The Education Secretary, Gavin Williamson, has said of the disgraced academic David Miller: “I do not expect universities to tolerate racists”.

Mr Williamson made the comments at an Education Select Committee hearing last Wednesday after being asked for his position on the sociology professor by the Chair, Robert Halfon.

Mr Williamson responded: “I would never expect a university to tolerate racists and I would never expect a university to tolerate antisemitism. Where there is racism – whether that is manifested in antisemitic remarks – I would naturally expect there to be a proper and full employment procedure. I wouldn’t expect any form of racism to be tolerated and I would expect those people who are committing antisemitism to be dismissed from the staff.”

Prof. Miller, a Professor of Political Sociology at the University of Bristol, is a conspiracy theorist with a history of controversy relating to Jewish students. In his latest outburst, which is being investigated by the University and the police, he asserted that “Zionism is racism”, declared his objective “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world” and accused the Bristol University Jewish Society of being part of a worldwide Zionist conspiracy, adding that it is “fundamental to Zionism to encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”. At the same online event, Prof. Miller also observed that the Jewish Society and the Union of Jewish Students are Zionist, thereby implying that Jewish students (and the wider Jewish community) inherently “encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”.

He also portrayed the International Definition of Antisemitism as an attack on free speech and accused the Israeli Government of engaging in an “all-out attack” on the global Left as part of an “attempt by the Israelis to impose their will all over the world”. In comments reminiscent of the darkest years of the United Nations, Prof. Miller insisted that “Zionism is racism” and asked how “we defeat the ideology of Zionism in practice”, “how is Zionism ended” and about the way “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world”.

Also at the Committee hearing, Jonathan Gullis, the Conservative MP for Stoke-on-Trent, asked the Secretary of State about the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities and whether those that failed to do so would be penalised financially. Mr Williamson said that he backs the campaign for widespread adoption of the Definition, and observed that “We’ve had an exceptionally large rise in the number of universities that have signed up”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities. Recently, we passed the threshold of over half of British universities having adopted the Definition.

Mr Williamson continued: “Some [universities] have required a little bit of extra time, but if we’re in a position where there is a complete reluctance to be able to do this, we will look at taking other actions that may be available.”

According to the JC, a spokesperson for the Support David Miller campaign said: “Gavin Williamson and other Government ministers should find their backbone instead of repeatedly giving in to a vast censorship campaign being pushed by Israel lobbyists onto British schools and universities.”

The claim that combatting antisemitism is merely a cover for censoring debate about Israel or is conducted at the behest of the Jewish state are themselves antisemitic tropes.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

A neo-Nazi teenager from Derbyshire has admitted terror offences after threatening an attack on migrants at Dover.

The fifteen-year-old, who cannot be named for legal reasons, discussed the attack on a far-right Telegram channel that he had created, explaining his intentions and potential weapons.

He appeared on Monday at Westminster Magistrates’ Court and pleaded guilty to encouraging terrorism and possessing and disseminating a terrorist publication.

He had a previous conviction for threatening to blow up a mosque last year but was given a slap on the wrist for what was described as a “bomb hoax, a prank and a joke”. However, at that time he appeared alongside a sixteen-year-old co-defendant from southeast London who admitted dissemination of a terrorist publication. An investigation showed that he had made videos featuring Hitler, Nazis murdering victims in concentration camps and a woman singing “All Jews should die, race mixing is a sin”, and had searched the internet for weapons.

The Senior National Coordinator for Counterterrorism Policing, Dean Haydon, said: “We cannot hope to arrest our way out of this problem – the only way we can hope to reverse this worrying prevalence of children in our arrest statistics is to stop them from being radicalised in the first place.”

Far-right terrorist activity among British youth has become a very concerning trend. Just last month we reported that, according to recent figures that were released from the Home Office, out of over 300 people who were identified in 2019-2020 who could be seen to harbour radical views, 175 were below the age of twenty, with 70 being below the age of fourteen.

Earlier this year, a teenager from Cornwall became the UK’s youngest terror offender, after he admitted twelve terrorism offenses, while another teenager from Newcastle who called himself Hitler on numerous social media platforms and an online group that he created glorifying far-right violence pleaded guilty to terrorism offences.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

A neo-Nazi who wrote that ethnic minorities should be “sent home” and “sterilised” has been jailed on terror offences.

Michael Nugent, 38, used online chat groups to disseminate violent, neo-Nazi ideas, which included advocating terrorism. He also shared information of how to make explosives.

According to police, he used Telegram where he ran and contributed to “extreme right wing chat groups,” where he adopted different personas in order to spread “abhorrent, extremist” ideas.

The jury were read extracts from Mr Nugent’s diary. In addition to his abhorrent views on ethnic minorities, the court heard that he also wrote: “We are being genocided in our own homes.”

“Terrorism is the only way out of it,” read another extract.

Mr Nugent pleaded guilty to five counts of dissemination of terrorist publications and eleven of possessing information likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism.

Last week, at Kingston Crown Court, Mr Nugent was sentenced to three and a half years’ imprisonment.

Judge Peter Lodder QC told the court that Mr Nugent “posted toxic offensive material to websites and administered groups which were dedicated to violent racist, antisemitic, and neo-Nazi ideology.” Judge Lodder added: “You used your channel as a safe haven to post messages expressing and encouraging extreme racial hatred and violence towards black people, and in setting up this channel you provided others with access to terrorist publications and encouraged terrorist acts.”

Earlier this year, Campaign Against Antisemitism reported on the concerns that were raised over the alleged increase in neo-Nazi content on Telegram.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Image credit: Counter Terrorism Policing

Evidence has emerged that the second ‘Free Palestine’ convoy did lead to antisemitism on the streets of London.

A visibly Jewish man has revealed that one driver in the 35-car convoy shouted ‘Free Palestine’ at him and another beeped their car horn.

The incident took place on Shabbat on Finchley Road.

The victim, who was targeted by the convoy because he wears a kippah, wrote on Twitter: “I walked down Finchley Road today wearing my kippa (Jewish skullcap) & one member of #Convoy4Palestine shouted ‘Free Palestine’ at me & another blew a horn at me. You are entitled to demonstrate for your cause but not to do so at people who are visibly Jewish. That is antisemitism.”

Finchley Road was also where participants in the previous ‘Free Palestine’ convoy last month shouted “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” through megaphones. Four men were arrested and bailed over the former incident and an alleged antisemitic incident committed in Manchester before the convoy arrived in London. Other incidents of antisemitic intimidation and even a car ramming were also reported in connection with the convoy.

The police declined a request by Campaign Against Antisemitism, supported by legal representations, to ban the returning convoy.

The convoy ultimately joined an antisemitism-infested demonstration at Downing Street that was addressed by the antisemitic former Labour Party leader, Jeremy Corbyn.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A sticker belonging to the neo-Nazi group, British National Socialist Movement, was found on a lamppost near Manchester’s Charedi Jewish community.

Discovered on 31st May, the sticker was affixed to street furniture on Great Cheetham Street West and bore the symbol of the racist organisation with the words “British Movement Manchester,” along with the group’s website.

Founded during the 1960s and having supposedly dissolved in the early 1980s, the movement exhibited antisemitism and advocated for violence towards ethnic minorities.

The group now appears, however, to have reactivated, with a website currently featuring several antisemitic tropes and images, including references to “globalists” and “cultural Marxists,” praise for Hitler, and images of people performing the Nazi salute.

Last year, we reported that the Royal United Services Institute (RUSI), a British think-tank, had published a report noting the “conspiracy theories propagated widely online” in connection with COVID-19 and calls for violence against minority communities, among them Jews. The report observed that “the pandemic has amplified antisemitic tropes and calls for violence against Jewish communities”, and also noted that there have been “calls online by groups such as the British National Socialist Movement for the virus to be ‘weaponised’”.

Last year, members of the proscribed National Action group were sentenced to prison, having engaged, amongst other activities, in far-right stickering and recruitment campaigns. Campaign Against Antisemitism continues to monitor and report on far-right stickering campaigns.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to Sky News over a tweet posted by its Middle East Correspondent, Mark Stone.

In response to a tweet stating that “unbalanced reporting” in the media “is resulting in such Jew hatred in the UK. My children have to hide who they are”, Mr Stone yesterday tweeted: “I am so sorry your children have to hide. Unacceptable,” adding: “It’s interesting that so many ‘Israelis’ tell me that the ‘Jew hatred’ you experience is actually the consequence of the current Israeli government’s policies; their prolongation of an untenable occupation.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Holding Jews collectively responsible for the actions of the State of Israel” is an example of antisemitism.

Mr Stone has since deleted the tweet and apologised, but sought to blame others by claiming: “These are not my views; they are those of people I have spoken to in my reporting from Israel. I am sorry.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is appalling for Mark Stone to give credence to victim-blaming and excuses for antisemitism by portraying as legitimate the view that anti-Jewish racism is a reasonable reaction to the policies of the Israeli Government. Furthermore, his tweet also implies doubt about the experience of antisemitism by the victim to whom he was responding. Even his apology was inadequate, as he denied that the views were his but still held them out as being worthy of consideration.

“Anyone airing and disseminating such grotesquely antisemitic views is not fit to be entrusted with the responsibility of working at Sky News. We have submitted a complaint to Sky News and will also be writing to Ofcom. We look forward to hearing what action Sky News will be taking to avoid further loss of public confidence.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

Jewish passers-by have reported to Campaign Against Antisemitism that police stood by as a demonstrator shouted “F””” the Jews” outside the residence of the Israeli ambassador in London.

The witnesses did not see the demonstrator but described the voice as being that of a woman.

The incident took place at around 19:10 at a protest last night outside the residence.

This is not the first time in recent weeks that police officers have failed to act in the face of antisemitic hate crime or have participated in political protests in contravention of policing protocols. Campaign Against Antisemitism has submitted complaints in respect of the relevant officers.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is in discussions with the Metropolitan Police Service over this and other incidents.

Image credit: Google

Carlisle Castle has been daubed with antisemitic graffiti.

Cumbria Police are reportedly investigating the vandalism at the 900-year-old landmark near the border between England and Scotland as racially aggravated criminal damage.

The graffiti was discovered on 2nd June and the police are currently appealing for witnesses.

A police spokesman said: “Hate related incidents can have a serious impact on communities and individuals. There is no place for hate on the streets of Cumbria and these types of incidents are dealt with vigorously and appropriately.”

If you have any more information, please contact PC 2999 on 101, or report online at www.cumbria.police.uk/reportit, quoting incident 191 of 2nd June.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A new GMB union General Secretary, with a history of speaking out against antisemtism, was elected last Thursday.

Gary Smith has previously said: “No political party has clean hands on the issue of antisemitism but nobody should need any reminders that antisemitism is on the rise and we in GMB are clear that it is absolutely intolerable.”

In the past, he has spoken out against Richard Leonard, the former Scottish Labour leader, for failing to support the International Definition of Antisemitism.

In March 2019, he labelled the Labour Party’s handling of antisemitism “disgraceful” and revealed that he even thought about leaving the Party himself.

Mr Smith also spoke out when Rhea Wolfson, a Jewish official with the GMB Scotland union, was targeted in an article which mentioned that Hitler had alleged that Jews had gradually assumed leadership of the trade union movement.

A colleague of Mr Smith’s stated: “Some union people struggle with the idea of treating racism against Jews in the same way they would treat racism against other ethnic minorities. Gary understands the poisonous nature of anti-Jewish racism, and does not operate with any hierarchies.”

In April, it was reported that a former senior official from the GMB union allegedly referred to victims of antisemitism as “rich b****** Jews” in an appalling speech, sources claim.

Last month, Dennis McNulty, a GBM union activist, was jailed for nine years after he assaulted a Jewish barrister in an antisemitic attack and saying: “It’s always you f***ing people, you’re always the problem.”

Labour’s General Secretary’s invitation to Party members to antisemitism training in line with the Action Plan agreed with the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) has been met with a revolt and antisemitic conspiracy theories.

David Evans, who has undertaken antisemitism training himself, wrote: “When I first became General Secretary of the Labour Party, I made my priorities clear. I want to ensure that our Party is a welcoming environment for all our members. In order to tackle antisemitism, it is vital to understand it.”

He added: “Our movement thrives when it is together. That’s why I am very grateful for all the invaluable work that has gone into this training session, and would like to stress its importance. I have undertaken the training myself and found it thought provoking and useful.”

The online training is due to be led by Labour’s Jewish affiliate from on 14th June.

However, it is understood that a revolt by some members is being mounted on WhatsApp, accusing the affiliate of being a propaganda tool for Israel and urging a boycott of the training sessions.

Some members were reportedly concerned that they might be recorded in the sessions, with their comments used to expel them from the Party. One participant in the discussions portrayed the Party as white supremacist, while others described antisemitism as having been weaponised or used as a smear.

Numerous pro-Corbyn groups within and beyond Labour have reportedly urged members to boycott the training sessions.

The Labour Party was found by the EHRC to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is asking the Metropolitan Police Service to use its powers under the Public Order Act 1986 to address the threat of the returning “Free Palestine” convoy, after the previous convoy drove through a Jewish neighbourhood shouting “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” through megaphones.

Four men were arrested and bailed over that incident and an alleged antisemitic incident committed in Manchester before the convoy arrived in London.

In addition to this, a vehicle chased a Jewish mother down a London street and rammed her car whilst she was driving her four-year-old child to see friends.

The drivers were alleged to have been part of the same convoy of some 200 cars displaying Palestinian Authority flags, which is understood to have driven from Bradford, Sheffield and Leicester down the M1 motorway before veering into Hendon and Golders Green, two of North London’s Jewish neighbourhoods. According to witnesses, convoy participants shouted to Jewish passers-by “Free Palestine! Go back to Poland” and other antisemitic chants.

The returning convoy is due to leave Bradford on Saturday morning and arrive outside Number 10 Downing Street at 1pm.

Under sections 12 and 13 of the Public Order Act 1986, the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service may, with the consent of the Home Secretary, prohibit processions or impose specific conditions upon them.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Less than one month after the ‘Free Palestine’ convoy drove through a Jewish area of London shouting “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” and ramming a car where a mother was driving her four-year-old child, it is returning this weekend.

“We are in talks with the Metropolitan Police Service to use its powers under the Public Order Act to ensure that the malicious acts of hatred we saw last month do not reoccur and that they prioritise the safety of the Jewish community.”We are also having ongoing discussions with the Met regarding recent events, including the investigation into the previous convoy, to ensure that offenders are brought to justice.

“Protest is one thing, but intimidation and violent hatred have absolutely no place on our streets, and anyone victimising British Jews must face the full force of the law.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A writer for HuffPost and Al Jazeera has defended the harassment of Jewish people, tweeting that British Jews are “either dual-nationals of Israel, serve in the army and/or have homes and lands there.”

Dilly Hussain’s Twitter thread sought to justify the three anti-Israel YouTubers who filmed themselves harassing members of the Jewish community in Golders Green – to whom they appear to refer in the video’s title as “radical Israelis” – over “child-killing” last month.

The video, the premise of which is initially outlined by one of the presenters as intending to open “a dialogue…a discussion…a friendly debate,” quickly became an excuse for the presenters to accost passing members of the Jewish community, including children.

Mr Hussain’s thread began with: “I believe Muslims (be it lay or public figures) questioning Jews (many of whom are pro-Israel to different degrees) about Israel is legitimate.”

He proceeded to say that it is a false equivalence to question Muslims about terrorism and compared Israel to ISIS, writing: “Muslims don’t support ISIS or lone-wolf attacks in the remotest way in comparison to British Jews who are either dual-nationals of Israel, serve in the army and/or have homes and lands there.”

He added: “In short, the number of Muslims who support, justify and defend acts of criminality by their co-religionists is simply incomparable to a faith community who are grossly and intimately involved with Israel.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Accusing Jewish citizens of being more loyal to Israel, or to the alleged priorities of Jews worldwide, than to the interests of their own nations” is an example of antisemitism, as is “Holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the State of Israel.”

A councillor for Bingham Town Council has apologised for shouting out “Heil Hitler” during a council meeting on 25th May.

Councillor Viv Leach shouted the remark after the councillors voted on a motion, seemingly comparing their raised arms to Nazi salutes.

A Bingham Town Council spokesperson said: “During the Town Council’s meeting on Tuesday May 25, an inappropriate comment of ‘Heil Hitler’ was made by Councillor Leach for which she wishes to apologise unreservedly.”

Apologising for the comment, Cllr Leach said: “The comment was made in response to an observation which, on reflection, was stupid and thoughtless of me. My comment was not intended to cause offense, but it has and for that I am extremely sorry. If I could take the comment back I would, and therefore I fully accept that there may be consequences.”

The Town Council’s Mayor, Councillor Andrew Shelton, said: “the Council does not and will not tolerate such offensive language or unacceptable comments. However, we will support Councillor Leach in making amends and help identify appropriate training.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The Nazi genocide of six million Jewish men, women and children was punctuated by the call of ‘Heil Hitler’. It is therefore shocking to hear the call of ‘Heil Hitler’ in a town council meeting in 2021 Britain. Cllr Viv Leach’s conduct was utterly deplorable and it is no wonder that she has now apologised for it and accepted that there will be consequences. Mere ‘training’ is, however, insufficient. Instead, she should devote time to taking meaningful action against antisemitism so as to show the sincerity of her remorse. She could start by proposing that her council adopts the International Definition of Antisemitism.”

The disgraced Labour MP, Naz Shah, reportedly spoke at a rally where calls were made to “lift the curse of the Jews off the Muslims in Palestine!”

Footage has become available of the rally, held in May in Ms Shah’s home town of Bradford, in which speakers appear to beseech G-d to “make us part of the mujahideen in Palestine!”; “purify al-Aqsa from impure people!”; “make the earth quake under their [impure people’s] feet!”; and “make the Jews lose!”

Other chants included beseeching G-d to “lift the curse of the Jews off the Muslims in Palestine!” and “make Islam win!”

Ms Shah, who also serves as Labour’s Shadow Minister for Community Cohesion, urged demonstrators: “Don’t stop just here today. It must carry on, even when this stops. The year 2015 we all know what happened. We were here. This place was packed. And again we find ourselves here. It’s not unacceptable to be coming here time and time again because children are being killed.”

Ms Shah’s previous dalliances with antisemitism were so grave that they led to her suspension from the Labour Party even under Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership, has appeared in recent weeks to resent how she was held to account. She also recently shared a platform with Mr Corbyn but has not been disciplined, even though Mr Corbyn, like Ms Shah before him, was suspended from the Party for antisemitism. 

The disgraced former Liberal Democrat MP, David Ward, was also reportedly present at the same rally. He lost his council seat in last month’s local elections, running as an Independent after being expelled by the Liberal Democrats in 2017 for standing against the Party in an election, having previously been disciplined for comments about Jews, the Holocaust and Israel.

Ms Shah is not the only Labour MP to have courted controversy in recent weeks. John McDonnell, the former Shadow Chancellor, encouraged his “Muslim constituents” in particular to come out to protest in demonstrations against Israel over the past month, seemingly stoking religious and communal divisions in the UK at a particularly vulnerable time for the Jewish community. He also promoted an antisemitic image in one of his tweets about a march that he himself attended.

Former Party Leader (and now Independent MP) Jeremy Corbyn addressed a rally where antisemitism was also on display. Mr Corbyn failed to condemn Hamas in his remarks, having previously described the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group as his “friends”.

Former Shadow Home Secretary Diane Abbott spoke also spoke at a rally, describing it as a “great demonstration” even as it featured chants praising the massacre of Jews, Hamas-style headbands and antisemitic signs.

According to extensive research conducted by Campaign Against Antisemitism, the Parliamentary Labour Party and its leadership – including Sir Keir Starmer and Shadow Foreign Secretary Lisa Nandy – have been particularly one-sided in its condemnations of Israel and have appeared to give Hamas a free pass for its responsibility for its latest conflict with the Jewish state, with many in the Jewish community concerned that the volume and vehemence of the one-sidedness coming from many MPs, particularly in the Labour Party, have contributed to an atmosphere conducive to the horrendous antisemitism recently witnessed on British streets and campuses, in hospitals and schools, online and elsewhere.

Beyond the Parliamentary Labour Party, numerous Labour councillors have also courted controversy in relation to the Jewish community and antisemitism in recent weeks as well. Among them were Kirk Master, Yusuf Jan-Virmani, David Owen and Puru Miah.

Cllr Master, Labour’s Assistant Mayor of Leicester and the city’s former Deputy Police and Crime Commissioner, demanded that Jewish and Muslim faith leaders in Leicester sign a declaration to “condemn the killings of the innocent and Palestinian people.” He subsequently apologised.

Cllr Jan-Virmani, a Labour councillor in Blackburn, was suspended after making derogatory comparisons between Israelis and animals while referencing the antisemitic blood libel conspiracy theory in the council chamber and refusing to apologise.

Cllr Owen, a prominent Labour councillor in Blackpool, has reportedly been referred to the Party over social media posts he allegedly shared, including one quoting former Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard David Duke and another comparing Israel to Nazis.

Cllr Miah, a Labour councillor in Tower Hamlets, was pictured standing in front of a sign with an antisemitic message comparing Zionism to Nazis (later disavowed by the council).

Meanwhile, Mohammed P Aslam, a former councillor on Nottinghamshire County Council has reportedly been suspended by Labour after comparing Israel to Nazis and making remarks about “Jewish treachery”. Louise Regan, the Chair of the same Constituency Labour Party – Nottingham East – has reportedly been reinstated after an investigation following her handling of a meeting at which a Jewish member felt that he had to leave due to the atmosphere.

In addition, Ruth George, the former MP for High Peak, was elected Deputy Leader of Derbyshire County Council, where she retained her seat in the recent local elections. Campaign Against Antisemitism has an outstanding complaint with the Labour Party against Ms George, who was challenged during the election campaign by a member of the public over her past antisemitic comments, for which she has apologised. In her response, she said: “You may wish to look into the political affiliations of the Campaign against Antisemitism and the ongoing complaints to the Charity Commission so you have a full picture.” The suggestion that those calling out antisemitism in the Labour Party had mendacious or political motives for doing so was highlighted by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) in its report on antisemitism in Labour as being part of the unlawful victimisation of Jews that took place in the Party.

Joe Glasman, Head of Political Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Despite being declared institutionally racist against Jews just six months ago by the EHRC, and notwithstanding the current special measures imposed on the Party to address its unlawful antisemitism, Labour MPs appear to have learned nothing.

“Too many have encouraged, attended and addressed rallies featuring antisemitic banners and chants, contributing to the atmosphere conducive to the rampant antisemitism, physical assaults on Jews and damage to Jewish property that we have seen in recent weeks. The condemnations by those same MPs of the antisemitism that they helped to unleash ring hollow and give no comfort to the Jewish community.

“Over the past month, it has been difficult to tell the difference between today’s Labour and the Party as it was under Jeremy Corbyn. Labour has managed to return to square one when it comes to antisemitism.”

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A Jewish teacher at a non-Jewish school was physically abused after their pupils “competed” to stick Palestinian Authority flags on their hair and clothing, it was reported this week.

The teacher, who chose to remain anonymous, said that they were targeted because they were Jewish, and immediately resigned following the incident.

They said: “The whole school was full of Palestine flags, the pupils all began shouting ‘Free Palestine’.

“At the beginning, I thought they were just making a statement for all the teachers, but then I realised it was targeted to me and other teachers that are Jewish.”

Detailing the incident, they went on to say: “They [the pupils] were trying to stick Free Palestine stickers in my hair, I broke into tears, I couldn’t take my class that morning.”

The teacher claims that the school’s senior leadership offered no support whatsoever.

Recently, Education Secretary Gavin Williamson wrote to schools demand that they act against antisemitism and the politicisation of classrooms.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We applaud the Education Secretary for raising awareness of antisemitism in schools. We have received multiple reports of antisemitic incidents targeting Jewish pupils and teachers, and just last week one Jewish school advised its pupils to conceal garments that might identify them as Jewish. We recently published a short resource for parents and schoolchildren who encounter anti-Jewish hate, and we continue to urge the community to be vigilant and to report any incidents.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently published a short resource on “What to do about antisemitism at school” for children and parents, which helps identify antisemitism using the International Definition of Antisemitism and provides pointers on how to act when antisemitic incidents arise.

Do you or your friends/family have stories of schoolteachers or pupils facing antisemitism at schools in the UK? We have received a significant number of reports and the Incident Response colleagues would be keen to hear of further examples if you could share them. Contact us at [email protected] or call +44 (0)330 822 0321.

A Jewish children’s school bus that featured religious memorabilia has had its tyres slashed in Stamford Hill.

The incident took place on Vartry Road and was reported yesterday by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CHS 28842 02/06/21.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The Communities Secretary, Robert Jenrick, has said that he is “very concerned” by the rise in antisemitism in Britain.

Mr Jenrick, married to the granddaughter of Holocaust survivors, added that he was “horrified” by the convoy of cars which spouted antisemitic hatred through megaphones less than a month ago.

“Some of the themes we’ve seen in recent weeks are more than just casual antisemitism, or people who don’t understand what antisemitism is and drift into it by accident. I think there were signs of something more pernicious – of extremism,” he told The Telegraph. “And that makes my desire to root out extremism even stronger.”

Recently, Mr Jenrick, along with the Home Secretary, Priti Patel, wrote to reassure the Jewish community of the Government’s intent to combat antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 showed that three in five British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

A suspended nurse who reportedly described the NHS as the “new Auschwitz” has reportedly been permanently removed from the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) register.

Kate Shemirani’s removal from the register comes after she was suspended as a registered nurse for eighteen months last July, pending an investigation into her past alleged comments on COVID-19 and 5G conspiracy theories.

However, it was reportedly decided last Friday by the NMC Fitness to Practise Committee that she would be permanently struck off from the register. Ms Shemrani can appeal this ruling in five years. In the meantime, however, she will be unable to practice as a registered nurse.

Last year, Ms Shemirani led protests against mask-wearing and lockdown restrictions, defending her use of comparisons to Auschwitz and Nazis. Ms Shemirani said at the time: “When I likened this to Auschwitz and the cattle trucks – you tell me the difference? Because the only time in history I could find where the doctors and nurses were able to end people’s lives was the nurses of the Third Reich. The nurses of the Third Reich are here today. I don’t care if they find it offensive. I find it offensive that our elderly have been murdered in care homes. Stop being a special snowflake and saying you’re offended. They are killing our elderly, our most vulnerable.”

It has also been reported that Ms Shemrani is a follower of the “Committee of 300” conspiracy theory, which over a century ago laid the foundations for the antisemitic fabrication, The Protocols of the Elders of Zion.

Ms Shemirani said: “Can I state the obvious. There is no covid19. It’s a scam. There is however contaminated vaccines, contaminated tests and a lovely direct energy weapon system being primed to activate those nano particles you have injected, ingested and inhaled.”

She has also claimed: “Without the help of the doctors and nurses, the extermination of Jews, gypsies, homosexuals, blacks, disabled… in the Holocaust could not have been executed…”

According to the JC, Ms Shemirani has also made frequent reference to the Jewish financier, philanthropist and controversial political activist, George Soros, who is often the target of antisemitic conspiracy theories.

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds the British Government for announcing its decision to boycott the controversial United Nations “Durban IV” event.

The decision follows “serious concerns” of antisemitism which have been present at previous Durban events.

Campaign Against Antisemitism had called last month on the British Government to boycott this year’s Durban IV event, following a similar decision by the United States, Australia and Canada.

The Durban conferences, while presented under the guise of combatting racism, have previously provided a stage for antisemitic hate speech and actions. At the original 2001 conference in the South African city, there were attempts to equate Zionism with racism, in an echo of the United Nations’ darkest period. Subsequent review conferences in the Durban series have included the distribution of the notorious antisemitic propaganda, The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, an early twentieth-century forgery long used to incite mob violence against Jews, as well as then-Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad referring to the Holocaust as “ambiguous and dubious.”

Earlier this year, Campaign Against Antisemitism reported that the UN General Assembly approved an operating budget that includes money to commemorate the Durban conference, an event which has been widely described as antisemitic.

Despite protests from the United States, the $3.231 billion budget containing a provision to mark the notorious 2001 World Conference Against Racism in Durban, South Africa, was approved. The General Assembly voted 167 in favour, with only the United States and Israel voting against.

The Durban conference was dominated by clashes over the Middle East. The US and Israel walked out over a draft resolution that equated Zionism with racism. The language was amended in the final documents, but the conference was seen as the beginnings of the boycott of Israel known as BDS, the tactics of which an overwhelming majority of British Jews believe are intimidatory.

A senior Essex rabbi has spoken out about “frightening” incidents of antisemitism, as well as safety concerns regarding his children identifying as Jewish in public.

Noting the anxiety felt by both him and his community, Senior Rabbi Mordechai Wollenberg of Woodford Forest United Synagogue said: “My wife went to get her vaccine the other day and I went with her and it was the first time I thought, ‘Do I put a kippah on?’

“I thought, I don’t know who is going or who would be there and I felt slightly uncomfortable.”

Regarding his children, Rabbi Wollenberg said that he worried about his children identifying as Jewish, “because what has happened in recent weeks is very ugly.”

“Sentiments under the surface have come to the surface now. It’s not new, we have seen it before and it is happening again,” he added.

In the last few weeks, several members of the Jewish community have had to question whether they would continue to publicly identify as Jewish. Recently, a prominent Jewish school has advised its pupils to wear hats over their skullcaps and to cover their school blazers in public amid skyrocketing cases of antisemitism. These a fellow Essex rabbi being assaulted and hospitalised.

Speaking on this issue, Rabbi Wollenberg said: “I definitely feel there’s much more of an angst and I sense that as a community, for those of us most visible, which I am, we are primary targets of physical hate attacks. We have seen it happen and seen that change in recent weeks.”

“You still think, that could happen to me. I’m obviously Jewish and my kids are obviously Jewish. I don’t hate who I am but we are also a little careful. You have to take care and protect yourself outside,” he added.

Many Jews have been worried about being identified as such on public transport, including Rabbi Wollenberg’s son.

“My son was going out and was going to put on a mask when he was leaving and one of the masks had Hebrew on it that said ‘Love your neighbour as yourself’ and he said ‘I probably shouldn’t wear that on a tube, people will probably get a bit jumpy’ and that was really smart,” the Rabbi said.

The country has seen a number of rallies take place recently where several antisemitic signs and chants were present. Rabbi Wollenberg acknowledged this, while also stating that he believes that the demonstrations were organised with “good intentions.”

“We can all have our views as long as it doesn’t spill out into how we treat each other,” he said, adding: “The one thing that sticks out to me also is there is a peculiar double standard in our culture. Every liberal cause going, people jump on the bandwagon and Jews are the only minority who they will say ‘stop complaining’. If it was the other way around, it wouldn’t be like that. We say we feel threatened on the streets and feel uncomfortable and people say ‘sorry it’s our freedom of speech’.”

In recent weeks, there have been several videos of people issuing threats to Jewish people. Rabbi Wollenberg spoke about one in which he saw people allegedly chanting “kill the Jews” in Arabic.

He said: “I don’t know much Arabic but I know how you say ‘Kill the Jews’ and hearing people shouting that in tandem – they weren’t shouting ‘Kill Israelis’, they are saying ‘Kill the Jews’ and it’s happening now in our country and social media means we are all aware of it. That is very frightening. We know from Jewish history that we are often not taken seriously. People are making these threats, what happens next?

“If there’s a message to ‘go kill the Jews’ then someone will go do it. I have heard a lot from Jewish friends say it’s only a matter of time before someone dies. That doesn’t mean it is necessarily going to happen in Essex but nationally, it’s a disaster waiting to happen.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 showed that three in five British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

A new study has suggested that one-quarter of the top universities in the United Kingdom released antisemitic statements during last month’s conflict between Israel and Hamas.

The report from the Pinsker Centre, a British think-tank with a focus on international policy, noted that out of the UK’s top 40 universities, student unions or faculty bodies at twelve of them released “highly partisan” statements that may have breached the International Definition of Antisemitism.

According to the Definition, “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour)” and “Applying double standards by requiring of Israel a behaviour not expected or demanded of any other democratic nation” are both examples of antisemitism.

Nine of the twelve universities mentioned in the study have adopted the Definition, leading Jonathan Hunter, the Chairman of the Pinsker Centre, to feel that the Definition may not be sufficient by itself without stricter measures from universities.

This is particularly concerning in view of the likely connection between inflammatory statements in connection with Israel by university bodies and campus antisemitism.

In the report, it was stated that there was “an extremely high possibility of a strong correlation between the publication of highly emotionally-charged statements on the Israel-Gaza conflict, and reports of antisemitism on campus.”

The report went on to suggest that Students’ Union officers should be provided with appropriate training in order properly to look after their Jewish students.

A Charity Commission spokesperson said: “It’s concerning to hear these reports. Our guidance makes clear our expectations of all trustees around political activity and campaigning. We will carefully assess the contents of this report in line with our risk and regulatory framework.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently reported on University College London’s one-sided Instagram post that Jewish students considered to be inflammatory.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

A visibly Jewish man was left injured and needing a tetanus injection after repeat offenders set their vicious dog upon him.

The attack took place on Queen Elizabeth’s Walk in Stamford Hill and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

Hackney Police are investigating the incident. If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: 4612639/21.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 showed that three in five British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

It has been reported that a gang in Stamford Hill, understood to be operating on the Webb Estate, have been involved in three recent antisemitic incidents involving attacks Jewish homes and heinous threats against Jews.

The first incident took place on Craven Walk in Stamford Hill at the end of May, as four youths attacked the front door of a Jewish home (CAD 7646 30/05/21).

The second incident, also on Craven Walk the next day, involved the Webb Estate gang throwing rocks at Jewish homes (CAD 5790 31/05/21).

A third incident, reported today, saw the same gang sitting on a garden fence belonging to a Jewish person. The gang members swore at both the victim and her eight-year-old daughter, and then threatened to “blow up the house” (CAD 3728 02/06/21).

All three incidents were reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information regarding any of these incidents, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting the relevant reference number.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 showed that three in five British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

Jewish patients and a staffer have been targeted in multiple antisemitic incidents at two London hospitals.

In one incident on Tuesday morning of this week, a staff member allegedly made a cutthroat death-threat gesture towards a Jewish patient, who was attending the Royal Free Hospital for a blood test. The patient reportedly noticed that the practitioner was wearing a Palestinian Authority flag on her jacket and a badge that read “Stop killing our children”.

The patient asked for a different practitioner to administer the test, but as she walked away the staffer “swiped her finger across her throat.” Campaign Against Antisemitism has been in contact with a witness and officials from the hospital.

The hospital is investigating the incident, and the Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust said in a statement: “We do not tolerate racist or antisemitic behaviour of any kind, from anybody on our premises. The Royal Free London is proud of the rich diversity of the patients that we serve and we are taking these allegations extremely seriously. Although we have not received a formal complaint, we will investigate this matter thoroughly.

“We would urge anybody who experiences racist or antisemitic abuse in any of our hospitals to report it immediately to a member of our security team or to the patient advice and liaison service.”

However, this incident, which was highly publicised on social media, came barely a fortnight after a much less prominent incident at the same department in the same hospital. In that incident, another Jewish patient was also present for a blood test. The tests were being administered by a practitioner of reportedly Pakistani origin. When the Jewish patient came into the room, the practitioner left the room. The patient was reportedly told to wait to be tested, and in the meantime other patients were all being tested before him, including some who arrived later than he had.

Eventually, the patient asked a female attendant whether he would be seen, and she assured him that he would be seen imminently, and he then asked if he had not yet been seen because of prejudice, a question that the attendant, apparently now blushing, refused to address. The patient was deeply upset and immediately left the hospital, without being tested, despite the urgency of the test.

Eventually, after intervention by a senior staffer at the hospital, the patient returned to the hospital some days later and was seen immediately, but the case is reportedly being investigated.

Elsewhere, a Jewish staffer was the target of antisemitic abuse at the Royal London Hospital in East London. Hadasa Mayerfeld, 27, a Jewish neonatal intensive care nurse, reports that she was left “shaken” after being told by a man, “I want to kill all your people”.

The incident took place in on Tuesday in a hospital lift as a man noticed her Magen David necklace and shouted: “So you don’t support a free Palestine? How can someone who comes from people who kill all our innocent children get a job working here? I want to kill all your people, we need to kill all you people.”

A second man in the lift, apparently dressed in a religious Muslim garment, stood by and laughed.

The men are not believed to be employees of the hospital, but it is understood that Ms Mayerfeld will be submitting a formal complaint in the coming days. She said: “I spend hours on end caring for babies from all walks of life. Every race, every religion, every ethnicity. I care for each of them with so much love and devotion to give them all the care they need. Even at work I need to be scared to stand up for my religion and my beliefs.”

A spokesperson for Barts Health NHS Trust reportedly said: “We are investigating a distressing report of verbal abuse by visitors to The Royal London Hospital, and supporting the wellbeing of the nurse involved. We do not tolerate antisemitism, racism or abusive behaviour in our hospitals and are committed to making them safe places for all our communities.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Notwithstanding the ceasefire in Israel, we are continuing to see antisemitic incidents not only on the streets and online, but even in schools and hospitals. These cowardly perpetrators are targeting young people, vulnerable patients and heroic medical staff and teachers, which is utterly shameful. The Jewish community must continue to remain vigilant, and we call on the hospital trusts to conduct thorough investigations and ensure that racist abusers are appropriately sanctioned.”

Earlier this week, Campaign Against Antisemitism welcomed the statement by the British Medical Association (BMA) condemning antisemitism and racism.

The Culture Secretary has called on Facebook to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism and condemned the recent surge of antisemitic incidents in Britain.

Speaking at Bevis Marks, the oldest synagogue in Britain, about the Definition, Oliver Dowden said: “There may be some practicalities about exactly how [social media giants] incorporate it, but the essence of the International Definition [of Antisemitism] I want them to adopt, just as the Government has committed to that.”

Mr Dowden added: “If companies fail to comply with the legislation, they will face fines of up to ten percent of their global revenue. But I’ve set out the overall direction I want them to go in and I don’t see why they can’t get on with it now.

“Ultimately, as the fallback, we will have it [in law] and we’ll look at how we incorporate the [D]efinition into the online harms legislation.”

The Culture Secretary also condemned the recent surge of antisemitism in Britain, stating: “I have lots of shuls in my constituency, not least in Bushey, Borehamwood and Radlett, and I think the community is feeling vulnerable and deeply worried. I have had people contacting me saying they didn’t expect to see these scenes on the streets of London.

“I want to send an absolutely unambiguous message to the Jewish community: that this government is on their side and we will stand absolutely steadfast and resolute in showing zero tolerance for antisemitic abuse, whether it’s in the street or online.

“A Jewish pensioner in Golders Green is a Jewish pensioner and any attacks are antisemitism, pure and simple. It does worry me that there is this kind of conflation with events in Israel. There is no culpability of Jewish people in this country, regardless of one’s views on what is happening in Israel, and it’s really important that we address this.”

Last year, the Culture Secretary announced that social media companies will have a duty of care to users under new legislation, and that “criminal antisemitic posts will need to be removed without delay”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been at the forefront of calls for Online Harms legislation, and last year joined a global coalition calling on Facebook to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities, public bodies and other institutions. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

Three anti-Israel YouTubers filmed themselves harassing members of the Jewish community in Golders Green – to whom they appear to refer in the video’s title as “radical Israelis” – over “child-killing” last Saturday.

The video, the premise of which is initially outlined by one of the presenters as them just wanting to “have a dialogue…a discussion…a friendly debate,” quickly became an excuse for the presenters to accost passing members of the Jewish community, including children.

This involved one of the presenters, Ali Dawah, confronting Jewish passers-by with a microphone and asking: “Do you agree with what’s happening [in Israel]?”

Mr Dawah is also seen following and questioning a group of Jewish men and their children who are walking away from him.

When the YouTubers saw that Jews were crossing the street in order to avoid a confrontation, another one of the presenters, known as Smile2Jannah, commented: “The thing is, if somebody is being butchered in this way, the least you should be able to do is have a conversation. Provide your view. I mean, why would you cross the road and not be willing to engage?”

His co-host, Mohammed Hijab, then instructed the cameraperson to film them crossing the road, before Smile2Jannah said: “They should understand, they should realise that people want answers. People want to know your opinion, so go on record. Give your opinions. Discuss, debate.”

When a group of Jews walked past the YouTubers, declining to engage, Smile2Jannah told them: “You should really give your opinion about what’s going on, guys.”

At one point, the police asked what the cameras were for, at which point Mr Dawah explained that they were “raising awareness.” 

The YouTubers also brought with them an LED billboard, upon which they displayed images of Jewish Holocaust victims in a concentration camp. Next to the images were the words: “Did we learn nothing from the Holocaust?” The images were then proceeded by photos from the conflict between Israel and Gaza.

Standing in front of the billboard, Mr Hijab went on to say that “as Muslims”, they “have no problem with Jews, per-se,” before pressuring them to “reveal their viewpoints.”

Shouting at a Jewish man who was walking away, Mr Hijab yelled: “Do you condemn the killing of children? Do you condemn it? Do you condemn it? See, look at you. The silence is deafening.”

In an outtake from that video, uploaded to Mr Hijab’s own YouTube channel, Mr Hijab is seen acting aggressively towards another Jewish man off-camera, yelling: “You need to go back to the Torah. That’s what I tell you all. Go back to the Torah, read it from the beginning again.”

Abandoning all pretences that their video was ever solely about Israel, Mr Dawah states directly to camera: “The reason we came here today is to speak to our Jewish brothers and sisters, those who are Zionist or those who are not, and just ask how they feel…we’re using our freedom of speech to come and have a dialogue and say ‘what’s your say on the matter on what’s going on in Palestine?’”

Golders Green is a neighbourhood renowned for its large Jewish population. According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the State of Israel” is an example of antisemitism. The program was also being filmed on the Jewish Sabbath, when many observant Jews do not wish to be filmed.

When questioned as to why the YouTubers chose to visit Golders Green on Shabbat, Mr Hijab denied that they went to Golders Green “looking for Jewish people”, but instead for “pro-Israeli Zionists.”

He also claimed that they used images of victims of the Holocaust in order to “demonstrate that just as the rest of the world watched on while Jewish people were brutally incinerated at the hands of fascists, so too it looks on whilst Arab Palestinians are brutally bombed in the most densely populated area in the world.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

The video appears to show that the police stood by without interfering.

A spokesperson for the Metropolitan Police said: “Police are aware of a video circulating on social media of two men in Golders Green on Saturday, 22 May with a van displaying messages and images on a screen. Officers were called at approximately 19:28 and engaged with those present. No offences were identified. We have since been made aware of concerns that have been brought to our attention from the community and will liaise with the appropriate partners. Local officers had already increased patrols in the area in response to recent community concerns and will continue to provide additional reassurance in coming days.”

Recently, Campaign Against Antisemitism filed a complaint to the Directorate of Professional Standards at the Metropolitan Police after officers ignored antisemitic threats among demonstrators at a pro-Israel rally who were shouting: “We’ll find some Jews there. We want the Zionists. We want their blood!”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 showed that three in five British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to the Vice-Chancellor of Middlesex University raising concerns about one of its course leaders, Raza Kazim. The University has confirmed that it is investigating.

Following a complaint from a member of the public, Campaign Against Antisemitism was able to confirm that on his WhatsApp profile, Mr Kazim likened Zionism to Nazism. According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

Mr Kazim is also a spokesman for the Islamic Human Rights Commission (IHRC), an organisation known in the past for its pro-Hizballah “Al-Quds Day” parades. The IHRC has also previously been accused by a Holocaust education campaigner of “using false equivocations of the Holocaust and deliberately conflating, downgrading and revising the Holocaust.”

Additionally, Mr Kazim has appeared on Press TV, an Iranian state-owned news network whose British broadcasting licence was revoked by Ofcom in 2012. The network has a history of giving platforms to notorious antisemites and Holocaust deniers. In one appearance, Mr Kazim can be seen speaking on the ban of Hizballah in Britain and the impact that this will have on future Al-Quds Day parades. He states that “there’ll be surprises for the authorities and for the Zionists as there have been every year”. Mr Kazim can also be seen talking about the influence of Al-Quds Day parades whilst images of people burning an Israeli flag play in the background.

In 2017, Al Quds Day leader and pharmacist Nazim Ali shouted over a public address system: “Some of the biggest corporations who are supporting the Conservative Party are Zionists. They are responsible for the murder of the people in Grenfell, in those towers in Grenfell. The Zionist supporters of the Tory Party. Free, Free, Palestine…It is the Zionists who give money to the Tory Party to kill people in high-rise blocks. Free, Free, Palestine. From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently reported on our success after the Professional Standards Authority asked the High Court to quash a decision of the General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC), over its decision in relation to Mr Ali. The GPhC has subsequently confirmed to Campaign Against Antisemitism that it agrees that its decision was wrong, that Mr Ali’s comments were antisemitic and that it shall not be contesting the matter in the High Court.

Middlesex University’s Code of Conduct states that staff “must conduct themselves outside of work in a manner which will not be reasonably regarded as bringing the University into disrepute.” It also states that the University “will not accept unlawful discrimination of any kind.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

The Instagram page belonging to the Jewish charity Norwood has been hacked by anti-Israel trolls today.

Norwood’s display photo was changed to that of a Palestinian Authority flag with the words “Free Palestine, end apartheid” circling it.

The hackers also uploaded a photo of a man holding a Palestinian Authority flag with the caption “From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free.”

Another photo uploaded of the Palestinian Authority flag bore the caption: “Repeat after us: Palestine will be free. Free free Palestine.”

According to Norwood’s description on Instagram, it is “the UK’s largest Jewish charity supporting children, families and people with learning disabilities and autism.”

The charity has no affiliation with Israel and has likely been targeted purely because of its association with the British Jewish community.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the State of Israel” is an example of antisemitism.

A spokesperson for Norwood said: “We became aware that Norwood’s Instagram account was breached on Thursday afternoon with content posted from the Free Palestine movement. As a British charity, our duty is to support vulnerable members of the British Jewish community and, as such, we condemn as abhorrent all hate crimes. Norwood stands for inclusivity regardless of our differences and we endorse Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s recent statement that there is no place for antisemitism in British society.”

Norwood has now regained control of its Instagram account.

Campaign Against Antisemitism urges all Jewish institutions to be vigilant with their digital assets and operations.

Campaign Against Antisemitism welcomes Chelsea Football Club’s tweet in which the club announced its support for the Jewish community by condemning the recent acts of antisemitism in Britain.

These incidents include mezuzahs being vandalised in Borehamwood, a rabbi in Essex being assaulted and hospitalised, and a convoy of cars that drove down the Finchley Road shouting “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” through a megaphone.

The football club released a tweet last weekend, stating: “Chelsea FC stands with the UK’s Jewish community, and Jewish communities across the world, in the face of rising antisemitism. This hatred and intimidation towards the Jewish community is unacceptable and must stop. #SayNoToAntisemitism #NoToHate”

However, Chelsea received backlash from some Twitter users over the anti-racist tweet.

One wrote: “I think im changing clubs.”

Another tweet read: “F**k Chelsea club,” while a different user remarked: “A s**thole club, disgusting, disgraceful f**k off”

Recently, Chelsea Football Club announced that it had banned an abusive online troll from its matches for ten years after he hounded a Jewish journalist who came forward and received support from Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Chelsea and the Premier League have adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We commend Chelsea for this show of solidarity with Britain’s Jewish community. At a time of surging antisemitism, it is reassuring to have the support of a club that has itself made enormous progress in tackling anti-Jewish hate, including a recent ten-year ban from matches for an online troll who hounded a Jewish journalist who received support from us. We hope that fellow Premiership teams and other sporting clubs and association will follow Chelsea’s lead.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

Campaign Against Antisemitism welcomes the statement released by the British Medical Association (BMA) condemning antisemitism and racism.

The BMA is the trade union and professional body for doctors and medical students in Britain, and its statement comes in the wake of multiple instances of antisemitism over the past fortnight, which include mezuzahs being vandalised in Borehamwood, a rabbi in Essex being assaulted and hospitalised, and a convoy of cars that drove down the Finchley Road shouting “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” through a megaphone.

In its statement, the BMA said: “Recent events internationally and in the UK have brought to the fore how differences in ethnicity, faith and culture can be used as a justification for hate and violence. Shameful acts of antisemitism and incitements to violence against Jewish people witnessed in recent days, on the streets of the UK and on social media, run contrary to a key ethical principle for doctors to do no harm. Antisemitism and racial discrimination harms people and harms communities. We empathise with the negative impact these events have had on our Jewish members. Therefore, we have and will continue to affirm that hate in all forms is unacceptable. Whether by doctors or towards doctors; from patients, other doctors, or any healthcare professional. Antisemitism and any form of racial discrimination is unacceptable and to maintain the trust of our patients and colleagues, the BMA affirms that we cannot achieve equality for some without equality for all.”

A spokesperson for the Jewish Medical Association told Campaign Against Antisemitism: “Racism – structural, institutional or plain and simple personal – can take many different forms and guises. Antisemitism is one type of racism. One doesn’t have to look different to be subject to racism. And doctors are at least as likely as anyone else to be subjected to racism, including antisemitism. Sadly, some doctors and some patients are perpetrators of antisemitism. Ignoring antisemitism as racism is unacceptable.

“Against this background, the Jewish Medical Association (UK), in supporting Jewish medical professionals and students in the UK, welcomes the forthright recognition of this issue by the British Medical Association in their recent statement. We are saddened that it has been necessary for the BMA to publish this statement about tolerance and respect, but it is clearly needed and we call upon other national organisations to adopt this as their model.”

Other unions have come under fire for their stance on recent antisemitism-infested demonstrations, with Jewish members quitting one union en masse in protest.

At least 25 members of the National Education Union (NEU) from JFS have reportedly quit over concerns about antisemitism.

The resignations over the past few weeks come as Kevin Courtney, the NEU’s Joint General Secretary, spoke at antisemitism-infested rallies in the past fortnight.

There were also general concerns that the NEU’s stance on the conflict between Israel and Hamas was unbalanced, with some JFS staffers alleging that the NEU failed to condemn Hamas, an antisemitic genocidal terrorist organisation.

John Lopez, a former NEU representative at JFS, said: “I felt I had no choice to leave the Union which isolated me as a Jewish, pro-Israel, teacher. I spent close to two years trying to get the NEU (starting with Brent Branch) to adopt the [International Definition of Antisemitism] so Jewish NEU members can feel safer, as well as writing letters with others to Educate magazine which were ignored. 

“Most recently they urged NEU members to join the PSC [Palestine Solidarity Campaign] rally for Palestine which involved antisemitism and calls for the abolition of the Jewish State. The NEU have picked a side which is not only anti-Israel but indifferent to Jews. I am glad I am no longer part of this Union,” he added.

Research conducted by Campaign Against Antisemitism has previously revealed widespread antisemitism amongst supporters of the Palestine Solidarity Campaign.

There was also discontentment among Jewish teachers, with one claiming that she was muted on an NEU Facebook page after she wrote: “I wish to cancel my membership, with immediate effect. This is due to the union’s continuous and in my opinion biased involvement with demonstrations that have unfortunately seen a rise of antisemitic attacks against one of the smallest UK communities. A teaching union should be impartial, as we are a professional body, who must represent these strong ethics and values in our schools. I do not feel comfortable being part of a union that encourages (although not necessarily intended) antisemitism. This is not why I became a teacher. I expect my membership to be terminated immediately.”

Recently, a Jewish school advised their students to cover their skullcaps and avoid wearing their school blazers in public.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has reported on pupils and teachers being intimidated by peers in connection to the conflict between Israel and Hamas and published a short resource for children and parents facing antisemitism in schools.

A prominent Jewish school has advised its pupils to wear hats over their skullcaps and to cover their school blazers in public as reports of antisemitism have risen 568 percent within the last seventeen days, equating to some 267 reported incidents. Reported incidents are lower than actual incidents as reports can take time to process and many incidents go entirely unreported.

The letter from the school’s headmaster, which was sent out to parents, read: “I am writing to remind you and your children about the need for enhanced awareness and caution with regard to security in these troubled times. Of course, the news of the recent ceasefire was most welcome, but I fear that the tensions and the incidents of antisemitism in this country will be slow to decline.

“We still advise all boys to wear a cap over their kippah when travelling to and from school, but we are also now suggesting that not wearing the College blazer (or at least covering it with a coat) on those journeys is an additional, sensible precaution for all pupils.

“It is sad that this should be necessary, but safety is – as ever – our top priority.”

The rise in incidents come in the wake of the conflict between Israel and Hamas. These incidents include mezuzahs being vandalised in Borehamwood, a rabbi in Essex being assaulted and hospitalised, and a convoy of cars which drove down the Finchley Road shouting “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” through a megaphone.

However, despite a ceasefire being announced last week, several more incidents were reported over the weekend. After a demonstration on Sunday in support of Israel, counter-demonstrators were seen roaming the surrounding streets looking for Jewish people to target.

Another incident which took place after the rally saw two visibly Jewish men assaulted outside of a kosher restaurant. A video uploaded to Twitter by the activist Joseph Cohen shows the alleged victims describing the assault. One said: “We crossed the street and the next thing we know, we turn around and they’re essentially swinging for us.”

The other added: “They connected a few punches…[we] got hit in the head, got kicked.”

A woman across the road invited them into her café where they then called the police.

We are continuing to hear of incidents and urge the Jewish community around the country to remain vigilant.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 showed that three in five British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

 A tribunal has found in favour of a Jewish sales manager who was reportedly dismissed from his firm after alleging racist and sexist discrimination in connection with “unpleasant banter” at the office.

Michael Weinreb took his former employer, Online Travel Training Group, to the tribunal following comments from colleagues such as “Is that the Jew coming out of u [sic]?” and alleged bullying.

After Mr Weinreb raised the complaint, his employment was reportedly terminated, which the court considered amounted to victimisation.

The court said that “We find that the ‘banter’ often crossed the line of acceptable behaviour,” adding: “We note that it is often difficult for the butt of the joke to complain about the joke for fear of being regarded as humourless and, indeed, we find that the claimant put up with a lot of unpleasant banter without complaint in order to have a good working environment.”

However, Mr Weinreb’s claim for discrimination failed due to insufficient evidence that the alleged bullying was motivated by his race or sexuality.

A hearing for remedy is set for July.

Parliament’s Joint Committee on Human Rights has published evidence from Campaign Against Antisemitism which counters claims that the International Definition of Antisemitism restricts freedom of expression.

The written evidence was submitted in February and was published by the Committee earlier this month on 12th May.  

The campaign to encourage universities to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism has encountered opposition on the basis that adoption somehow stifles freedom of expression, but this argument does not have merit, and the evidence that we have submitted lays out in detail why this is the case. “The claim that adoption of the Definition conflicts with the duty on universities to protect free speech is a familiar and flawed argument, notwithstanding its persistence,” our letter says.

The letter proceeds to analyse the difference between speech that is ‘merely’ insulting or offensive, and speech that is antisemitic, and the implications for whether those types of speech are protected under Article 10 of the European Charter of Human Rights.

We also cite the legal opinion, produced for us in 2017 by Lord Wolfson of Tredegar QC and Jeremy Brier, which argued that “this Definition should be used by public bodies on the basis that it will ensure that the identification of antisemitism is clear, fair and accurate” and emphasised that “Criticism of Israel, even in robust terms, cannot be regarded as antisemitic per se and such criticism is not captured by the Definition.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities, public bodies and other institutions. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

The full letter to the Joint Committee can be accessed below, and we have made the material available on our website, in particular for students, here.

Sheikh Asrar Rashid, a controversial cleric in Birmingham, has stood by his description of Jews as “a cowardly nation” and call for a “jihad” on Israel.

Whilst commenting on the violence in Israel and Gaza in a panel discussion, Mr Rashid was quoted as saying: “Personally, I believe the only solution is jihad, and a call for jihad, and an announcement for jihad by Muslim majority states that we have.

“Even surgical strikes or wallpaper strikes, the type that Saddam Hussein did in the early Nineties, I believe. Thirty-nine rockets he fired into Tel Aviv and every Jew was running into his shelter. Those with a European passport would be running back to Europe.”

“You see the way they react to Katyusha missiles or Qassam missiles that do not even kill anyone, they run into their shelters so the Jews are known as…a cowardly nation.”

Following criticism from the Jewish Chronicle, which Mr Rashid described as a “Zionist newspaper”, he defended his comments on Facebook and Twitter, writing that the term “Jews” was “used in the same vein as the mainstream media regularly employ ‘Muslim’, ‘Arabs’, or ‘Palestinian’.”

He went on to say: “This context also reflects my statements that the ‘Jews are known as a cowardly nation’, pertaining to the State of Israel and its actions against the Palestinians where women and children are indiscriminately killed.”

In his online post, Mr Rashid went as far as to say that it was impossible for Muslims to be antisemitic because the Prophet Muhammad “had a Jewish wife”. He did, however, maintain that “a call for jihad – a just war – in the form of military intervention by Muslim-majority states to avert the humanitarian catastrophe unfolding in Occupied Palestine, is the only solution.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Calling for, aiding, or justifying the killing or harming of Jews in the name of a radical ideology or an extremist view of religion” is an example of antisemitism, as is “Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 showed that over eight in ten British Jews consider the threat from Islamists to be very serious.

A councillor in Blackburn who has been suspended from the Labour Party after quoting an antisemitic conspiracy theory in chambers has refused to apologise.

Councillor Yusuf Jan-Virmani, the representative for the Audley and Queen’s Park ward, made derogatory comparisons between Israelis and animals while referencing the antisemitic blood libel conspiracy theory.

Cllr Jan-Virmani reportedly said: “Mr Mayor, councillors – I am not aware of any animal that is so cruel as the Israelis. Not even crocodiles. They bomb schools day and night… hospitals, they bomb them – they flatten them. 

“They kidnap the kids and harvest their organs… that’s been proven. That’s from the United Nations.

“They inject people there. They murder by land sea and air. And what’s worse, the Israelis slander the defenceless Palestinian victims as terrorists.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Using the symbols and images associated with classic antisemitism (e.g. claims of Jews killing Jesus or blood libel) to characterise Israel or Israelis” is an example of antisemitism.

This also references an antisemitic meme containing a quote that is falsely attributed to Sir David Attenborough, which has since been debunked.

Rick Moore, Deputy Chair of the Blackburn Conservative Association, said: “In regards to Cllr Jan-Virmani’s speech, I am concerned that it seems to be clearly antisemitic in nature, comparing the Israeli people to animals which is clearly unacceptable.”

When questioned, Cllr Jan-Virmani doubled down on his remarks, saying: “I stand by what I said. It was nothing to do with Jews. It was criticism of the Israeli Government.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The Archbishop of Canterbury has condemned the convoy of cars where drivers shouted “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” through a megaphone last weekend.

Archbishop Justin Welby, who is the most senior clergyman in the Church of England, tweeted: “There can be no excuse for the appalling antisemitism we have seen in the UK today.

“Such hatred here will not help bring long overdue peace with justice in Israel/Palestine. As we continue to pray for the Holy Land we must reject violence, the threat of violence and antisemitism.”

Four men were arrested and bailed on suspicion of shouting “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” as they drove in a convoy through Jewish neighbourhoods on Sunday, waving the flag of the Palestinian Authority.

The men are alleged to have been part of the convoy of some 200 cars displaying Palestinian Authority flags that is understood to have driven from Bradford, Sheffield and Leicester down the M1 motorway before veering into Hendon and Golders Green, two of North London’s Jewish neighbourhoods. According to witnesses, convoy participants shouted to Jewish passers-by “Free Palestine! Go back to Poland” and other antisemitic chants.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A man has been arrested in Golders Green after allegedly attacking a car displaying an Israeli flag.

The suspect is said to have stopped his car to block another car displaying an Israeli flag, exited his car and began physically attacking the victim’s car. He reportedly tried to tear the Israeli flag from the car as it drove up Golders Green Road in the heavily Jewish North London neighbourhood.

According to the victim, the alleged assailant was detained by personnel from the Community Security Trust. Volunteers from Shomrim North West London, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol, then attended to assist before police arrested the suspect.

If you have any further information, please contact the police on 101.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We are grateful for the swift response of CST and Shomrim personnel, thanks to whom a suspect has been detained. At a time of severely heightened concerns over antisemitism, it is vital that offenders face the full consequences of their actions.“

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Matthew Offord, the Conservative MP for the heavily-Jewish constituency of Hendon in North London, has written to the BBC’s Director-General, Tim Davie, to request that the BBC not broadcast the upcoming episode of Desert Island Discs, which is set to feature Alexei Sayle this Sunday.  

Mr Sayle has previously claimed that allegations of antisemitism “amongst supporters of Jeremy Corbyn are a complete fabrication.” He is also a patron of the Palestine Solidarity Campaign. Research conducted by Campaign Against Antisemitism revealed widespread antisemitism amongst supporters of the Palestine Solidarity Campaign.

According to a statement that was released on his website, “Matthew’s request comes in response to the antisemitic incidents which occurred over the weekend following the violence in Israel.” It goes on to say that “The letter says that every broadcaster should be wary of giving a platform to anyone who is seen to be excusing antisemitism. For a person to state publicly that another who made allegations of antisemitism is a liar is not only wrong but also allows antisemitism to continue and in some cases flourish.”

The statement continued: “Matthew said: ‘ITV recently took the decision not to broadcast the final episode of a drama starring Noel Clarke after allegations were made against him. In light of Alexei Sayle’s continuing behaviour and the distress this is causing my constituents and others, the BBC should take the same action and not broadcast the next episode of Desert Island Discs which features Mr Sayle.’”

Mr Sayle claimed in 2014 that BBC presenter Emma Barnett, who is Jewish, supported the murder of children following an article and radio interview in which she had decried antisemitism amongst anti-Israel activists.

Dr Offord is an Honorary Patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

This morning, Campaign Against Antisemitism and Jewish community and religious leaders were convened for an urgent meeting by Prime Minister Boris Johnson following a week of skyrocketing antisemitic crime on the streets of Britain.

A number of important matters were raised with the Prime Minister in relation to antisemitic hate crime witnessed over the past week in the form of Jew-hatred at rallies and vehicle convoys, as well as support for genocidal antisemitic terrorist organisations, criminal damage and assaults.

We are grateful to the Prime Minister for his solidarity with the Jewish community in the wake of horrendous antisemitism on our streets and on social media. We raised a number of matters relating to the surge in antisemitism with the Prime Minister.

In addition to Campaign Against Antisemitism, which was represented by Gideon Falter, those invited included the Chief Rabbi and representatives of the Union of Orthodox Hebrew Congregations, Reform Judaism, the Jewish Leadership Council, the Community Security Trust, the Board or Deputies. The Prime Minister was joined by his Chief of Staff and the Government’s Independent Adviser on Antisemitism.

At least two Jewish homes in Borehamwood have seen their mezuzahs vandalised in heinous antisemitic attacks.

Police are investigating the incidents, which took place at two next-door houses in the heavily-Jewish Hertfordshire neighbourhood as racially-motivated crimes.

One mezuzah was wrenched from the doorframe while next door the mezuzah was “maliciously” removed and the parchment trodden into the ground. The families were reportedly left “petrified”.

One of the victims reportedly said: “”At about 5pm yesterday, I picked up a package from Amazon and then saw something on the ground. I realised it was my mezuzah, lying on the floor broken. The top had been opened and the parchment had been taken out, scrunched up and then trodden into the mud. It had been deliberately sabotaged. That’s what really upset me, the maliciousness of the act. We are the only two Jewish families in this section of our road, which is a beautiful, multicultural neighbourhood. I got such a shock. We’ve had that mezuzah for years. My son is now 18 and we’ve had it all his life, so it’s very special to us. I can’t get that image out of my head of seeing it scrunched up and trodden into the ground. In all my life I’ve never seen anything like this.”

She added: “It’s had a terrible effect. My son and I couldn’t sleep last night and I’ve been throwing up. I think I went into shock.”

Her neighbour, also a victim, said: “It’s clearly malicious. You don’t want to believe it’s a hate crime, but that’s exactly what it is.” She added: “My son, who is at secondary school, doesn’t want to walk by himself, while my daughter, who is at primary school, knows someone has targeted her house. It’s not nice at all.”

In a statement, Hertsmere Police said: “I would like to make it clear to the local Jewish community that we will not tolerate antisemitism. Please be reassured that thorough enquiries are being carried out to find those responsible and get justice. We have currently got extra patrols in place across Hertsmere; please don’t be afraid to approach us with any concerns when you see us out and about. I would also like to reassure you that we have reported these incidents centrally so that it can feed into the wider intelligence picture across the UK. The victims are understandably shaken by what has happened and we will be putting them in touch with a specially trained hate crime officer in case they want extra support.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “This is a heinous antisemitic crime that targets Jewish houses on their doorsteps and is designed to signal to Jewish families that they are unsafe even in their own homes. It is particularly terrifying at a time of skyrocketing antisemitism on our streets. We are grateful to the Hertsmere Police for their strong stance and support for the local community, which broadcasts the message that the authorities stand with local Jewish residents against such attacks. The criminals behind this vandalism must be caught and face the full force of the law.”

There are also reports that hostile signs are being affixed to the front doors of Jewish flats inside apartment blocks in Stamford Hill. These incidents come just days after antisemitic graffiti was found in the common parts of an apartment block in the same area.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101, quoting reference numbers 41/36556/21 and 41/36605/21.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

We are hearing disturbing accounts of Jewish schoolchildren being pressured by their peers to “pick a side” in the conflict between Israel and the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group, Hamas.

We have published a short resource on “What to do about antisemitism at school” for children and parents, which helps identify antisemitism using the International Definition of Antisemitism and provides pointers on how to act when antisemitic incidents arise.

The problem is not only impacting pupils but also Jewish teachers. The spouse of one Jewish teacher wrote on Facebook this week of how she had to “ensure multiple incidents” in one day at her school in Mill Hill, as students repeatedly screamed “Free Palestine” at her in large groups, “targeting her alone as a known Jewish teacher at the school”.

She is reportedly feeling very unsafe and is considering handing in her notice.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Reports of antisemitism directed at Jewish schoolchildren and teachers are harrowing. Teachers, colleagues, headteachers and governors have an obligation to step in to prevent abuse and punish perpetrators when it arises. There must be no place for racism in schools. We have produced a resource for pupils and parents who encounter antisemitism at school, and we urge victims to contact us for assistance.”

If any pupils, parents or teachers are concerned about antisemitism at school, please contact us at [email protected]

A man has been arrested after a van covered in antisemitic, pro-Nazi slogans was seen driving through Boca Raton and Miami earlier this week.

Rabbi Efrem Goldberg, rabbi at Boca Raton Synagogue, tweeted footage of the van driving past a pro-Israel rally. Several antisemitic slogans were scrawled across the van.

“Hitler was right” can be seen in large, capital letters written across the windows, directly above a door which bore the words “Holocaust never happened.” Written above that is ”We hate kikes”, along with a swastika.

“Rabbi’s rape” was also written on the driver’s door in large blue letters. Other slogans on the van included “Vax the Jews” and “White goy summer.”

In his tweet, Rabbi Goldberg wrote: “We rally for peace and this van filled with hate, call for genocide and threats kept circling. Thank you to our local law enforcement for keeping us safe. Hard to believe in the heart of Boca Raton if didn’t see it myself.”

The arrested man is reported to be Joseph Bounds, 33, of Denver, Colorado, who is said to belong to the anti-Jewish hate group, Goyim Defense League, along with the other men in the van. According to the ADL, the group is “a loose network of individuals connected by their virulent antisemitism. The group includes six primary organisers/public figures and thousands of online followers.”

Mr Bounds was accused of stepping outside of his vehicle in the middle of the street to record his encounter with the policeman. According to a police report, the officer issued Mr Bounds “three lawful commands to step away from traffic,” which Mr Bounds ignored.

According to Jared Holt, an expert on domestic extremism, the antisemitic stunt was live-streamed to a white supremacist website. He also noted that one of the members inside the van was Jovanni Valle, also known as Jovi Val, a member of the far-right group, Proud Boys.

We recently reported on the “Hitler was right” hashtag has been trending on Twitter this week.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Ryan Houghton, a Conservative councillor who was previously suspended over antisemitic Facebook posts which diminished the Holocaust, has withdrawn from his role as the next Leader of the Aberdeen Conservatives after complaints.

This comes less than one week after Mr Houghton agreed to take up the position.

In a post on a martial arts forum eight years ago, Mr Houghton wrote under the username, Razgriz, that there was “no credible evidence to suggest the Holocaust did not happen” but revealed that “I do find some of the events fabricated, and exegarated [sic] in some cases.” He continued: “As history is written by the victors there is always going to be a bit of re-writing.” He also praised the “interesting” research of the antisemitic Holocaust-denier, David Irving. However, in a later post he said that he was “not defending David’s Irving’s views” and that he does not agree with “some of the stuff he says.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Denying the fact, scope, mechanisms (e.g. gas chambers) or intentionality of the genocide of the Jewish people at the hands of National Socialist Germany and its supporters and accomplices during World War II (the Holocaust)” is an example of antisemitism.

Mr Houghton is also accused of having made homophobic and anti-Muslim statements online. In a statement at the time, he said: “I apologise unreservedly for any hurt now caused by these comments and have been in contact with members of the Jewish community in Aberdeen.” Mr Houghton also said that he was a member of the Holocaust Education Trust, had visited Auschwitz-Birkenau and has “never held antisemitic or intolerant views.”

The Scottish Conservatives readmitted him last year, but apparently there was no further sanction or expectation for him to undertake antisemitism training.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

In a success for Campaign Against Antisemitism, the General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC) has accepted that comments made by Nazim Ali, a pharmacist and leader of the annual Al Quds Day rally, were antisemitic.

The GPhC has also confirmed that it will not contest an appeal brought at Campaign Against Antisemitism’s behest by the Professional Standards Authority (PSA) over a previous decision to let Mr Ali off with a formal warning over his comments at the rally in 2017.

Last year, the GPhC’s Fitness to Practise Committee, found that Mr Ali brought the pharmaceutical profession into disrepute, following a two-week hearing that culminated on 5th November arising from a complaint by Campaign Against Antisemitism. However, the GPhC panel did not find that he had been antisemitic and let him off with just a formal warning.

Following the GPhC’s ruling, Campaign Against Antisemitism made representations to the PSA, which oversees disciplinary decisions made by the GPhC. We asked the PSA to use its statutory power to appeal the GPhC’s decision to the High Court under the National Health Service Reform and Healthcare Professionals Act 2002, on the grounds that the decision made by the GPhC panel was insufficient to protect the public because it was “irrational and perverse”.

In particular, we asked the PSA to review the GPhC’s ruling that Mr Ali’s statements were not antisemitic, including by attempting to distinguish between “antisemitism” and “antisemitic”. We have asked the PSA to consider the International Definition of Antisemitism, which has been adopted by the British Government, and the Guidance to all Judiciary in England and Wales produced by the Judicial College that makes clear that the word “Zionist” or “Zio” as a term of abuse has no place in a civilised society.

Furthermore, we argued that the ruling misapplied the law when asking whether a “reasonable person” would have considered the comments made by Mr Ali as being antisemitic. The GPhC’s Fitness to Practise Committee ruled that Jewish bystanders who saw the demonstration or watched the recording of it posted online could not be considered to be “reasonable persons” in the legal sense because of their “selective view of events”.

The PSA made the referral that we requested, opening the way for the High Court to decide whether to quash the GPhC panel’s decision, leading to the matter being re-opened.

However, the Chief Executive of the GPhC has now told Campaign Against Antisemitism that the regulator “took the view, and still does, that the comments were antisemitic.” He confirmed that the GPhC does not intend to contest the PSA’s appeal to the High Court, accepts that Mr Ali’s comments were indeed antisemitic and that the GPhC panel’s decision was inadequate and wrong, and that it intends to leave Mr Ali to defend the decision himself in the High Court if he wishes to do so. The GPhC has suggested to the High Court that it might consider the option of making a decision on the matter itself rather than returning it to the GPhC for another fitness to practice hearing.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We commend the GPhC for recognising that the original ruling by its Fitness to Practise panel was badly flawed and for taking the necessary steps to correct it. It is absolutely right to recognise that Nazim Ali’s comments were antisemitic and that the panel’s decision and sanction were inadequate and wrong. The road to justice in this case has proved long and winding, but we are again heading in the right direction. It is important that we are unrelenting in pursuit of such cases.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism made its initial complaint to the GPhC related to Mr Ali’s actions in 2017, when he led the pro-Hizballah “Al Quds Day” parade for the controversial London-based organisation calling itself the Islamic Human Rights Commission, just four days after the Grenfell Tower tragedy in which over 70 people were burned alive.

Heading the parade, surrounded by the flags of Hizballah, the genocidal antisemitic terrorist organisation, Mr Ali shouted over a public address system: “Some of the biggest corporations who are supporting the Conservative Party are Zionists. They are responsible for the murder of the people in Grenfell, in those towers in Grenfell. The Zionist supporters of the Tory Party. Free, Free, Palestine…It is the Zionists who give money to the Tory Party to kill people in high-rise blocks. Free, Free, Palestine. From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free.”

At another point he told marchers: “Careful of those Rabbis who belong to the Board of Deputies, who have got blood on their hands, who agree with the killing of British soldiers. Do not allow them in your centres.”

The events were filmed by members of Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Demonstration and Event Monitoring Unit.

Mr Ali is the Managing Partner of Chelsea Pharmacy Medical Clinic. Campaign Against Antisemitism submitted a complaint to the GPhC, which confirmed that the matter “calls into question the pharmacy professional’s fitness to practise as a pharmacist.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism previously sought a criminal prosecution of Mr Ali. When the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) refused to prosecute him, we launched a private prosecution which the CPS disgracefully used its statutory powers to take over and discontinue, protecting Mr Ali from prosecution.

Andrew Dymock, a politics graduate from Aberystwyth University, has been accused of creating and running the website of the neo-Nazi System Resistance Network (SRN) group.

During the trial at the Old Bailey, the court heard that Mr Dymock wrote and shared several antisemitic and hate-motivated articles through the website. He is being prosecuted for fifteen offences which include encouraging terrorism through the use of propaganda.

One article was allegedly titled “Join your local Nazis”, while another, “The Truth about the Holocaust”, said that “the only guilt felt by the Germanic race in regard to the Holocaust should be that we did not finish the job.”

It reportedly went on to say that Jews were a “cancer on this earth…that must be eradicated in its entirety”. Numerous antisemitic stereotypes and tropes were also said to have been included, such as conspiracy theories about Jewish control of the banks and the Government.

Another article reportedly written by Mr Dymock read that white people needed to “wake up and bring slaughter to Europa, cleansing it of the unclean filth that pollutes her lands”.

Prosecutor Jocelyn Ledward told jurors that “the article is clear in its encouragement of the eradication of Jewish people.” She added: “Such encouragement constitutes encouragement to commit acts of terrorism.”

Mr Dymock is accused of harbouring “books, flags, clothes and badges” in both his bedroom at home and at university. It was understood that Mr Dymock promoted the SRN on a right-wing website, claiming that SRN was “focused on building a group of loyal men, true to the cause of National Socialism and establishing the Fascist state through revolution.

“The System in the United Kingdom is the most oppressive within the Western World, so we are only looking for the truly dedicated and motivated soldiers to carry the flame with their comrades and ignite the fire that will burn the rats and rot out,” he is alleged to have written.

Ms Ledward told the court that “Before its proscription, the prosecution case contends that Mr Dymock was not only an active member of SRN but also participated in its activities in significant and specific ways. It is the prosecution case that he set up and operated both a website and a Twitter account which he used to promote, encourage and advance the organisation and its aims.”

Ms Leward went on to say that Mr Dymock was not being prosecuted for his beliefs, but rather: “He is facing prosecution for his encouragement of terrorist activity, of violence, as a means to shape society in accordance with his beliefs, rather than through free speech and democracy.”

The court was also shown a propaganda video which was hosted on the SRN website that featured members posing with the groups flag. Others, believed to be members of the American neo-Nazi group, Atomwaffen Division (AWD), were also seen in the video wearing masks covered in skulls.

The video depicted people burning flags and putting a pumpkin with a swastika carved into it outside a Welsh police station.

AWD is a paramilitary neo-Nazi group that trains its members in the use of firearms and reportedly seeks to ignite a race war in the United States. Last year, a member of AWD who made terror threats against American Jewish journalists and activists was sentenced to sixteen months in federal prison in Washington state.  

The Home Secretary, Priti Patel, recently called for the proscription of the AWD. This would make membership of the group punishable by up to ten years in prison.

Denying all charges, Mr Dymock stated: “I’m doing my dissertation on the rise of nationalism and why, and how, ranging from moderate to extreme. I kind of thought I might as well start preparing for my third year in advance.”

Mr Dymock denies five charges of encouraging terrorism, two of funding terrorism, stirring up racial hatred and hatred based on sexual orientation, four counts of disseminating terrorist publications, possessing a terrorist document and possessing racially inflammatory material. 

The trial continues.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Image credit: Crown Prosecution Service

There have been mixed results for candidates with controversial histories relating to the Jewish community and antisemitism in last week’s local elections. The candidates hail from all political parties and ran in races across the UK. 

ENGLAND

In England, the Conservatives’ Darran Davies, who used an antisemitic “Jew Boy” slur online before apologising with a slap on the wrist from his Party, won his election for a seat on Hillingdon Council.

Labour’s Ruth George, the former MP for High Peak, retained her seat representing Whaley Bridge ward on Derbyshire County Council. Campaign Against Antisemitism has an outstanding complaint with the Labour Party against Ms George, who was challenged during the election campaign by a member of the public over her past antisemitic comments, for which she has apologised. In her response, she said: “You may wish to look into the political affiliations of the Campaign against Antisemitism and the ongoing complaints to the Charity Commission so you have a full picture.”

The suggestion that those calling out antisemitism in the Labour Party had mendacious or political motives for doing so was highlighted by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) in its report on antisemitism in Labour as being part of the unlawful victimisation of Jews that took place in the Party. Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant in the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party.

Elsewhere, Lisa Forbes, the controversial former MP for Peterborough, ran in the Fletton and Woodston ward, where two seats were being contested. Ms Forbes finished third, losing out on a place on the council. Campaign Against Antisemitism has an outstanding complaint with the Labour Party against Ms Forbes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently reported on the allegations of antisemitism in Peterborough within both the Constituency Labour Party and the local Conservative Association only days before the election.

The former Liberal Democrat MP and incumbent councillor David Ward campaigned to hold his seat in Bolton and Undercliffe ward in Bradford. He was running as an Independent after being expelled by the Liberal Democrats in 2017 for standing against the Party in an election, having previously been disciplined for comments about Jews, the Holocaust and Israel. There was some concern after the Liberal Democrats declined to run a candidate of their own in the ward, which some interpreted as the Party giving Mr Ward a free run. In the event, Mr Ward lost his election.

Several reports of antisemitism have emerged regarding some of Banbury’s Labour candidates, according to one Twitter user. Cllr Clair Bell, who did not win in Calthorpe North, was said to have shared an article entitled “The Jewish establishment’s ‘War Against Corbyn’ risks bringing real antisemitism to Britain.” The article alleged that the “Jewish community’s leadership or media” only had “one issue on their mind – Israel, and how best to protect it from criticism.”

Also in Banbury, Cllr Wajdan Majeed, who unsuccessfully ran for Calthorpe South, was similarly alleged to have shared a lengthy Facebook post which featured “long-ago debunked propaganda maps.” In a separate post, he was also said to have shared antisemitic tropes alleging that ISIS was “found to protect Israel”, going on to state that “the Iraqi people fought a war against the alternative Zionist army.”

Cllr Cassi Perri, who lost the seat for Banbury Town Centre, tweeted that the International Definition of Antisemitism was “unlawful” and that for political parties to adopt it would “put them in direct conflict with human rights legislation.”

Labour Party Councillor Ross Willmott was unsuccessful in his bid for the position of Leicester and Rutland’s Police and Crime Commissioner. He has previously shared several antisemitic Facebook posts, including the antisemitic meme: “An antisemite used to be a person who disliked Jews. Now it is a person who Jews dislike.”

Ian Middleton, representing the Green Party, was elected in the Oxfordshire ward of Kidlington South.

Andrea Carey-Fuller, also representing the Green Party, stood for the New Cross ward in Lewisham but was not elected.

Brian Rose, the podcaster and entrepreneur, failed in his campaign for Mayor of London with the ‘London Real Party’. He previously interviewed the antisemitic hate preacher, David Icke, in a podcast, during which Mr Rose failed to challenge any of Mr Icke’s antisemitic diatribe regarding 9/11 or COVID-19. The podcast remains on Mr Rose’s website, even thought Ofcom sanctioned the television channel London Live for carrying the interview.

SCOTLAND

In Scotland, three controversial SNP candidates were in the spotlight.   

Stephanie Callaghan retained her seat in Uddingston and Bellshill, Lanarkshire. Colm Merrick failed to unstead his opponent in Eastwood in Glasgow, while Suzanne McLaughlin was also unsuccessful in winning Glasgow Southside. Past social media comments by all three candidates emerged during the race, with the first two comparing other mainstream political parties to the Nazis, and the third likening Zionism to fascism. 

Derek Jackson, the unsuccessful, anti-vaccination candidate for the Liberal Party (no connection to the Liberal Democrats), arrived at the Emirates Arena in Glasgow during the election count wearing sunglasses, a black suit, and a yellow star whilst performing a Nazi salute. Claiming his antics were merely satire, he was later escorted out by police.

Ryan Houghton, a Tory councillor who was previously suspended over antisemitic Facebook posts which diminished the Holocaust, has now been made the leader of the Aberdeen Conservatives.

WALES

In Wales, representing Plaid CymruLeanne WoodCarrie Harper and Sahar Al-Faifi were all unsuccessful in this year’s election to the Welsh Assembly.

Ms Wood, the former leader of Plaid Cymru with a history of endorsing controversial comments and articles, lost her Rhondda seat to Labour candidate Buffy Williams.

Ms Harper failed to take Wrexham, while Ms Al-Faifi was unsuccessful in her bid to gain the South Wales Central seat.

Joe Glasman, Head of Political Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Not only are some of these results troubling, but the very fact that some of these controversial candidates were endorsed by their parties to stand for office in the first place is deeply disappointing. We have publicised the records of many of these figures in the past, in many instances submitting formal complaints directly to their parties. Yet here they are again, representing their parties on local election ballots.

“No political party should have allowed these candidates to stand for office, particularly after the EHRC made clear that its recommendations applied not just to Labour but to all parties. These elections have shown how much more there is to do to combat antisemitism in public life.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is mobilising volunteers following a significant increase in reports by members of the Jewish community of antisemitism on our streets, on social media and in traditional media in the wake of fighting between terrorist organisations and Israel.

We have been contacted by a growing number of British Jews reporting antisemitic harassment on the street and in schools, and countless attacks on social media, including praise for Adolf Hitler and the Holocaust.

On social media, abhorrent hashtags such as #HitlerWasRight, #HitlerTheGreat and #Holocaust_was_right, have all been trending internationally.

The hashtags were invariably accompanied by explanations. For example, one tweet was captioned: “Our modern history is always biased. The great Hitler was right about these Zionists”.

Many directly called for the extermination of the Jewish people. For example, one tweet read “#F***theJews Hitler was right. Now I know why he like slaughtering those Goddamn Jews [sic].”, and in another where one user wrote: “Now I think everyone has understand that Hitler was right [sic].”

Twitter users have also begun to spread a fabricated quote attributed to Hitler, in which it is claimed that he said: “I would have killed all the Jews of the world…but I kept some to show the world why I killed them.” Influencers including Pakistani actress Veena Malik tweeted the false quote to her 1.2 million followers before deleting it later.

Meanwhile on Britain’s streets, protesters in Manchester targeted a housing complex for Charedi Jews on Sunday, and in London, protesters yesterday tried to gain entry into Chelsea football stadium before burning an Israeli flag outside. Chelsea is owned by Jewish business Roman Abramovich who has pioneered a campaign to drive antisemitism out of football. Outside Downing Street, a demonstration last night featured numerous antisemitic banners comparing Israel to Nazi Germany, in breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

We have also received reports from Jewish people of abuse shouted at them in the streets, for example in Golders Green, a Jewish patron of a kosher restaurant reported today that she and her friend were left shaken as a driver yelled “Free Palestine” at them as they walked in the street.

In a particularly concerning development, Jewish schoolchildren are being victimised by their peers, forced to try to explain allegations put to them about a foreign conflict, with demands made that they condemn Israel or face the consequences.

The situation has not been helped by media coverage of the fighting. For example, Sky News has blamed “powerful Jewish lobbies” overseas for housing policies in Jerusalem, strengthening the perception that the Jewish Diaspora is to blame for rising tensions in the city. Campaign Against Antisemitism’s most recent Antisemitism Barometer revealed that 90% of British Jews believe that media bias against Israel is used to fuel persecution of Jews in Britain.

Due to the volume of demand for our assistance, we are mobilising additional volunteers to help with the influx and to monitor online antisemitism, as well as to provide assistance to victims. If you would like to volunteer, please visit https://antisemitism.org/volunteer. If you cannot give your time, please consider donating to support our work at antisemitism.org/donate.

To report an antisemitic incident, please e-mail [email protected].

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We fear we may see a recurrence of the record-breaking spike in antisemitism that we witnessed in 2014, when we first established CAA due to the failure of the criminal justice system to enforce the law against anti-Jewish racists.

“This week, we have seen social media and our streets rife with antisemitic motifs, with a foreign conflict used as a pretext by antisemites to target Jewish schoolchildren, adults and institutions in Britain.

“In anticipation of a spike in antisemitism, we are mobilising volunteers to help monitor and report antisemitic incidents and provide assistance to victims.

“We continue to call on the Government to proscribe in its entirety Hamas, an antisemitic genocidal terrorist organisation that aspires to the destruction of Jews worldwide. Proscription is supported by over 90% of British Jews and will send a message of zero-tolerance of anti-Jewish hatred.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s 2020 Antisemitism Barometer revealed that an overwhelming 91% of British Jews want the British Government to proscribe the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group Hamas in its entirety.

rally was held outside Downing Street yesterday that protested the ongoing events in the Middle East and featured several antisemitic themes.

Around 1,500 people attended Tuesday’s “Emergency Rally for Palestine – Save Sheikh Jarrah.” Volunteers from our Demonstration and Event Monitoring Unit gathered material which we are now reviewing for possible legal action.

We photographed several disturbing banners comparing Israel to the Nazis. One disturbing sign (pictured) read: “Holocaust 1941 (with a swastika), Holocaust 2021 (with a Star of David).”

Another antisemitic sign, referencing both the Holocaust and South African apartheid, read: “It wasn’t ok in South Africa. It wasn’t ok in Nazi Germany. So why is it ok in Palestine (It’s not!)”.

“Israel have no conscience, no honour, no pride. They curse Hitler day & night but they have surpassed Hitler in Barbarism”, read another.

At one point, protesters jumped on top of a double decker London bus and held aloft a banner equating the Israeli flag with the Nazi swastika. According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

Other banners – in Arabic – appeared to incite and glorify violence against Israelis in graphic language, while songs were chanted calling for the destruction of the Jewish state.

The rally was addressed by former Labour Party leader, Jeremy Corbyn, who failed to condemn Hamas in his remarks. The crowd welcomed Mr Corbyn with the familiar refrain of “Oh, Jeremy Corbyn.” In the past, Mr Corbyn has referred to Hamas as his “friends”.

The demonstration was organised by the Friends of Al Aqsa (FOA), Palestine Solidarity Campaign (PSC), Stop the War Coalition and Palestine Forum in Britain.

The founder of FOA told a cheering crowd in 2009 during a war between Israel and Hamas: “Hamas is not a terrorist organisation. The reason that they hate Hamas is because they refuse to be subjugated to be occupied by the Israeli state and we salute Hamas for standing up to Israel.”

An investigation by Campaign Against Antisemitism in 2017 exposed extensive antisemitic bigotry amongst supporters of the PSC.

Stop The War Coalition has appeared in the past to advocate war against Israel and its marches routinely feature antisemitic tropes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s 2020 Antisemitism Barometer revealed that an overwhelming majority of British Jews — 91% — want the British Government to proscribe the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group Hamas in its entirety.

St Anne’s College at the University of Oxford has removed a statement issued by the President of the College’s JCR and its MCR BAME representatives offering “support to the Muslim and Palestinian members of our community” but not to its Jewish members.

The statement related to ongoing violence in Jerusalem and said: “We want to sincerely support and send solidarity to St Anne’s Muslim and Palestinian members and the wider Oxford community. We would also like or remind students to reach out to the St Anne’s JCR & MCR Welfare and BAME Officers if they are struggling and would like somebody to talk to. In addition, you can also reach out to the Oxford University Islamic Society (ISOC) ‘Welfare Officers’ and/or the Oxford University Champaign for Racial Awareness Equality (CRAE) Officers.”

It went on to say: “We also encourage other Oxford colleges’ JCRs and MCRs to show solidarity with the wider Oxford Muslim and Palestinian community and combat the noticeable lack of support.”

Disgracefully, nowhere did the statement offer any support or resources to Jewish students. The “lack of support” to the College’s Jews was thus particularly “noticeable”.

The statement was shared on St Anne’s College’s official Instagram account. The College then prohibited comments on the statements before deleting the post entirely, without explanation or apology.

There are growing reports of Jewish students facing antisemitism on campus and online since violence in the Middle East has erupted in recent days.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].  

It was announced today in the Queen’s Speech, in which Her Majesty announces the Government’s legislative agenda, that a new law will be passed banning public bodies from joining in with the Boycotts, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) campaign, on the grounds that it “may legitimise antisemitism”. 

According to the Government’s official documentation, the purpose of the legislation is to “deliver the manifesto commitment to stop public bodies from imposing their own approach or views about international relations, through preventing boycott, divestment or sanctions campaigns against foreign countries.”

The document also acknowledges the long-standing connections between the BDS movement and antisemitism, stating that: “Unofficial boycotts have been associated with antisemitism in the United Kingdom — including kosher food being removed from supermarket shelves, Jewish films being banned from a film festival and a student union holding a vote on blocking the formation of a Jewish student society.” 

While boycotting a country is neither illegal nor racist per se, the problem with BDS is that it is no mere boycott. Supporters of BDS routinely engage the International Definition of Antisemitism by:

  • Setting political tests which Jews must pass, or face being treated as a pariah, especially by demanding that Jews renounce their cultural and religious ties to Israel, the physical centre of the Jewish religion, the world’s only Jewish state, and the country in which almost half of the world’s Jewish population lives;
  • Attempting to isolate and shame Israeli Jews, but not non-Jews, who do not support BDS when they visit Britain or come to study or teach at British universities;
  • Treating the entirety of the State of Israel as occupied land, and thereby asserting that the existence of the state of Israel is a racist endeavour;
  • Working with genocidal antisemitic terrorist organisations;
  • Claiming that Israeli policy is to deliberately kill babies, or harvest the vital organs of non-Jews, which revives ancient blood libels;
  • Attempting to portray Israeli Jews as having created a Nazi state in the model of Nazi Germany, and of ‘using’ the Holocaust as political cover for purported Jewish crimes;
  • Defending against claims of antisemitism by proposing that the allegations are a ruse used by Jewish victims, not to call out racism but to silence criticism of Israel;
  • Projecting antisemitic conspiracy myths about nefarious Jewish power onto the Jewish state.

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds the Government’s latest efforts in tackling antisemitism in Britain.

Singer Van Morrison has faced fresh allegations of antisemitism after releasing a new song entitled “They Own the Media.”

The song alludes to a powerful elite who control the media and have influence over societal behaviours and beliefs. Some of the lyrics read:

“They tell us that ignorance is bliss
I guess by those that control the media, it is
They own the media, they control the stories we are told
If you ever try to go against them, you will be ignored”

In another verse, Mr Morrison sings:

“They control the narrative, they perpetuate the myth
Keep on telling you lies, tell you ignorance is bliss
Believe it all and you’ll never get, nеver get wise
To thе truth, ’cause they control everything you do”

By singing “they own the media,” Mr Morrison has been accused of deploying a trope regarding the hidden power of Jews which featured heavily in the antisemitic propaganda of the Soviet Union, as well as in other eras and places.

Tom Breihan, the Senior Editor for Stereogum, wrote that the song had “a title that sure seems to be an antisemitic trope.”

He went on to say: “Maybe it’s satire. Maybe the ‘they’ of the title doesn’t refer to any specific group of people. But when you consider that this man just went on a months-long COVID-denial tantrum, we have every right to be suspicious about this one.”

This is not the Northern Irish musician’s first brush with accusations of antisemitism. In 2005, Mr Morrison released “They Sold Me Out”, a song that appeared to perpetrate the antisemitic conspiracy theory of deicide. One verse of the song reads:

“Sold me out for a few shekels and divided up my robes
They sold me out
It’s the oldest story that’s ever been told
They sold me out”

Derek Jackson, an anti-vaccination local election candidate for the Liberal Party (no connection to the Liberal Democrats), arrived at the Emirates Arena during the election count wearing sunglasses, a black suit, and a yellow star whilst performing a Nazi salute.

Mr Jackson, who was running for Glasgow’s Southside seat, was accompanied by several Liberal Party campaigners who were all dressed identically to Mr Jackson, and who were also performing the salute. Each of them had drawn red hearts onto the palms of their hands, and when performing the Nazi salute, would claim it was a “love salute.”

The yellow stars, designed to resemble the ones that Jewish Holocaust victims were forced to wear as a mark of identification, had the word “UNVAX” written on them. When questioned about the stars, the Liberal Party representatives stated that they were “sheriff badges.”

In an attempt to satire what he perceived to be the Scottish National Party’s (SNP) restrictions on hate speech, Mr Jackson performed the Nazi salute to a crowd of baffled onlookers as he proclaimed: “Love everyone…spread love…we’re just here to love everybody.”

Speaking directly to the crowd, he went on to say: “You’ve all got to love us as well. You’ve all got to love everybody, people you’ve never met before. You’ve got to care about people everywhere, all the time. You’ve got to give up your freedom and your liberty to love people you never met before.”

After being called a racist by a member of the crowd, Mr Jackson apparently grew agitated. He adopted what appeared to be a frustrated and confrontational tone and stated: “I hope you’re not stupid enough, all of you…I hope none of you are stupid enough to believe we’re promoting fascism, when plainly, and very obviously, we’re here to satire and parody the fascist SNP hate laws. Obviously. Are you all so stupid? Are you all so stupid, you think we’ve come here to promote fascism and racism and Nazism. Really? We are here to campaign against the SNP’s fascist hate speech laws which criminalise you expressing your thoughts in your home.”

Mr Jackson and his supporters were later escorted out of the arena by police.

The Liberal Party has now expelled Mr Jackson and given him a lifetime ban.

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes, and this is not the first time that anti-vaccination campaigners have used the yellow star during events. Recently, London protestors were condemned online for wearing the yellow stars, while French protesters were seen wearing them at a demonstration in Avignon. They have also been seen elsewhere in Europe and North America.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Darran Davies, the Conservative candidate who used an antisemitic slur on Facebook has won a seat in the Hillingdon Council election.

Mr Davies won with 2,098 votes while Labour candidate Steve Garelick finished a close second with 1,799.

Mr Davies, who expressed “deep regret” for his actions, shared an image of a man on Facebook with the words, “Wanted Jew Boy Reward $100”. Mr Davies shared the image on his personal Facebook page with the caption: “Guys have you seen this bloke.”

A friend of Mr Davies’ apparently commented that the message referred to him because he had not attended a local pub in some time.

When the post emerged last month, Hillingdon Council’s Conservative group leader said: “The posting…relates to the use of an inappropriate nickname among friends. Although the comment was inappropriate and below the standards expected of a Conservative member this has been resolved by admonishing Mr Davies and reinforcing with him the standards expected of persons seeking to represent Hillingdon Conservatives. Mr Davies has shown deep regret for his lack of judgment and has apologised.”

It has been reported that the matter is being investigated by the Conservative Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.   

The Northern Ireland Assembly has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism. This came despite Sinn Fein’s opposition to the Democratic Unionist Party’s (DUP) proposal to adopt it.

The DUP motion stressed “the need to tackle the scourge of antisemitism in every aspect of our society” and called on the Assembly to adopt the Definition in full with the illustrative examples, which are integral to the Definition.

Sinn Fein tried to pass an amendment to remove the reference to the Definition, but retained similar wording without the examples.

In the past, Belfast City Council explicitly rejected the adoption of the Definition.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We applaud this decision by the Northern Ireland Assembly to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism. We regret that Sinn Fein opposed the adoption resolution, but its passage is a strong demonstration of solidarity with the Jewish community and a powerful expression of opposition to anti-Jewish racism, which has no place in Northern Ireland or any other part of the United Kingdom. We continue to call on local authorities, as well as universities and other public bodies, to adopt the Definition and apply it in cases of antisemitism.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds the decision. The British Government was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism and Lord Pickles worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street. Since then, the Scottish Government and the Welsh Government have also both adopted the Definition.

A judge’s decision has been criticised after he ruled in favour of a claimant claiming unfair dismissal against Lidl after the supermarket reportedly fired him for brandishing his swastika tattoo to a colleague.

Istvan Horvarth, the former caretaker at Lidl’s Telford Hadley branch in Shropshire, was said to have proudly displayed his tattoo whilst laughing. The Hungarian native also reportedly joked that it was “his country’s symbol.”  

The colleague who reported Mr Horvarth, referred to only as MB, was only on their second shift when Mr Horvarth approached him. They alleged that the swastika tattoo was surrounded by barbed wire, and that Mr Horvarth also had other far-right tattoos.

MB said: “[Mr Horvarth] exposed the top of his arm and shoulder and pointed to a tattoo of the swastika symbol. I thought it was disgusting for someone to brazenly show it as a proud symbol. I come from a military background so I was not impressed for that to be displayed so publicly in a company that promotes equality and the acceptance of people from different backgrounds.”

This led to a disciplinary hearing conducted by Andrew Shaw, the branch’s Area Manager, which then resulted in Mr Horvarth’s dismissal. Mr Shaw stated: “These are sensitive issues and I felt it was massively inappropriate for [Mr Horvarth to be] behaving this way. I felt that him showing the tattoos at work was damaging to Lidl’s reputation.”

When questioned, Mr Horvarth apparently claimed that the symbol was a “Buddhist peace symbol”, despite Lidl’s internal investigation confirming that it was indeed the Nazi symbol.

Judge Ian Miller, presiding in the case, concluded that the symbol was offensive, however he felt that a warning about uniform policy would have been more appropriate, and upheld Mr Horvarth’s accusation of unfair dismissal.

Despite stating that there was “beyond any sensible doubt that a Nazi swastika is offensive to most people for obvious reasons,” Judge Miller ruled in favour of Mr Horvarth, partly because he believed that Mr Shaw and branch boss Craig Taylor had already branded Mr Horvarth as a “troublemaker” and a “bully”. Judge Miller also felt that Mr Horvarth was not afforded an adequate opportunity to defend himself during his disciplinary hearing.

Mr Horvarth’s additional claim of race discrimination was denied.

Mr Horvarth is now awaiting compensation from the supermarket chain.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Image credit: Google

Campaign Against Antisemitism will be writing to Tim Davie, the BBC’s Director-General, after our concerns over a BBC journalist’s social media activity were dismissed by BBC Arabic’s Head of Daily Output.

Last month, Nour Eddine Zorgui shared an article titled “Who are the Israel lobbyists that want David Miller fired?” that referred to Zionism as “Israel’s racist ideology”.

The article was published by The Electronic Intifada, an online news outlet which has also previously attacked Campaign Against Antisemitism.

In a letter from the BBC Arabic’s Head of Daily Output, we have been informed that Nour Eddine Zorgui was merely “reminded of the BBC social media guidelines.”

However, not only is the description of Zionism in the article offensive, but the article and tweet represents an intervention in the public debate over Prof. David Miller, a Professor of Political Sociology at the University of Bristol with a history of peddling conspiracy theories relating to Jewish students. Most recently, he asserted that “Zionism is racism”, declared his objective “to end Zionism as a functioning ideology of the world” and accused the Bristol University Jewish Society of being part of a worldwide Zionist conspiracy, adding that it is “fundamental to Zionism to encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”. At the same online event, Prof. Miller also observed that the Jewish Society and the Union of Jewish Students are Zionist, thereby implying that Jewish students (and the wider Jewish community) inherently “encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism”.

For a BBC journalist to intervene in this debate, share an offensive article and defend an academic accused of antisemitism – and to do so by suggesting that those making the allegations do so in service to Israel, which is precisely the sort of antisemitism-denial found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission to have contributed to institutional antisemitism in the Labour Party – is unacceptable. It is woefully insufficient for the BBC to be served with a mere reminder of the Corporation’s guidelines.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 revealed that two thirds of British Jews are deeply concerned by the BBC’s coverage of matters of Jewish concern, and 55% by its handling of antisemitism complaints.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

This week saw the first “key monitoring date” in the Labour Party’s Action Plan, agreed with the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) regarding antisemitism in the Party.

The Action Plan came following the publication of the EHRC’s damning report into antisemitism in the Labour Party, the product of an investigation in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant. The EHRC found that Labour had unlawfully discriminated against and harassed Jews. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Party.

A large proportion of the requirements due to be met by this first monitoring date are either proposals or internal policy changes, which will be assessed by the EHRC.

However, a number of items are outward-facing and are therefore available for evaluation.

The Labour Party is required by now, for example, to have engaged with stakeholders in the Jewish community and established an Advisory Board on antisemitism. It is understood that the Party has achieved this, but selectively. As we noted earlier this month, Sir Keir’s repeated refusal to engage with us, despite our being the complainant in the EHRC’s investigation into antisemitism in his Party, and Labour’s failure even to acknowledge our complaints against MPs, do not reflect a leadership wholly willing to address past failures.

The Party was also required, by this stage, to have published “at least one performance report”. The Party discharged this requirement earlier this year in part; the report contained ambiguities that made it difficult to assess. In particular, it referenced case numbers in 2014-2018 but appeared to make no reference to 2019 whatsoever.

By this first monitoring date, the Party was required to have published a Complaints Handling Handbook, which it has done. The handbook made some welcome improvements to the process but was largely a disappointment. In particular, the Handbook was pilloried for including a number of examples of what seemingly purported to be best practice, but which in fact served only to illustrate why Labour’s disciplinary process is unfit for purpose.

In one example, a Labour member “posted and shared several things on social media that were antisemitic; using Hitler, Nazi and Holocaust metaphors, distortions and comparisons in debates about Israel-Palestine”. In other words, they breached the International Definition of Antisemitism in at least one and possibly multiple ways. Yet the sanction given in the handbook was merely that the member was given a Formal Warning, which would remain on their record for eighteen months.

These case studies have now, however, been scrubbed from the Handbook entirely.

The Party was also required, by this stage, to have completed antisemitism training for all those officials responsible for disciplinary cases relating to anti-Jewish hatred. However, it recently emerged that a member of Jewish Voice for Labour, an antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, chaired a Labour disciplinary panel on antisemitism just earlier this month. It is difficult to square that development with the fulfilment of the training requirement.

Labour was also due by now to demonstrate to the EHRC that it has completed its “clearing of the backlog” of antisemitism cases. It is difficult to see, however, how the Party can do so before introducing an independent disciplinary system, which it has said it will not do until later this year. Campaign Against Antisemitism has submitted numerous complaints against MPs and others, which we expect the Party to investigate only once the independent system is in place. But the Party has not acknowledged our complaints, and the only indication that the Party has taken any action whatsoever was a report that our complaint against Deputy Leader Angela Rayner was dismissed out of hand earlier this year.

Reflecting on the milestone, Joe Glasman, Head of Political Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “This week was intended to be a landmark moment in the Labour Party’s recovery from the institutional antisemitism ushered in by Jeremy Corbyn. However, progress has been marked by inconsistencies, lack of transparency and potential burying of awkward issues, for example our complaints against Labour’s Deputy Leader and numerous other MPs.

“Only in the last few weeks, we have seen perplexing disciplinary outcomes, a member of an antisemitism-denial group chair a disciplinary panel, and now Labour has embarrassingly scrubbed its ‘best practice’ case studies from its Complaints Handling Handbook after we and others highlighted their absurdity.

“At this first major juncture in the Action Plan, we are yet to be reassured that the Party is capable of getting to grips with its antisemitism problem.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer study in 2019 found that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A police officer found guilty of being a member of the banned neo-Nazi terrorist group National Action has been jailed for four years and four months.

Benjamin Hannam, a 22-year-old from Edmonton in North London, has now been fired from by the Metropolitan Police for gross misconduct following his conviction earlier this month. Last year, it was alleged that he belonged or professed to belong to the proscribed group National Action between December 2016 and January 2018 and that he falsely represented himself in his application to join the Metropolitan Police in this connection.

With his conviction at the beginning of April, Mr Hannam became the first police officer to be convicted of far-right terrorism after being found guilty at the Old Bailey of membership in National Action, lying on his application to join the police and possessing guides to knife-fighting and bombmaking. It is understood that the ban on reporting the case was lifted after Mr Hannam admitted possessing an indecent image of a child.

Mr Hannam, who reportedly has autism, was apparently “desperate to impress” an older National Action organiser who gave him free stickers, but he ended his association with the organisation before he joined the Metropolitan Police.

Sentencing Mr Hannam at the Old Bailey today, Judge Anthony Leonard QC told him that “I consider what you did to be very serious and you have harmed public trust in the police by your deceit”, as he sentenced Mr Hannam to four years and four months in prison.

The Head of the Metropolitan Police’s Counter Terrorism Command, which carried out the investigation, emphasised earlier this month that there is no evidence that Mr Hannam abused his position at the police force to further his far-right views.

Mr Hannam had denied being a member of National Action before or after it was proscribed, and told the court that he had been attracted to fascism aged sixteen because of its artwork and propaganda and was under the impression that it was a youth network. He denied engaging in any stickering or propaganda campaigns and insisted that he only attended social events.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “National Action was proscribed as a terrorist organisation at our behest because it poses a considerable threat. Its members are indoctrinated to kill and instructed in the use of weapons. Benjamin Hannam posed as someone who would protect the public, when in fact he was a member of a dangerous far-right terrorist organisation, in possession of knife fighting and bomb-making manuals, as well as disturbing sexual images of a child.

“We applaud Counter Terrorism Command for its investigation of this very troubling case, as well as the CPS for prosecuting it and the court for delivering an appropriate sentence. Public confidence in the police depends on holding officers to a high standard and zero tolerance of far-right or neo-Nazi infiltration. The verdict and sentence in this disturbing case sends exactly the right message.”

Other members of National Action were recently convicted and sentenced to prison for their role in the organisation.

National Action was proscribed as a terrorist organisation in December 2016 following a long campaign by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others. Under section 11 of the Terrorism Act 2000, membership of a proscribed terrorist organisation is a criminal offence.

Image credit: Metropolitan Police

Chelsea Football Club has announced that it has banned an abusive online troll from its matches for ten years after he hounded a Jewish journalist who came forward and received support from Campaign Against Antisemitism. The announcement comes as football clubs around the country are walking out of social media in protest at online hate.

Sam Mole, a twenty-year-old from Kettering, had sent antisemitic and homophobic messages online to freelance Jewish journalist Dan Levene, including one wishing that Mr Levene would die and another lamenting that Mr Levene had not been killed in the Holocaust.

Further abusive messages had also been sent by Mr Mole from another account that Twitter suspended. Mr Mole, a fan of Chelsea Football Club, took issue with Mr Levene’s stance in opposition to antisemitic chanting by some fans of the club.

Earlier this year, a legal case against Mr Mole ended with a judge declaring his regret that “the law prohibits me from punishing you” following a blunder by the investigating police force. Mr Mole had admitted to police that he had sent the abusive tweets in October 2019, but he was found not guilty at Leicester Magistrates Court in February 2021 on the technicality that he was on holiday in Australia at the time, and therefore outside the jurisdiction of the UK’s courts.

Mr Mole was nonetheless issued a three-year restraining order prohibiting him from directly or indirectly contacting Mr Levene and posting messages about him on social media or encouraging others to do so. He was told that if he broke this order, he could go to prison.

The court heard that Mr Mole, a trainee teacher, expressed remorse for his actions. Campaign Against Antisemitism is in contact with the Teaching Regulation Agency.

Campaign Against Antisemitism contacted Chelsea to urge the football club to exclude Mr Mole from attending matches and the club confirmed that it would investigate. Chelsea has now confirmed that it has banned Mr Mole for a period of ten years.

In a statement, Chelsea said: “Following the conclusion of court proceedings in February, the club conducted our own investigation into the matter and has taken the decision to ban the individual from Chelsea FC for a period of ten years. Everybody at Chelsea is proud to be part of a diverse club. Our players, staff, fans and visitors to the club come from a wide range of backgrounds, including the Jewish community, and we want to ensure everyone feels safe, valued and included. We will not tolerate any behaviour from supporters that threatens that aim.”

The statement added: “As a club, we will continue to take action against individuals or groups who produce or disseminate social media posts that contravene these values.”

Chelsea was among nineteen Premiership clubs, along with the Premier League itself, to have adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Dan Levene said: “I’m delighted with this outcome. It sends a very strong message that abusive and antisemitic behaviour online is unacceptable. And it’s particularly poignant coming today, when football clubs are walking out from social media because of racism online. I hope this case leads to better processes at Chelsea and other clubs so that it doesn’t take so long to come to the right decision in future, but this is a good day for the fight against racism in football.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Chelsea should be applauded for banning an abusive troll for ten years. This announcement sends a powerful message that antisemitism in football and online must not be tolerated. Football clubs walking out of social media over online hate is one thing, but backing it up with strong action like this is the strongest antidote.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

The BBC has been forced to amend its website to confirm that Jews are indeed considered an ethnic minority, after Campaign Against Antisemitism demanded an apology in response to the BBC’s airing of an offensive segment last month titled “Should Jews count as an ethnic minority?”

In addition to having launched a petition, signed by thousands, calling on the BBC to apologise for the “ridiculous” and insensitive segment, we also submitted a complaint to the Corporation. 

The segment featured four panellists and a guest, Ben Cohen, the Editor of Pink News, who is Jewish. Mr Cohen rightly observed on air that “the notion of this debate is ridiculous”.

Host Jo Coburn proposed that “many Jews have succeeded in reaching high political office and therefore don’t need to be seen as a group needing recognition in the same way as others”, but Mr Cohen observed that Jews “face antisemitism and racism very clearly” and referenced the Labour Party’s institutional antisemitism.

The debate was triggered by social media backlash against Labour’s Deputy Leader, Angela Rayner, who had tweeted that Scottish Labour’s newly-elected leader is “the first ever ethnic minority leader of a political party anywhere in the UK”.

The BBC has now confirmed to Campaign Against Antisemitism that our comments had been passed on to senior editors of the programme, and that they would publish a clarification to their website to “make clear that Jews are officially an ethnic minority.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It was outrageous for the BBC to air a segment questioning whether Jews count as an ethnic minority. The show’s only Jewish guest rightly considered the debate to be ‘ridiculous’. It is a question that the Corporation would never presume to ask of any other minority community in Britain, and it is telling that it does so in relation to the Jews. Debacles such as this one show why, according to our research, two thirds of British Jews consider that the BBC’s coverage of Jewish matters is unfavourable. Accordingly, we launched a petition, signed by thousands, calling for action, and submitted a complaint to the BBC. We are pleased that the BBC has recognised its error and clarified the position, but it must still consider the editorial failures that allowed the question to be asked in the first place.”

It is notable that the BBC initially rejected our complaint and only upheld it on appeal.

Our Antisemitism Barometer 2020 showed that two thirds of British Jews view unfavourably the BBC’s coverage of matters of Jewish interest (including antisemitism). Given segments like these, this breathtaking finding is wholly reasonable.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reports in the media, they should contact us.

Ofcom has dismissed a complaint from Campaign Against Antisemitism regarding a Channel 4 segment that criticised the International Definition of Antisemitism without offering a Jewish perspective. The media regulator said that it found “no issues warranting investigation under its rules.”

Speakers during the segment, which lasted nearly ten minutes, repeatedly stated that the Definition “silenced” debate about Israel, which is precisely the “Livingstone Formulation” that the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) confirmed was used to victimise Jews in the Labour Party to such an extent that it broke equalities law. In using this antisemitic formulation, the segment breached Ofcom’s guidance on harm and offence.

Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant in the EHRC’s investigation of antisemitism in the Labour Party.

The failure to include a single representative from the mainstream Jewish community – in which there is a consensus in favour of widespread adoption of the Definition – represented a failure by Channel 4 News to show due impartiality in its programme, which is also a breach of Ofcom’s guidance.

In Ofcom’s response to us, they wrote: “In our view, the editorially-linked interview with Daniel Barenboim provided further context and helped to reflect an Israeli and Jewish perspective to the extent it was necessary given the limited content that had referred critically to the policies and actions of the Israeli Government in the earlier Akram Salhab item.”

Regarding our complaints that the Definition should not have been labelled ‘controversial’ due to its widespread adoption, and that under the Definition criticism of Israel similar to that levelled against any other country cannot be regarded as antisemitic, Ofcom replied: “In our view, the programme did not suggest that the Definition does not permit any criticism of Israel whatsoever. It also correctly highlighted that calling the existence of a state of Israel a racist endeavour would fall within the [D]efinition of antisemitism. We also considered that there has been a robust debate around the [Definition] and about the government’s efforts to convince universities to adopt it. In this context, we do not consider it would have been misleading to the audience to have described the [D]efinition as ‘controversial’.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 revealed that almost half of British Jews consider Channel 4’s coverage of matters of Jewish interest and antisemitism to be unfavourable, while almost a third add that they are unsatisfied with how Channel 4 deals with complaints relating to antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected]

Brunel University has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

In a statement the University said: “Brunel University London supports initiatives that seek to tackle prejudice and discrimination. It recognises the International Definition as supporting the University’s existing policies on Equality, Diversity and Inclusion, reinforcing the message that antisemitism will not be tolerated and will have due regard to the Definition when considering any allegation raised. Council upholds Brunel’s commitment to freedom of speech.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities and public bodies. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Eric Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

The University of Bath has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

In a statement, the University said: “Our University is committed to being an inclusive community, which cherishes diversity. We seek to create a community where hate, harassment and discrimination are never tolerated. Condemning antisemitism and tackling any antisemitic incidents is very much part of this commitment.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities and public bodies. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Eric Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

A fifteen-year-old Abingdon schoolboy has been expelled after allegedly sending an antisemitic image to a Jewish student from the same school.

The image, sent through the social media app Snapchat, was said to have depicted three people dressed as Nazis soldiers.

The teenager also allegedly created a video on Tik Tok, another social media app, in which he was said to have joked about raping a woman from a different Tik Tok video.  

The Headmaster of the prestigious Oxfordshire boarding school, Michael Windsor, said that the videos were “grossly racist and sexist”. He added: “These incidents do not just contravene our Behaviour, Rewards and Sanctions Policy but they go completely against the ethos and culture of the school based on courtesy, kindness and respect.”

The schoolboy has issued a response, stating: “I am deeply sorry and regretful of my stupid actions. I deeply regret my actions and I understand that people could get offended by them very easily but I had no intention of offending or hurting someone’s feelings. In the small amount of time I have had to think about my disgraceful actions, I can certainly confirm that not a single thing I said was intended with harm or to offend anyone. I understand now that it would and I regret posting those things, it was a lack of judgment before when posting, and I did not think about all the people that would see my profile. I am deeply sorry and I promise that this will not happen again.”

However, the boy’s parents defended their son, arguing that social media is not real life and therefore that the punishment should not be too severe, claiming that the videos were “just jokes”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

The Home Secretary, Priti Patel, has called for the proscription of the neo-Nazi group, Atomwaffen Division (AWD). This would make membership of the group punishable by up to ten years in prison.

AWD is a paramilitary neo-Nazi group that trains its members in the use of firearms and reportedly seeks to ignite a race war in the United States. Last year, a member of AWD who made terror threats against American Jewish journalists and activists was sentenced to sixteen months in federal prison in Washington state.  

The Home Secretary has also called for the National Socialist Order (NSO) to be listed as an official alias of AWD. This decision comes after AWD apparently disbanded in the UK last year. However, only a few months later in July, the NSO declared itself to be the group’s successor.

Ms Patel said: “Vile and racist white supremacist groups like this exist to spread hate, sow division and advocate the use of violence to further their sick ideologies. I will do all I can to protect young and vulnerable people from being radicalised which is why I am taking action to proscribe this dangerous group.”

Last year, the Home Secretary proscribed the neo-Nazi Sonnenkrieg Division as a terrorist group. This follows the proscription of National Action in 2016, for which Campaign Against Antisemitism had called.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

The growing community of Charedi Jews in Canvey has been targeted with antisemitic abuse after announcing plans to build a new synagogue.

Local Canvey Island leaders have raised concerns regarding the effect that the planned synagogue may have on the surrounding area, such as noise pollution and traffic, with others also worried that the synagogue’s architecture may not fit in with the other buildings on Canvey Island.

However, while most of the concerns raised were presented as genuine and civil, some Facebook users on the ‘Canvey Island action group’ used the opportunity to spew vile antisemitic vitriol.

One of the comments read: “I’ve objected. P***ed off my 13 yr old has to walk in the road, around their [Charedi Jews] f ing vans dropping 100’s of kids off”…if they allow this more will move here.”

Another wrote: “All they do is take and no give, what is happening here ?????”

Referring to the Jewish community of Stamford Hill, one user said: “Stamford Hill slung them all out, because they took over everything just like they are doing on the island. Unfortunately they don’t think about people around them, it’s their way or no way.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

Twitter users have responded to news of a possible launch of a new European Super League (ESL) by blaming Jews for “ruining football.”

The announcement of the ESL has proved controversial and unpopular with swathes of football fans due to the potential harm it is believed may be caused to domestic football leagues. Many fans apparently feel that the concept of the ESL is not in keeping with the game’s integrity.

However, for some Twitter users, what began as reasonable criticism regarding the direction of modern football quickly escalated into vitriolic, antisemitic accusations levelled against some of the league’s creators. who are the owners of the football clubs involved. Some of the owners or chairmen are Jewish. Among the tropes were claims of Jewish greed, a classic antisemitic notion.

One user wrote: “Notably, most of the owners of these ‘big’ football clubs pushing for a Super League are Jews, including Roman Abramovic and the Glazers…..Jews are ruining football, they dont give a f**** about the Gentile fans..”

Another tweeted: “All this talk of the European Super League. It’s jew rats behind it. All money grabbing c***s. It’s no wonder that people hate them as much as the muslims.” This abhorent post was accompanied by a popular antisemitic meme.

Yet another wrote: “Them 3 fat AMERICAN C***S YOU F***ING BASTARDS. And as for that Jew levy your family should have been gassed. Inters owners also ruined the cal champions. Perez is in the f***ing mafia”. Daniel Levy is the Chairman of Tottenham Hotspur, one of the founding clubs of the ESL. He was recently targeted by antisemitic abuse online.“

Another still said: “Hey Zionists it’s not all about money you suckers“.

These were only a selection of the antisemitic abuse online, appealing to classic tropes of Jewish greed, parasitism and control, as well as references to the Holocaust. Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms. The Premier League and nineteen of its constituent clubs have adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The beautiful game has some very hideous fans, and they are out in force on social media objecting in the most grotesque fashion to the possible launch of a new European Super League. No controversy, however great the passions it may stir, can justify the horrendous antisemitic abuse meted out by some Twitter users towards football clubs and their owners. The Premier League, the clubs and social media networks have a responsibility to remove this material immediately and punish the offenders with bans from attending matches. This minority of perpetrators bring shame to the majority of fans who want to see racism expelled from football.“

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

It has been revealed that a candidate for the Scottish National Party (SNP) posted a comment on Facebook comparing the Labour Party’s political strategy in Scotland to that of the Nazi propagandist Joseph Goebbels.

Colm Merrick, the SNP candidate for Eastwood in Glasgow, the seat representing Scotland’s largest Jewish community, reportedly shared a post in February 2015 in connection with an article. In the post, Mr Merrick wrote: “Analysis of UK Labour in Scotland’s election strategy…becomes truly terrifying when the following potential source of its inspiration is considered: ‘If you tell a lie big enough and keep repeating it, people will eventually come to believe it’.”

The quotation is attributed to Joseph Goebbels, one of Hitler’s closest henchmen and Reich Minister of Propaganda for the Nazi Party.

Mr Merrick has since apologised, saying: “I am sorry for this stupid post I made over six years ago.”

Within the last fortnight, another SNP candidate was forced to apologise after comments from 2017 emerged in which she had reportedly compared tactics by the Conservatives to Hitler and the Holocaust.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “This is the second time in as many weeks that past comments by current SNP candidates have emerged comparing a major political party to the Nazis. Last time it was the Conservatives and Hitler, this time it is Labour and Joseph Geobbels, the mastermind of Nazi propaganda.

“Such trivial equations of today’s politics with the darkest period in human history diminish the meaning and memory of the Holocaust. This is the opposite of the example politicians are supposed to be setting, both about Holocaust education and how to conduct public debate.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Ten Jewish gravestones in Belfast City Cemetery were desecrated in an antisemitic hate crime.

The desecration is believed to have taken place last week on 15th April.

Sinn Fein councillor Steven Corr, along with other Sinn Fein members, were active participants in the clean-up crew. He posted photos of the scene on Facebook, writing: “We work continuously after attacks on all graves belonging to all denominations, all religions, adults and children and these unbelievable attacks on the headstones of dead people needs to stop. Let them Rest in Peace.”

Inspector Róisín Brown of the Police Service of Northern Ireland stated: “I am appalled at these criminal acts. City Cemetery, like any graveyard, is a place where members of the community come to pay their respects. The damage to these graves shows a total lack of respect for others and will have a significant impact on individuals and families within the Jewish Community.

“We are investigating this incident as a hate crime, but we need help from the local community in West Belfast to hold those responsible to account for their actions.

“If you saw anyone acting suspiciously in the City Cemetery yesterday evening, or if you have information that would help our investigation, I am asking you to please contact us on the non-emergency number 101 quoting reference 713 16/04/21.”

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Vandalism of Jewish graves is a cowardly act, but all too common in Britain and abroad. We can honour the dead by ensuring that the perpetrators are brought to justice, and we support the efforts of the Police Service of Northern Ireland in doing so.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Cllr Steven Corr

A graduate of Cambridge University “called for the extermination of all Jewish people,” Manchester Crown Court has heard.

Oliver Bel, 24, of Salford, was also said to have been in possession of a bomb-making manual. He denies the terror charges, claiming that his interest in the book was only “academic.”

However, in 2016 Mr Bel was reportedly in contact with members of National Action, a far-right neo-Nazi terrorist organisation. National Action was proscribed as a terrorist organisation in December 2016 following a long campaign by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others. Under section 11 of the Terrorism Act 2000, membership of a proscribed terrorist organisation is a criminal offence.

The court heard that Mr Bel expressed views in “preserving racial superiority.” The court was also told that Mr Bel “harboured and possibly still does harbour extreme right-wing views.”

Prosecutor Joe Allman told the court that in addition to declaring himself a National Socialist, Mr Bel “had held Jews responsible for ‘the communist revolution and pretty much every other progressive movement since then.’”

Mr Bel had also allegedly made several heinous claims, apparently calling for the extermination of the Jews as well as claiming that only 200,000 Jews died in the Holocaust, not 6 million.

Mr Bel was said to have had a track record of troubling online posts. Jurors heard that Mr Bel posted on Facebook: “I just want to go on a killing spree,” and posting just a day later, “Hate them Jews, kill them all then kill all n******.”

The court was told that it was only after Mr Bel made several antisemitic comments, which extended to defending Adolf Hitler, on the Young Free Speech society Facebook page that the Counter Terrorism Unit began to pay attention to him.

It was said that an officer from the Prevent Programme, a division of the Counter Terrorism Unit, spoke to Mr Bel in person. However, Mr Bel continued to espouse “angry and racist views online,” prosecutors said.

In a raid of Mr Bel’s house, anti-terror police found Nazi memorabilia and books about Hitler, with Mr Bel reportedly adding: “I have got more extremist material than that, I have got the Anarchist Cookbook,” which is a guide to making bombs and illegal drugs at home, written during the 1970s.

Jurors also heard that when the police were examining Mr Bel’s phone, which Mr Bel apparently attempted to hide from them, they found conversations between him and Alex Davies, founder of National Action.

In addition to controversial images, they also reportedly found an article written about Mr Bel for the anti-fascist website, Hope Not Hate. The article was said to have included Mr Bel’s online posts, in which he was said to have written: “Jews are parasites, well known for nepotism and financial corruption, with a background of communist revolution and pretty much every progressive movement from there… Extermination is the best option for them.”

The trial continues.

Last year, members of the proscribed National Action group were sentenced to prison, having engaged, amongst other activities, in far-right stickering and recruitment campaigns.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Image credit: Hope Not Hate

A former student at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) has reportedly been refunded his fees after he was forced to leave the University due to a ”toxic antisemitic environment”.

Noah Lewis was called a “white supremacist Nazi” and accused of covering up war crimes when he proposed to write a dissertation on bias against Israel at the United Nations. He said that fellow students labelled him and other Jews pejoratively as “Zionists” and left antisemitic slurs on lockers, desks and toilet walls.

The student, originally from Canada, matriculated in 2018 but lodged a formal complaint in May 2019 after finding his mental health adversely affected by the stress and extreme discomfort caused by the ”toxic antisemitic environment” which ultimately led him to quit the University and return home.

In July 2019, the University offered an apology for the ”emotional trauma…experienced due to the perceived antisemitic discrimination which he had to endure” and recommended compensation of £500.

Mr Lewis appealed the decision with assistance from UK Lawyers for Israel (UKLFI), however, and in March 2020 the appeal panel determined that the original decision ”had not been adequate” and recommended an external investigation, even if the University reached a settlement with Mr Lewis.

A settlement has reportedly been reached, with Mr Lewis refunded £15,000 in full in December 2020.

Jonathan Turner, Executive Director of UKLFI Charitable Trust, said: ”The panel grasped the nettle and has set a benchmark for best practice which should be followed in other cases of an antisemitic environment. We hope that other students who experience antisemitism at universities will now be encouraged to object.”

A spokesperson for the University said: ”SOAS is extremely concerned about any allegations of antisemitism at our school. Diversity is key to the SOAS mission and we want all our students to feel welcome and supported in their studies. We cannot comment on any individual student case or the outcomes of any appeal. However, where we have established an independent panel as part of a complaints process, we would of course consider the findings of such a panel thoroughly and take appropriate action.”

SOAS has long been a hotbed of antisemitism among UK campuses and has not adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism. Last September, a professor at the University labelled Israel as a “virus” and said that it “exploited the Holocaust” for its own political agenda.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]