Multiple Chanukah displays have been vandalised across three cities in Ukraine.

In the country’s capital city of Kyiv, a public menorah that was erected in the city’s northeast district of Troieshchyna was knocked down and its lamps were smashed. This incident occured last Tuesday and was reported on Facebook by Eduard Dolinksy, the Director of the Ukrainian Jewish Committee.

In the eastern city of Dnipro, five teenagers have been arrested after being suspected of knocking down a large menorah on 29th November.

It was also reported that on 30th November, unidentified individuals in Nikolayev, a city in southern Ukraine near Odessa, cut the lighting strips that decorated a large menorah.

Last week, hundreds of residents of the Pennsylvania town of Lancaster turned out to support the town’s Jewish community after a chanukiah in the town-centre was vandalised.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has launched a new weekly podcast. New episodes of Podcast Against Antisemitism are available every Thursday and can be streamed here or downloaded wherever you get your podcasts.

The co-founder of the neo-Nazi National Action terrorist group has today been jailed for ten years.

Ben Raymond, 32, was found guilty of membership of the proscribed group earlier this week at Bristol Crown Court, where he has now been sentenced.

Mr Raymond, from Swindon, helped launch the group in 2013 and reportedly coined the term “white jihad”. He is the seventeenth person to be found guilty of membership in the banned group. He was also convicted of possessing a manifesto written by the far-right terrorist Andrews Breivik, as well as a guide to homemade detonators, but was found not guilty of four counts of possessing other documents.

Mr Raymond remained involved in the group, even after it was banned, producing much of its material and reportedly being likened to Joseph Goebbels, the Nazi Propaganda Minister. He also remained in contact with other leading figures in the group, several of whom have been jailed.

The court how he had also forged links with foreign neo-Nazi groups, including Atomwaffen Division, which the UK has also proscribed.

Sentencing him, Judge Christopher Parker QC said that Mr Raymond was the “principal propagandist” for National Action, both before and after the ban and sat “at the centre of the web” as the group fragmented in an effort to evade the ban. The judge said: “In the shadows of the internet you continued to offer guidance to regional National Action organisations on tactics, security, organisation but most importantly propaganda. From the centre of that web you intended just as much as other associates that National Action should survive following proscription.”

The judge added: “It was intended that the documents produced by you would be used to create instability within society, hatred between white people and other ethnic groups and ultimately create racial violence on which National Action could capitalise. You intended that the material should be used to recruit new members, specifically new young members…those young people were at risk of being groomed by your behaviour into committing acts of extreme racial violence.”

Mr Raymond was sentenced to eight years in prison for membership and two years, to run concurrently, for the two offences relating to possession of terrorist documents. After release, he will be subject to terrorist notification requirements.

National Action was proscribed by the British Government following repeated calls by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others.

Mr Raymond’s alleged co-founder recently pleaded not guilty to a single charge of membership of a proscribed organisation and will stand trial next year.

They are alleged to have founded the group when they were both university students.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Ben Raymond was the co-founder of National Action, the poster child group for neo-Nazis in Britain today. He was also its master propagandist, doing what he could to broadcast its message of racist hate. The ban on National Action, secured after calls from Campaign Against Antisemitism and others, was the first step, and convictions of its members are the second. This sentence, removing someone with grotesque and dangerous views from society, is the third.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Image credit: Counter Terrorism Policing

A man has been convicted of religiously-aggravated harassment after sending Alan Sugar a series of abusive and antisemitic letters.

Lord Sugar, the former host of The Apprentice television show, was reluctant to refer the matter to the police, but thanks officers for “helping to shine a light on the fact that this type of behaviour is simply not acceptable.”

Patrick Gomes, 70, sent three letters to one of Lord Sugar’s business premises in Loughton between October and December 2018, according to Essex Police.

Each letter was addressed to Lord Sugar and reportedly included abusive, threatening and offensive language that was also derogatory towards the Jewish faith.

Mr Gomes was arrested at his home in Leyton in March 2019, after his DNA and fingerprints were found on one of the letters. Police found additional discriminatory letters, and discovered that the address of the letters to Lord Sugar was in Mr Gomes’ address book.

Mr Gomes denied involvement but was found guilty of religiously-aggravated harassment, putting those targeted in fear of violence, on 1st December at Chelmsford Crown Court.

He did not appear at court and a warrant was issued for his arrest. He was arrested on 2nd December and is being remanded in custody to await sentencing, which will take place on 23rd December.

A spokeswoman for Chelmsford Crown Court said a sentencing hearing has been listed for 23rd December.

Lord Sugar said: “I would like to pass on my sincere gratitude to the police for their assistance in this case. I have to be honest, I was reluctant to pass this matter on to the police as they are already stretched and have enough on their plates…I would like to thank them sincerely for helping to shine a light on the fact that this type of behaviour is simply not acceptable and that racism or any form of discrimination is simply not acceptable.”

Investigating officer PC Marc Arnold, of Epping Forest’s Community Policing Team, said: “Nobody should ever be subjected to this level of abuse or fear physical violence because of their faith. I’m really pleased that justice has been rightly served. There is simply no excuse for any hate crime and if this happens to you or you witness this type of behaviour, please tell us – we will not tolerate racism or discrimination of any kind and neither should you.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has launched a new weekly podcast. New episodes of Podcast Against Antisemitism are available every Thursday and can be streamed here or downloaded wherever you get your podcasts.

The New York Police Department is looking for three women who are allegedly behind a spree of assaults on Jewish people.

According to police, the suspects slapped a three-year-old boy across the face last Friday and pulled an eighteen-year-old girl to the ground on Sunday. Shortly after, the women reportedly slapped a nine-year-old boy on the head repeatedly.

All three of the victims were said to have been visibly Jewish. 

Anyone with information on the incidents is asked to call the NYPD’s Crime Stoppers Hotline at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477) or reach out via the CrimeStoppers website or on Twitter @NYPDTips

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: New York Police Department

The co-founder of National Action has today been found guilty of membership in the proscribed neo-Nazi organisation

Ben Raymond, 32, helped launch the group in 2013, with Bristol Crown Court hearing how he coined the term “white jihad”.

Mr Raymond, from Swindon, is the seventeenth person to be found guilty of membership in the banned group. He was also convicted of possessing a manifesto written by the far-right terrorist Andrews Breivik, as well as a guide to homemade detonators, but was found not guilty of four counts of possessing other documents.

National Action was proscribed by the British Government following repeated calls by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others.

Mr Raymond’s alleged co-founder recently pleaded not guilty to a single charge of membership of a proscribed organisation and will stand trial next year.

They are alleged to have founded the group when they were both university students.

Mr Raymond remained involved in the group, even after it was banned, producing much of its material and reportedly being likened to Joseph Goebbels, the Nazi Propaganda Minister. He also remained in contact with other leading figures in the group, several of whom have been jailed.

Mr Raymond has been remanded in custody, with sentencing expected at the same court on Friday.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Ben Raymond was the co-founder of National Action, the poster child group for neo-Nazis in Britain today. He was also its master propagandist, doing what he could to broadcast its message of racist hate. The ban on National Action, secured after calls from Campaign Against Antisemitism and others, was the first step, and convictions of its members are the second. We trust that the sentence will be proportionate to the very serious charges on which Mr Raymond has been found guilty.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Image credit: Counter Terrorism Policing

A jury in Virginia has found that prominent white supremacists and white-supremacist organisations are liable for more than $26 million (£19.5 million) in damages from the August 2017 “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, in which one civil rights activist was killed and dozens were injured.

During the rally, held to oppose the planned removal of a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee, white supremacists marched through the town carrying torches and chanting “Jews will not replace us.”

The case, seeking damages for the physical and emotional injuries caused at the rally, was brought about by the civil rights organisation “Integrity First for America”, alongside those injured in the violence as well as other town residents. The jury in the civil trial heard testimony for four weeks and took three days to deliberate.

Evidence entered in the trial known as Sines v. Kessler included social media posts, text messages and online chats between the rally organisers. According to the jury, the plaintiffs proved that the defendants – who included event organiser Jason Kessler and Richard Spencer, thought to have coined the term “alt-right” – violated a Virginia conspiracy law in advance of the event.

In her testimony, Holocaust historian Deborah Lipstadt said that there was “a great deal of overt antisemitism and adulation of the Third Reich.” Ms Lipstadt added that “very few things” surprised her, but she was “taken aback” by the evidence she saw.

According to reports, antisemitic slurs and hate speech were frequently heard from defendants during the trial, with defendant Michael Hill pledging during testimony that he was “a white supremacist, a racist, an antisemite, a homophobe, a xenophobe, an Islamophobe, and any other sort of ‘phobe’ that benefits my people, so help me God.’”

Commenting on the result in a statement, Integrity First for America said that the case had sent “a clear message” that “violent hate won’t go unanswered.” The statement added: “At a moment of rising extremism, major threats to our democracy, and far too little justice, the case has provided a model of accountability.”

During the 2017 violence, white supremacist James Alex Fields Jr drove his car into a crowd, killing civil rights activist Heather Heyer and injuring dozens. Mr Fields was convicted of murder in 2019 and sentenced to life in prison.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

A far-right influencer who reportedly stormed the US Capitol earlier this year has now been charged with damaging a Chanukah display in Arizona. 

Tim Gionet, who is also known as “Baked Alaska” and has been accused of harbouring neo-Nazi views, faces charges of criminal damage and attempted criminal damage after allegedly vandalising the Chanukah display at the Arizona Capitol building in Phoenix in December 2020.

One of the organisers of the Chanukah presentation at Wesley Bolin Plaza stated that video footage shows Mr Gionet tearing a sign off the festive display. Arizona’s Rabbi Levi Levertov said that he viewed the incident as “an attack on an entire community.”  

Mr Gionet also faces charges over allegedly storming the US Capitol during the riot on 6th January, and is also awaiting sentencing after he was convicted of assault, disorderly conduct and criminal trespassing in an incident in which authorities state that he shot pepper spray at an employee at a bar in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

An Ohio man who spat on his Jewish neighbours and told them that Adolf Hitler should have gassed them has been sentenced to six months’ imprisonment. 

The man has also been ordered to pay a fine of $50,000 and one year of supervised release for criminally interfering with the right to fair housing. 

Court documents reveal how on 7th November 2020, Douglas G. Schifer, 66, broke his neighbours’ windows, spat on them, and hurled antisemitic abuse and threats towards them.

Mr Schifer was quoted as saying: “All you f***ing people, it’s no wonder Hitler burned you people in ovens,” “f***ing Hitler should have gassed you,” and “Jews burn, you belong in ovens.” He also threatened to shoot both his neighbours and their dog.

Mr Schifer’s trial was held in July, where he pleaded guilty in federal court to criminally interfering with the right to fair housing.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The four men charged in connection with the alleged antisemitic abuse shouted from a ‘Free Palestine’ convoy in North London in May have appeared in court today.

Mohammed Iftikhar Hanif, 27; Jawaad Hussain, 24; Asif Ali, 25; and Adil Mota, 26, all from Blackburn, all appeared remotely at Wood Green Crown Court today and pleaded not guilty to charges of using threatening, abusive or insulting words, or behaviour, with intent, likely to stir up racial hatred.

The charges relate to the convoy on 16th May, participants in which were caught on video allegedly shouting through a megaphone “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” as they drove through Jewish neighbourhoods waving the flag of the Palestinian Authority, during fighting between Hamas and Israel.

The incident took place a stone’s throw from a synagogue in West Hampstead and continued into St John’s Wood. The convoy had previously and provocatively passed through other Jewish neighbourhoods as well, including Hendon and Golders Green.

The abuse was condemned by the Prime Minister and Home Secretary.

In a statement, the Metropolitan Police Service admitted that they had failed so badly to monitor the convoy that it took hours to find the car in question, which was identified from photographs taken by a Jewish member of the public who had the presence of mind to capture images of the vehicles’ licence plates. Later that day, the four arrests were made.

The charges are punishable by up to three years in prison.

Today’s trial preparation and plea hearing will be followed by a further remote hearing on 11th February 2022.

Last week, the Home Secretary announced a full ban on the antisemitic genocidal terrorist Hamas in the UK, following calls by Campaign Against Antisemitism and allies.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A man in Manhattan had his kippah grabbed from his head by an unidentified male who also made an antisemitic comment, it was reported on Friday.

According to the NYPD Hate Crimes Unit, when asked to give back the kippah, the assailant allegedly threw it at the 34-year-old victim. Police said the attacker and the victim did not know each other. 

In a tweet that referred to a “disgusting” act, Mayor Bill De Blasio wrote: “Get the message: if you commit an act of antisemitism in our city you will face the consequences.” 

Alongside an image of the suspect issued by police, Mayor De Blasio added: “If you have any information on this disgusting act, contact the NYPD immediately.” 

A local website cited statistics from the NYPD noting that up until 31st October 2021, hate crimes against New York City’s Jewish residents had increased by 48 percent since 2020, with 164 attacks compared to 111. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

Image credit: New York Police Department

An arson attack on a synagogue in Austin, Texas has prompted a resolution by the City Council to condemn antisemitism and seek ways to combat hate. 

The attack on Austin’s Congregation Beth Israel on the night of 31st October was the latest in a series of incidents in the Texas city. In its response to the incidents, the Austin City Council passed a resolution condemning “all hateful speech and violent action that…promotes racism or discrimination, or harms the Jewish community.”

Speaking at the council session, Council Member Alison Alter said recent events were “simply further evidence of the challenges” the city faced. “The reality is that the hate is here, and we need to up our game, to lead our community, and to devote focus and attention so hate does not take root in our community.”

The resolution directs the Austin City Manager to work with local groups, including the ADL, “to review and then identify and implement improvements to the City’s response to hate.”

These improvements should include training for city staff to educate “participants in how hate manifests; how to effectively respond to incidents of hate; and how social media is used to propagate hate.”

Damage to the synagogue was so severe that its rabbi, Steve Folberg, and President, Lori Adelman, said in a message to congregants that it would take “weeks rather than days” to get their “sanctuary fit for occupancy” leading them to seek temporary accommodation for services.

A few days after the incident, some 500 people, including clergy and political leaders, gathered at the oldest synagogue in Texas – the B’nai Abraham – to condemn antisemitism. Rabbi Folberg and Ms Adelman said the rally and “expressions of solidarity” had been a source of strength for all  those “facing the practical and emotional demands of beginning to heal our community from this attack.”

In a media release, the Austin Fire Department issued stills from a security video of the arson suspect and his vehicle. The release said that the suspect had driven into the synagogue car park in a black SUV and approached the building carrying a five-gallon gasoline can. He then returned to his vehicle. The FBI is also now investigating the incident.

A series of antisemitic incidents in Austin have included the vandalising of a local high school with Nazi symbols, a banner hung from an overpass reading “Vax the Jews,” and the display of antisemitic posters on a local street.

Two of the incidents were allegedly committed by a local hate group calling itself the Goyim Defence League”, a group whose membership reportedly contains several neo-Nazis and is understood to be led by Jon Minadeo II. The group is responsible for stunts such as visiting a Chabad centre to claim that “these Jewish terrorists” were behind 9/11, and hanging a banner on a Los Angeles overpass reading “Honk if you know the Jews want a race war.” Earlier this year, Mr Minadeo II created t-shirts carrying antisemitic slogans such as the Holocaust was “a hoax”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

Italian Police are investigating an incident in which an Israeli tourist visiting Pisa was assaulted, suffering head injuries.

On 31st August, Elad Forgash was shopping for souvenirs in the Tuscan city and was chatting to the sales assistant. Mr Forgash said that after telling the man that he was from Israel, the man allegedly said that he “hated Israel and the Jews because they were killers.”

Mr Forgash said that he remained calm, merely handing back the sculptures and saying he would “rather not buy from him.” Mr Forgash said the man then hit over the head with the sculptures.

“Luckily, there were tourists who filmed him,” said Mr Forgash. Police arrived and an ambulance took him to hospital. He reported suffering a fractured eye socket and a broken nose, which he said would need surgery in Israel.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

An Ohio man has pleaded guilty to spitting on his Jewish neighbours and telling them that Adolf Hitler should have gassed them.

Court documents reveal how Douglas G. Schifer, 66, broke his neighbours’ windows, spat on them, and hurled antisemitic abuse and threats towards them.

Mr Schifer was quoted as saying: “All you f***ing people, it’s no wonder Hitler burned you people in ovens,” “f***ing Hitler should have gassed you,” and “Jews burn, you belong in ovens.” He also threatened to shoot both his neighbours and their dog.

Mr Schifer, 66, pleaded guilty in federal court to criminally interfering with the right to fair housing and faces up to one year’s imprisonment. He may also have to pay a fine of $100,000.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.