that “As the situation stands today, the Holocaust persists and its primary victims are the Palestinian people”.

We observed that Prof. Gould’s co-author, Dr Shwaikh, had made various deeply concerning statements, including that “If terrorism means protecting and defending my land, I am so proud to be called terrorist. What an honour for the Palestinians!”; marked Holocaust Memorial Day by tweeting that “The shadow of the Holocaust continues to fall over us from the continuous Israeli occupation of Palestine to the election of Trump”; claimed that “Zionism ideology [sic] is no different than that of Hitler’s”; and wrote that “Hitler did his deed and the Palestinians had to pay for it.” Dr Shwaikh previously claimed through her solicitors that the tweets, sent over a significant period, were the result of a hacking attack, but failed to substantiate her claim when challenged.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

A leading academic at King’s College London has published an op-ed making the case for regulation of social media citing the landmark conviction of antisemite Alison Chabloz, which was brought about by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Daniel Allington, a senior lecturer who is also a volunteer with Campaign Against Antisemitism, wrote about how “conspiracy theories pumped out by unregulated social media platforms” had a real life impact on whether people followed Government rules regarding the COVID-19 lockdown. Campaign Against Antisemitism has for years similarly been warning that antisemitic material online was not only problematic in itself but also had real world implications.

Dr Allington noted the discrepancy that when unfounded conspiracy theories are propagated on broadcast radio or television they are challenged by a regulator, Ofcom, as for example in the recent case of the antisemitic hate preacher David Icke. But the same conspiracy theories face no sanction when promoted online, despite the equal if not greater danger they pose. 80,000 viewers saw Mr Icke’s interview on the television; six million watched it on YouTube. But whereas the London Live channel was sanctioned by Ofcom, the social media platform faced no regulatory censure.

Dr Allington rightly noted that this is because “social media platforms do not regard themselves as publishers but rather as communications networks,” and just as what newspapers and television stations present to readers and viewers is regulated, so should social media companies be regulated for what they permit to be uploaded onto their platforms and promoted through their algorithms. Social media companies already do make decisions, Dr Allington observed, about what they allow to remain on their platforms, similar to publishers, but unlike publishers they are not regulated.

Turning to the case of Ms Chabloz, Dr Allington recounted that she was found guilty of broadcasting antisemitic songs on YouTube, a conviction resulting from sustained legal action by Campaign Against Antisemitism. Ms Chabloz was prosecuted under the Malicious Communications Act, but Dr Allington rightly noted that the problem is far greater than one offender and that the social media companies should be penalised for publishing her material, but this cannot be achieved under Communications legislation.

“Social media companies are not communication networks like the telephone — they are media companies and publishers. That needs to be recognised now,” Dr Allington concluded, observing that social media companies did take action following crackdowns on the mass copyright violations that used to occur when users would upload films and music videos without permission from the owners, and therefore they are in principle capable of changing, but it requires the Government to act.

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

The President-Elect of Edge Hill University’s Students’ Union ‘liked’ a statement on Instagram that claimed that a scandal for which he apologised was in fact a conspiracy to damage him.

Following contact from an alumnus of the university, Campaign Against Antisemitism can reveal that Sam Farrell ‘liked’ a statement saying: “there is evidence suggesting the whole Sam Farrell exposed thing was planned as a back-up in case he won”.

The statement apparently referred to the scandal arising from images posted on social media and revealed by Campaign Against Antisemitism earlier this year following a tip from a disgusted student in which Mr Farrell, then a candidate for the presidency of the Students’ Union, is seen apparently dressed in striped pyjamas with a number appended, and wearing a cap, reminiscent of an inmate at Nazi concentration camps. Captions accompanying the images referred to “needing a shower” and “feeling gassed”.

Mr Farrell subsequently won the election and apologised for his behaviour. However, Mr Farrell ‘liked’ the Instagram statement several days after he apologised, indicating that he is not repentant or does not actually understand the offence he caused.

The alumnus commented: “I have read in the news about the disgusting behaviour of the Students’ Union President-Elect Sam Farrel and I am outraged that the university has not forced him to step down yet. He issued an apology but I feel that if he had truly changed his views he would have voluntarily stepped down from his role as his past behaviour makes him unfit to represent all students at the university.” With regard to the Instagram post, the former student said: “This post was made after he had made a public apology about the issue. The fact that he ‘liked’ this post clearly shows that he is only sorry because he was called out on his behaviour.”

Hundreds have now signed a petition aimed at any “student, parent or staff member” at Edge Hill calling for Mr Farrell to be removed from office and for a new election.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been in contact with Edge Hill University, which has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism and has assured us that it is taking action.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “There is no place on a British campus for such behaviour, and certainly not by someone hoping to represent all students. This new revelation shows that the President-Elect is unrepentant and his position has become totally untenable. Sam Farrell must step down to prevent his university becoming synonymous with mockery of the Holocaust, and we will be pressing the university administration again for action.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

After Campaign Against Antisemitism publicised the troubling behaviour of Edge Hill University’s Students’ Union (SU) new president-elect and demanded action, the SU has now announced that it will suspend the result of last week’s election and open a full investigation.

The information about the candidate was originally provided to Campaign Against Antisemitism by a concerned student.

Sam Farrell, the new SU president-elect, recently dressed up as a Holocaust victim for a “Movie and TV Show” themed night out and was seen in images posted on social media apparently in striped pyjamas with a number appended, and wearing a cap, reminiscent of an inmate at Nazi concentration camps, with captions accompanying the images referring to “needing a shower” and “feeling gassed”. Then yet another social media post emerged in which he jokes about the billing for a club night saying: “pretty sure the Holocaust had better headliners”.

Mr Farrell went on to win the election last week and was due to become the SU’s new president. Mr Farrell had issued a lengthy apology, and the SU released a statement explaining why, despite learning of his behaviour in November 2019, it nonetheless permitted him to run as a candidate.

However, the SU has now released a further statement disclosing (extracted): “Due to new evidence [of Mr Farrell’s behaviour] coming to light and new evidence received by the University and the Students’ Union over the past 48 hours, new disciplinary action has also been opened. The Students’ Union will be fully transparent in cooperating with University counterparts in full should they wish to begin their own investigation, and the Students’ Union itself can confirm that it will be re-examining existing and new evidence as part of its new investigation. To be clear, the result of the SU Presidency election will be suspended until the result of any disciplinary procedure has been finalised.

“We do not underestimate the severity of this situation and the harm that the SU President-elect’s actions have caused.”

The SU will also be undertaking antisemitism training with the Union of Jewish Students.

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We are very pleased that the SU has taken this step, and we will also be writing to the University to follow suit. Prejudice of any sort has no place on a university campus, and certainly not when it comes from a potential president of a students’ union. Jewish and non-Jewish students at Edge Hill deserve to be represented by someone who stands up for them, not someone who distresses them. It is right that the SU is taking this seriously, and we will continue to monitor the process to ensure that a suitable sanction is recommended and enforced.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

After Campaign Against Antisemitism publicised how one of the candidates to become Edge Hill University’s Students’ Union president had recently dressed up as a Holocaust victim for a “Movie and TV Show” themed night out, more evidence has come to light of his mockery of the Holocaust.

Sam Farrell was seen in images posted on social media apparently dressed in striped pyjamas with a number appended, and wearing a cap, reminiscent of an inmate at Nazi concentration camps, with captions accompanying the images referring to “needing a shower” and “feeling gassed”. Now yet another social media post has emerged in which he jokes about the billing for a club night saying: “pretty sure the Holocaust had better headliners”.

Mr Farrell went on to win the election last week and will be the Students’ Union’s next president and the face of Edge Hill’s student body.

The student who originally spotted the photographs and contacted Campaign Against Antisemitism complained to the university at the time and Mr Farrell was advised to remove the images from social media, but apparently no further action was taken by the university and he was permitted to continue to stand in the election by the Students’ Union.

She said: “I feel this is very insensitive, inappropriate and not someone who I want to represent my university if he feels it is appropriate to mock such a devastating event like the Holocaust.”

In a lengthy statement, Mr Farrell said (extracted): “Despite what my past posts may suggest, I do understand the severity of making light of events from history, especially when that history plays a fundamental role in reminding us of the needless persecution of others. I only hope I can convey how genuine I am when I say that I now realise how naïve and ignorant my past behaviour was. It was wrong, it will not happen again, and it should not have happened in the first place. I will not attempt to justify the behaviour by saying it occurred before I was nominated for SU President, but instead want to learn from past mistakes.”

The Students’ Union also explained that “As a Students’ Union, we take matters of this nature extremely seriously and when the individual’s actions were first brought to our attention in November 2019 we formally took disciplinary action to deal with his inappropriate behaviour. The student fully cooperated and apologised…and reiterated that it was not his intention to cause offence. He fully understood the severity of these accusations and was also given an appropriate disciplinary sanction following a thorough investigation. Since then, the student has tried to make amends and has engaged in lots of proactive initiatives to support his fellow students.

“Edge Hill Students’ Union made the decision that he should be able to run for any student officer position after carefully examining their Election Bye-Laws, which state that complaints can only be made against a candidate’s behaviour during the time that they are a candidate in the election. Taking these factors into account and adhering to the National Union of Students official guidance, the student was allowed to continue to stand in the 2020 Students’ Union Elections.”

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Sam Farrell clearly didn’t expect any repercussions from his grotesque attempt at humour, and sadly Edge Hill University has proved him right. The university’s failure to discipline him when the incident occurred means that now, as he becomes the face of its student body, Edge Hill has become synonymous with mockery of the Holocaust. The university’s inaction is unacceptable, and we shall be writing to the administration and the Students’ Union demanding his expulsion and to the Charity Commission calling for them to investigate the institutional failure to address this matter appropriately.” 

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

One of the two candidates running to become President of Edge Hill University’s Students’ Union recently dressed up as a Holocaust victim for a “Movie and TV Show” themed night out.

Sam Farrell is seen in images posted on social media apparently dressed in striped pyjamas with a number appended, and wearing a cap, reminiscent of an inmate at Nazi concentration camps. Captions accompanying the images referred to “needing a shower” and “feeling gassed”.

The student who publicised the photographs complained to the university and Mr Farrell was advised to remove the images from social media, but apparently no further action was taken and he was permitted to continue to stand in the election.

She said: “I feel this is very insensitive, inappropriate and not someone who I want to represent my university if he feels it is appropriate to mock such a devastating event like the Holocaust.”

Voting in the election closed on 17th March and the results are due tomorrow.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Sam Farrell should be expelled for his repulsive stunt. Someone who thinks the murder of 1.5 million Jewish children during the Holocaust is a joking matter at a time of rising Holocaust denial and antisemitism in Britain is clearly utterly unfit for any leadership position.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

The controversial organisation, EuroPal, is scheduled to present a session on antisemitism at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) in London on 7th March, despite the group’s history of promoting an antisemitic conspiracy myth.

The event is part of a day long student workshop titled ‘Advocacy for Palestine on Campus’, hosted by SOAS’s Palestine Society. The particular session is intended to “[look] comprehensively at the ‘new antisemitism’ and how it has affected Palestine advocacy at large, and what it means for pro-Palestinian advocacy moving forwards.”

It is outrageous that EuroPal could be invited to deliver a session on antisemitism, given its own troubling history. The organisation is reported to have published and distributed a pamphlet containing antisemitic conspiracy theories once employed by the Nazis and since by modern-day neo-Nazis and white supremacists such as the KKK.

The pamphlet – ‘Basic Facts on the Palestinian Issue’ – promulgates the Khazar myth, which is a universally discredited, derided, offensive and decidedly unacademic theory that Ashkenazi Jews are descended from a nomadic people in Central Asia who converted to Judaism during the Middle Ages. The theory’s sole purpose is to delegitimise the right of the Jewish people to self-determination in its ancestral homeland. It is unconscionable for an organisation that holds antisemitic views to be allowed on campus by SOAS for the purpose of delivering training in antisemitism.

SOAS has in the past refused to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism, despite growing concerns over campus antisemitism, thereby affirming the abysmal reputation of the university in the Jewish community.

A spokesman for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “EuroPal has no place on a university campus. For such an organisation to lead a discussion on antisemitism is an insult to the Jewish community and to what is left of the integrity of the university, which is already known within the Jewish community as the School of Antisemitism.

“Time after time SOAS manages to fall short of the ever lower expectations accorded to it by the Jewish community. We are consulting our lawyers on measures we can take if this event goes ahead.”

Last year, the Equality and Human Rights Commission published a report showing that two-thirds of students who said that they had experienced racial harassment during the first half of the 2018/19 academic year did not report it to their university.

The former Universities minister, Chris Skidmore, has called on universities to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism, with the Communities Secretary Robert Jenrick suggesting that public funding for institutions that fail to do so may be in jeopardy.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Campaign Against Antisemitism is currently raising a litigation fund, a major focus of which will be to challenge universities through legal action. Please consider contributing.

White supremacist posters have appeared on the campus of the University of Bristol as well as in Bristol’s town centre and in the city of Hull.

The posters, which read “It’s okay to be white”, are intended as a racist dog whistle and have been tied to an online group known as the Hundred Handers that encourages users to print and distribute the material.

The phrase was also described by the Bristol Students’ Union as “as a gateway into more serious conspiracies.”

A University spokesperson said: “The University of Bristol aspires to be a community where everyone should feel safe, welcomed and respected.”

In Hull, it was understood that members of the local council are now set to receive training on how to idenitfy white supremacist propaganda.

Similar propaganda has recently appeared in Edinburgh and Sunderland.

The Education Secretary, Gavin Williamson, has observed that “there have been appalling incidents directed at the Jewish community at leading London universities.”

Mr Williamson made the remark in an opinion editorial in which he affirmed that if universities do not defend free speech, the Government will do so. His reference to incidents impacting Jewish students was in the context of noting how “activists’ threats are able to shut down events.”

For years Jewish students have seen their events diluted by university authorities or found fellow students and other activists imported from off campus disrupting the events with protests that sometimes even turn violent.

Last year, the Equality and Human Rights Commission published a report showing that two-thirds of students who said that they had experienced racial harassment during the first half of the 2018/19 academic year did not report it to their university.

The Universities minister, Chris Skidmore, has called on universities to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism, with the Communities Secretary Robert Jenrick suggesting that public funding for institutions that fail to do so may be in jeopardy.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

The University of Warwick has been condemned by Andrew Percy MP in the House of Commons for refusing to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Mr Percy, who co-chairs the All Party Parliamentary Group Against Antisemitism, urged public bodies to adopt the Definition in comments in Parliament last week, saying that “this applies to universities as well where we have a big problem with antisemitism on campuses”. In particular, he singled out “universities like Warwick, whose Vice-Chancellor is refusing to sign up” to the Definition.

The Vice-Chancellor declined to adopt the Definition because it did not offer “any added value,” declaring that the university would not “formally adopt individual definitions of specific forms of discriminatory behaviour.” The Vice-Chancellor explained that “to adopt one would inevitably lead to the adoption of a whole series of such definitions.” The university, however, would be “mindful” of the Definition.

The decision was criticised by the Warwick Jewish Israeli Society, which, following Mr Percy’s comments, reiterated its call on the university to adopt the Definition. The president of the Society said that the reference to the university’s refusal to adopt the Definition in the House of Commons “is a damning indictment of our university”, adding: “Enough is enough. The university should finally listen to Jewish students and adopt the Definition without delay.”

The university’s Students’ Union also criticised the Vice-Chancellor’s decision, noting that the university has adopted a “revamped Sexual Misconduct policy” because “it was widely agreed that a specific definition of sexual misconduct was a given for an effective process to be formulated.” It concluded that “we cannot therefore place our trust in the university to take racism seriously – particularly in the area of discipline – without an equally specific definition of what racial discrimination actually entails. It is unacceptable for victims of racism to constantly have to explain and unpack their experiences in order to be taken seriously.”

It is understood that negotiations on the matter at the University of Warwick will continue.

Robert Jenrick, the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, has made several calls on universities, as well as local councils, to adopt the Definition, warning that those that do not may be named and shamed and have their funding cut.The Universities Minister, Chris Sikdmore, has also called on universities to adopt the Definition.

The Sheffield branch of the University and College Union (UCU) has been criticised for holding an event to mark Holocaust Memorial Day featuring a controversial Jewish academic who holds unrepresentative views regarding the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The event was in fact billed as an evaluation of the Definition. The speaker was Brian Klug, a Senior Research Fellow at St Benet’s Hall, University of Oxford, who defended the Labour Party’s unacceptable substitute for the Definition.

Among the critics was Holocaust survivor and founder trustee of the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust, Agnes Grunwald-Spier MBE, who insisted that she was “not raising the issue…because I object to controversial views being expressed in a university – on the contrary,” but rather because Dr Klug is reportedly opposed to the adoption of the Definition by universities – “a very useful tool in controlling hate speech against Jews” – his opinions will not be balanced at the event and it is inappropriate to use Holocaust Memorial Day to promote divisive views. “I also object,” she said, “to a day which is supposed to reflect on the lessons of the Holocaust and to remember the many victims of the Nazis and subsequent genocides being hijacked in this manner.”

UCU has a very negative reputation in the Jewish community, resulting from a poor record when it comes to fighting antisemitism, including refusing to adopt the Definition, repeatedly endorsing the antisemitism-riddled Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) campaign against the Jewish State (the tactics of which an overwhelming majority of British Jews find intimidating) and fighting a legal battle against a Jewish academic who unsuccessfully sued UCU for breach of the Equality Act 2010.

Most recently, in October, the union sent an e-mail to secretaries of local branches encouraging them to mark Holocaust Memorial Day on 27th January and providing a near-exhaustive list of minority groups persecuted by the Nazis — but failing to include the Jews.

The University of Warwick Students’ Union has released a passionate statement calling on the university to think again after Vice-Chancellor Professor Stuart Croft refused to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism because it does not offer “any added value.”

In its statement, the Warwick Students’ Union regretted that the university would not be adopting the Definition and would rely instead on the “framework of the values and principles developed over the past year to determine its response to allegations of racial discrimination and hate crime,” which the SU itself was “heavily involved” in producing.

However, the Students’ Union went on to note that “blanket terms like ‘values’ and ‘respect’ have always been subject to ambiguity and debate…[and do] not take into account the severity and nuance that often accompanies racial discrimination.” The SU further noted that “when working on the revamped Sexual Misconduct policy and procedures, it was widely agreed that a specific definition of sexual misconduct was a given for an effective process to be formulated.”

Similarly, the Students’ Union argued, “we cannot therefore place our trust in the University to take racism seriously – particularly in the area of discipline – without an equally specific definition of what racial discrimination actually entails. It is unacceptable for victims of racism to constantly have to explain and unpack their experiences in order to be taken seriously.”

The statement went on to observe that the Universities Minister wrote to all UK universities calling on them to implement the Definition in full, that the SU itself adopted it following a student vote in 2016, that the SU has lobbied the university to follow suit, that the National Union of Students and the Union of Jewish Students have also recommended its adoption, and that Universities UK, which represents institutions of higher education, has also called on universities to consider adopting the Definition. The SU therefore called again for “specific definitions of racial discrimination” to be adopted by the university.

In December, the University of Bristol adopted the Definition, after a controversial debate. University College London has also adopted the Definition, following a call on universities to adopt the Definition by the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, Robert Jenrick.

Antisemitism at universities has long been a major focus for Campaign Against Antisemitism, however this year we will elevate it to one of our three major national strategic priorities. This will include working with university administrations to persuade them to formally adopt the Definition.

Warwick University has reportedly refused to adopt the widely accepted International Definition of Antisemitism because it does not offer “any added value.”

In a letter, the university’s Vice-Chancellor, Professor Stuart Croft, told the university’s Jewish Israeli Society (JSoc) president, Angus Taylor, and Jewish Chaplain, Rabbi Fishel Cohen, that the university would not “formally adopt individual definitions of specific forms of discriminatory behaviour.”

Prof. Croft explained that “to adopt one would inevitably lead to the adoption of a whole series of such definitions.” The university, however, would be “mindful” of the Definition.

In response to the letter, Mr Taylor said: “We are deeply disappointed with this decision and call on the university to reverse it without delay.” He called the decision a “shameful abdication of its responsibilities towards Jewish students.”

Mr Taylor added that: “Instead of heeding the Government’s advice and adopting the internationally-recognised Definition, they have instead invented their own pseudo-definition with no consultation from Jewish students at Warwick.”

A university spokesperson said that the Vice-Chancellor has offered to “continue the dialogue” in person with students and the Jewish Chaplain.

In December, the University of Bristol adopted the Definition, after a controversial debate. University College London has also adopted the Definition, following a call on universities to adopt the Definition by the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, Robert Jenrick.

Antisemitism at universities has long been a major focus for Campaign Against Antisemitism, however this year we will elevate it to one of our three major national strategic priorities. This will include working with university administrations to persuade them to formally adopt the Definition.

Fifty Jewish professors and students at the University of Cambridge have written an article protesting the political Left’s belittling of antisemitism and dismissal of their concerns.

The endorsers of the article include Prof. Simon Sebag Montefiore, Prof. David Abulafia and Daniel Janner QC.

The intervention was prompted by a campaign event featuring the (successful) Labour candidate, Daniel Zeichner, who, they claim, was dismissive of antisemitism concerns raised with him. One student reportedly asked Mr Zeichner for his view on what Labour should do to resolve its antisemitism crisis, to which the candidate responded that Labour is merely a “voluntary organisation” like a “football club” or a “church”, and asked: “what else do you want us to do?”

The authors of the article accused the MP of “Labour-splaining” antisemitism to Jewish students and observed that his response was “emblematic of a wider disease that has taken hold of both the Labour Party and left-wing spaces here at Cambridge.”

They lamented that when antisemitism is raised, Labour activists and supporters feel personally attacked and respond by pointing out fault in other parties or questioning Jews’ motives.

They also note that the “disturbing choice” between speaking out against antisemitism on the Left versus suffering in silence has “taken a profound toll on Jewish students at Cambridge”, including impacting mental health. There is a “social cost of speaking out,” they say.

The article questions why students who wear Jewish skullcaps have had their pigeon-holes stuffed with Labour leaflets while others lay empty, why Labour activists aggressively approach Jewish students, why blatantly antisemitic tropes are excused as mere criticism of Israel, and why they are told that their experiences of antisemitism do not matter.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism has shown that Jeremy Corbyn is personally responsible for 24 incidents of antisemitic discourse.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

The head of the Hebrew and Jewish Studies Department at University College London has used a Chanukah message to attack the university’s adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Prof. Sacha Stern, who is Jewish, explained that his and others’ public opposition to the adoption of the international definition is that it “will stifle the expression of such legitimate political views.” He also claims that the Community Security Trust (CST) and the Board of Deputies “have adopted, very sensibly, a politically neutral definition of antisemitism that makes no reference to Zionism or Israel.

Prof. Stern is wrong on both points. First, the international definition does not stifle free speech, only hate speech. In July 2017, Campaign Against Antisemitism published the opinion of expert counsel, David Wolfson QC and Jeremy Brier, on the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism. The opinion states that: “Public bodies in the United Kingdom [such as universities] are not ‘at risk’ in using this Definition. Indeed, this Definition should be used by public bodies on the basis that it will ensure that the identification of antisemitism is clear, fair and accurate. Criticism of Israel, even in robust terms, cannot be regarded as antisemitic per se and such criticism is not captured by the Definition. However, criticisms of Israel in terms which are channels of expression for hatred towards Jewish people (such as by particular invocations of the Holocaust or Nazism) will in all likelihood be antisemitic.” The definition itself states that “criticism of Israel similar to that levelled against any other country cannot be regarded as antisemitic.”

Second, the CST does in fact use the international definition in its reportage and the Board of Deputies has expressly called for the wide adoption of the international definition in its recent election manifesto.

It is absurd for Prof. Stern to claim that the international definition poses a risk to anyone but those intending to express antisemitic views and contribute to the toxic atmosphere for Jewish students that now prevails on many campuses, as Prof. Stern himself concedes. It is particularly reprehensible that Prof. Stern would use his Chanukah message to attack the adoption of a tool on which so many Jewish students and professionals rely in combating the resurgence of the world’s oldest hatred. Prof. Stern should apologise.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is currently raising a litigation fund, a major focus of which will be to challenge universities through legal action. Please consider contributing.

A Jewish student has told Campaign Against Antisemitism of how he was violently assaulted at a Labour Party rally.

The student attended a Labour Party rally yesterday in Bristol carrying a placard stating that Jeremy Corbyn is a racist, in order to highlight the issue of Labour antisemitism and Mr Corbyn’s culpability in the Party’s antisemitism crisis.

He reported that he and his friends faced a torrent of antisemitic abuse, including: “f*** you, you filthy Jew”; “Who’s funding you?” and “I bet the Israeli Government has paid you to be here”. The student added that he and his friends were called “Tory operatives” and that they were “selfish” for “only caring about antisemitism”. They also faced repeated demands to justify the policies of the Government of Israel, despite not having brought Israel up in their exchanges with the Labour supporters

The student says that he was physically attacked twice and that Labour supporters successfully wrestled the placard out of his hands outside City Hall, and in the scuffle he sustained a small cut to his hand.

The student has reported the incident to Avon and Somerset Police, who have confirmed that they are investigating and will examine CCTV.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism has shown that Jeremy Corbyn is personally responsible for 24 incidents of antisemitic discourse, which is equal to fifteen percent of all recorded incidents involving parliamentary candidates and party leaders. Overall, Labour Party candidates for Parliament account for 82 percent of all incidents.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right, and that Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn is the party leader of choice for those who hold multiple antisemitic views.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

Over 58,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

The University of Bristol has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism, following a controversial debate.

The University had reportedly initially declined to adopt the full roster of examples that are appended to the International Definition, with the senate removing the examples and elevating the amended version to the trustees. However, following a protest by the Jewish Society, the International Definition has been adopted in full by the University.

The University has had its share of scandals, dropping a complaint against one lecturer, Dr Rebecca Gould, over an article in which she claimed that “privileging the Holocaust as the central event in Jewish history” should end and that “the Holocaust persists and its primary victims are the Palestinian people”; and rebuffing Jewish students’ concerns over a lecture course titled “Harms of the Powerful”, in which a conspiracy theorist sociology professor, David Miller, suggested that the “Zionist movement” is one of the “five pillars” of hatred of Muslims (redolent of the five pillars of Islam) and is bankrolled by “ultra Zionist funders”.

University College London adopted the International Definition recently, following a call on universities to adopt the International Definition by the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government.

The University of Warwick has backed a lecturer who dismissed concerns over Labour’s ongoing antisemitism crisis by saying such concerns are “an Israeli lobby kind of idea.”

In a lecture on 11th November, Dr Goldie Osuri posited in a recording obtained by Campaign Against Antisemitism that “the next time they say that the Labour Party is antisemitic, you know there are some people possibly that are possibly antisemitic, but this idea that the Labour Party is antisemitic is very much an Israeli lobby kind of idea.”

Her conspiratorial comments, alluding to supposed outsized Israeli power and interference in British politics, and dismissal of antisemitism in Labour as a smear, left Jewish students outraged.

Rather than some shadowy conspiracy, Labour’s institutional antisemitism is very real. Indeed on 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

Dr Osuri was challenged over her remarks by the Warwick Jewish Israeli Society who said in a statement released jointly with the Union of Jewish Students, said that “there can be no excuse from an academic at such a prestigious university to spread conspiracy theories associated with classic antisemitism.” They went on to point out that Dr Onsuri’s comment  “belittles and diminishes the fears, experiences and concerns of the Jewish community and spreads the antisemitic conspiracy that Jews control the media”. 

In an email to students shown to Campaign Against Antisemitism, Dr Osuri doubled down on her claims, promoting the work of the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, Jewish Voice for Labour, as well as bemoaning that she was “saddened” that “none of these issues were raised in the seminars.”

In a statement Angus Taylor, the President of the Warwick Jewish Israeli Society responded that, “Dr Osuri has sought to downplay and deny our community’s experience of racism by suggesting that it is in fact a conspiracy, and that the representative bodies of British Jews are in fact lying, making up racism against them.” He ended by saying that “Dr Osuri’s argument that the concerns of Jewish students in the lecture were not ‘raised in the seminars… in a respectful manner’ demonstrates a demonstrable lack of sensitivity to the experience of people affected by racism. Her comments upset students and this response amounts to victim-blaming.”

This case has been exacerbated by the response of Warwick University to questions from the Jewish News, in which the University repeated Dr Osuri’s claim that the accusations were a “misrepresentation of her lecture” that leaves out “significant context,” as well as sharing her demand that concerned students “discuss and debate.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism shares the Jewish students’ conclusion that the University has committed “a shameful dereliction of its responsibility to protect Jewish students” and that “the University has chosen to side with antisemites and not Jewish students.”

This incident follows other concerns over the University’s failure to address a scandal over a group chat which gained national attention, in which antisemitic, misogynistic, abusive and threatening messages, including rape threats, were uncovered.   

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

The anonymous student Facebook page, “ExeHonestly”, a platform used by University of Exeter students, has closed in a furore over neo-Nazi posts and is now under investigation by the police.

ExeHonestly had featured several posts including one that read: “People’s favourite number? Mine’s 1488.” This is a coded reference to the neo-Nazi fourteen-word oath: “We must secure the existence of our people and a future for white children”, a slogan initially devised by David Lane, a member of the white supremacist terrorist group “The Order” which was responsible for the murder of Jewish radio host Alan Berg. The number 88 refers to the eighth letter of the alphabet, H, and is intended as a code for “Heil Hitler.” Other posts on the page included anti-black racism.

A University spokesperson told The Tab that the page was “operated by anonymous administrators,” explaining, “We have deep concerns about the content these administrators post that affect our community and we urge our students not to use it. We have reported our concerns about the site to Facebook, and now escalated matters to the police hate crime unit and will work with them to identify those responsible. If we obtain specific information about any of our students posting abusive or offensive content we will take immediate and appropriate action. Racism cannot be tolerated in any form in our community and students can contact us with information or concerns through our ‘Speak Out’ website.”

Speaking to The Tab, Exeter’s Jewish Society said: “We are appalled by the recent posts on ExeHonestly. Whilst we champion free speech and see a great value in it, there is no space for Jewish students, or indeed any students at any university to feel uncomfortable or scared due to their religious, racial or ethnic background. We praise the university for taking action, bringing a problem to the attention of students.”

The administrators of the group meanwhile have claimed ignorance arguing that while they “do not condone any hateful racist content” the “dog-whistle” posts were “not apparent to people unless they have specialised knowledge.” They further attempted to justify their failings claiming that: “It is standard practice on social media for posts to occasionally get through.” They later opted to close the page.

The University has called the response “either not credible or… evidence that they are not capable of hosting a community site” and the police have confirmed they are investigating this as a hate crime.

The University of Exeter has a history of antisemitic incidents. In 2017 the university tried to brush off an antisemitic incident in which a “Rights for Whites” sign was found in halls of residence and a swastika was found carved into a door in on-campus halls Birks Grange, with a spokesman downplaying this blatant antisemitic incident as possibly merely “an ill-judged, deeply offensive joke.”

This follows another alarming antisemitic incident at the university last term in which students were photographed at a sports club social event wearing t-shirts with handwritten antisemitic slogans. One t-shirt bore the slogan: “the Holocaust was a good time.” In response to this, students organised a protest march condemning antisemitism during which they asked Malaka Shwaikh, exposed by Campaign Against Antisemitism over her statements about terrorism and the Holocaust, to address the crowd and make Jewish students feel safe. Whilst professing an admirable desire for solidarity, Shwaikh took the opportunity not to renounce any of her views and to instead berate those “attacking” her as simply venting their “Islamophobic” prejudice.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Birkbeck, University of London is set to host the controversial Socialist Workers Party (SWP) this weekend for an event entitled “The Big Socialist Weekender”.

Ilan Pappé will address the event on the topic: “Anti-Zionism is not antisemitism.”

Zionism is the movement supporting the right of Jews to self-determination. Self-determination is guaranteed to all peoples under article 1 of the UN Charter.

Ilan Pappe has made several inflammatory comments, claiming accusations of antisemitism have been used “to stifle debate on Palestine” and to “depose” politicians supportive of Palestine as well as ridiculing concerns that the Labour Party has a problem with institutional antisemitism. He has also said that Jeremy Corbyn should not “be afraid” after laying a wreath at the grave of the Black September terrorists who tortured and murdered Israeli Olympians, saying: “as an Israeli Jew I was there [at the same graveyard]…and I paid respect for the freedom fighters of Palestine.”

He also defended Chris Williamson’s claim that the Labour Party is “too apologetic” about antisemitism, arguing that “you can’t satisfy these beasts.”

Mr Pappe has also defended Jeremy Corbyn’s connection to Holocaust denier Paul Eisen and other antisemites as well as his links to terror groups.

Many of these comments have come while delivering speeches of the same title at previous events, making it likely that they could be repeated this weekend.

To add insult to injury, the event attempting to whitewash antisemitism is set to take place on a Saturday, the Jewish sabbath. This severely limits the Jewish community’s ability to participate in an event designed to define their own oppression. The SWP has form on this front, having previously been involved in an event featuring the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, Jewish Voice for Labour (JVL), hosted by their front organisation Stand Up to Racism on the holiest night of the Jewish calendar, Kol Nidrei, the night of Yom Kippur.

Birkbeck has previously come under scrutiny over an antisemitic demonstrator at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) in London, who was filmed claiming that the Holocaust happened because Jews are “cowards”. He was later reportedly sighted being escorted off campus by security staff at Birkbeck, University of London. The man had been filmed by students and a member of Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Demonstration and Event Monitoring Unit at a demonstration at SOAS.

Campaign Against Antisemitism will be approaching Birkbeck to urge the university to reconsider this event and its overtly inflammatory speaker.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]. 

The Most Reverend Justin Welby, the Archbishop of Canterbury, has called on the Government to pressure universities to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The Government responded that as universities are independent, the Government could not apply pressure but could issue guidance, and that the Government “strongly encourages” institutions of higher education to adopt the International Definition.

It is understood that so far only five such institutions have done so.

Robert Jenrick, the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, has also previously expressed concern regarding “the disgraceful experiences that Jewish students have lived through at certain universities,” and has called for local councils and universities to follow the UK Government in adopting the International Definition, indicating that he intended to take action in this direction.

He has since written to local councils urging them to adopt the International Definition.

Nottingham Trent University has expelled a first-year student for photoshopping a Palestine sticker over the mouth of an Orthodox Jew sleeping on the London Underground.

The student had a photograph taken of himself in a mocking pose with the sleeping Jewish passenger on public transport and reportedly posted it on the dating site Tinder, before it was shared more widely on Twitter.

The University had suspended the student, who had not yet begun his studies, as a disciplinary panel decided on appropriate action.

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We applaud Nottingham Trent University for swiftly suspending and now expelling this student for this grossly offensive act. This is what zero tolerance of antisemitism looks like, and other universities should learn from Trent’s example.”

The Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) has published a report showing that two-thirds of students who said that they had experienced racial harassment during the first half of the 2018/19 academic year did not report it to their university.

The reasons for the underreporting included a lack of confidence that the university would address the matter and fears of the personal consequences on their education, career and wellbeing of making a report, as well as ignorance of how to make reports.

The EHRC’s report quoted an undergraduate at an English university being told by a fellow student that “they were baking Jews like cupcakes in Auschwitz” and that they would like to put the student in an oven, while antisemitic slurs toward students and staff were noted at Scottish and Welsh universities as well.

One of the most widely reported antisemitic issues, according to the report, was harassment experienced by students in and around protest events on campus, including physical intimidation.

According to the report, “racial harassment can cause humiliation, isolation, loss of confidence and serious harm to mental health and wellbeing. Students who experienced racial harassment said they were left feeling angry, upset, depressed, anxious and vulnerable; eight percent said they had felt suicidal.”

The research indicated that one in twenty students said that they had left their studies due to racial harassment and three in twenty staff said that racial harassment had caused them to leave their jobs.

The report further stated that many universities significantly underestimate the prevalence of racial harassment and overestimate victims’ willingness to come forward, the adequacy of their own processes and their record of handling reports. “Nearly all universities we surveyed who had received complaints felt that they had dealt with them fairly. However, our call for evidence found a much higher level of dissatisfaction with investigative processes than university responses would suggest.”

The report provides numerous recommendations, but Campaign Against Antisemitism also calls on universities to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism, without which the handling of antisemitic abuse by campus authorities will inevitably be haphazard, inconsistent and inadequate. It will also indicate to Jewish students, staff and the wider community – as well as antisemites – that universities take antisemitism on campus seriously.

The disgraced Labour MP, Chris Williamson, has been denounced as an antisemite by a student at the University of Nottingham as he gave a lecture.

Mr Williamson was lecturing students at an event at the Centre for British Politics as part of a series on “British Politics in Crisis”.

Jewish students at the University had called for the invitation to be withdrawn, citing Mr Williamson’s “history of Jew baiting”, but the University defended the invitation in a decision condemned by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

During the lecture, one student accused Mr Williamson of being “a member of a sewer of racist groups on Facebook including Palestine Live” and “troll[ing] the Jewish community endlessly on Twitter” and, asked rhetorically whether the MP is “the most unlucky anti-racism campaigner or are you just an outright liar?”

The student was applauded as Mr Williamson described the question as “abusive” and declared: “I will take no lectures from people who attack my credentials as an anti-racism campaigner…so don’t come here and accuse me of being an antisemite or a racist. It’s an absolute slur.”

Mr Williamson also again defended Jackie Walker, who has been expelled from the Labour Party over her comments about Jews.

Mr Williamson was suspended from the Labour Party after claiming that Labour has been “too apologetic” over antisemitism and is currently on his third suspension from the Party (the second suspension was overturned by the High Court due to meddling in the disciplinary process).

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 55,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

The University of Leicester Students’ Union is investigating a white t-shirt party in which students wrote pro-Nazi and antisemitic messages on their t-shirts, including “Hitler wanted my kind alive”. At another recent social, a student wore a high visibility vest with the phrase “I’m a Nazi” printed on it.

A white t-shirt party involves students donning plain shirts and emblazoning messages on them, and students too commonly take the opportunity to write offensive or racist comments. This latest incident follows prior incidents at Lancaster, Plymouth, Newcastle and Coventry.

Responding to the incident, an officer at the University’s Jewish Society has written: “The University has allowed a hostile environment for Jewish students to flourish, and so long as things like this continue to fly under the radar of the majority of students, nothing will improve.”

The Students’ Union, which claims that the social event was “unauthorised”, has apologised for the incident and has promised to “ensure we tackle any antisemitism and make it wholly clear that white t-shirt socials are not allowable by the Union.”

It is understood that the students involved have now identified themselves to University authorities and that the Students’ Union and the University will be undertaking investigations and disciplinary action. The University society that hosted the social has reportedly also pledged to run inclusivity training.

We commend the Students’ Union and University for their pledges in response to this incident. Campaign Against Antisemitism is taking a close interest in the outcomes of the investigations and hopes to see the University uphold zero tolerance to antisemitism.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Nottingham Trent University has suspended a first-year student for photoshopping a Palestine sticker over the mouth of an Orthodox Jew sleeping on the London Underground.

The student had a photograph taken of himself in a mocking pose with the sleeping Jewish passenger on public transport and reportedly posted it on the dating site Tinder, before it was shared more widely on Twitter.

When confronted about the incident, the twenty-year-old student conceded that it was a “terrible picture” and “absolutely insensitive” but insisted he is “in no way antisemitic”.

The university says that a disciplinary panel will now decide on appropriate action.

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds Nottingham Trent University for taking swift action against the student for this antisemitic and humiliating assault on a Jewish tube passenger, and trusts that the decision of the disciplinary panel over future action will be such that it will also provide a deterrence to others.

The University of Nottingham has defended a decision to invite Chris Williamson MP to speak on its campus. 

Mr Williamson was suspended from Labour and then readmitted, only to be resuspended following a public outcry after claiming that Labour has been “too apologetic” over antisemitism.

The disgraced MP is scheduled to speak on 11th October as part of a series on “British Politics in Crisis” at the Centre for British Politics.

Jewish students at the university have reportedly called for the invitation to be withdrawn, citing Mr Williamson’s “history of Jew baiting.”

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “It is a damning reflection on the University of Nottingham that it chooses to invite a politician suspended from the Labour Party over his attempts to minimise the Party’s antisemitism crisis and who has a record of praising antisemites to give a lecture. If the university wishes to teach its students why British politics is in crisis, it might start by exploring why leading institutions are so ready to legitimise Labour antisemitism by inviting one of its chief defenders to speak.”

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, twelve MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 55,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

The University and College Union (UCU) sent an e-mail to secretaries of local branches encouraging them to mark Holocaust Memorial Day on 27th January and providing a near-exhaustive list of minority groups persecuted by the Nazis — but failing to include the Jews.

The e-mail described persecution of “trade unions, including social democrats and Communists…; Roma and Sinti people; asocials, which included beggars, alcoholics, drug addicts, prostitutes and pacifists; Black people; disabled people — those with physical as well as mental illness; freemasons; gay and lesbian people; Jehovah’s witnesses; [and] non-Jewish Poles and Slavic POWs.”

Extraordinarily, the e-mail did not mention Jewish victims of the Nazis, who were the principal victims of the Holocaust. This was even despite the specific reference to non-Jewish Poles.

UCU indirectly apologised for the offensive omission in an e-mail from an “equality support official” for what were described as “drafting errors” and “human error”. The official stated that “UCU apologises for the offence this caused and reassures all members that it continues to fight against all forms of antisemitism, hatred and bigotry in society.” In the updated e-mail, a paragraph was added about the genocide of Jews in the Holocaust.

Ordinarily, such an omission might not have been noteworthy, but UCU has a poor record when it comes to fighting antisemitism, including refusing to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism, repeatedly endorsing the antisemitism-riddled Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) campaign against the Jewish State and fighting a legal battle against a Jewish academic who unsuccessfully sued UCU for breach of the Equality Act 2010.

It is hardly a stretch to imagine that there is a relationship between UCU’s cavalier approach to antisemitism today and its insensitivity toward commemoration of historic antisemitism. If the Union were to show greater awareness of the antisemitism of the past, perhaps its attitude toward Jews today will also find the correction it so desperately needs.

Jackie Walker is scheduled to appear on a panel at University College London (UCL) marking the launch of a volume of essays titled The Responsibility of Intellectuals – reflections by Noam Chomsky and others after 50 years.

The event is being organised by the Institute of Advanced Studies, which in the billing anticipates that Ms Walker and others will “describe the personal price they have paid for speaking out”. Ms Walker has a chapter in the book titled “I Don’t Want No Peace — a Black, Jewish activist’s take on the responsibility of intellectuals”.

Ms Walker is a former vice-chair of Momentum who was repeatedly suspended by Labour and finally expelled earlier this year. She has persistently claimed that complaints of antisemitism are part of a plot to destabilise the leadership of Jeremy Corbyn and has rejected the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The book’s release and the event marks fifty years since the publication of The Responsibility of Intellectuals by the controversial American professor, Noam Chomsky. 

UCL has defended the invitation to Ms Walker, despite her record, citing “freedom of expression”.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “It is appalling that someone who has blamed the Jews for the slave trade and even been expelled from the Labour Party is nonetheless given a platform by one of Britain’s leading universities to talk about the ‘personal price she has paid’ for her unrepentant racism. One cannot help but imagine that if Ms Walker had spoken about any other minority in similar terms, UCL would not tolerate her appearance on a panel.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism will be reviewing what is said at the event against the charitable objects of UCL, which is a charity.

The University of Bristol has rebuffed Jewish students’ concerns over a lecture course titled “Harms of the Powerful”, in which a conspiracy theorist sociology professor suggested that the “Zionist movement” is one of the “five pillars” of hatred of Muslims (redolent of the five pillars of Islam) and is bankrolled by “ultra Zionist funders”.

One slide shown to students depicted a complex web of Jewish and Zionist organisations along with prominent Jewish community figures. Prof. Miller’s comments led Jewish students to feel “uncomfortable and intimidated”, according to one complaint. The idea that Jews secretly exert extraordinary power over society and hold dual loyalties are longstanding antisemitic canards.

In the past, Prof. Miller has belittled antisemitism in the Labour Party as “mostly false”, condemned Ken Livingstone’s treatment by the Party as a “disgrace” and dismissed concerns about the safety of Jewish students on campus.

Prof. Miller has also set up platforms which promote conspiracy theories. He founded a website called PowerBase, which categorises Campaign Against Antisemitism as in fact being part of the “Israel lobby”. Powerbase is linked to another of Prof. Miller’s websites, Spinwatch, which is funded by various Islamist-linked organisations.

Another brainchild of Prof. Miller’s, a website called NeoCon Europe, has also previously published work by Kevin MacDonald, a supporter and public defender of notorious Holocaust denier David Irving. Mr MacDonald has said that “there are clear apologetic tendencies — tendencies to view the Jewish ‘in group’ in a favourable manner and to pathologise antisemitism as irrational and completely unrelated to the actual behaviour of Jews.” NeoCon Europe eventually pulled the article, which included MacDonald’s suggestion that Jewish characteristics included “Access to prestigious and mainstream media sources, partly as a result of Jewish influence on the media.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The University of Bristol is failing its students. Universities should be educating students, not inciting them to view Jewish communal groups, leaders and philanthropists as somehow part of a pillar of Muslim-hatred. The false accusation that Jews harm Muslims and Christians has been used to demonise Jews and inflame antisemitic violence for centuries. It is beyond the pale that Prof. Miller has been permitted to indoctrinate students to view much of the Jewish community as a threatening web of dangerous forces. He must be removed from academic staff.”

This is also not the first time the University of Bristol has refused to take action in troubling cases. Two years ago, the university declined to discipline Dr Rebecca Gould over appalling comments about the Holocaust.

The University of Essex has reportedly dismissed a computer science and electronics lecturer, Dr Maaruf Ali, over antisemitic Facebook posts opposing the creation of a Jewish society at the university. In one post, Dr Ali wrote that “the Zionists next want to create a society here at our university” on a Facebook page for new students.

We commend the university for its handling of this incident.

In February, Dr Ali openly and vociferously opposed the establishment of a student Jewish society at the university, which was formed after the initial vote had received opposition from hundreds of students.

Dr Ali also posted conspiracy theories alleging “Zionist” control of the media, and shared far-right content alleging Mossad involvement in the 2015 terror attack in Paris. He also shared a post claiming that the Jewish population of Europe actually rose during the Holocaust, and equated Israel with Nazi Germany.

In response to his sacking, Dr Ali said that he was disappointed to be dismissed and did not “hate Jews, their religion, people or their culture. I believe that everyone should be allowed to form any society. This is what I’m thinking now, which is what I didn’t think at the time.”

A University of Essex statement confirmed that a member of staff had been dismissed following a tribunal hearing. The statement said: “The university has now completed an independent investigation into the serious allegations made against a member of university staff.”

Daniel Kosky, Union of Jewish Students campaigns organiser, welcomed the dismissal and said that it was the correct decision for “severely antisemitic” social media comments.

Earlier this month, Chris Skidmore, the Minister of State for Universities, urged all of the UK’s higher education institutions to formally adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Chris Skidmore, the Minister of State for Universities, has urged all of the UK’s higher education institutions to formally adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism.

In a letter to all universities, Mr Skidmore wrote that: “Institutions like King’s College London are already displaying leadership in this area but I expect our universities, as vehicles of change, to show moral leadership and adopt the IHRA definition of antisemitism, which shows that an institution and its senior leaders are serious about ensuring their campuses are tolerant environments where ideas and debate can flourish but persecution can never take hold.”

The Department for Education (DfE) posted a video on Twitter reiterating the message and calling on universities to adopt the definition. Mr Skidmore met with Jewish students yesterday to hear about their concerns and experiences of antisemitism on campus.

Jewish students sometimes suffer appalling intimidation, abuse and even violence at British universities.

The National Union of Students has adopted the definition, but the University and College Union has rejected it.

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds Mr Skidmore for taking this measure which demonstrates the Government’s support for Jewish students.

Students who would like advice or help can e-mail us at [email protected].

Britain was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Eric Pickles and others worked hard for over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

Omar Chowdhury, the University of Bristol Students’ Union’s Black and Minority Ethnic officer has been allowed to remain in his post after making antisemitic comments online.

Mr Chowdhury told Izzy Posen, a Jewish student, that he should “be like Israel and cease to exist.” He also said to Mr Posen that his comments were like “Israeli settlements: always popping up where they’re not wanted.”

The comments which have been deleted were made on the university’s student “confessions” Facebook page, called Bristruths, which is publicly accessible.

Mr Posen complained to Bristol Students’ Union, which launched an independent inquiry. It concluded that Mr Chowdhury’s comments were antisemitic but stopped at giving him him a formal warning. The Union also made “recommendations” that Mr Chowdhury make an unqualified apology, educate himself on antisemitism and work with Jewish students to rebuild their trust.

In a statement, the Union said: “Omar’s comments were found to be antisemitic, and in addition to receiving an official warning about his future conduct, a series of recommendations have been made for Omar.”

Mr Chowdhury issued a statement “wholeheartedly” apologising to Mr Posen. He extended his apology to “Jewish students at the university, and the wider Jewish community for these ignorant and offensive comments.” He acknowledged that his remarks were “antisemitic and unacceptable, adding: “I regret my words and I am disappointed in myself for contributing to the hostile environment that is faced by Jewish people at university and in society.”

Mr Chowdhury said that Jewish students had good reason to be concerned about his ability to work as Bristol Students’ Union’s ethnic minority officer, acknowledging: “I take responsibility for my words and actions, and now it is my job to show that I can and will work with Jewish students to represent them at this university and regain their confidence before I begin my role in June. Over the last two weeks, I have already begun efforts to educate myself on antisemitism and I have learned a lot just in this small timeframe. I want to continue to grow my understanding of antisemitism and the different forms it takes and will undertake antisemitism training as part of this. I will do everything I can to show that these comments do not represent my character and commit to creating a more welcoming environment for minorities in the work I do next year, starting with myself.”

Mr Posen accepted his apology in a post on Facebook. “Apology accepted. I’m glad that Omar could stay in his elected role and that he has expressed remorse. I wish him the best of luck in his future work on campus.”

Bristol’s Jewish Society said in a statement that they “recognise that there are a variety of views surrounding the controversial decision in response to the antisemitic breach of conduct by BME Officer elect Omar Chowdhury, all of which are valid. Although Chowdhury’s apology appears genuine and we look forward to seeing the actions that he takes to combat antisemitism, Jewish students may still rightly be concerned.”

A petition calling for Mr Chowdhury’s resignation has already received nearly 1,000 signatures. It demands that he resigns as the BME officer after his “antisemitic abuse”, stating that an official warning is “not enough”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism considers it to be extremely important that Mr Chowdhury apologise, as he has done, and take steps to educate himself so that he can overcome his vile antisemitism. However, we do not agree with the University of Bristol Students’ Union that he is a suitable champion for students from minorities and should not remain in that role.

Zeid Truscott has been disqualified from standing as a candidate for the National Union of Students (NUS) Executive Council after complaints over antisemitic social media posts, including one claiming that Mossad trained the leader of ISIS.

Jules Mason, NUS Chief Returning Officer, tweeted a statement confirming: “As your Chief Returning Officer, I am responsible for ensuring that elections are not just fair, safe and accessible but with that they also follow the rules and abide with NUS rules and policy. As I mentioned in my accountability report yesterday, I have ruled on a complaint concerning antisemitism…Despite being informed of the potential of disqualification [Mr Truscott] has not complied with my ruling in respect to a complaint made about them concerning antisemitism whilst a candidate. As a result, I have disqualified that candidate from this year’s NUS NEC Block of 15 election.”

Mr Truscott has refused to apologise for reportedly sharing an article on Facebook claiming that Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the leader of ISIS, was trained by Mossad.

Another post claimed that the International Definition of Antisemitism is “anti-Palestinian and anti-Arab.” Another message said that: “Some of the [definition’s] examples ([such as] Israel being a racist endeavour) aim to silence Arab lived experience and sideline oppression of Arabs.” He also allegedly tweeted: “Just your daily reminder that Israel is a racist, apartheid state. Founded on ‘divine right’ and created through terrorism and ethnic cleansing.”

A number of messages allegedly sent from his Facebook and Twitter accounts were uncovered by a Twitter user.

In a statement posted on social media, Mr Truscott, a University of Bath student, declined to apologise for the posts, instead saying that he rejected accusations of antisemitism. He wrote: “Since my involvement in the student movement, I have always tried to advocate for justice, liberation and amplifying the voices of the marginalised.”

In a statement posted on Twitter, the Union of Jewish Students (UJS) said that it is “deeply troubled” by “antisemitic” social media posts by Mr Truscott.

An NUS spokesman said that: “The National Union of Students believes that all forms of hate and prejudice are unacceptable. NUS will continue to engage with the Jewish students and the community to identify ways in which we can ensure our spaces are inclusive and accessible to all students.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism condemns Mr Truscott’s language and his refusal to back down. The International Definition of Antisemitism, which NUS has adopted, is clear that “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour)” is antisemitic, as are antisemitic conspiracy theories.

NUS still has a long way to go to repair its reputation with Jewish students, but Mr Truscott’s disqualification is a positive development and we commend Mr Mason for his principled decision.

Once a pioneer in fighting antisemitism, in past years NUS has been rocked by scandal, including under the leadership of the widely-criticised Malia Bouattia who called Birmingham University a “Zionist outpost in higher education” because it has “the largest JSoc (Jewish Society) in the country”. Campaign Against Antisemitism thanks Shakira Martin, the outgoing President, for her continued efforts to support Jewish students and rebuild relationships between NUS and the Jewish community.

Leeds University Union last night voted in a panel decision against a proposal to combat antisemitism. Jewish students have described the atmosphere at the meeting as “intimidating”.

The panel vote required 12 votes to pass the motion but only 10 voted for and 5 against. This means that the motion for the Union to combat antisemitism will now be decided by a student referendum, which will involve all students on campus.

The motion called for the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism, ensuring that sabbatical officers receive training on how to tackle antisemitism and calling for the University of Leeds to commemorate Holocaust Memorial Day annually.

Leeds Jewish Society said that it was “incredibly disappointed” in a statement on Twitter, adding that “the forum involved sniggering and some students asking us to withdraw the motion in full or amend it”, explaining that “in theory, [Leeds University Union] could be giving money to students to run [a referendum campaign] against combating antisemitism. We will not cower. Jewish students have a right to feel safe on campus.”

The proposer of the motion Emma Jacobs tweeted that she “barely slept last night. I cannot stop thinking of the injustice…why’s the Jewish community the only one who aren’t [sic] allowed to define our own oppression?”

In the name of democratic accountability, Campaign Against Antisemitism calls for the names of those students who voted against the motion to be released by Leeds University Union so that they can be publicly judged for their actions. Anybody with information about their identities should contact [email protected].

Jewish students at the University of Essex were left shocked as students rallied in an attempt to block the establishment of a new Jewish Society on campus. Until now, the university’s Jewish students have not had an organised body.

When founding a new student society through the University of Essex Students’ Union, approval is needed by the student body, so as usual students were allowed the opportunity to vote whether or not to permit the establishment of the Jewish Society.

The proposal was met with heavy opposition. 200 students voted against the establishment of a Jewish Society, including members of societies such as the “K-Pop Society” and “Pokémon Go Society.” In total, over 500 students voted, with 64% voting for the establishment of a Jewish Society, but 36% of students voting against Jewish students being permitted to organise.

Students were not alone in voicing their opposition. A lecturer, Dr Maaruf Ali, openly and vociferously opposed the establishment of a Jewish Society, writing on Facebook that “the Zionists next want to create a society here at our university!”

Dr Ali has previously posted conspiracy theories alleging “Zionist” control of the media, and has shared far-right content alleging Mossad involvement in the 2015 terror attack in Paris. He has also shared a post claiming that the Jewish population of Europe actually rose during the Holocaust, and equated Israel with Nazi Germany. The Jewish News has reported that he is now under investigation by the university. A spokesperson told the Jewish News that they are “looking into the allegations as a matter of urgency in accordance with our zero tolerance policy.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism is making representations to the University seeking disciplinary action not only against Dr Ali, but also some of the students who sought to prevent the establishment of a Jewish Society. The Union of Jewish Students has forcefully condemned both those who voted against the establishment of the Jewish Society and Dr Ali.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Coventry University Dodgeball Team is under fire for hosting a white t-shirt party in which students elected to emblazon their t-shirts with antisemitic emblems and the slogan “The Jews deserved it.” This follows prior incidents at Lancaster, Plymouth and Newcastle.

On 6th February, Coventry University Dodgeball Team was photographed at Empire nightclub at what appears to have been a white t-shirt party, a party in which participants don plain white t-shirts and write messages on each other’s shirts. In this case, some members of the team decided to scrawl antisemitic remarks and a swastika.

The team has been suspended by Coventry University Students’ Union, after being reported to the university by the President of Coventry University Jewish Society.

In a joint statement, the Jewish Society and the Union of Jewish Students said: “We expect appropriate action to be taken to demonstrate that such behaviour is unacceptable.” Tochukwu Ajare, President of Coventry University Students’ Union issued a response promising: “We do not tolerate antisemitism or any form of hate crime. We will fully support the university in any disciplinary action it may take.”

Coventry University has also promised action, telling The Independent: “We are deeply concerned about this matter. We are investigating and we will take disciplinary action against any student of the University who is involved.”

We commend the Students’ Union and University for their handling of this incident. Campaign Against Antisemitism is taking close interest in the outcomes of the investigation and hope to see the University live up to its commitment to show zero tolerance to antisemitism.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Campaign Against Antisemitism has not obscured the faces of those in the photograph above; the photograph was already pixellated.

In a shocking event hosted at Student Central in London, Alex Kenny of the National Union of Teachers joined a panel including Professor Jonathan Rosenhead of the so-called Jewish Voice for Labour (JVL), author Ghadaq Karmi, director of the Palestine Solidarity Campaign (PSC) and Lindsey German of the Stop the War Coalition. Activist Rob Ferguson also spoke. Members of our Demonstration and Event Monitoring Unit were on hand to capture all that was said.

The event included a wide array of outrageous claims. It started with Ghada Karmi’s accusations that the Jewish community have created an “artificially whipped-up witch hunt” claiming that “there is only one way to deal with it: no appeasement.” She accused Jeremy Corbyn of “appeasement” in commissioning the whitewash Chakrabarti report, and merely for meeting Jewish community organisations at all, saying “he should never have met them, having met them, he should have thrown them out straightaway.” Dr Karmi finished by turning on those MPs who attended a rally condemning antisemitism in the Labour Party, demanding that Labour “get rid of those MPs.”

Dr Karmi’s speech was followed by Professor Jonathan Rosenhead, a leading figure in the so-called Jewish Voice for Labour. Previously Professor Rosenhead has been heard promoting the debunked theory that modern-day Jews are imposters from ‘Khazaria’ and defending Ken Livingstone. This time, Professor Rosenhead questioned the legitimacy of claims of Labour antisemitism, going as far as to blame Israel for the issues of antisemitism plaguing the Labour leadership and activists. He said: “If I was the Israeli government, I’d be running all sorts of false flag operations, getting people to post, and they have hordes of them in Israel doing this sort of stuff on the internet, saying things which will then discredit Jeremy Corbyn.” Attacking the MPs who have defended Ruth Smeeth in the disciplinary case of Mark Wadsworth “accused of antisemitism at the antisemitism launch of the Chakrabarti Committee because they wished to undermine the report by staging this.”

Professor Rosenhead returned to prior form later on, emulating Ken Livingstone, saying: “Just before the outbreak of war, the United States had organised for hundreds of thousands of Jews to escape from Germany and go – not to the United States, certainly, but to a number of Latin American countries that had agreed to have them. And in those last few weeks before the war, the Zionists stopped that from happening. Because a Jew who got out of Germany and didn’t go to Palestine was a Jew lost. And the result was, hundreds of thousands of Jews who would have escaped did not.”

Later on in the event Ben Jamal of the PSC called the antisemitism crisis in the Labour Party an attempt to “destabilise” Jeremy Corbyn, although he later admitted that there is an issue of antisemitism within the anti-Israel movement. Last year, Campaign Against Antisemitism exposed in a report the PSC’s failure to regulate antisemitism on its Facebook page, whilst managing to remove racist comments against other minorities, even made-up ones.

This event served as an underlining of the JVL’s continued role as harbourers of Holocaust revisionism, and shields for antisemites.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long said that JVL is a sham. This event is yet further proof of it and Student Central should be ashamed of having hosted it.

This week, despite opposition from Jewish groups, the Free University of Brussels is set to honour film director Ken Loach with a doctorate honoris causa in recognition of “his militant work on social conflicts and the fight for the right of workers or illegal immigrants”.  A member of the Labour Party for many years, Mr Loach’s voice has been among the loudest of those who attempt to dismiss the antisemitism crisis currently afflicting the Party as non-existent and a right-wing smear campaign, despite the Labour leader himself having recently acknowledged the existence of the problem. This is hard to see as anything other than accusing the victims of antisemitism in the Party of acting in bad faith by fabricating or exaggerating their claims.

Last September, Mr Loach caused outrage when, during an interview with the BBC, he refused to denounce Holocaust denial. The interview took place shortly after the last Labour Party conference, where an activist at a fringe meeting attached to the event publicly stated that it should be legitimate to discuss whether the Holocaust happened.  Mr Loach told the BBC interviewer: “History is for all of us to discuss. All history is our common heritage to discuss and analyze. The founding of the State of Israel, for example, based on ethnic cleansing, is there for us to discuss.”

The International Definition of Antisemitism states that “denying the fact, scope, mechanisms (e.g. gas chambers) or intentionality of the genocide of the Jewish people at the hands of National Socialist Germany and its supporters and accomplices during World War II (the Holocaust)” is a manifestation of antisemitism.

Although Mr Loach later sought to clarify his remarks, he has continued to make inflammatory and provocative statements about Labour’s antisemitism scandal. Earlier this month, while speaking at a meeting of the Kingswood Constituency Labour Party, Mr Loach advocated the removal from the Party of those Labour MPs, some of whom are Jewish, who have taken a principled stand against antisemitism. Shortly after this incident, the Labour Party announced that it would no longer use Mr Loach as a producer of their election broadcasts.

By defending the right to deny the Holocaust, by dismissing the antisemitism crisis in Labour as a conspiracy to attack Jeremy Corbyn, and by demanding the expulsion of Labour MPs who fight against antisemitism, Mr Loach has rendered himself worthy of sanction, not honour. Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to Yvon Englert, the Rector of the Free University of Brussels, pointing out that to proceed with this week’s ceremony would be a slap in the face to Jewish people, not just in Britain but around the globe, and urging him to reconsider making this inappropriate award.

You may wish to add your voice to ours by contacting Professor Englert at [email protected].

Every year at universities across the country, ‘Israeli Apartheid Week’ sees a flurry of antisemitic speakers and demonstrations on British campuses. Each year, we are contacted by Jewish students who are unsure of their rights, what they can do, and how we can help them.

Following a great deal of work by Campaign Against Antisemitism, Sir Eric Pickles and others, the British government became the first in the world to formally adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism in 2016, following which the then Minister of State for Universities reminded all universities of the definition and their obligation to protect their Jewish students. Although it offered no new measures, his call was backed by the Prime Minister.

Some universities such as the University of Exeter and the University of Central Lancashire showed principled leadership and banned ‘Israeli Apartheid Week’ events, whereas others, like the University of Sussex, rolled out the red carpet.

Last year, by the end of ‘Israeli Apartheid Week’, which often runs for more than one week, students were making videos complaining about problematic events being cancelled. We hope that there might be similar successes in stopping extremist, antisemitic or abusive events this year, despite unhelpful comments by the former Minister of State for Universities in December 2017.

Universities and students’ unions are governed by complex rules and laws, including the government’s Prevent counter-extremism strategy, the public sector equality duty, charity law and numerous other requirements. It can be complicated to enforce the law, but we are here to help. Today we have sent a simple guide to students explaining how we can help them to enforce their rights. The guide has been sent to Jewish Societies directly but it can also be downloaded by anybody from our website.

 

To be perfectly clear, Campaign Against Antisemitism has no objection to robust political discourse about Israel, but there must be zero tolerance for antisemitic discourse disguised as political criticism. We call on universities to abide by their moral and legal obligation to protect Jewish students. We are keen to hear from students who are experiencing antisemitism on campus, or who are aware of recent and future events of concern via e-mail at [email protected].

Following a complaint from Campaign Against Antisemitism to University College London (UCL), UCL has instructed its security team to remove the extremely disturbing posters found around campus depicting the United States trying to restrain a bloodthirsty giant dog emblazoned with a Star of David, eating a smaller animal with the Palestinian flag painted on it.

UCL members of staff and students contacted Campaign Against Antisemitism about the posters and we wrote to the UCL administration within hours, calling for a disciplinary investigation. This highly-offensive and inappropriate poster was being used to promote a talk last night that was originally to be hosted by UCL Friends of Palestine Society and UCL Marxist Society on “Trump and Jerusalem: How to stop Imperialism.” UCL Friends of Palestine Society, however, pulled out as a host following publicity around the controversial posters, leaving UCL Marxist Society alone to run the event. Approximately fifteen people were in attendance.

In a response to a letter from Campaign Against Antisemitism, UCL said: “We immediately asked Security to remove copies of [the poster] and asked the Union to investigate who was responsible.”

UCL also made efforts to publicly condemn the incident on Twitter and Facebook, responding underneath our article link on both platforms. Their statement said that: “UCL condemns antisemitism in any form and without reservation. The poster is deeply offensive and inflammatory. The person responsible for it has withdrawn it and accepts that it was inappropriate and not a reflection of what is being discussed at the meetings it was advertising.”

Communication is ongoing and we have asked for UCL to confirm its timeframe for deciding whether to take disciplinary action.

The event was part of the so-called “Al-Aqsa Week”, an initiative at UCL which involves events from UCL Friends of Palestine, UCL Islamic Society and UCL Marxist Society. Other talks in the series include one tonight called “US Embassy in Jerusalem: What’s the big deal?” and another tomorrow called “Winning and losing Jerusalem.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism commends UCL for its transparency in dealing with the incident and the steps they are taking to prevent this happening again. We thank them for their strong and public condemnation of the inflammatory poster and the support they have shown to Jewish students on campus. We expect to see appropriate disciplinary action taken against the individual responsible for the posters.

University College London (UCL) members of staff and students have contacted Campaign Against Antisemitism about an extremely disturbing poster depicting the United States trying to restrain a bloodthirsty giant dog emblazoned with a Star of David, eating a smaller animal with the Palestinian flag painted on it.

UCL Friends of Palestine SocietyUCL Islamic Society and UCL Marxist Society are hosting a series of events for so-called “Al-Aqsa Week”. This highly-offensive and inappropriate poster is being used to promote a talk hosted by UCL Friends of Palestine Society and UCL Marxist Society on“Trump and Jerusalem: How to stop Imperialism” at 19:00 tomorrow.

Other talks in the series include one called “US Embassy in Jerusalem: What’s the big deal?” on Wednesday and another called “Winning and losing Jerusalem” on Friday.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is writing to the UCL administration, calling for a disciplinary investigation.

An inquiry by UCL in January last year found serious problems in its previous performance, and since then speakers including Miko Peled and eugenicists have been invited to speak at the campus.

Two senior sabbatical officers from every students’ union at every university and college in Britain will be sent to visit Auschwitz and receive antisemitism training, the Government has announced.

Sajid Javid, the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, told a Holocaust Educational Trust reception: “We all have a duty to speak out in the memory of those who were murdered during the Holocaust and all those, today, who are the subject of hatred and antisemitism. Holocaust education remains one of the most powerful tools we have to fight bigotry.”

Frequently when speaking to students’ unions we find a lack of understanding of modern antisemitism. With antisemitism at universities at such worrying levels, we commend the Government and the Holocaust Educational Trust for this initiative.

University College London (UCL) has told Campaign Against Antisemitism that it is investigating after London Student revealed that four secret eugenics conferences attended by neo-Nazis and white supremacists have allegedly been held on campus since 2014.

The London Conference on Intelligence (LCI) has been hosted by Professor John Thompson, a senior honourary professor at the university, and according to London Student it has included talks and contributions from a number of high-profile white supremacists and eugenicists including Richard Lynn, president of the Ulster Institute for Social Research (UISR) who has previously advocated the “phasing out” of the “populations of incompetent cultures”.

UISR is funded by the Pioneer Fund, which has been described as a racist organisation founded by Nazi sympathisers.

Other beneficiaries of the fund included Roger Pearson, founder of Institute for the Study of Man, whose work has included editing magazines dedicated to promoting extremism, including one promising to conduct “a responsible but penetrating inquiry into every aspect of the Jewish Question.”

The conference, with its attendance list of 24 invite-only guests last year included Toby Young, who has now resigned from the board of the new universities regulator, the Office for Students, as well as stepping down from his role within the Fulbright Commission, an organisation which oversees scholarships between US and UK students.

Mr Young published an article in The Spectator on Thursday this week claiming he only attended the conference as a journalist and only “popped in for a few hours on a Saturday and sat at the back.” What is curious about Mr Young’s journalistic attendance is that given the explosive newsworthy nature of the event, he failed to publish an exposé on it.

Mr Young remains head of the government-backed New Schools Network.

UCL has told Campaign Against Antisemitism it had no knowledge of the conference and is “investigating a potential breach of its room bookings process for events after being alerted to conferences on intelligence hosted by an honorary senior lecturer at UCL.” The statement noted: “Our records indicate the university was not informed in advance about the speakers and content of the conference series, as it should have been for the event to be allowed to go ahead. The conferences were booked and paid for as an external event and without our officials being told of the details. They were therefore not approved or endorsed by UCL. We are an institution that is committed to free speech but also to combatting racism and sexism in all forms. We have suspended approval for any further conferences of this nature by the honorary lecturer and speakers pending our investigation into the case. As part of that investigation, we will be speaking to the honorary lecturer and seeking an explanation.”

The President of the National Union of Students (NUS), Shakira Martin, has apologised to Jewish students for the release of an NUS survey which asked respondents to select their religion from a long list of religions that omitted Judaism. This is not the first time that NUS has missed out its Jewish members and that Ms Martin has apologies: in July 2017, in a different survey of students, Judaism was also notably absent.

However, Ms Martin acknowledged the omission immediately, directly communicating with aggrieved students on Twitter before tweeting a heartfelt apology video, accepting that she was “accountable” and recognising “Jewish students should be pissed”. She assured students that this “would not be happening again”, “actions speak louder than words, when I said I was gonna stamp out all forms of antisemitism I’m not giving no lip service.” She acknowledged that this was a repeated issue, stating that “The first time it happened, I could tweet and say sorry,But the second time, it’s unacceptable, and I just want to reassure the whole Jewish community that I will be dealing with this.”

Ms Martin went on to discuss the context of these incidents, which came following an extremely difficult time for Jewish students under Ms Martin’s predecessor, the widely-scorned Malia Bouattia. Ms Martin was direct, saying: “I totally understand after the years – but especially last year, before my presidency, that Jewish students had – that this type of thing is not acceptable.”You will not not see Judaism on an NUS form again. I will be making sure that we will be reviewing all our forms, and that this is on everyone’s form, and that this [situation] will not happen again.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism thanks Ms Martin for her continued efforts to support Jewish students and rebuild relationships between NUS and the Jewish community. We recognise that Ms Martin has immediately responded to this latest incident with a strong and sincere apology, and we believe her when she says that this will be the last time that she has to apologise for this regrettable omission.

https://twitter.com/gabe_milne_96/status/948998831907262465

Central Saint Martins, a college of the University of the Arts London, has apologised after a red banner featuring swastikas was hung from its central hall. A student reportedly proposed the banner as a piece of “art” about prohibition, and was told not to go ahead on ethical grounds, but proceeded nonetheless.

Professor Jeremy Till, principal of the college, said: “As soon as we became aware of this, the work was removed. The installation of the banner was proposed by a student yesterday, and immediately and emphatically rejected.” He added that the university was “deeply sorry for the offence caused to our Jewish community and will be pursuing the matter…Central Saint Martins is committed to providing a supportive and inclusive environment for our diverse students, and we are aghast that the banner was installed against our specific instructions.”

According to one report, there was no explanation around the banner and students were simply laughing about it. However when the banner was removed, Alex Schady, Programme Director for the Arts, said that students cheered: “The student proposed the piece of work to me, which was to be part of an exhibition about prohibition. I immediately said no. But then the student arrived on the day with his work. He showed it to me and I said we are not comfortable with it. He then hung it without permission. As soon as I saw it I took it down and the students watching cheered as it came down. When putting any work in public spaces you have to consider the ethics. It is important that as a university we put on work that is ethically sound.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism commends Central Saint Martins for its swift action in removing this imitation Nazi banner and calls for strong disciplinary action to be taken.

Students who encounter antisemitism can contact our dedicated team at [email protected].

American-Israeli activist, Miko Peled, compared Zionists to Nazis in a controversial talk on Friday 10th November at University College London (UCL).

The talk was titled “Segregated and Unequal, Palestinian Life in Apartheid Israel”. Though it was organised by UCL Friends of Palestine Society, it had the backing of pro-Palestinian student societies at various London universities, namely City, Imperial, Kings College, Queen Mary and Westminster.

Following approaches from concerned Jewish students at UCL, Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to the UCL administration prior to the event to raise our concerns about Mr Peled and to call for the event to be cancelled. We demonstrated that Mr Peled’s views have, in the past, engaged the International Definition of Antisemitism adopted by the British Government, and also engage the Prevent counter-extremism strategy.

In response, a university official assured us that: “In discussion with officers in the Union it has been agreed that the event will go ahead. Mr Peled has agreed to abide by the Union’s Code for speakers, and the event will be chaired by an independent student officer. I understand the concerns you express but we believe that the arrangements we have put in place strike the right balance between compliance with our legal obligations to secure freedom of speech, other legal obligations and our responsibilities towards our students.”

Sadly our concerns and those of the students were proven to be correct.

Volunteers from our Demonstration and Event Monitoring Unit went to the talk to gather evidence.

During the question and answer session, Mr Peled compared Zionists to Nazis. He said: “Would we allow members of the KKK to come and explain to us why racist laws are the right thing to do? Would we allow Nazis to come here and tell us that Jews belong in concentration camps and just explain themselves? On that same token, Zionism which is a racist, brutal ideology, has been involved in genocide for seven decades and has been responsible for the murder and suffering of an entire nation for seven decades. I believe they can talk all they want, they do not deserve a platform.” This was met with rapturous applause from the audience.

He mocked and disputed antisemitism in the Labour Party, saying that in the last two years there has been a “witchhunt against antisemites and Holocaust deniers, many, most, if not all of whom happen to be Corbyn supporters and sympathisers with the Palestinian cause. Interesting coincidence.” He added: “You put away the nonsense about Holocaust denying and the nonsense about the antisemitism. In cases like this, when they’re not, where it’s not made obviously.”

Mr Peled said that his 2016 tweet that “Jews have a reputation for being sleazy thieves” had been taken out of context. He said that he was not accusing Jews of this behaviour but in regards to this antisemitic trope, “the State of Israel is enforcing it.” He explained that the aid provided to Israel by the US Congress “was exactly why Jews have a reputation for being sleazy thieves.” He stated that “my criticism was against the State of Israel, which do [sic] behave like sleazy thieves and worse and because they claim that they represent Jews, the conclusion must be there.” He concluded that “you can’t complain that there is antisemitism and that people make all these, you know, sic characteristics about Jews, racist slurs about Jews, and then behave in this particular way.”

During the question and answer session, a member of the audience said that “Washington is colonised by AIPAC”, a comment which went unchallenged by the moderator, the independent student officer. AIPAC is a pro-Israel lobbying organisation.

In September, Mr Peled made national headlines by demanding at the Labour Party Conference that delegates should have the freedom to engage in debate as to whether the Holocaust actually happened at all. He said that people should be free to ask “Holocaust, yes or no” because “there should be no limits on the discussion.” He additionally reportedly proposed that Israelis should be treated like Nazis. He was widely condemned.

This event should not have gone ahead. If you wish to raise concerns with University College London, please use the university’s complaints process.

If you are aware of a problematic speaker being invited to speak at a university, please contact [email protected].

American-Israeli activist, Miko Peled, is scheduled to speak on Friday 10th November at University College London (UCL) at an event organised by the UCL Friends of Palestine Society.

Mr Peled’s views have, in the past, engaged the International Definition of Antisemitism adopted by the British Government and also engage the Prevent counter-extremism strategy.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is writing to UCL to raise our concerns about Mr Peled and to call for the event to be cancelled.

In September, Mr Peled made national headlines by demanding at the Labour Party Conference that delegates should have the freedom to engage in debate as to whether the Holocaust actually happened at all. He said that people should be free to ask “Holocaust, yes or no” because “there should be no limits on the discussion.” He additionally reportedly proposed that Israelis should be treated like Nazis. He was widely condemned.

Mr Peled has form. For example, on 23rd May 2016, speaking at an art gallery in Euston, London, Mr Peled alleged that the Labour Party’s antisemitism furore is being fabricated by “Zionists”. He said: “Everyone knows this entire antisemitism thing is nonsense”. At the same event, Mr Peled also alleged that Islamophobia is a strategic invention of “Zionists”. He said: “If anyone has any doubt, that this entire Islamophobia thing isn’t coming directly from pro-Israeli groups, then excuse me you are out of your mind.  Absolutely. And when you look at each case, individually you will see, the hand, the fingerprints of some Israeli lobby, some pro-Zionist groups.”

On 14th September 2016, Mr Peled tweeted about a new aid package granted to Israel by the United States: “Then theyr surprised Jews have reputation 4being sleazy thieves. #apartheidisrael doesn’t need or deserve these $$.” In response, his forthcoming event hosted by the Princeton Committee on Palestine was cancelled on the basis that: “The last string of tweets are antisemitic and hateful, which are counterproductive to an educational event on the conflict.”

The event is advertised to take place from 17:00-20:30 in Cruciform LT1 and is titled “Segregated and Unequal, Palestinian Life in Apartheid Israel”. Though it has been organised by UCL Friends of Palestine Society, it has the backing of pro-Palestinian student societies at various London universities, namely City, Imperial, Kings College, Queen Mary and Westminster.

Miko Peled’s views engage the International Definition of Antisemitism and his invective is threatening to the safety of Jewish students. In the wake of antisemitic violence at UCL and an internal inquiry which found severe failures in the university’s response to antisemitism, UCL should cancel this event and ensure that theirs is a campus that does not give antisemitism the space to thrive.

Cancelling Mr Peled’s event will ensure that Jewish students feel welcome at UCL and have a safe and positive experience. If you are aware of an antisemitic speaker being invited to speak at a university, please contact [email protected].

 

Swastikas and the Star of David were found day after day between 28th September and 3rd October at a student residence at the London School of Economics (LSE), reappearing each time they were removed. The LSE student newspaper, The Beaver, reported that the first instance occurred in Carr-Saunders Hall on 28th September, in which a swastika was found drawn on a sign in the lifts. The defaced sign was replaced the next day. However, two more swastikas were discovered that Sunday, one of which was found alongside a Star of David.

Residents within the student halls quickly transformed these antisemitic hate symbols into drawings of houses and peace signs. The Halls Committee and warden team then met to discuss this before yet another swastika was discovered on 3rd October on the newly replaced sign.

The President of the Halls Committee condemned this antisemitic graffiti which he stated was “trying to be divisive and separate us as a community”. He emphasised that the “way to overcome it is to come together”.  Support has been offered to “anyone who had been affected in any way by these acts.”

The Metropolitan Police Service has been informed and measures are in place to ensure these incidents do not occur again in the future. No further reoccurrence has been reported.

LSE stated that “hate speech and deliberate provocation of this manner are abhorrent and completely contrary to LSE’s values of openness and inclusion”, adding that “any student caught engaging in this behaviour would face severe disciplinary actions, including expulsion from the residence”.

The Halls Committee is seeking to organise a series of events promoting tolerance and inclusivity as a result of this incident. However, the Halls Committee President has stated that the collective experience of dealing with such an upsetting series of events has made the community “better than it was before”.

We commend the Halls Committee and LSE’s warden team for their fast response to these incidents. Unfortunately, antisemitic graffiti has been a frequent occurence at campuses with incidents reported at various universities, including University of Sussex and University of Exeter.

A detailed report on “Extreme speakers and events” in the 2016-17 academic year has revealed a plethora of antisemitic extremist speakers being given platforms in British universities. Of the 112 separate extremist events mentioned in the report, 50 events included the hosting of known antisemites such as Anas Al Tikriti who vehemently criticised the Muslim Council of Britain for their ending of their outrageous boycott of Holocaust Memorial Day and Yvonne Ridley, who engaged in antisemitic rhetoric in her criticism of Israel, claiming that “the Zionists have tentacles everywhere.” Events were also organised by various organisations with known links to antisemitism, according to the report’s authors, the Henry Jackson Society think tank and Student Rights.

The report singled out the Islamic Education and Research Academy (IERA), which was investigated by the Charity Commission over comments made by its founder, Abdurraheem Green. Mr Green was recorded saying: “Why don’t you take the Yahoudi [Jew] over there, far away so his stench doesn’t disturb us?” The charity said that the comment was “aimed at a habitual heckler in Hyde Park Speakers’ Corner, in a highly charged forum of debate, who happened to be Jewish. It was not aimed at any community or meant to be antisemitic in any way. However, recognising that it could be misconstrued, he has apologised openly for such errors of judgement made more than 20 years ago.” The comment was referred to the Charity Commission as part of a report by the Council of Ex-Muslims of Britain. The Commission responded that it will not act over the incident because it found Mr Green’s comments to have been made in a “personal capacity and not on behalf of the charity or at an event it organised,” though it did concede that the comments exposed the charity to risks.

Mr Green himself spoke at one event this year, at the SOAS Islamic Society Annual Charity Week Dinner and Auction. We put the matter to IERA, which directed us to a video by Mr Green responding to claims about him, and their press release in response to the report. The charity said that “The report’s assumptions are wildly speculative and the presentation of information incoherent…[and] makes the dangerous, unfair and irresponsible accusation that iERA’s speakers are ‘extreme’.”

Friends of Al Aqsa also featured prominently in the report, with several notable examples of controversial speakers such as Moshe Machover who spoke at Queen Mary University of London at an event in which he denied Israel’s right to exist, and announced his support for genocidal antisemitic terrorist organisation Hamas’ supposed “right to resist with arms”. This, alongside accusations that Jewish students in attendance were representatives of the “Israeli propaganda machine” led to a formal complaint being made by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Friends of Al Aqsa further co-hosted the Federation of Student Islamic Societies Palestine Conference 2017, which included a presentation by American-Israeli activist Miko Peled who this week made national headlines by demanding at the Labour Party Conference that delegates should have the freedom to engage in debate as to whether the Holocaust actually happened at all, demanding the freedom to ask “Holocaust, yes or no” because “there should be no limits on the discussion.” He additionally reportedly proposed that Israelis should be treated like Nazis. His remarks prompted widespread condemnation from politicians and the media. On 23rd May 2016, speaking at an art gallery in Euston, London, Mr Peled reportedly alleged that the Labour Party’s antisemitism furore is being fabricated by “Zionists”, allegedly saying: “Everyone knows this entire antisemitism thing is nonsense”. At the same event, Mr Peled is also said to have alleged that Islamophobia is a strategic invention of “Zionists”, reportedly claiming: “If anyone has any doubt, that this entire Islamophobia thing isn’t coming directly from pro-Israeli groups, then excuse me you are out of your mind. Absolutely. And when you look at each case, individually you will see, the hand, the fingerprints of some Israeli lobby, some pro-Zionist groups.” Furthermore, on 14th September 2016, Mr Peled tweeted about a new aid package granted to Israel by the United States, writing: “Then theyr surprised Jews have reputation 4being sleazy thieves. #apartheidisrael doesn’t need or deserve these $$.” In response, his forthcoming event hosted by the Princeton Committee on Palestine was cancelled on the basis that: “The last string of tweets are antisemitic and hateful, which are counterproductive to an educational event on the conflict.” Friends of Al Aqsa did not respond to our request for a comment.

The report also shows that the quantity of incidents in which antisemitic speakers, or speakers from antisemitic organisations appear on campus shows no reduction through the year, with more events occurring in March than in any prior month. This points towards an ongoing failure by universities to commit to banning speakers to protect Jewish students and the student population at large. As well as the high quantity of speakers holding problematic beliefs about Jews or with ties to controversial organisations, there is also a consistent display of homophobia throughout.

By contrast, the report reveals that both of the two far-right events scheduled to occur in the 2016-2017 academic year were cancelled. This shows that whilst universities and student bodies have proven themselves capable of protecting Jewish and other minority students from aggression from the far-right, the far-left and even Islamist speakers remain largely unchallenged.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has developed relationships with universities around the country, but we experience drastically varying levels of cooperation from one institution to another. Many universities seem to have an extremely poor understanding of antisemitism and extremism. We call on Universities UK and individual universities and students’ unions to shoulder responsibility for the events that our students are exposed to. The threat of radicalisation threatens the whole of British society, not only Jews. Extremists and antisemites must be denied a platform, and universities and students’ unions must strengthen their screening procedures and put an end to this deeply disturbing trend of permitting antisemitic and extremist speakers to influence students on British campuses, thereby putting Jewish students at risk.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Demonstrations and Events Monitoring Unit is particularly keen to hear from students who have concerns about forthcoming events on their campus via [email protected].

The University of Bristol has decided to take no action against a lecturer, Dr Rebecca Gould, over an article in which she claimed that “privileging the Holocaust as the central event in Jewish history” should end and that “the Holocaust persists and its primary victims are the Palestinian people.”

The university’s Deputy Vice Chancellor and Provost, Professor Guy Orpen, wrote: “it is our considered opinion that Dr Gould’s article is not antisemitic and does not breach the proper bounds of freedom of speech and academic freedom” in a letter to the Chairman of Campaign Against Antisemitism. The decision was reached by a panel appointed by the university, in response to a letter from Campaign Against Antisemitism dissecting the article’s antisemitic passages. The verdict has been published on the university’s website.

Dr Gould’s article titled “Beyond Antisemitism” was published in the radical left-wing Counter Punch magazine edition of November 2011. Dr Gould wrote: “Defining the Shoah vis-a-vis the Greek (and, incidentally, Christian) term for a sacrifice to G-d has helped make it available to manipulation by governmental elites, aiming to promote the narrative most likely to underwrite their claims to sovereignty. Claiming the Holocaust as a holy event sanctifies the state of Israel and whitewashes its crimes.” She added: “perhaps the time has come to stop privileging the Holocaust as the central event in Jewish history.” She concluded the article: “As the situation stands today, the Holocaust persists and its primary victims are the Palestinian people.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is antisemitic. Additionally, according to the expert legal opinion commissioned by Campaign Against Antisemitism, contending that either Jews, Israel or the West have “manipulated” the Holocaust to generate sympathy for Jews or for Israel or prevent criticism of them is an allegation “chosen to be emotive and upsetting to Jewish people and to generate hostility towards them.”

The article appeared on various websites but it seems to have disappeared from all but one website which offered a PDF download.

According to the University of Bristol School of Modern Languages website, the lecturer has a PhD from Columbia University and is a Reader in Translation Studies & Comparative Literature. She taught previously at New York University, Columbia University, and Yale-NUS College in Singapore and specialises in the literatures of the Persian and Islamic world (especially the Caucasus). She is “happy to supervise in the areas of Middle Eastern and Central Asian literatures and cultures, translation studies, Islamic studies, comparative literature, critical theory, and modern Iran”.

Dr Gould has not expressed any remorse and sent us the following statement: “A complaint was made by Campaign Against Antisemitism in relation to an article I published in 2011, which discussed the exploitation of the Holocaust by government elites in order to advance certain policy agendas. I refute any suggestion that the article contained antisemitic material; as I have publicly stated, it was a rallying call to people of conscience horrified by the slaughter of six million Jews to speak out against injustice everywhere…I stand firmly opposed to racism in all forms, from antisemitism to Islamophobia, and in support of academic freedom. The complaint was dismissed by the university which made a public statement that the article was not antisemitic and was within the ambit of academic freedom.”

Any current student at the University of Bristol can appeal this verdict, and Campaign Against Antisemitism will provide support to any student wishing to do so. If you are a student at the University of Bristol and would like to know more, please e-mail [email protected].

Following a speech, translated by Campaign Against Antisemitism, in which Mohamed Farid Fouad Khamis, Chairman of the Board of Trustees at the British University in Egypt (BUE) and one of its principal donors, promoted the antisemitic Protocols of the Elders of Zion, we wrote to the British Government to obtain assurances that the BUE would receive no further assistance whilst Mr Khamis remained associated with it. Mr Khamis’ speech, delivered at an event in March, was no mere passing reference to the antisemitic Protocols, but contained long passages in which he claimed that rabbis had convened to decide how Jews should control the world.

We have now received assurances that the Government and Loughborough University have already terminated their association with the BUE, with the final contract ending in December.

The Minister of State for International Development, the Rt Hon. Alistair Burt MP, confirmed to us in a letter that the Department for International Development does not provide assistance to BUE, writing: “I share your commitment to tackle antisemitism in all its forms, including in the perpetuation of the slanders within the Protocols of the Elders of Zion…I note your concerns about BUE very carefully. Thank you.”

The Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) confirmed that Loughborough University previously had a validation agreement with the BUE, whereby students passing courses at the BUE would receive their degree from Loughborough University, however the agreement was terminated in 2012. Under the termination clause of the agreement, the final degrees will be awarded in December this year, at which point the relationship will end.

We are pleased that the Department for International Development and HEFCE have investigated the matter thoroughly and, in the case of the former, that the matter has received ministerial oversight.

The only association with Britain that the BUE now has is its name.

Mohamed Farid Fouad Khamis, Chairman of the Board of Trustees at the British University in Egypt (BUE) and one of its principal donors, has promoted the antisemitic Protocols of the Elders of Zion.

Mr Khamis’ conspiracy-laden speech at a Cairo conference is particularly disturbing because there is close cooperation between the BUE, the British Government and universities in the UK.

The comments were made in a speech at the second annual conference on “Sustainable Media and Development for Arab Societies, Real Challenges and Future Prospects” which was organised by the El Shorouk Media Academy under the patronage of Dr Khaled Abdel Ghaffar, the Minister for Higher Education and Scientific Research in the Egyptian Government and the Head of the Egyptian National Committee to UNESCO.

The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, sometimes shortened to “Protocols”, is one of the most offensive and common antisemitic conspiracy myths about Jews. It is an antisemitic document that was forged at the start of the twentieth century by the secret police of Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and used to incite mob violence against Jews. It purports to be the minutes of a meeting of Jewish leaders, at which they discussed their subversive plot for global domination.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has translated a video from 27th March of the speech in which Mr Khamis said in Arabic: “The Protocols of Zion: one hundred of the most important Zionist leaders of the world assembled, got together, so that they agree on how to control the world. This event is definitely true and documented.” Mr Khamis continued: “The hundred got together for a week behind closed doors, nobody can enter in their midst. So they discussed: how can we control the world? And they reached agreement on the protocols that are here [Mr Khamis holds documents aloft]. Some say there are 14 protocols and some say 24. And in both versions, it is written: ‘we will control the world with the media, then with money.’ The hundred got together and agreed to the protocols. Protocol means an agreement on a plan of action. And they were scared that it might leak out!”

Mr Khamis then went into great detail, claiming: “A funny story really: so they made 100 copies and wrote ‘copy number one’ to this person, this Rabbi, ‘copy number two’ for that Rabbi, and they gave it to him, and so on. The important thing is that the copies were given by the names. One of them lived in Paris, he had an apartment there and he had a French girlfriend, he went to meet her, then he got busy and went to the bathroom. She searched his pockets for money or other valuables, she found the document, she took it, hid it and smuggled it, then sold it. And from then the Protocols of Zion were publicly known.”

Mr Khamis added that “The protocols talk in a very clear way on how to carry out control of the media and whoever consumes it, will discover a very strange thing. He will understand the meaning of the ‘Arab Spring’ or the ‘Arab Autumn.’ Is it a black day [Egyptian colloquialism meaning a disastrous time]? Yes it is! He will understand [former US Secretary of State] Condoleezza Rice when she described ‘creative [destruction and] chaos [in the Middle East].’”

The Minister was seated next to Mr Khamis throughout, and accepted an award from him, but he later repudiated Mr Khamis’ speech in comments to Al Bawada News: “The Minister confirmed in reply to Al Bawaba News on the importance of the media in all its forms, insisting very strongly on his refusal on what came out of the mouth of Mohamed Farid Khamis regarding the Protocols of the Elders of Zion and other matters that relate to that subject, as Egypt respects all religions and is no enemy to any particular one. On the contrary, all countries must and their various media outlets have to work in order to bring their peoples together and helping dialogue between their respective cultures.”

According to the BUE’s website, “The formation of a British University in Egypt arose from a 1998 Memorandum of Cooperation between the UK and the Egyptian Governments.” It continues: “Planning for the new institution was put in train and financial support was provided by a group of prominent Egyptian business and public figures, principal amongst whom was Mr Farid Khamis, Chairman of Oriental Weavers, a major international carpet manufacturing company. In 2004, with strong support from the British Embassy and the British Council, a Presidential decree was issued establishing the British University in Egypt.” The website further states: “The University has been supported by a high profile and influential Board of Trustees compromising [sic] individuals drawn from UK and Egyptian business, public life and educational sectors. A group of British universities, led by Loughborough University provided the academic direction, teaching and quality management processes thereby ensuring the ‘British’ quality of the education.”

BUE and Mr Khamis’ company did not respond to our request for comments.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is writing to the Minister of State for Universities, the Chief Executive of Universities UK and the Chief Executive of the Higher Education Funding Council for England about Mr Khamis’ antisemitic speech. It is unconscionable that British taxpayers’ money should go to supporting an institution whose Chairman of the Board of Trustees would espouse and endorse such repulsive and discredited views.

The University and College Union (UCU) has concluded its annual congress by voting to reject the International Definition of Antisemitism. The definition, which was adopted by the British government following a long campaign by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others, notably Sir Eric Pickles, has been widely endorsed. The National Union of Students (NUS) reaffirmed its support for the definition earlier this month. A recent NUS survey showed that 26% of Jewish students said that they were either “fairly worried” or “very worried” about suffering a physical attack, property damage, verbal abuse or theft because they are Jewish.

Now, the UCU has put itself at odds with NUS, which first adopted the definition in 2007. The UCU, which is the largest higher education union in the world, representing almost 120,000 university academics around the United Kingdom, adopted a resolution stating “that this definition conflates antisemitism with criticism of the State of Israel and has been used to intimidate academics who are engaged in activities that are critical of the policies of the Israeli government but that are not antisemitic.”

The definition could not be clearer that criticism of Israel is not antisemitic, and even contains a passage explicitly stating that “criticism of Israel similar to that levelled against any other country cannot be regarded as antisemitic”. What the definition does consider to be antisemitic is calling Jews or the Jewish state the successor to the Nazis. That is not criticism, it is hate speech. The definition equally identifies as antisemites those who engage in spreading conspiracy myths about Jewish subterfuge and nefarious power.

The resolution commits UCU to actively lobby against the definition and to “make no use of it (e.g. in educating members or dealing with internal complaints).”

The UCU is now institutionally committed to opposing the only definition of antisemitism used around the world, including by the European Parliament, the UK College of Policing, the US Department of State, and the 31 countries comprising the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance. It is a disgraceful act by the UCU, but it is sadly not a surprise: the UCU voted to reject the definition before, in 2011.

Christ’s College at the University of Cambridge has admitted “significant failings” in its investigation into the violent antisemitic assault of three Jewish students returning from Shabbat dinner by members of sporting societies in November last year.

The three Jewish students said that they were attacked by seven men when they entered the graduate union building in Mill Lane. The bar area had been rented out for a party jointly held by the Marguerites and Hippolytans sporting societies of Christ’s College.

One of the victims, Shlomo Roiter-Jesner, 25, told The Telegraph at the time: “It was a closed party so we walked out but as we did so these individuals started getting more physical and more vocal and they noticed our kippot [Jewish skullcaps]. All of a sudden they were shouting: ‘Jew, get f*** out of here’. We tried to leave but they were yelling at us.”

In an e-mail to Professor Jane Stapleton, Master of Christ’s College, sent a day after the attacks, another of the Jewish students, wrote: “We heard shouting and were literally grabbed and pulled out of the building by about seven large, intimidating males. We, and other bystanders, heard a number of vicious antisemitic slurs including ‘F***ing Jew, you don’t belong here’, ‘dirty Jew’ and to myself, ‘f*** off, darkie’. They then proceeded to try and choke my friend with his scarf, leaving him gasping for oxygen, and to push me and the third friend around, despite our attempts to de-escalate the situation. They eventually went back in after threatening to ‘smash our faces in’.”

According to The Telegraph, Professor Stapleton wrote in response that the trio had every right to take the matter to police but if they chose not to do so the College would order an immediate inquiry. The victims did not go to the police and instead left the College to investigate. The College obtained CCTV footage of the attack but it contained no audio recording.

The College told one of the victims that it disciplined two students but cleared them of antisemitism and refused to identify the perpetrators or even confirm whether they had been punished in any way.

The victims publicly accused the College of covering the matter up, sparking an outcry. The College commissioned three external legal experts, Dame Janet Smith, Sir Martin Moore-Bick and Professor Graham Zellick, to review its handling of the matter.

In a statement issued today, Professor Stapleton has accepted that “though there was no bad faith or intention to cover up, there were significant failings in how the College responded to the complaint.” The legal experts criticised the fact that the victims were made to believe that their complaints had been rejected and were not interviewed by the College, and that even though there was insufficient evidence to discipline individual students for antisemitism, the College failed to consider what general measures could be taken.

The College has now agreed to implement the recommendations of the report, including:

  • Appointing an adjudication panel for serious disciplinary offences and a dean for discipline;
  • Ensuring that future complainants are kept fully informed during the disciplinary process;
  • Adopting a procedure for continuing to investigate incidents even where the perpetrator cannot be identified, so that general measures can be adopted and the incident can be recorded and condemned; and
  • Allowing the College to impose restrictions, conditions and penalties on groups such as student societies which are complicit in wrongdoing.

In response to the incident, the College expressed disappointment that witnesses had not stepped forward and that the perpetrators had not admitted their acts, and consequently the Marguerites and Hippolytans sporting societies will been banned from holding events outside the College until October 2019 “unless those responsible admit the abuse”.

In a statement, Professor Stapleton said: “The College accepts that racist and antisemitic conduct occurred and has apologised to the students who reported it. The incident also revealed significant deficiencies in college procedures and in response the college is overhauling its entire complaints, training, investigation, record-keeping and disciplinary machinery with the assistance of external legal experts. We greatly regret the deficiencies in the way the complaints were originally handled and have taken further measures against the two student societies involved. The Jewish community can be reassured that if there were to be a similar incident in the future the college would address it robustly.”

On behalf of the victims, Shlomo Roiter-Jesner said: “We are satisfied that Christ’s is now comfortable giving credence to our story, admitting that antisemitic conduct occurred and taking decisive steps to improve their disciplinary system.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism commends the victims for standing up not only to the antisemitic thugs who attacked them, but also to their College which failed to investigate the matter appropriately.

We are pleased that the College has admitted that its handling of the incident was utterly contemptible and that it has chosen to redress this with extensive reforms.

One final question remains, however. We believe that the College should disclose how it decided to punish the two students disciplined for participating in the assault (even though they were not proven to have been the ones who engaged in antisemitic abuse) and whether Cambridgeshire Constabulary was invited by the College to investigate.

Tayyib Nawaz, the newly-elected Manchester Metropolitan Co-Chair of Manchester Labour Students (MLS), has reportedly resigned from his post after the uncovering of shocking antisemitic and homophobic tweets by the The Mancunian, the student newspaper of the University of Manchester. It appears that since the exposé, Nawaz has removed his Twitter account.

The Mancunian reported that the tweets surfaced late last week. According to the paper: “At an official MLS meeting on Monday night, a motion calling for his resignation, brought by outgoing [MLS] Co-Chair Zak Deakin, was unanimously backed by the committee. On Tuesday afternoon, Nawaz chose to resign from the post.”

Deakin told The Mancunian before Nawaz’s resignation that “I stood on a platform of tackling antisemitism and so I’m incredibly dismayed and frustrated that I once again find myself having to make a statement in regards to this blatant racism: I can only apologise to Jewish students who have again had to be put through this.”

The Mancunian has revealed a number of appalling antisemitic tweets in screenshots captured two days ago. Nawaz allegedly tweeted on 1st April 2016 that “the same victims of the Holocaust are now murdering and ethnically cleansing Palestinians…The irony”. He reportedly tweeted on 13th September 2013 that “there were approximately 150,000 Jewish SS who personally were involved in the Holocaust” and on 15th April 2014 he allegedly tweeted: “Truth hurts, Hitler was Jewish himself.”

In a statement to The Mancunian, Leoni Benabú Morales, President of the Manchester Jewish Society (JSoc), said that “Claiming that Hitler himself is Jewish and comparing Israel to Nazi Germany is an insult and should not be tolerated from anyone, much less someone who is meant to represent our students. For us, it is of uttermost importance that Jewish students in Manchester feel safe, and we believe that this is a step backwards in achieving that. The JSoc will not stand for this kind of racist behaviour”.

On 26th April, we applauded the National Union of Students (NUS) under its newly-elected President, Shakira Martin, for reaffirming its commitment to the International Definition of Antisemitism at its recent National Conference. The very definition that Nawaz has so blatantly and repeatedly breached with his alleged tweets.

If you would like to help us to address antisemitism on campus, please contact [email protected].

Amongst the first decisions taken by the National Union of Students (NUS) electing Shakira Martin to replace Malia Bouattia as President, has been to reaffirm is commitment to the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Motion 426, entitled “It’s Time To Combat Antisemitism” quoted Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer research which found that 77% of British Jews have witnessed antisemitism disguised as a political comment about Israel, and roundly condemned outgoing President Malia Bouattia’s record on antisemitism.

Noting that “Jewish students have the right to define what they constitute [sic] as antisemitism” and the adoption by the British government of the International Definition of Antisemitism following a long campaign by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others, NUS resolved to adopt the definition and “To recommend that Students’ Unions use the…definition in guiding their responses to incidences of antisemitism”.

An attempt by a fringe group to have the union adopt a different, unusably loose, definition was defeated.

NUS has used a previous version of the International Definition of Antisemitism since 2007, but following the growth of antisemitism in NUS under former President Malia Bouattia, a survey of 485 Jewish students by the NUS showed that more than a quarter are living in fear of an antisemitic attack and less than half would be comfortable attending an NUS event.

We applaud NUS for taking this measure to reaffirm its support for Jewish students against antisemitism.

If you would like to help us to address antisemitism on campus, please contact [email protected].

Malia Bouattia has been defeated in her bid for re-election as President of the National Union of Students (NUS). Shakira Martin has been elected to succeed Bouattia and we look forward to getting to know her better and working with her to root out antisemitism in the organisation.

Candidates for other elected positions (who may yet win them) have been exposed as having previously made offensive comments about Jews, whilst a survey of 485 Jewish students by the NUS showed that more than a quarter are living in fear of an antisemitic attack and less than half would be comfortable attending an NUS event.

Bouattia has previously called Birmingham University a “Zionist outpost in higher education” because it has “the largest Jsoc [Jewish student society] in the country.” She has railed against “Zionist-led media outlets”, defended Palestinian terrorism as “resistance” and voted against condemning ISIS. When called on by Campaign Against Antisemitism and countless student leaders to retract her comments, she penned an article in The Guardian claiming that her accusers were simply sexists and racists. Bouattia since refused to confirm that Israel has a right to even exist, and told an audience at the School of Oriental and African Studies that the government’s anti-terrorism strategy is led by “Zionist and neo-con lobbies”. Last July Bouattia drew further condemnation when she used her casting vote to strip Jewish students of their ability to elect their own representative.

Student leaders have gone so far as to write open letters expressing embarrassment and apologising to Jewish students for the actions of Bouattia and the NUS. The Union of Jewish Students has called for her resignation, as have other student groups including Oxford University Students’ Union. The House of Commons Home Affairs Committee’s Inquiry into the Rise of Antisemitism in Britain strongly criticised her.

A two-month inquiry launched by NUS to ascertain whether Bouattia is an antisemite found that Bouattia made comments that “could be reasonably capable of being interpreted as antisemitic”, but recommended that no disciplinary action be taken. Instead, Professor Carol Baxter, the NHS’s former equality chief who authored the report, outrageously proposed that Bouattia should apologise instead and escape any further consequence.

We look forward to working with Shakira Martin. There is much to be done.

If you would like to help us to address antisemitism on campus, please contact [email protected].

The Independent has revealed that more officeholders and candidates running for positions on the National Union of Students (NUS) Executive Committee at the NUS National Conference in Brighton from 25th to 27th April have made antisemitic comments in the past.

Earlier this month, the NUS released its survey on The Experience of Jewish Students in 2016/17, showing that only 49% of the 485 Jewish students polled said that they would feel comfortable attending NUS events and just 40% would feel comfortable engaging in the NUS policy making process.

Ali Milani, a candidate for Vice President of Union Development, made a series of antisemitic tweets between 2012 and 2013. In one of the many antisemitic tweets, he called someone a “Jew” for being stingy, writing: “Nah u won’t mate. It’ll cost you a pound #jew.” In a tweet to Piers Morgan, Milani wrote: “u are a zionist and a corperate [sic] jackass.” In a string of tweets about Israeli-US relations and the Israel-Palestine conflict, he commented: “Israel has no right to exist.”

Sean O’Neill, another candidate running for a place on the NUS National Executive Council, posted on Twitter in 2012 using the hashtags “heilhitler” and “f**kslutskilljews” – apparently in an attempt at humour. O’Neill also previously claimed that accusations of antisemitism made against students were a smear designed to silence Palestinian activists. He asked for a statement to be read out an Oxford University Students’ Union Council meeting on 18th January 2017. The statement included: “authorities are looking into several instances of university students being falsely accused of antisemitism as a means of intimidating student campaigners for Palestinian rights at Oxford, and evidence of foreign interference in democratic processes on our campus.”

Meanwhile, another current NUS officer, LGBT+ Officer Noorulann Shahid, shared a Jewish-made, self deprecating video on Twitter in 2012 containing offensive Jewish stereotypes.

In statements to The Independent, Milani, O’Neill and Shahid have apologised. Milani said: “I have apologised unreservedly for these comments before and I do so again. They do not reflect how I see the world today. These tweets are from an incredibly long time ago – when I was 16 to 17 years old.”

O’Neill said: “I was absolutely horrified to see this tweet. It flies in the face of my commitment to anti-fascism and anti-sexism. It was five years ago, and I have no recollection of writing it. I can only assume it was an incredibly distasteful inside joke, or a reference to something someone else said the night before. I wholly, unreservedly apologise for having ever associated myself with these truly vile hashtags. I am ashamed, and reach out to all groups affected to say sorry.” O’Neill has subsequently written on Facebook that his tweet has been taken out of context.

Shahid said: “What I said was not acceptable. I sincerely and unreservedly apologise to Jewish students for the video I shared and comments I made on Twitter. I wrote the tweet a long time ago when I had a limited amount of political education and understanding, and I’d never make such comments again as I am committed to unlearning all types of offensive and oppressive language.”

Milani, O’Neill and Shahid are all part of a far-left grouping that includes Malia Bouattia, the current NUS President who is seeking re-election. The Independent also revealed that during her time as a student at University of York, Bouattia was involved in hosting a play as part of Israel Apartheid Week events in 2010 called “Seven Jewish Children” that has been widely criticised as antisemitic. Bouattia was recently condemned by the House of Commons Home Affairs Committee for “outright racism” after she referred to the University of Birmingham as a “Zionist outpost.” An internal report for NUS found that she made antisemitic comments but outrageously she faced no action whatsoever as a consequence. Last July, Bouattia drew further condemnation when she used her casting vote to strip Jewish students of their ability to elect their own representative.

Campaign Against Antisemitism calls on the newly-elected NUS leadership, following the elections this week, to ensure that all Jewish students have a safe and positive experience at university and on Milani, O’Neill, Shahid and Bouattia to take steps to ensure they are well educated in the concerns of Jewish students and the insidious nature of antisemitism. Education is the key to ridding society of antisemitism and it is up to aspiring leaders to lead by example on this front.

Ali Milani, a candidate for Vice President of Union Development of the National Union of Students (NUS), has apologised for a series of antisemitic tweets from 2012 and 2013. In one of the many antisemitic tweets, he calls someone a “Jew” for being stingy, writing: “Nah u won’t mate. It’ll cost you a pound #jew.” The stereotype of the miserly and cheap Jew is extremely offensive.

In a tweet to Piers Morgan, Milani wrote: “u are a zionist and a corperate [sic] jackass.” In a string of tweets about Israeli-US relations and the Israel-Palestine conflict, he commented: “Israel has no right to exist.”

Just last week, the NUS released its survey on The Experience of Jewish Students in 2016/17, showing that only 49% of the 485 Jewish students polled said that they would feel comfortable attending NUS events, and just 40% would feel comfortable engaging in the NUS policy making process.

Milani, who is the current President of the Union of Brunel Students, is contesting the Vice President position at the NUS National Conference in Brighton from 25th to 27th April. Speaking to The Tab, Milani said: “I have apologised unreservedly for these comments before and I do so again. They do not reflect how I see the world today. These tweets are from an incredibly long time ago – when I was 16 to 17 years old. It’s unacceptable, I know that now. Education taught me that.” The NUS was contacted by The Tab but declined to comment.

Milani is a supporter of Malia Bouattia, the current NUS President, who was found by an NUS inquiry to have made antisemitic comments. According to The Tab, Milani signed an open letter in defence of her when her antisemitic comments were under investigation. Following outrage from the Jewish student body, which last summer wrote an open letter condemning Bouattia for her comments, an internal report for NUS found that Bouattia made antisemitic comments but outrageously she has faced no action whatsoever as a consequence. Milani was also quoted in an article in The Guardian praising Bouattia’s activist credentials, saying: “She is the most hardworking, dedicated and principled person I have ever met in my time as a sabb [sabbatical officer].”

The National Union of Students (NUS) has released its survey on The Experience of Jewish Students in 2016/17, showing that more than a quarter of Jewish students are living in fear of an antisemitic attack. Some 485 of the estimated 8,500 Jewish students in the UK responded to the survey carried out by an NUS internal research team in cooperation with the Union of Jewish Students (UJS) between last November and February.

We welcome the efforts of Robbie Young, the NUS Vice President for Society and Citizenship, who initiated this survey and applaud this step in the right direction. There can be a positive impact on Jewish student life if the concerns of Jewish students are actually listened to.

As we have reported, however, NUS has a track record of and has failingfailed miserably to tackle antisemitism. Current NUS President, Malia Bouattia, was recently condemned by the Home Affairs Select Committee for “outright racism” after she referred to the University of Birmingham as a “Zionist outpost.” An internal report for NUS found that she made antisemitic comments but outrageously she faced no action whatsoever as a consequence.

Bouattia called Birmingham University a “Zionist outpost in higher education” because it has “the largest Jsoc [Jewish student society] in the country.” She railed against “Zionist-led media outlets”, defended Palestinian terrorism as “resistance” and voted against condemning ISIS. When called on by Campaign Against Antisemitism and countless student leaders to retract her comments, she penned an article in The Guardian claiming that her accusers were simply sexists and racists. Bouattia refused to confirm that Israel has a right to even exist and told an audience at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) that the government’s anti-terrorism strategy is led by “Zionist and neo-con lobbies.” Last July Bouattia drew further condemnation when she used her casting vote to strip Jewish students of their ability to elect their own representative on the national anti-racism committee. She has yet to publicly apologise to Jewish students for the offence she has caused.

Given the tolerance for antisemitism by NUS, is it surprising that so many Jewish students feel detached and alienated from their union? The results of this survey are disturbing but therefore not unexpected:

  • Only 49% of students said they would feel comfortable attending NUS events.
  • Just 40% would feel comfortable engaging in the NUS policy making process.
  • Alarmingly, a staggering 65% do not believe the NUS would “respond appropriately” to allegations of antisemitism. One student said that “There is a tendency for NUS representatives to make blanket statements about Jews, including presumptions about their motives. This is very belittling and indicates that issues of Jewish students are not seriously considered.”

Other worrying findings in the survey are:

  • 26% of students said that they were either “fairly worried” or “very worried” about suffering a physical attack, property damage, verbal abuse or theft because they are Jewish.
  • 28% have experienced personal abuse through social media or other communication.
  • 65% had not experienced any crime whilst they have been students at their current place of study but 66 percent of those who had experienced crime believed these incidents were motivated by the perpetrator’s prejudice towards them based on their Jewish belief.
  • 42% reported difficulties accessing kosher food on their campuses. One student mentioned the impact of BDS on kosher food. “BDS…It’s xenophobic and prevents kosher food being sold in SU outlets as most Kosher food is made in Israel.”
  • 59% disagreed or strongly disagreed that their university avoids scheduling classes and exams during Sabbath and Jewish religious festivals. One student gave the example of “being told I would be marked down in a module if I left early for Shabbat because the university is a secular institute.”
  • Allegations of Jewish students being the victim of antisemitic comments made by lecturers. For example, “The only reason he was thrown in jail is because he was taking money from Jews and they are resourceful” and a “A lecturer made a joke about a gas chamber during a lecture about atmospheric gases and climate change.”

The first recommendation in the report is “Reviewing the current definition of antisemitism it adopts to ensure it is fit for purpose.” While NUS has been using the International Definition of Antisemitism, we call on them to enforce it. If they feel that they are unable to work with this definition, it questions their practices rather than the definition. It is an established principle that you cannot address a problem until you have identified what it is and adopted criteria, in this case a definition of antisemitism. If NUS is serious about addressing its antisemitism problem, it must use the international definition.

Another recommendation is for “NUS Leadership, staff and volunteers, elected and appointed, to receive training and guidance on antisemitism, within training on equality/race equality.” It is vital that NUS receives the right training to recognise antisemitism. Antisemitism is often nuanced and camouflaged and expressed in coded language so it is important that NUS comprehends its complexities.

Some Jewish students, however, have questioned the survey following its release. A student at the SOAS in London told The Algemeiner, an American Jewish newspaper, that she did not participate in the study because “I don’t trust the NUS or its intentions to improve Jewish student experience on campuses.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism calls on the NUS leadership, particularly the new leadership following the elections later this month, to use this report and its findings as a catalyst for real change and to ensure that all Jewish students have a safe and positive experience at university.

Richard Falk, the discredited and disgraced fringe antisemitic conspiracy theorist and the former UN envoy, has been prevented from holding an event at Middlesex University tomorrow. The university had insisted the event would take place, but following intervention by Campaign Against Antisemitism, the university has now decided to cancel the event.

This development comes hours after the University of East London took action to stop another event at which Falk was due to speak.

Falk had intended to speak about his new book, “Palestine’s Horizon”. Yesterday he held a similar event at the London School of Economics at which antisemites in the audience told Jewish students that “the Jews were expelled from Germany for misbehaving” and that they should read the works of disgraced historian David Irving, who in 2000 was proven in court to be an antisemite, a Holocaust denier and an admirer of Hitler. It is also reported that Atzmon later said, “Jews are always expelled for a reason.”

Falk, the Special Rapporteur on Human Rights for the Palestinian Territories from 2008-2014, has been condemned repeatedly for making antisemitic remarks. He has been denounced by the United Kingdom on at least three separate occasions for antisemitism, as detailed by UN Watch in an open letter.

For example, in 2012 the Foreign and Commonwealth Office condemned Falk for providing the cover endorsement of a virulently antisemitic book that describes Jews as Nazis and which asks whether “Hitler might have been right after all”. In 2011, then Prime Minister David Cameron “strongly condemned” Falk’s publication of an antisemitic cartoon. The image posted by Falk on his blog showed a dog wearing a Jewish skullcap, urinating on a depiction of justice, and devouring a bloody skeleton.

Falk was publicly rebuked by former UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon in 2011 for suggesting the 9/11 terrorist attacks were orchestrated by the US government. He blamed the Boston bombings on “American global domination” and “Tel Aviv”. In fact, Falk’s glorification of the Hamas terrorist group, which calls for the genocide of all Jews worldwide in its Charter, was so severe that even the Palestinian Authority sought to expel him from the UN.

We are very pleased to have been able to prevent this notorious antisemite from speaking at the University of East London and Middlesex University, but he should never have even been considered as an appropriate speaker.

We are lodging a formal complaint with LSE and the Higher Education Funding Council for England over the disgraceful event held there yesterday.

If you are aware of an antisemitic speaker being invited to speak at a university, please contact [email protected].

Richard Falk, the discredited and disgraced fringe antisemitic conspiracy theorist and the former UN envoy, has been prevented from holding an event at the University of East London tonight.

The university took action to stop the event after Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to the university’s Vice-Chancellor and Chief Executive, Professor John Joughin.

Falk had intended to speak about his new book, “Palestine’s Horizon”. Yesterday he held a similar event at the London School of Economics at which antisemites in the audience told Jewish students that “the Jews were expelled from Germany for misbehaving” and that they should read the works of disgraced historian David Irving, who in 2000 was proven in court to be an antisemite, a Holocaust denier and an admirer of Hitler. It is also reported that Atzmon later said, “Jews are always expelled for a reason.”

Falk, the Special Rapporteur on Human Rights for the Palestinian Territories from 2008-2014, has been condemned repeatedly for making antisemitic remarks. He has been denounced by the United Kingdom on at least three separate occasions for antisemitism, as detailed by UN Watch in an open letter.

For example, in 2012 the Foreign and Commonwealth Office condemned Falk for providing the cover endorsement of a virulently antisemitic book that describes Jews as Nazis and which asks whether “Hitler might have been right after all”. In 2011, then Prime Minister David Cameron “strongly condemned” Falk’s publication of an antisemitic cartoon. The image posted by Falk on his blog showed a dog wearing a Jewish skullcap, urinating on a depiction of justice, and devouring a bloody skeleton.

Falk was publicly rebuked by former UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon in 2011 for suggesting the 9/11 terrorist attacks were orchestrated by the US government. He blamed the Boston bombings on “American global domination” and “Tel Aviv”. In fact, Falk’s glorification of the Hamas terrorist group, which calls for the genocide of all Jews worldwide in its Charter, was so severe that even the Palestinian Authority sought to expel him from the UN.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is in contact with Middlesex University to demand that Falk’s book launch events there on Wednesday be cancelled immediately.

We are also lodging a formal complaint with LSE and the Higher Education Funding Council for England.

If you are aware of an antisemitic speaker being invited to speak at a university, please contact [email protected].

Today, Richard Falk, the discredited and disgraced fringe antisemitic conspiracy theorist and the former UN envoy, has delivered a lecture at the London School of Economics (LSE) to launch his new book, “Palestine’s Horizon”.

Witnesses at today’s event have reported that the event descended into chaos. Jewish community members held up signs calling Falk an antisemite. University security tried to confiscate the signs and attempted to remove the protesters.

Also in attendance was the notorious antisemite, Gilad Atzmon, who told those around him that “the Jews were expelled from Germany for misbehaving.” Stunned audience members asked him to repeat what he had said and he did. Atzmon also was heard recommending the works of disgraced historian David Irving, who in 2000 was proven in court to be an antisemite, a Holocaust denier and an admirer of Hitler. It is also reported that Atzmon later said, “Jews are always expelled for a reason.”

Falk, the Special Rapporteur on Human Rights for the Palestinian Territories from 2008-2014, has been condemned repeatedly for making antisemitic remarks. He has been denounced by the United Kingdom on at least three separate occasions for antisemitism, as detailed by UN Watch in an open letter.

For example, in 2012 the Foreign and Commonwealth Office condemned Falk for providing the cover endorsement of a virulently antisemitic book that describes Jews as Nazis and which asks whether “Hitler might have been right after all”. In 2011, then Prime Minister David Cameron “strongly condemned” Falk’s publication of an antisemitic cartoon. The image posted by Falk on his blog showed a dog wearing a Jewish skullcap, urinating on a depiction of justice, and devouring a bloody skeleton.

Falk was publicly rebuked by former UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon in 2011 for suggesting the 9/11 terrorist attacks were orchestrated by the US government. He blamed the Boston bombings on “American global domination” and “Tel Aviv”. In fact, Falk’s glorification of the Hamas terrorist group, which calls for the genocide of all Jews worldwide in its Charter, was so severe that even the Palestinian Authority sought to expel him from the UN.

Falk’s invitation onto our campuses blatantly violates the government’s Prevent counter-extremism strategy. To make matters worse, LSE was warned in advance.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to the University of East London and Middlesex University to demand that Falk’s book launch events there on Tuesday and Wednesday respectively be cancelled immediately. We are also lodging a formal complaint with LSE and the Higher Education Funding Council for England.

Tom Harwood, a candidate to succeed Malia Bouattia as President of the National Union of Students, has released a video making a pledge to fight antisemitism one of his core manifesto promises. Decrying the loss of legitimacy suffered by the National Union of Students under Bouattia’s leadership, Harwood has identified antisemitism as an “advancing bigotry” which must urgently be tackled.

It is a damning indictment of the National Union of Students that a candidate has had to make fighting antisemitism within the union a major part of his election manifesto, and it is more damning still that this is newsworthy.

Bouattia has previously called Birmingham University a “Zionist outpost in higher education” because it has “the largest Jsoc [Jewish student society] in the country.” She has railed against “Zionist-led media outlets”, defended Palestinian terrorism as “resistance” and voted against condemning ISIS. When called on by Campaign Against Antisemitism and countless student leaders to retract her comments, she penned an article in The Guardian claiming that her accusers were simply sexists and racists. Bouattia since refused to confirm that Israel has a right to even exist, and told an audience at the School of Oriental and African Studies that the government’s anti-terrorism strategy is led by “Zionist and neo-con lobbies”. Last July Bouattia drew further condemnation when she used her casting vote to strip Jewish students of their ability to elect their own representative.

Student leaders have gone so far as to write open letters expressing embarrassment and apologising to Jewish students for the actions of Bouattia and the National Union of Students. The Union of Jewish Students has called for her resignation, as have other student groups including Oxford University Students’ Union. The House of Commons Home Affairs Committee’s Inquiry into the Rise of Antisemitism in Britain strongly criticised her.

A two-month inquiry launched to ascertain whether Bouattia is an antisemite found that Bouattia made comments that “could be reasonably capable of being interpreted as antisemitic”, but recommended that no disciplinary action be taken. Instead, Professor Carol Baxter, the NHS’s former equality chief who authored the report, proposed that Bouattia should apologise instead and escape any further consequence.

Students have been shocked by two antisemitic graffiti attacks at the University of Sussex. A grotesque message has been discovered by Sussex Friends of Israel on a blackboard located at Library Square: “Jet fuel can’t melt Jews. Holocaust was an inside job.” In another incident, a poster was defaced with swastikas. The poster, advertising a talk by Yoav and Horit Herman Peled, was titled “The religionisation of Israeli society.”

Student’s Union President, Annie Pickering, was quoted in the university newspaper saying: “The swastikas have scared us as much as anyone else and we are working with students and the university to remove the signs and if possible work out who is behind this.” The Vice Chancellor, Adam Tickell, tried to reassure students, saying: “I want to assure everyone in our community that you are safe here. Whatever your race, religion, gender identity, sexuality or age, or if you have a disability – Sussex is your home and you will be protected from discrimination or abuse. We have taken immediate action in this particular instance and will not tolerate any acts which are illegal or incite hatred.”

Last month, Campaign Against Antisemitism helped to expose an upcoming Friends of Palestine event scheduled at the University of Sussex for 2nd March as part of Israeli Apartheid Week. The event was billed as “Palestine: 100 Years of Settler-Colonialism. 100 Years of Popular Struggle for Justice.” We were extremely concerned by the controversial speakers, Aja Monet and Farid Esack and wrote to the university following requests from a number of students. The event went ahead and our Regulatory Enforcement Unit is now considering taking further action.

Some universities such as the University of Exeter and the University of Central Lancashire showed principled leadership and banned ‘Israeli Apartheid Week events’. A spokesperson for the University of Central Lancashire said that they banned the event for contravening the International Definition of Antisemitism. The University of Sussex should have followed this precedent.

There is clearly a climate of intense concern for Jewish students resulting from ‘Israeli Apartheid Weeks’ at universities across the country, which repeated incidents such as these graffiti attacks are consolidating.

Campaign Against Antisemitism calls on universities to step up their moral and legal obligation to protect Jewish students. We are keen to hear from students who are experiencing antisemitism on campus, or who are aware of recent and future events of concern via e-mail at [email protected].

Middle East Eye has produced a video showing students from around the UK complaining that their ‘Israeli Apartheid Week’ events had been banned over antisemitism or public safety fears. The video provides an insight into the mindset of activists who appear to believe that the bans are politically motivated and an assault on freedom of speech, and who seem not to recognise any problems whatsoever with the events that they were planning to organise.

A number of universities have banned ‘Israeli Apartheid Week’ events over the last couple of week (though it is called ‘Israeli Apartheid Week’, the events tend to span two or three weeks).

The bans follow the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by the government following a sustained campaign by Campaign Against Antisemitism, Sir Eric Pickles and others.

Minister of State for Universities, Jo Johnson MP, wrote to Universities UK earlier this month asking that all universities be conscious of the definition as ‘Israeli Apartheid Week’ approached. Universities have responded with bans on events that they feared would be antisemitic, extremist or dangerous to the public. This week the Prime Minister weighed in, calling on all universities to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The bans came as Campaign Against Antisemitism released urgent guidance to students dealing with antisemitic incidents during ‘Israeli Apartheid Week’. Students with questions are very welcome to contact our specialist team by e-mailing [email protected].