Prosecutions

Britain has one of the strongest legislative frameworks in Europe for fighting hate crime and extremism, but it is not being used. Though antisemitic hate crime has risen to record levels, the list of prosecutions has yet to record more than two dozen prosecutions per annum, out of more than 15,000 hate crimes that are prosecuted annually. In the absence of law enforcement, antisemitism will continue to spread, antisemites will become bolder, attacks on Jews will become more common and more ferocious, the Jewish community will become more fearful, and the golden era for Jews in Britain will have ended. The situation has become so desperate that we have now launched multiple lawsuits, including judicial review proceedings against the Crown Prosecution Service and private prosecutions of individuals that the authorities have failed to prosecute themselves. The Crown Prosecution Service refuses to disclose how many cases of antisemitism it prosecutes each year, so we maintain our own register of prosecutions.

9

antisemitic hate crime cases prosecuted

14

antisemitic criminals convicted

10,679

total hate crime cases prosecuted

Paul Dunleavy, a seventeen-year-old teenager from Rugby who was involved in the neo-Nazi Feuerkrieg Division group pleaded not guilty to preparing acts of terrorism at Birmingham Crown Court. The court was told that he had to pass a test to prove his hatred of Jews, he had “graphic” video footage of a terrorist attack on his telephone, had praised terrorists, and had searched the internet for information about guns, including how to convert a gun that fires blanks into a live weapon. Jurors wer also told that he had adopted Nazi and white supremacist ideology and participated in far-right chat rooms where he aspired to leading his own “local unit” and called for volunteers.

Dunleavy was sentenced to five years and six months in jail, with the judge describing his terrorist efforts as “inept”.

Paul Biaylock and Ian Routledge pleaded guilty to racially aggravated disorderly behaviour after they shouted “go back to where you came from” at a group of Jews wearing skullcaps on a Carlisle train.

They were fined at Carlisle and District Magistrates’ Court in Rickergate, with Biaylock ordered to pay £200 and Routledge given a £250 fine. Both also incurred additional costs and a victim surcharge. The fines were higher owing to the racial element of the offences.

David Holmes, 63, was arrested after Derbyshire Police identified it from a fingerprint on the neo-Nazi stickers, including phrases such as “Hitler was right” and “Muslim scum out”, that he was affixing to bus stops and street furniture around the county. He admitted his actions and was let out on bail, during which time he displayed Ku Klux Klan and Confederate flags in his window and left racist messages for his neighbours, invoking Nazis, and threatened one of them. He was rearrested and appeared at Derby Crown Court, where he had previously pleaded to numerous charges, including racially aggravated harassment, racially aggravated criminal damage and witness intimidation.

Holmes was jailed for twelve months, given a two-year restraining order not to contact his neighbour and a two-year criminal behaviour order prohibiting him from placing stickers on any items visible to other people.

Two brothers aged fifteen and sixteen attacked a 54-year-old senior rabbi visiting the UK from Israel for a wedding. They shouted “f*** Jews” and “dirty Jew” during the attack on Shabbat in November 2019 in Stamford Hill before running off laughing. The rabbi was left with an injured back and a bleeding finger and immediately left the UK. The teenagers surrendered to a police station the following month after CCTV footage of the attack was released, and they were charged with racially aggravated common assault.

The two brothers, who pleaded not guilty at Stratford Magistrates’ Court, were sentenced by Stratford Youth Court. They were given a twelve-month Youth Rehabilitation Order and sentenced to an electronically-monitored curfew from 06:00 to 18:00 for just 30 days, as well as a victim surcharge of £21 each. They were also both ordered to attend a ten-day Diversity Awareness Programme.

Alice Cutter, 23, used the name “Buchenwald Princess” to enter the online “National Action Miss Hitler 2016” contest in June 2016 in order to attract new members to the neo-Nazi terrorist group National Action. Cutter, of Sowerby Bridge near Halifax, had also disseminated antisemitic and racist material and had joked about gassing synagogues and using a Jew’s head as a football. Her entrance into the beauty pageant came just weeks after her then-partner, Mark Jones, 25 and also from Sowerby Bridge, performed a Hitler salute on a visit to the execution chamber of the Buchenwald concentration camp. Jones was reportedly a “leader and strategist” of the organisation and a former member fo the BNP’s youth wing. Both were convicted with membership of a proscribed neo-Nazi terrorist organisation, along with Garry Jack, 24 and from Birmingham, who reportedly self-identifies as a Nazi, and Connor Scothern, 19 and fromNottingham, who was apparently a practicing Muslim and activist with the extremist anti-fascist group, Antifa, before joining National Action.

All four defendants were found guilty at Birmingham Crown Court, with Cutter being sentenced to there years in prison and Jones to five-and-a-half years. Jack was given four-and-a-half years in prison and Southern a sentence of eighteen months in jail. (Another defendant, Daniel Ward, 28, pleaded guilty to being a member of National Action last year and was jailed for three years.)

Adam Cassidy, 20, confronted a Jewish family in broad daylight in August 2019 on a busy high street in St Albans, calling the parents “dirty Jews” and attacking their baby in its pram. He also kicked hoarding at the family. The altercation was filmed and the footage went viral. Raised in Egypt, Cassidy claimed in his defence that the victims had called him a “dirty Arab” first, a contention that the judge did not believe. Cassidy was found guilty of racially aggravated assault and of using an antisemitic slur.

Cassidy was sentenced to six weeks in prison. The judge said that a community order was not imposed because, as it was a racially aggravated office, the sentence was uplifted. No costs order was issued due to limited means.

Andrew Prendergast, 47, broke into Blackpool Reform Synagogue on 19th November 2019, leaving his blood strewn across walls, offices and the prayer hall. He had also damaged the alarm in a bid to destroy it. He told police officers: “synagogue, synagogue, f***ing blow them up. We don’t want them f***ers over here. I’m f***ing English and f***ing proud,” reportedly admitting to them that burglary was religiously motivated. He pleaded guilty to burglary and racially aggravated criminal damage and appeared at Preston Crown Court to be sentenced. According to the defence, he suffered from paranoid schizophrenia and a breakdown and was on drugs at the time.

Prendergast was sentenced to eight months consecutively for burglary and racially aggravated criminal damage suspended for two years, and was ordered to carry out 50 rehabilitation days and a nine-month drug rehabilitation requirement.

A teenager pleaded guilty at Highbury Corner Youth Court to racially and religiously aggravated common assault after setting a Jewish passenger’s hair on fire while using racist epithets. The incident took place in March 2018 on the number 210 bus. The then-fourteen-year-old asked the victim: “are you a P**i or a Jew?” He then proceeded to singe the victim’s hair and, when confronted by the victim, said: “Are you Jewish? You can’t be Jewish because you don’t have horns. Do Jews keep money under their caps?” The teenager also threatened to beat up the victim and smash the laptop that he was working on.

The teenager was sentenced to a four-month youth rehabilitation order and ordered to write a letter of apology to the victim and pay him £100 in compensation. The fourth month of rehabilitation was due to the racist nature of the attack. The teenager was also given an activity requirement of eight hours and one-to-one behavioural sessions with educational staff to combat racial discrimination.

Jack Reed, 17, had begun drafting a manifesto titled “A Manual for practical and sensible guerrilla warfare against the kike system in the Durham City area, Sieg Heil”. Other items seized from the teenager’s Durham home included a copy of Mein Kampf and material on explosives and firearms. He was charged with preparation of terrorist acts between October 2017 and March 2019. The prosecution claimed that he had become an adherent of neo-Nazism and described Hitler as a “brave man”, confiding to his diary that he hoped to follow in the Nazi leader’s footsteps. A unanimous jury found him guilty.

Reed was sentenced at Manchester Crown Court to six years and eight months in prison, and was also given a separate custodial sentence for unrelated child sexual offences against a schoolgirl. (A year after the case, following Mr Reed’s eighteenth birthday, a judge ruled that it was permissible to name him.)

3

antisemitic hate crime cases prosecuted

3

antisemitic criminals convicted

10,950

total hate crime cases prosecuted

Michal Szewczuk, 19, and Oskar Dunn-Koczorowski, 18, were members of the Sonnenkrieg Division, a neo-Nazi group. Both Szewczuk and Dunn-Koczorowski posted propaganda that encouraged terrorist attacks and suggested targets that included Jews and non-whites. They also glorified the Norwegian neo-Nazi terrorist Anders Breivik, suggested that Prince Harry should be shot for being a “race traitor,” and said that white women who date with non-white men should be hanged.

Szewczuk pleaded guilty at the Old Bailey (via videolink from HMP Belmarsh) to one count under Section 1 (encouraging terrorism) and five counts under Section 58 (possession of material likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism) of the Terrorism Act 2006 and was sentenced to four years and three months in prison, while Dunn-Koczorowski pleaded guilty to two counts under Section 1 of the Terrorism Act 2006 and was sentenced to an eighteen-month detention and training order.

Alkarim Versi, a local resident, approached a synagogue in Hendon, North London, and started behaving erratically, intimidating the security officers and making abusive gestures. He was convicted of racially aggravated intentional harassment at Harrow Crown Court.

Versi was handed a three-month prison sentence, suspended for fifteen months, and a £115 victim surcharge. He was also required to undertake rehabilitation activity.

James Malcolm pleaded guilty to behaving in a threatening or abusive manner, maliciously damaging headstones (having caused £27,000 of damage to 27 headstones, nearby which was found a swastika scrawled on a piece of glass) and scribbling offensive slogans after drawing antisemitic and neo-Nazi symbols (including a Star of David being hung on gallows) on an MSP’s office. He also yelled “Heil Hitler” at a sixteen-year-old in a park and vandalised two national parks and a police cell with his own blood, drawing swastikas. Nazi and antisemitic slogans, including “death to all Jews” and “death to all non-whites” were found on the walls in his home.

Malcolm was jailed for two years and four months at Glasgow Sheriff Court.

23

antisemitic hate crime cases prosecuted

27

antisemitic criminals convicted

12,828

total hate crime cases prosecuted

Adam Thomas, 22, was found guilty of being a member of the neo-Nazi National Action, which was proscribed as a terrorist organisation at the culmination of a long campaign by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others. Thomas stood trial with his partner, Claudia Patatas, and Daniel Bogunovic, who were also convicted of the same charge alongside him at Birmingham Crown Court. The couple gave their son the middle name “Adolf” and owned a large collection of Nazi and far-right memorabilia.

Thomas was jailed for six years and six months, Patatas for five years and Bogunovic for six years and four months. Three other men had also pleaded guilty to membership of the group.

Joseph Brogan from Gorton had two previous convictions for racially aggravated offences before shouting “child killers” and “you people should live in Israel” at demonstrators at a rally against antisemitism in Manchester in September 2018, as well as performing a Nazi salute towards them.

Brogan was jailed for six months by Manchester Crown Court.

Two teenage boys pleaded guilty to racially/religiously aggravated public order and assault at Medway Magistrates’ Court after throwing stones at a Jewish family on Minster beach in Kent and shouting “Jews” at them.

The teenagers were sentenced to a Youth Rehabilitation Order for twelve months, as well as 160 hours of unpaid work, supervision by the Probation Service for twelve months and a 19:00-07:00 curfew for four months.

Leighton Johnson from Swansea was captured making a Nazi salute to Tottenham Hotspur supporters at Liberty Stadium in April 2017. Johnson denied causing racially aggravated alarm or distress and claimed that he was merely waving to a family member about going for a cigarette.

Johnson was sentenced by Swansea Crown Court to 150 hours of unpaid work and a twelve-month community order, was ordered to pay £1,085 in costs and was banned from Swansea City home matches for three years.

Alberto Busalacchi repeatedly shouted “Heil Hitler” at local Jews and shoplifted at a kosher bakery in Stamford Hill in January 2018.

Busalacchi pleaded guilty to racially or religiously aggravated harassment and theft at Stratford Magistrates’ Court and was sentenced to six weeks’ imprisonment, suspended for twelve months, and ordered to pay £400 victim compensation.

Austin Ross of Newport set fire to his old secondary school and a Masonic hall (which had a Star of David on the front), causing tens of thousands of pounds of damage, and spray-painted swastikas on a church, school, the University of South Wales campus and other local landmarks around his hometown. His Facebook account also contained links to a Hitler Youth account.

Ross pleaded guilty to fifteen charges, including arson, racially aggravated harassment and racially aggravated damage, and was jailed for six years by Cardiff Crown Court.

Peter Morgan, a far-right extremist, was convicted in Scotland of preparing acts of terrorism after being found with a bomb-making kit in his flat, along with antisemitic, anti-Muslim and neo-Nazi materials. This included al-Qaeda and IRA literature and a racist and antisemitic novel that inspired numerous historic terrorist attacks. No target for the bombing was identified.

The High Court in Edinburgh jailed Morgan for twelve years and a further three years under licence.

Jonathan Jennings from Carmarthenshire posted a number of messages on the Gab social networking website in which he threatened the Jewish community, Muslims and public figures. He had threatened Jews that if they did not behave themselves they would share the same fate as Muslims. Another message stated that Hitler was born too soon.

Jennings was sentenced at Swansea Crown Court to sixteen months’ imprisonment after having pleaded guilty to six counts of publishing or distributing written material intended to stir up religious hatred, contrary to section 29C of the Public Order Act 1986, and four counts of sending communications with intent to cause distress or anxiety, contrary to section 1 of the Malicious Communications Act 1988.

Christopher Lythgoe, 32, of Warrington, and Matthew Hankinson, 24, of Newton-le-Willows, Merseyside, were convicted of membership in the neo-Nazi National Action group, which was proscribed as a terrorist organisation at the culmination of a long campaign by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others. Lythgoe, the leader of the group, was found not guilty of encouragement to murder for allegedly giving Jack Renshaw, 23, of Skelmersdale, Lancashire, permission to kill Rosie Cooper MP on behalf of the group. Jurors at the Old Bailey were unable to decide whether Renshaw, Michal Trubini, 35, from Warrington or Andrew Clarke, 33, from Prescot, Merseyside were guilty of membership in National Action, and found Garron Helm, 24, from Seaforth in Merseyside not guilty of being a member of the group.

Lythgoe was jailed for eight years and Hankinson for six years.

Sheroz Iqbal sent antisemitic e-mails to members of the North London Orthodox Jewish community. The e-mails included references to “Your Zionist murdering community.” Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol, reported the incident to the Metropolitan Police Service. Iqbal was previously convicted after pleading guilty to making antisemitic death threats in September 2016 and was given a suspended sentence in that case of sixteen weeks’ imprisonment and 80 hours’ unpaid work.

Iqbal was sentenced at Thames Magistrates’ Court to eleven weeks in jail suspended for eighteen months and 60 hours’ unpaid community work, and was fined £115 and required to pay £85 court costs.

Husnain Rashid, a 34-year-old ISIS supporter from Lancashire, made repeated calls to murder British citizens, sending instructions in 300,000 posts on the heavily-encrypted Telegram network in just eighteen months and urging Islamists to wage jihad by murdering Jews.

Rashid was found guilty at Woolwich Crown Court on three counts of engaging in conduct in preparation of terrorist acts, and one count of engaging in conduct in preparation of terrorist acts, and was sentenced to life in prison, of which he must serve at least 25 years.

Bashir Shamraize, a 34-year-old business-owner from Bradford, pleaded guilty to racially aggravated threatening behaviour following an antisemitic rant on a flight from Tel Aviv to Manchester, which he blamed on smoking cannabis during Ramadan.

Shamraize was ordered by Manchester Magistrates’ Court to complete a twelve-month community order, 100 hours’ unpaid work, attend a course to address his cannabis use and pay £505 in costs.

Stephen Panagi gave a Nazi salute and shouted “Heil Hitler” from his car at parents taking children into the Wolfson Hillel Primary School in Southgate, North London on 20 April 2018, a significant date in neo-Nazi circles as it was Hitler’s birthday.

Panagi was sentenced to 100 hours’ unpaid community service after pleading guilty. He was also ordered to pay £50 in compensation, a £85 surcharge, £85 in costs and to attend a session on Holocaust education.

Holocaust revisionist, Alison Chabloz, from Glossop in Derbyshire, penned and sang three songs mocking Holocaust survivors and claiming that the Holocaust was a Jewish fraud. The songs were uploaded to YouTube. The lyrics included: “Did the Holocaust ever happen? Was it just a bunch of lies? Seems that some intend to pull the wool over our eyes. Eternal wandering liars haven’t got a clue, and when it comes to usury, victim’s always me and you”; “Now Auschwitz, holy temple, is a theme park just for fools, the gassing zone a proven hoax, indoctrination rules”; “Tell us another, come on, my brother, reap it, the cover, for tribal gain. Safe in our tower, now is the hour, money and power, we have no shame”; and “History repeats itself, no limit to our wealth, thanks to your debts we’re bleeding you dry. We control your media, control all your books and TV, with the daily lies we’re feeding, suffering victimisation. Sheeple have no realisation, you shall pay, all the way, until the break of day.” Chabloz was convicted in the first case of its kind, following a private prosecution by Campaign Against Antisemitism, which the CPS eventually agreed to take over.

District Judge John Zani found Chabloz guilty on all counts of criminal offences under the Communications Act at Westminster Magistrates’ Court. She was sentenced to a twenty-week prison sentence suspended for two years, 180 hours of unpaid community service and an indefinite restraining order against contacting two leaders of Campaign Against Antisemitism, as well as an order banning her from social media for twelve months. She was also ordered to pay a £115 victim surcharge, and costs of £600.

Wayne Bell, a prominent member of National Action before it was banned in 2016, published hundreds of posts on Twitter and a Russian social media site, including one which described Jewish people as “destructive” and “vile”. Neo-Nazi National Action was proscribed a terrorist organisation at the culmination of a long campaign by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others. Bell had also daubed neo-Nazi graffiti on pillars and lamp posts in his hometown of Castleford. His online activity took place between March and December 2016 when he set up a profile on the Russian site VK using the pseudonym Celtic Raider. Among his postings was an image of a man being hanged by a rope with a Star of David on his forehead.

Bell was sentenced to four years and three months in jail at Leeds Crown Court. His sentence was added on to a 30-month jail term he is already serving for involvement in violent clashes with left-wing activists in Liverpool in 2016. 

Jack Renshaw, 22, made speeches describing Jewish people as “parasites” and proclaimed himself a Nazi. Renshaw made a speech on Blackpool promenade in March 2016 at a far-right demonstration during which he stated that Hitler had got it wrong by showing mercy to Jewish people. In another speech at a far-right gathering in North Yorkshire, he said that Jewish people did not deserve to be shown any mercy and needed to be eradicated. He also showed support for the neo-Nazi National Action which was proscribed as a terrorist organisation after a long campaign by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others. The CPS decided to prosecute Renshaw after lawyers for Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to declare our intention to launch a private prosecution.

Renshaw was sentenced to three years’ imprisonment by Preston Crown Court for stirring up racial hatred and calling for the genocide of the Jewish people.

Neo-Nazi leader Jeremy Bedford-Turner gave a speech in 2015 at a demonstration called to protest against the “Jewification” of Golders Green. In his speech to neo-Nazis, surrounded by police, Mr Bedford-Turner said that: “…all politicians are nothing but a bunch of puppets dancing to a Jewish tune, and the ruling regimes in the West for the last one hundred years have danced to the same tune.” Evoking medieval libels which claimed that Jews drank the blood of non-Jewish children, Mr Bedford-Turner told his followers, one third of whom were from the violent far-right National Rebirth of Poland group, that the French Revolution and both World Wars were massacres perpetrated by Jews. He concluded that England was “merry” during the period of the expulsion of Jews from England and demanded: “Let’s free England from Jewish control.” Campaign Against Antisemitism had to battle the CPS since 2015 to take on the case, eventually winning a landmark judicial review which forced the CPS to prosecute Mr Bedford-Turner.

Bedford-Turner was jailed for twelve months after being unanimously convicted by a jury of incitement to racial hatred at Southwark Crown Court.

Mark Meechan, who uses the online name Count Dankula, posted to YouTube a video of a dog he had trained to give Nazi salutes when it hears certain phrases, including “gas the Jews” and “Sieg Heil”. Meechan, a UKIP member from Coatbridge North Lanarkshire, denied committing an offence and said that he had made the video to annoy his girlfriend in April 2016. He subsequently attempted to overturn the conviction and sentence but was refused leave to appeal by the Sheriff Court in Edinburgh. In a YouTube video, Meechan suggested that he would refuse to pay the £800 fine by the October deadline or carry out any other punishment or community order that the court may impose. His appeal was refused in August.

Meehan was fined £800 at Airdrie Sheriff Court for an offence under the Communications Act.

Aweys Shikhey, a delivery driver of Somali origin from Tottenham, discussed killing “the old woman Elizabeth” and former Prime Minister David Cameron and attacking Jewish football fans with an AK-47 at nearby White Hart Lane and Stamford Hill on online chat room. He also applied for loans to fund a trip to join ISIS, securing £10,000 from Barclays for a “wedding”.

Shikhey was convicted of preparing terrorist acts at the Old Bailey and jailed for eight years.

Lee Munns posted an antisemitic tweet in August 2017, in which he wrote that “Hitler isn’t the only one that can silence 70,000 Yids” after Chelsea F.C. beat Tottenham Hotspur 2-1 at Wembley Stadium.

Munns was sentenced to 70 hours supervised community service and a £85 fine after being found guilty of committing an offence under section 4a Public Order Act 1986.

David Bitton, a 40-year-old from Altrincham, tweeted around 600 posts on Twitter over the course of one weekend in May 2016, many directed at Greater Manchester Police, making highly abusive and antisemitic, racist and anti-gay comments. In the police interview, Bitton claimed that he had only written the tweets in order to gain followers and deleted them soon after.

Bitton was jailed for four years by Minshull Street Crown Court after pleading guilty to thirteen separate charges of sending racist and threatening communications.

Marcin Zych pleaded guilty to three driving offences and two charges of causing racially or religiously aggravated harassment, alarm and distress at Highbury Corner Magistrates’ Court following an incident on 28th January 2018 in which he had shouted “You f***ing Jew” at another motorist after crashing his car and failing to remain at the scene and provide a breath sample to police officers.

Zych was fined £250, ordered to pay court costs and £50 in compensation to his victim, sentenced to 100 hours of compulsory unpaid community work and disqualified from holding or obtaining a driving licence for 18 months, however he was offered a 4-month reduction in the period of disqualification if he satisfactorily completed a government-approved course.

Jason Galvin, 46, from Oxford pleaded guilty to using a public communication network to cause annoyance, inconvenience or anxiety under section 127 of the Communication Act 2003 at Oxford Magistrates’ Court. He had sent messages such as “you Jewish f***ing c***” and “all you people are the same” on 21st April 2017 to a Jewish man whom he incorrectly believed had failed to pay for his plumbing services.

Galvin was ordered to pay a fine of £300, costs of £85, compensation of £100 and a victim surcharge £30. He was also referred to a restorative justice programme to facilitate an apology.

22

antisemitic hate crime cases prosecuted

24

antisemitic criminals convicted

14,151

total hate crime cases prosecuted

Timothy Rustige, 68, of Altrincham, pleaded guilty to eight counts of criminal damage at Central Manchester Magistrates’ Court following a graffiti campaign between September 2016 and August 2017 that saw him scrawl slogans on the River Bollin Aqueduct in Dunham Massey. The graffiti included anti-Israel slogans such as “BDS” and “Gaza bleeds”, but also antisemitic slogans such as “ZioNazis”, accompanied by a Star of David.

Rustige was sentenced by magistrates to a 12-month community order with 140 hours of unpaid work, and he was ordered to pay £500 in compensation.

Glenn Okafor, 32, of West Norwood, was convicted of two counts of religiously-aggravated intentional harassment, alarm or distress at Stratford Magistrates’ Court. At approximately 9:00 on 4th March 2017, as Jewish families walked to synagogue for Saturday morning prayers, he shouted: “F*** you Jewish people…you lot should go back to your own country” and “We will sort you out. I have friends. I’ll be back tomorrow. We will wipe you out.” In an apparent reference to a conspiracy theory that white Jews are in fact imposters and that the supposed real Jews are black, he also shouted: “We are the real Jews”.

Okafor was sentenced at Thames Magistrates’ Court to a 12-month community order with 200 hours of unpaid work, and he was ordered to pay £150 to his victims and costs of £620 to the Crown Prosecution Service.

Allister ‘Ally’ Coutts was convicted of causing racially-aggravated intentional alarm and distress at Aberdeen Sheriff Court for intimidating a Jewish businessman and telling security guards that ISIS is controlled by Mossad, the Israeli spy agency.

Coutts was ordered to pay a fine of £175.

José Manuel Silva was convicted of racially and religiously aggravated intentional harassment, alarm, distress and criminal damage, including shouting “burn” at Jewish passersby, including children, in Golders Green in London.

Silva was sentenced to 28 days in prison and ordered to pay costs of £85 and a fine of £165.

Richard Reed was convicted of religiously-aggravated harassment at Ipswich Magistrates’ Court for shouting “I’m going to kill you f***ing Jews, I know where you are” and making gun gestures at a recognisably Jewish man who had entered a pub in Suffolk with friends on 5th August 2017. The landlady called the police, who arrested Reed at the scene.

Reed was fined £300 and ordered to pay court costs of £85, a victim surcharge of £30 and compensation of £100.

Ineta Winiarski, 33, was convicted of three counts of racially-aggravated assault at Thames Magistrates’ Court. On 3rd July 2017, she approached Jewish wedding guests who her husband was already attacking and whipped Ben Herbst with a dog’s leash and shouted “F***ing Jew”. Ben Herbst’s father, Israel Herbst rushed to protect his son from the attack and was hit by Winiarski in the shoulder. She shouted antisemitic abuse throughout the incident, including shouting “Kurwa” (a Polish expletive) and reportedly telling the Jewish wedding guests in broken English: “Dog stay here England, you Jews go away.”

Winiarski was sentenced to 12-weeks in prison, suspended for a year, as well as being ordered to participate in a rehabilitation programme lasting no longer than 20 days. She was also ordered to pay £40 to each of her three victims, as well as £230 in victim surcharges, and £85 in costs to the Crown Prosecution Service.

Kasimiersz Winiarski, 62, was convicted of two counts of common assault at Thames Magistrates’ Court for attacking guests at a Jewish wedding along with his wife on 3rd July 2017.

Winiarski was sentenced to 12-weeks in prison, suspended for a year, as well as being ordered to participate in a rehabilitation programme lasting no longer than 20 days. He was also ordered to pay £40 to each of his two victims, as well as £115 in victim surcharges, and £85 in costs to the Crown Prosecution Service.

James Evans, 70, pleaded guilty to racially aggravated harassment without violence at Worcester Crown Court for sending and hand delivering over 150 racist and offensive letters to his Member of Parliament between June 2016 and January 2017, often multiple times per day. In the letters he claimed that “Zionist Jews” are members of a “death cult” and they will “get us all killed in the Third World War”. It was his third such offence.

Evans was fined £250.

Paul Pawlowski, 90, of Burgess Hill, was convicted of racially or religiously aggravated harassment, alarm or distress at Brighton Magistrates’ Court for displaying a placard including the words: “Pull the chain, flush the Jew mafia down the drain” on the Old Steine, Brighton on 28th May 2017. He told the police officers who arrested him that if they took his antisemitic placard and leaflets, he would walk through the streets shouting his views.

Pawlowski was fined £150 and ordered to pay costs of £100 and a victim surcharge of £85.

‘Christopher’ Charles Panayi was convicted of racially aggravated criminal damage over a road rage incident in January 2017 during which he stopped his car multiple times, exposed and parted his buttocks, called a Jewish man a “F***ing Jewish prick”, punched the Jewish man’s car window and smashed his wing mirror.

Panayi was ordered to carry out 200 hours of unpaid community service work, and to pay £1,000 in compensation and £620 in prosecution costs at Hendon Magistrates’ Court. He was also handed a 12-week prison sentence, suspended for a year.

Mark Harding, 48, of Walsall was convicted of sending offensive communications at Hendon Magistrates’ Court for telling a fan of a rival football team to “stick your head in the oven like the Jew you are” on Twitter in November 2016, and expressing hope that the fan would “die in a freak car accident”.

Harding was ordered to pay £150 compensation and perform 60 hours of community service. He was also given an 18-month suspended prison sentence.

Michael Demetriou was convicted of racially aggravated harassment, alarm and distress for shouting “Heil Hitler” and “F***ing Jews” at Jewish victims in London in August 2016.

Demetriou was ordered to pay £640 in costs, and discharged on condition that he commits no further offences for six months.

Lawrence Burns was found guilty of two charges of publishing threatening, abusive or insulting written material with intent or likely intent to stir up racial hatred by a jury at Cambridge Crown Court, over his efforts to spread “vile and offensive sentiments”. He spoke in a YouTube video memorialising American white supremacist leader David Lane, accusing Jews of being “parasites” that wanted to create a “mongrelised race”.

Burns was sentenced to four years in prison by a judge at Peterborough Crown Court. On appeal, his sentence was reduced to two-and-a-half-years.

Abdul Ahaed, 29, was arrested on 26th November 2016 after calling a hostel worker a “Black n*****”. He became very abusive to police and while at the police station, shouted “Jewish c***” on two separate occasions at a police officer. Ahaed pleaded guilty at Wood Green Crown Court to two counts of racially aggravated intentional harassment alarm and distress.

Ahaed was sentenced on 24th February 2017 to a 12-month community order, a 6-week curfew between 23:00 and 6:00, a 10-day rehabilitation activity requirement, a victim surcharge of £85 and payments of £100 each to the hostel worker and the police officer.

Jaroslaw Goloshko shouted “Heil Hitler” and performed a Nazi salute directed at Jewish passersby in Stamford Hill on Christmas Day 2016. He was spotted by volunteers from Shomrim Stamford Hill whilst out on patrol. They followed him and called the police who came and arrested him. Goloshko was convicted of a racially aggravated public order offence.

Goloshko failed to attend court for sentencing on 2nd March 2017 and a warrant for his arrest was issued.

Sean Creighton, 45, of Enfield, was found to be in possession of the White Resistance Manual 2.4, which police described as the kind of document likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism. One of Crieghton’s social media posts said “You will never catch me shedding a tear for a n****r, Jew, commie or queer.” One image he posted showed “a number of trees, from each of which is hung one or more Jewish people with the word ‘Jew’ placed upon them by way of a sign.”

Creighton was sentenced to four years’ imprisonment for seven offences of incitement to racial hatred, and five years’ imprisonment for a terrorism offence, to run concurrently. He was also made subject to a notification order for 15 years.

Kristian Omilian, 30, stuck antisemitic stickers on a synagogue in Auckland Road, Cambridge, in November 2016. On 9th February, he pleaded guilty to a racially and religiously aggravated public order offence. 

Omillian has been sentenced to a 12-month community order. He was handed a restraining order which prevents him from stepping within 100 yards of the synagogues in Thompsons Lane and Auckland Road and he must participate in up to 15 days of rehabilitation activity and undertake 120 hours of unpaid work.

Clive Wilson, 46, admitted shouting: “Shame Hitler didn’t finish the job, Heil Hitler, Heil Hitler, Allahu Akbar” at volunteers from Stamford Hill Shomrim who suspected him of involvement in burglaries. He had earlier denied the charge.

Wilson was fined £160 and made to pay a £30 victim surcharge and £85 in court costs.

A 17-year-old neo-Nazi from Bradford and member of the proscribed terrorist organisation, National Action, who cannot be named for legal reasons, made a homemade pipe bomb in order to start an “all-out race war”. The boy, who praised the killer of Jo Cox MP, was arrested by the North East Counter Terrorism Unit (CTU) in July 2016 after a member of the public alerted police to a series of Snapchat photos, including threats to British Jews and an image of the pipe bomb.

The boy was handed a three-year Youth Rehabilitation Order and ordered to receive intensive counselling from a deradicalisation expert.

John Nimmo sent antisemitic messages to various Jewish people. One message to Luciana Berger MP, who is Jewish, said: “You are going to get it like Jo Cox did. So you better watch out Jewish scum” and included a photograph of a large kitchen knife.

Nimmo was sentenced to two years and three months in prison. He pleaded guilty to nine charges relating to grossly offensive, threatening and false communications. His sentence was increased on account of his convictions for previous similar offences and the racist nature of his messages.

Patrick Joseph Delany, 19, of Coggeshall, pelted Jewish shoppers, including a 13-year-old child, with 20 to 30 gas canisters and shouted “Hitler is coming, Heil Hitler, Heil Hitler, Heil Hitler” on 6th January 2016. He pleaded guilty to a charge of causing religiously-aggravated harassment, alarm or distress at Wood Green Crown Court.

Delaney was sentenced to six months in prison.

Damian Filipek pleaded guilty to 18 counts of criminal damage and 2 counts of racially-aggravated criminal damage at Maidstone Crown Court following a drunken night out on 17th November 2016, during which, he and his friend, Sebastian Tancula, painted slogans on shops, homes, and a public toilet in Tunbridge Wells. The graffiti consisted of football slogans such as “Wisla Sharks” accompanied by “Amti Jude” meaning “anti-Jewish” and a star of David. In Poland the fans of Wisla Sharks are infamous for violence and antisemitism.

Filipek was sentenced to 22 weeks in prison.

Sebastian Tancula pleaded guilty to 18 counts of criminal damage and 2 counts of racially-aggravated criminal damage at Maidstone Crown Court following a drunken night out on 17th November 2016, during which, he and his friend, Damian Filipek, painted slogans on shops, homes, and a public toilet in Tunbridge Wells. The graffiti consisted of football slogans such as “Wisla Sharks” accompanied by “Amti Jude” meaning “anti-Jewish” and a star of David. In Poland the fans of Wisla Sharks are infamous for violence and antisemitism.

Tancula was sentenced to 22 weeks in prison.

Daren Thomas, of Westcliffe-on-Sea, sent a series of antisemitic death threats to a Jewish man, also threatening his wife and children, between July and August 2016. One message said: “Have you seen inglorious barstard’ [victim’s name]? The swastika on the forehead is a nice touch! Nazi jew boy!” His messages made multiple mentions of the victim’s family, including: “I’m going to find your home retard. I know your married, and God, I hope you have kids!! I want them to see you on your f***ing knees!” Thomas was convicted of religiously-aggravated harassment.

Thomas was sentenced to 16 weeks in prison, suspended for 12 months conditional on his undertaking a behavioural training course. A restraining order was also put in place directing that he should not attempt to make contact with the victim and he was also ordered to pay a £300 victim surcharge.

20

antisemitic hate crime cases prosecuted

22

antisemitic criminals convicted

14,480

total hate crime cases prosecuted

Vandell Brooks, 39, who has a history of racism, pleaded guilty to shouting: “F***ing Jewish c***”  at volunteers from Stamford Hill Shomrim who suspected her of involvement in burglaries.

Brooks was fined £200, plus a £30 victim surcharge and £85 in court costs.

Philip Anthony Kuegler entered a branch of Tesco on 15th September 2016 where he assaulted staff and hurled a bottle at a police officer whilst shouting antisemitic abuse. He pleaded guilty to a charge of using religiously aggravated threatening words or behaviour to cause fear of violence and to assaulting a police officer at Llandrindod Wells Magistrates’ Court.

Kuegler was handed a six-month prison sentence suspended for two years, despite being a repeat offender. He was also ordered to complete 20 rehabilitation activity days and five hate crime sessions, pay the police officer £300 in compensation and pay a £115 victim surcharge.

Joshua Bonehill-Paine, a neo-Nazi, was convicted by a jury of racially-aggravated harassment under Section 32 (1)(a) of the Crime and Disorder Act 1998. He was tried over the racially-aggravated harassment of Jewish MP Luciana Berger.

Bonehill-Paine was sentenced to an additional two years in prison until at least April 2018, when he becomes eligible for release on licence. At the time, he was already serving a three year and four month sentence for his efforts to incite antisemitic demonstrations against the “Jewification” of parts of London.

Fabian Richardson, a fan of Chelsea Football Club, was convicted for performing 13 Nazi salutes in 15 minutes at a football match between Chelsea and Tottenham Hotspur in May 2015.

Richardson was banned from football grounds for three years and ordered to pay £365. He was also banned by Chelsea Football Club indefinitely.

Herminio Martinez, 86, was convicted for racially aggravated threatening behaviour after launching into an antisemitic tirade on 8th February 2016 following a city planning meeting at which Jewish businessmen were permitted to construct a block of flats.

Martinez was handed a two-month conditional discharge and ordered to pay £625 prosecution costs and a £15 victim surcharge.

Mr Bracey pleaded guilty to sending a grossly offensive antisemitic message to his neighbour, contrary to section 127 of the Communications Act 2003. He was convicted at North Wiltshire Magistrates’ Court.

Bracey was sentenced to a Community Order for 12 months to include 12 days complying with a Rehabilitation Activity Requirement.

Stuart Birnie was convicted of crossing a road to confront a Jewish pedestrian and shouting: “Oi you go f*** yourself, I’m going to kill all the Jews” and “Jews produce too many kids” on 17th December 2015. He was found guilty at Wood Green Crown Court.

Birnie was sentenced to six months in prison.

Shehroz Iqbal was convicted after making antisemitic death threats on 11th September 2016. Iqbal shouted “I’m going to kill you, I’m going to kill all of you Jews — you killed my brothers” at a Jewish motorist.

Iqbal pleaded guilty and was given a suspended sentence of 16 weeks’ imprisonment and 80 hours’ unpaid work.

Mark Zahra was convicted after shouting “F***ing Jewish scum. Why do you keep calling them [the police], because he’s Muslim?” at volunteers from Stamford Hill Shomrim, a Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol who were in fact assisting a Muslim man following a burglary. He was found guilty at Wood Green Crown Court of racially aggravated intentional harassment alarm or distress under section 4A of the Public Order Act.

Zahra was sentenced to a 12-month Community Order and ordered to comply with a 4-month a curfew.

Lee Savage was convicted of shouting “Shame Hitler didn’t kill all you Jews” and “Heil Hitler” at a Jewish family walking with their children in Haringey on 8th November 2015. He was found guilty at Wood Green Crown Court.

Savage was sentenced to 6 months in prison. He was not ordered to pay a fine, court costs or a victim surcharge.

Kamil Malmon, of Polish origin, wrote “F*** da juda” in pencil on the wall of Pinner Synagogue in June 2016. He was found guilty at Willesden Magistrates Court of racially or religiously aggravated criminal damage.

Malmon was given a 26 week prison sentence suspended for 12 months, and ordered to pay costs of £735.

James Evans sent 17 antisemitic letters to BBC employees. In the letters, Evans referred to Jews as “Yids”, “Zionists” and claimed “Jewish people rule the world.” He was found guilty of breaching a restraining order, banned from entering BBC Hereford and Worcester and making contact with members of staff.

Evans was given a new four year restraining order, ordered to pay a fine of £150, a 12 month community order, pay court costs of £135, and a victim surcharge of £75.

A 14-year-old boy, who could not be named because of his age, was arrested on 31st January 2016 in Stamford Hill after he put lit fireworks into the pockets of Jewish pedestrians as they passed him in the street. He was convicted by Hackney Youth Offender Panel of intentional harassment contrary to section 4A of the Public Order Act 1986.

The boy was sentenced to a one year referral order and ordered to pay £20 compensation.

17th June 2016

Geoffrey Ingram was involved in a minor motoring incident in June 2015 on Regent Street in London where he intimidated the victim, readily identifying him as Jewish because the victim was wearing a kippah, and shouted a series of antisemitic insults and threats. He pleaded guilty at Westminster Magistrates’ Court to racially aggravated abuse.

Ingram was sentenced to 16 weeks in prison, half on licence, and ordered to pay £250 in costs, £200 compensation and £80 victim surcharge.

Wilberth Henry was convicted of antisemitic harassment and threats after shouting “I’ll f***ing beat you up, you f***ing Jewish c***”. Henry failed to attend court, but was convicted in his absence on evidence given by a member of Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

Henry was sentenced to three months in prison.

Richard Prendiville, a fan of West Ham United Football Club, was convicted under the Crime and Disorder Act of racially aggravated harassment alarm and distress for singing antisemitic football songs on a train.

Prendeville was fined £220 and ordered to pay a victim surcharge of £23 plus £350 costs.

A man named only as R. Peacock, a fan of West Ham United Football Club, was convicted under the Crime and Disorder Act of racially aggravated harassment alarm and distress for singing antisemitic football songs on a train.

Peacock was fined £270 and ordered to pay a victim surcharge of £27 and £350 costs.

David Gregory shouted antisemitic insults in the street in Derby on 14th November 2015 after the terrorist attacks in Paris the previous day. He made numerous antisemitic comments and other remarks about people with dark skin.

Gregory was ordered to perform 150 hours of unpaid work and told to pay £85 costs and a £60 victim surcharge.

Darren Mark Lumb launched an antisemitic verbal attack in the street against Jon Trickett, Labour MP for Hemsworth in West Yorkshire, in January 2015. He pleaded guilty at Leeds Crown Court to one count of religiously aggravated harassment and stalking with fear of violence and one count of breaching an anti-social behaviour order.

Lumb was sentenced to a six-month prison sentence, suspended for 12 months.

Rashal Miah, an Uber driver, abused the Jewish driver of a school bus full of children who asked him to reverse his car which was travelling the wrong way down a one-way street on 29th September 2014. Miah left his black Mercedes and threatened the Jewish man who was identifiable as Jewish from his clothing. Miah had pleaded “not guilty” to shouting: “Shut the f*** up, you f***ing Jew. I will slit your throat.” He went on to refer to the school van driver as “Yehudi” (Jew) and said: “I’m going to kill all the Jews.” He was found guilty of racially and religiously aggravated harassment.

Miah was sentenced to a six month suspended prison sentence. He was also ordered to complete 100 hours of unpaid work and attend 15 days of ‘anger management’ training, as well as covering the prosecution costs of £900.

Thomas Flynn, yelled abuse, mimicked the sound of hissing gas and made Nazi salutes at Tottenham Hotspur fans during a match at Southampton’s St Mary’s Stadium on 19th December 2015. He was convicted at Southampton Magistrates’ Court.

Flynn was handed a three-year banning order preventing him from attending games in Britain and requiring him to hand his passport to police before major games abroad. He was also handed a 12-week community order and curfew, banned from going within a mile of St Mary’s Stadium four hours before and after kick-off on matchdays, and ordered to pay £145 in costs.

Michael Haydon, yelled abuse, mimicked the sound of hissing gas and made Nazi salutes at Tottenham Hotspur fans during a match at Southampton’s St Mary’s Stadium on 19th December 2015. He was convicted at Southampton Magistrates’ Court.

Haydon was handed a three-year banning order preventing him from attending games in Britain and requiring him to hand his passport to police before major games abroad. He was also handed a 12-week community order and curfew, banned from going within a mile of St Mary’s Stadium four hours before and after kick-off on matchdays, and ordered to pay £145 in costs.

12

antisemitic hate crime cases prosecuted

17

antisemitic criminals convicted

15,442

total hate crime cases prosecuted

Joshua Bonehill-Paine, was unanimously convicted by a jury at Southwark Crown Court of incitement to racial hatred for calling for “anti-Jewification” demonstrations in neighbourhoods with large Jewish populations. The demonstrations ended after action by Campaign Against Antisemitism. His Honour Judge Leonard QC called materials produced by Bonehill-Paine “about the most inflammatory documents I will ever see,” adding, “With time I hope you can mature and see the harm you are doing.”

Bonehill-Paine was sentenced to three years and four months in prison.

Issa Khazaal was found guilty at City of London Magistrates’ Court of performing a Nazi salute directed at a group of Jewish people outside Selfridges on Oxford Street, London. The incident took place in September 2014 at a demonstration.

Khazaal was fined £660 (including £220 due to the racially-aggravated nature of the crime), and ordered to pay £150 in compensation and £777 costs.

Joseph Kelly,17, was convicted of an attack on four Jewish boys in Manchester on 5th September 2015. Moshe Fuerst, aged 17, was the most seriously injured. He was knocked unconscious with a blow to the head and continued to be assaulted as he lay helpless on the ground. He suffered a fractured skull and had to be placed in a medically-induced coma. Antisemitic slurs were shouted at the victims and one of their skullcaps was spat on. Kelly pleaded guilty to one count of section 18 assault, one count of section 47 assault and two counts of section 39 assault.

Kelly was sentenced to youth detention for 18 months and ordered to contribute towards a £1,000 payment to the victims.

Zach Birch,17, was convicted of an attack on four Jewish boys in Manchester on 5th September 2015. Moshe Fuerst, aged 17, was the most seriously injured. He was knocked unconscious with a blow to the head and continued to be assaulted as he lay helpless on the ground. He suffered a fractured skull and had to be placed in a medically-induced coma. Antisemitic slurs were shouted at the victims and one of their skullcaps was spat on. Birch pleaded guilty to one count of section 47 assault and two counts of section 39 assault.

Birch was sentenced to youth detention for 12 months and ordered to contribute towards a £1,000 payment to the victims.

Nicholas Sweeney, 34, from Clapton, pleaded guilty at Thames Stratford Magistrates Court to two counts of racial religious harassment, and criminal damage to a police cell, after shouting antisemitic abuse at two Jewish men. He was reported to police by Shomrim Stamford Hill.

Sweeney was sentenced to 49 days in prison and ordered to pay a £80 victims surcharge and £166 for repairs to the police cell.

Anthony Michael pleaded guilty at Stratford Magistrates’ Court to racially threatening behaviour and racially aggravated criminal damage after he was filmed directing a Nazi salute at a Jewish van driver in London.

Michael was sentenced to 16 weeks in prison suspended for 12 months. He was also handed a community order for 20 days of rehabilitation activity and ordered to comply with an electronically monitored curfew for 8 weeks. He was also ordered to pay £250 victim compensation and £85 court costs.

Taha Bakhit, 24, from Swindon, pleaded guilty at Swindon Crown Court to racially aggravated common assault. He attempted to throttle and blind his flatmate, Sayed Hussain whom he told: “you are Jewish, you are Jewish, you will go to burn in hell fire”. He also threw a fire extinguisher at him and threatened him with a pair of scissors. He told officers he would behead him.

Bakhit was sentenced to nine months in prison.

Nicholas Goodwin, 23, from Troon, sent a photo of himself with a Nazi flag to a Jewish woman on 29th June 2015 in revenge for her stopping him from contacting her vulnerable son. He was convicted at Kilmarnock Sheriff Court.

Goodwin was sentenced to six months in prison.

Adam Elliott, 24, from Newcastle, pleaded guilty to racially aggravated harassment, alarm and distress at Newcastle Crown Court to shouting “I’m going to kill all Jews” and “Free Palestine” from a car driven by Muzamel Hussain in Gateshead on 20th July 2014. He then went into a shop and said “I hate Jewish f******”.

Elliott was sentenced to six months in prison, suspended for 18 months and handed a 12-month supervision order.

Muzamal Hussain, 28, from Fenham, pleaded guilty at Newcastle Crown Court to racially aggravated harrassment, alarm and distress after Adam Elliott, who was travelling in his car, shouted “I’m going to kill all Jews” and “Free Palestine” through the window as they drove through Gateshead on 20th July 2014.

Hussain was sentenced to six months in prison, suspended for 18 months and handed a 12-month supervision order.

Jakub Lukasz Kawczynski was challenged by a Jewish man for urinating in public whilst children were playing nearby on 21st June 2015. Kawczynski became very abusive and used racist language, including “F***ing Jewish f***ers”. He was followed by Shomrim who alerted the Police and followed Kawczynski until he was arrested. Kawczynski pleased guilty to racially aggravated harassment at Thames Magistrates’ Court.

Kawczynski was ordered to pay £795, including £200 compensation to the victim.

John Curchod pleaded guilty to sending antisemitic tweets just moments before his case was to be heard in Hastings Magistrates’ Court. In August 2014, he tweeted to a Jewish Twitter user: “The world will exterminate you. As Hitler failed to do in entirety.” When other Twitter users tweeted that he should be reported to the police, he replied: ”We are waiting – got the shot guns [sic] man – ready to shoot Jews.” He asked: “Why are Jews so despicable?” clarifying: “I just hate Jews”. He also predicted that “Police probably don’t give a f*** about Jews”.

Churchod was fined £1000 and ordered to pay £650 costs.

Mahmudul Choudhury, 35, an IT teacher, was convicted of racially aggravated harassment alarm and distress at Bromley Magistrates’ Court. He had used his Facebook page to praise Hitler for murdering Jews, sharing an image of Hitler captioned: “Yes man, you were right. I could have killed all the Jews, but I left some of them to let you know why I was killing them. Share this picture to tell the truth a whole world.”

Choudhury was fined £465 and ordered to pay a £47 victim surcharge. Campaign Against Antisemitism also secured a Prohibition Order banning Choudhury from teaching for life.

Balawal Sultan, 18, from Newcastle, pleaded guilty to assaulting a rabbi at Newcastle Crown Court. He had sent a text message saying: “I’m going to go Jew bashing. Haha.”

Sultan was committed to a young offenders’ institution.

Kesa Malik, 19, from Newcastle, pleaded guilty to assaulting a rabbi at Newcastle Crown Court.

Malik was committed to a young offenders’ institution.

Hassnain Aliamin, 18, from Newcastle, pleaded guilty to assaulting a rabbi at Newcastle Crown Court.

Aliamin was committed to a young offenders’ institution.

A 17-year-old boy from Newcastle, who cannot be named for legal reasons, pleaded guilty to assaulting a rabbi at Newcastle Crown Court.

The teenager was committed to a young offenders’ institution.