Once again, the antisemite Wiley has been able to create an account on Twitter and spout racist hate towards Jews, even directly attacking Campaign Against Antisemitism. Twitter has suspended his account after we called on the platform to do so.

The rapper Richard Kylea Cowie, who is known as Wiley, went on an antisemitic tirade on social media in July 2020, has gone on another tirade this week, culminating today. Using the handle @WileyRecordings, he has tweeted an image of himself in Hasidic garb and a video titled “the Jewish Faces that Control Hiphop and Mainstream Black Music.” He posted a further video “discuss[ing] historical tensions between blacks & Jews” and, in another tweet, asserted: “The more they block me the harder I go and when I get through the door I will stand there and look in their faces with the same look they don’t wanna see….They are just angry they can’t control me…” He also tweeted a video of the antisemitic hate preacher Louis Farrakhan titled “I’m here to separate the ‘good Jews’ from the ‘Satanic Jews’”, and a video of another antisemitic hate preacher, David Icke.

Wiley then went on to target a senior figure in Campaign Against Antisemitism directly, changing his profile picture to an image of this member of our team and tweeting a further picture of him. He then proceeded to taunt him in a series of tweets, including calling him a “coward” and then posting a video on Instagram taunting him.

The rapper, who recently released an album unsubtly titled “Anti-Systemic”, told our member on Instagram this morning: “Don’t hide” and “come outside”. Wiley has recently been charged with assault and robbery. We are in touch with the police over the taunts and are examining legal options.

At this minute, Wiley is currently live on Instagram spewing antisemitic rhetoric, talking about banks that are owned by “Jewish families” and speculating that maybe Jews do in fact control the world. We are in contact with Instagram, calling on the platform to ban him immediately.

In his tirade in 2020, Wiley likened Jews to the Ku Klux Klan and claimed that Jews had cheated him and were “snakes”, tweeted that Jews should “hold some corn” – a slang expression meaning that they should be shot – and added: “Jewish community you deserve it”. He also called on “black people” to go to “war” with Jews and repeatedly evoked conspiracy theories that Jews were responsible for the slave trade and were imposters who usurped black people — a conspiracy theory that has incited acts of terrorism against Jews in the United States.

In the days that followed, Wiley continued to rail against Jews on Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. Following discussions with Campaign Against Antisemitism, a major 48-hour boycott of Twitter and Instagram in which we participated, and our projection of antisemitic tweets onto Twitter’s London headquarters, which then went viral, TwitterFacebook (which owns Instagram), Google (which owns YouTube) and TikTok agreed to remove Wiley from their platforms, depriving him of access to his nearly one million social media followers.

At the time of Wiley’s original antisemitic tirade, Campaign Against Antisemitism immediately reported Wiley to the Metropolitan Police Service, but the police eventually confirmed to us that Wiley was not in the UK at the time of his tirade. Under Home Office rules, that means that the Metropolitan Police must give primacy to police in the jurisdiction where Wiley was at the time. Lawyers acting for Campaign Against Antisemitism have filed a criminal complaint with the Public Prosecution Service in the Netherlands, which is where he was located when he launched his tirade against Jews.

We also called for Wiley to be stripped of his MBE and have his Ivors Award rescinded.

However, barely a year later Wiley was again active on Twitter, Instagram and YouTube, notwithstanding their pledges to ban him. Wiley tweeted at the time: “In all my years on earth I realised everyone wants you to care about their stuff like Holocaust etc but not one of them give a f*** about the enslavement and f***ery of black people so it’s hard for me to care for them knowing they don’t care for us #YaGetIt #JusSayin.”

This week, he has gone on another tirade, and only now has Twitter finally removed him, after we called once again on the platform to do so. We are also calling on Instagram, to which he has shifted his attention, to do the same. If these platforms had kept to their word, he would not have been on them in the first place.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has called on several venues over the past year to drop the unrepentant Wiley from their line-ups.

Earlier this year, we published a major report that shows how Twitter fails to implement consistently its own policies on hate. The report showed how Twitter appointed Campaign Against Antisemitism as a partner to monitor anti-Jewish racism on its platform and promised regular meetings, only to cease those meetings and ignore offers of antisemitism training after we began alerting the company to the inconsistent application of its policies by personnel.

Not only were phrases like “f*** the Jews” not considered to breach Twitter’s rules, but other phrases such as “Hitler was right” were sometimes permitted and sometimes removed, without any form of coherent reasoning. Moreover, one of the few areas where Twitter has in the past said that it would take action is over Holocaust denial, pledging to remove “attempts to deny or diminish” violent events such as the Shoah. Our report, however, shows that Twitter personnel repeatedly raised no objection to phrases such as “#Holohoax” and other, more elaborate tweets of Holocaust denial.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The antisemite Wiley has been able to return to Twitter and Instagram to spout racist hate, even adopting the image of one of our personnel as his profile picture and taunting him. We are in contact with the police and are examining legal options.

“Twitter has suspended Wiley’s account after we called on the platform to do so, but the company has failed to prevent him joining the platform repeatedly over the past year, despite its pledge to ban him. The company continues to ignore a wide range of antisemitic accounts that we have brought to its attention, presumably because they fail to attract the same degree of public interest and negative publicity as this case.

“We are now in contact with Instagram, asking for his live stream to be ended and his account removed, and we are in touch with the police about some of his deranged output.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms. We also continue to make representations to the Government on this matter.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has today launched a new weekly podcast.

Podcast Against Antisemitism, streaming every Thursday, is the first podcast in the world to focus on racism against Jews.

Each week, the podcast gives you the chance to hear from those on the front line in the fight against antisemitism – in politics, media, universities, social media, entertainment and on our streets – with expert analysis from Campaign Against Antisemitism. In this first episode, we discuss the fight against antisemitism in sport.

The podcast also features an in-depth interview with a special guest in each episode, including leading activists, authors, celebrities, columnists, social media influencers and more. In this first episode, we are joined by the comedian and author of Jews Don’t Count. David Baddiel, who talks to us about antisemitism as the forgotten racism and his experiences of it as a football fan and in the arts.

You can stream or download Podcast Against Antisemitism on AmazonAppleBuzzsprout, Google, Spotify and Soundcloud or wherever you get your podcasts.

Alternatively, you can listen at antisemitism.org/podcast, where each episode will be available every week and where you can subscribe to receive the latest episodes straight to your inbox.

You can also watch the full interview with our special guests every week on our YouTube channel.

If you have any questions, please e-mail [email protected].

The co-founder of the neo-Nazi National Action terrorist group has today been jailed for ten years.

Ben Raymond, 32, was found guilty of membership of the proscribed group earlier this week at Bristol Crown Court, where he has now been sentenced.

Mr Raymond, from Swindon, helped launch the group in 2013 and reportedly coined the term “white jihad”. He is the seventeenth person to be found guilty of membership in the banned group. He was also convicted of possessing a manifesto written by the far-right terrorist Andrews Breivik, as well as a guide to homemade detonators, but was found not guilty of four counts of possessing other documents.

Mr Raymond remained involved in the group, even after it was banned, producing much of its material and reportedly being likened to Joseph Goebbels, the Nazi Propaganda Minister. He also remained in contact with other leading figures in the group, several of whom have been jailed.

The court how he had also forged links with foreign neo-Nazi groups, including Atomwaffen Division, which the UK has also proscribed.

Sentencing him, Judge Christopher Parker QC said that Mr Raymond was the “principal propagandist” for National Action, both before and after the ban and sat “at the centre of the web” as the group fragmented in an effort to evade the ban. The judge said: “In the shadows of the internet you continued to offer guidance to regional National Action organisations on tactics, security, organisation but most importantly propaganda. From the centre of that web you intended just as much as other associates that National Action should survive following proscription.”

The judge added: “It was intended that the documents produced by you would be used to create instability within society, hatred between white people and other ethnic groups and ultimately create racial violence on which National Action could capitalise. You intended that the material should be used to recruit new members, specifically new young members…those young people were at risk of being groomed by your behaviour into committing acts of extreme racial violence.”

Mr Raymond was sentenced to eight years in prison for membership and two years, to run concurrently, for the two offences relating to possession of terrorist documents. After release, he will be subject to terrorist notification requirements.

National Action was proscribed by the British Government following repeated calls by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others.

Mr Raymond’s alleged co-founder recently pleaded not guilty to a single charge of membership of a proscribed organisation and will stand trial next year.

They are alleged to have founded the group when they were both university students.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Ben Raymond was the co-founder of National Action, the poster child group for neo-Nazis in Britain today. He was also its master propagandist, doing what he could to broadcast its message of racist hate. The ban on National Action, secured after calls from Campaign Against Antisemitism and others, was the first step, and convictions of its members are the second. This sentence, removing someone with grotesque and dangerous views from society, is the third.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Image credit: Counter Terrorism Policing

A man has been convicted of religiously-aggravated harassment after sending Alan Sugar a series of abusive and antisemitic letters.

Lord Sugar, the former host of The Apprentice television show, was reluctant to refer the matter to the police, but thanks officers for “helping to shine a light on the fact that this type of behaviour is simply not acceptable.”

Patrick Gomes, 70, sent three letters to one of Lord Sugar’s business premises in Loughton between October and December 2018, according to Essex Police.

Each letter was addressed to Lord Sugar and reportedly included abusive, threatening and offensive language that was also derogatory towards the Jewish faith.

Mr Gomes was arrested at his home in Leyton in March 2019, after his DNA and fingerprints were found on one of the letters. Police found additional discriminatory letters, and discovered that the address of the letters to Lord Sugar was in Mr Gomes’ address book.

Mr Gomes denied involvement but was found guilty of religiously-aggravated harassment, putting those targeted in fear of violence, on 1st December at Chelmsford Crown Court.

He did not appear at court and a warrant was issued for his arrest. He was arrested on 2nd December and is being remanded in custody to await sentencing, which will take place on 23rd December.

A spokeswoman for Chelmsford Crown Court said a sentencing hearing has been listed for 23rd December.

Lord Sugar said: “I would like to pass on my sincere gratitude to the police for their assistance in this case. I have to be honest, I was reluctant to pass this matter on to the police as they are already stretched and have enough on their plates…I would like to thank them sincerely for helping to shine a light on the fact that this type of behaviour is simply not acceptable and that racism or any form of discrimination is simply not acceptable.”

Investigating officer PC Marc Arnold, of Epping Forest’s Community Policing Team, said: “Nobody should ever be subjected to this level of abuse or fear physical violence because of their faith. I’m really pleased that justice has been rightly served. There is simply no excuse for any hate crime and if this happens to you or you witness this type of behaviour, please tell us – we will not tolerate racism or discrimination of any kind and neither should you.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has launched a new weekly podcast. New episodes of Podcast Against Antisemitism are available every Thursday and can be streamed here or downloaded wherever you get your podcasts.

Spotify has reportedly removed nearly 150 hours of antisemitic, racist and white supremacist material from its platform following a media investigation.

The streaming giant does not allow hateful content on its platform, but a Sky News investigation reportedly found “days’ worth” of listening, promoting “scientific racism, Holocaust denial and far-right antisemitic conspiracy theories”.

Much of it was buried within hours-long episodes, but in some cases there were explicit slurs in titles, descriptions and artwork.

Spotify removed the content after being alerted, but it remains online on other, unmoderated platforms, such as Google Podcasts.

Searching for the phrase “Kalergi Plan”, for example, directs users to a podcast with 76 episodes discussing the far-right antisemitic conspiracy theory which imagines that Jewish elites promote mass immigration as part of a deliberate plan to erase the white European race. One of the episodes apparently contains a monologue that ends with an explicit call for violence against Jews.

Another US-based podcast featured racist slurs and white supremacist symbols in its title, descriptions and artwork, with the host promoting various antisemitic theories, Holocaust denial and scientific racism.

Yet another series talks of the “beauty” of white supremacism and features readings of essays and books by Hitler, Goebbels and other Nazi figures.

Spotify allows users to report material that violates the platform’s guidelines, and the company is developing new technology to identify hateful material. But questions remain over what is being done currently to monitor podcast material, the large volume of which requires a mix of algorithmic and human moderation, as well as technology that can detect hate speech in audio.

Hannah Kirk, AI researcher at the Oxford Internet Institute and The Alan Turing Institute, observed numerous technological challenges, including the amount of memory needed to store long audio files, the difficulty of sifting through multiple speakers and fast-paced dialogue, and the complexity of linguistic cues in audio, such as tone, pitch of voice, awkward silences and laughter. The technology to encode these sorts of linguistic signals is not currently available.

Google podcasts, which is more of a directory than a platform, reportedly does not wish to limit what people can find and will only remove content in rare circumstances, according to what a spokesperson has previously told The New York Times.

A Spotify spokesperson told Sky News: “Spotify prohibits content on our platform which expressly and principally advocates or incites hatred or violence against a group or individual based on characteristics, including, race, religion, gender identity, sex, ethnicity, nationality, sexual orientation, veteran status, or disability. The content in question has been removed for violating our Hate Content policy.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has launched a new weekly podcast. New episodes of Podcast Against Antisemitism are available every Thursday and can be streamed here or downloaded wherever you get your podcasts.

Peloton has apologised after an instructor quoted the phrase “liver of a blasphemous Jew” in a live workout.

The Halloween workout video, in which trainer Christine D’Ercole quotes the line from William Shakespeare’s Macbeth, has been removed from the company’s library.

A spokesperson for Peloton said: “Peloton’s aim is to strengthen, support and uplift our diverse community and sometimes we fall short of that goal. We apologise that during one of our classes an instructor quoted a Shakespeare passage that included an antisemitic line. This was a mistake and the class has been removed from our library.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has launched a new weekly podcast. New episodes of Podcast Against Antisemitism are available every Thursday and can be streamed here or downloaded wherever you get your podcasts.

Image credit: Jewish News

Scottish NHS staff are reportedly “scared” after a Conservative councillor who previously apologised for comments appearing to diminish the Holocaust was appointed to a health board.

In a post on a martial arts forum several years ago, Cllr Ryan Houghton, wrote under the username, Razgriz, that there was “no credible evidence to suggest the Holocaust did not happen” but revealed that “I do find some of the events fabricated, and exegarated [sic] in some cases.” He continued: “As history is written by the victors there is always going to be a bit of re-writing.” He also praised the “interesting” research of the antisemitic Holocaust-denier, David Irving. However, in a later post he said that he was “not defending David’s Irving’s views” and that he does not agree with “some of the stuff he says.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Denying the fact, scope, mechanisms (e.g. gas chambers) or intentionality of the genocide of the Jewish people at the hands of National Socialist Germany and its supporters and accomplices during World War II (the Holocaust)” is an example of antisemitism.

Cllr Houghton is also accused of having made homophobic and anti-Muslim statements online. In a statement at the time, he said: “I apologise unreservedly for any hurt now caused by these comments and have been in contact with members of the Jewish community in Aberdeen.”

According to The National, a senior figure from NHS Grampian has said that staff had been “astonished and actually scared” in reaction to the appointment of Cllr Houghton, which was effected by a letter sent by Scottish Health Secretary Humza Yousaf in May. Cllr Houghton was appointed “in your capacity as the nominated Local Authority Councillor from Aberdeen City Council”.

Aberdeen Council must appoint an elected member to the NHS Grampian board by law.

Earlier this year, Cllr Houghton withdrew as co-leader of the Council just days after being elected, due to his past comments. It is understood that he remains leader of the Conservative group on the Council.

A spokesperson for the Scottish Conservatives said that Cllr Houghton “had fully apologised for his comments, [and] was fully investigated by a committee, who ruled in favour of lifting his suspension. Perhaps most importantly, his appointment on the board was brought forward by Humza Yousaf who said he was looking forward to working with him in addressing challenges and opportunities.” The spokesperson also observed that a former chairman of Aberdeen Synagogue had said that while what Cllr Houghton had said “wasn’t right…it shouldn’t be held against him for the rest of his life.”

A spokesperson for the Scottish Government said: “There is no place in public life for holocaust denial, racism or any other form of discrimination and prejudice. The Health Secretary has no role in deciding which councillors are chosen by local authorities to sit on health boards – other than issuing a standardised routine letter to them after their appointment. We understand the concerns being raised about this appointment and will be in contact with NHS Grampian to check that all correct processes have been followed and to discuss the serious allegations being made.”

A spokesperson for NHS Grampian said that the health board “takes all matters relating to equality, diversity and human rights very seriously. We have received the concerns and are currently seeking clarity about due process.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has launched a new weekly podcast. New episodes of Podcast Against Antisemitism are available every Thursday and can be streamed here or downloaded wherever you get your podcasts.

The antisemitism-denial group Labour Against the Witchhunt is in turmoil over a decision by members to merge with another controversial group, Labour in Exile Network.

Both groups were proscribed by the Labour Party earlier this year and, in the months since, those who have had affiliation with the groups have been automatically expelled from the Party.

In a statement, members of Labour Against the Witchhunt, including Jackie Walker, explained that they were resigning from the group’s steering committee following a vote on 27th November over whether to merge with Labour in Exile Network, which reportedly passed by 47 votes to 27, with twelve abstentions.

The motion to merge was reportedly moved by the “notorious antisemite” Tony Greenstein, who apparently believed that Labour Against the Witchhunt had “outlived its usefulness”. However, the signatories of the statement believed that the group’s mission would not be served by merging with other, less focused groups that were simply committed to Jeremy Corbyn’s 2017 and 2019 election manifestos.

Earlier this year, Mr Greenstein was declared bankrupt by a judge after failing to comply with court orders to pay Campaign Against Antisemitism after his defamation claim against us humiliatingly backfired.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The Metropolitan Police are investigating as a hate crime an attack on a bus travelling down Oxford Street yesterday carrying a group of Jewish teenagers celebrating Chanukah.

The attack was filmed by passengers on the bus and appeared to show a group of men hitting the vehicle with their hands and then their shoes, spitting on it, trying to break windows and performing Hitler salutes.

The assailants were told that the passengers are Jewish and then hurled antisemitic insults and slogans.

The men appear to be of Middle Eastern heritage and hitting an object of antipathy with one’s shoes is common in that region.

The teenagers were on their way to a candle lighting ceremony in central London to celebrate Chanukah.

Campaign Against Antisemitism and others publicised the video and called on the police to investigate. We are also in contact with the victims.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “These are shocking images of an abhorrent attack on a bus carrying Jewish passengers at the heart of London during the festival of Chanukah. We are in contact with the victims. Police must investigate and identify suspects.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The prestigious American School in London is in turmoil over concerns about the content of diversity education and after revelations about a staff meeting that sparked antisemitism allegations.

The headteacher of the school – the most expensive day school in Britain, which counts several famous alumni and children of numerous celebrities – has resigned well short of the end of her ten-year term, after complaints were made by parents about the content of diversity education at the school, both to the media and directly to Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Concerns centred around the teaching of “critical race theory” and other controversial ideas, including “white privilege”. Campaign Against Antisemitism has received concerning reports about the school apparently teaching that Jews are part of a privileged elite. A “Privilege Power” chart was reportedly disseminated, which appeared to show Jews just below Protestants and Catholics at the upper end of the “Spirituality-Religion” segment of the chart.

The introduction of racially-segregated after-school clubs reportedly upset numerous parents, many of whom are American.

In addition, allegations have arisen about a staff meeting in which the words “Nazi”, “swastika”, “Hitler” and “skinheads” were used by faculty members during what was described as a heated conversation about how some parents have reacted to the diversity curriculum.

The school has denied that the inflammatory terms were used to describe parents but has not clarified in what context the terms were used. A spokesperson for the school did concede that remarks made during the meeting “could cause offence to the community,” with numerous Jewish families sending their children to the school.

Concerningly, the school’s statement noted that “There were questions asked about whether the response to racism is always as strong and immediate as the response to antisemitism.” This suggestion by one teacher, apparently in connection with parents, caused offence among colleagues, who passed on their concerns to parents and trustees.

Although the headteacher has resigned, concerns remain that the culture and curriculum are the product of wider thinking among senior staff.

A spokesperson for the school said: “Teachers did not refer to parents by any of the words [listed above]. However, [the headteacher] and the school were concerned that the question contrasting the responses to racism and antisemitism could cause offence to members of the community, and this was addressed immediately. We are committed to building and sustaining a diverse, equitable and inclusive school community and firmly believe this will lead to a better future for all our children.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We have been receiving disturbing reports about the American School in London. There are claims that terms like ‘Nazis’ were used at a staff meeting. Although the school denies this extreme language referred to Jewish parents, it apparently does not dispute that these terms did appear in their discussion, which allegedly also featured language suggesting that antisemitism and racism are different. The school must tackle this problem suitably forcefully and seriously.”

Do you or your friends/family have stories of schoolteachers or pupils facing antisemitism at schools in the UK? Contact us at [email protected] or call +44 (0)330 822 0321.

Image credit: Google

A woman in Swindon was reported to the police after neighbours saw a swastika flag hanging in her bedroom window.

One local resident said that “You couldn’t miss the flag,” adding: “It’s vile and this is such a nice area which makes it even more shocking. We’re all disgusted. That symbol means nothing but hate and evil. Why would anyone want to have it hanging on display for everyone to see through the window?”

When asked about the flag, the homeowner reportedly only said that she had “lots of flags in my home.” It was also alleged that her stepdad Derek, when told that the swastika was a racist symbol, said: “So? You want to mind your own business.”

Wiltshire Police said: “We responded to a call from a member of the public on Friday evening, who reported having seen what appeared to be a Nazi flag hung inside a room of an address in Lower Stratton, Swindon.

“Our officers attended the address that evening and gave strong words of advice to the person living there to advise that possession of the flag was not illegal, but that if it can be viewed from a public area, this could be considered a racially aggravated public order offence. The person agreed to remove it from public view.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism: “It is sickening to think that there are still people in Britain who take pleasure in hanging giant Nazi banners in their homes. This person even apparently had the audacity to display the flag for anyone looking from outside to see. She vastly underestimated the common decency of her neighbours. If it happens again, the police must issue more than just warnings.”

The former England striker Carlton Cole has apologised after he described a poor football performance as “a Holocaust” during an interview on BBC Radio 5 Live.

Speaking on West Ham boss David Moyes and whether he had chosen a defensive side against Manchester City, Mr Cole said: “You can say he has gone a bit negative. Why not? You’ve got to give Man City some respect otherwise you’re going to get picked off. Otherwise it will be a Holocaust and you don’t want that.”

Later during the programme, Mr Cole said: “I’d just like to apologise to the listeners for a totally unacceptable phrase that I used earlier in the show. I’m sorry if I’ve offended anybody, really and truly. Sorry.”

This is not the first time a Holocaust reference has been made in the context of describing a poor performance.

In October, Joey Barton, the former football player and current manager of Bristol Rovers Football Club, issued an apology after he also described a bad football performance as “a Holocaust”.

Reacting to Bristol Rovers’ loss to Newport County, Mr Barton said: “I said to the lads during the week, you know, the team’s almost like musical chairs, you know. Someone gets in and does well, but then gets suspended. Someone gets in and does well, gets injured. Someone gets in, does well for a game and then has a Holocaust, a nightmare, you know, an absolute disaster.”

Mr Barton later apologised, stating: “Clearly no offence was meant, but some people have rightly pointed out to me the use of the analogy was not correct. So if anybody was offended by that, I would like to apologise for that. I think the FA were right to write to me and remind me of that. You hope to use better analogies in future, but it was certainly with no malice or offence intended to anybody.”

In 2019, football pundit and former footballer, Perry Groves, apologised after reportedly describing a player as having “a Holocaust of a game” on a live radio show. One year earlier, Phil Brown, the football player turned manager, apologised for using the same phrase.

The co-founder of National Action has today been found guilty of membership in the proscribed neo-Nazi organisation

Ben Raymond, 32, helped launch the group in 2013, with Bristol Crown Court hearing how he coined the term “white jihad”.

Mr Raymond, from Swindon, is the seventeenth person to be found guilty of membership in the banned group. He was also convicted of possessing a manifesto written by the far-right terrorist Andrews Breivik, as well as a guide to homemade detonators, but was found not guilty of four counts of possessing other documents.

National Action was proscribed by the British Government following repeated calls by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others.

Mr Raymond’s alleged co-founder recently pleaded not guilty to a single charge of membership of a proscribed organisation and will stand trial next year.

They are alleged to have founded the group when they were both university students.

Mr Raymond remained involved in the group, even after it was banned, producing much of its material and reportedly being likened to Joseph Goebbels, the Nazi Propaganda Minister. He also remained in contact with other leading figures in the group, several of whom have been jailed.

Mr Raymond has been remanded in custody, with sentencing expected at the same court on Friday.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Ben Raymond was the co-founder of National Action, the poster child group for neo-Nazis in Britain today. He was also its master propagandist, doing what he could to broadcast its message of racist hate. The ban on National Action, secured after calls from Campaign Against Antisemitism and others, was the first step, and convictions of its members are the second. We trust that the sentence will be proportionate to the very serious charges on which Mr Raymond has been found guilty.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Image credit: Counter Terrorism Policing

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Director of Investigations and Enforcement, Stephen Silverman, joined the cricketer Azeem Rafiq on a tour of the Jewish Museum, organised by the JC, with a Holocaust survivor.

Mr Rafiq recently highlighted the problem of racial abuse in cricket before it emerged that he had made antisemitic comments when he was nineteen.

The thirty-year-old former Yorkshire cricketer has been praised for exposing racism in the sport, including during his tearful testimony at a hearing of the House of Commons’ Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee, where he said that racism destroyed his career.

But he then had to apologise after it was revealed that he and former Leicestershire cricketer Ateeq Javid, in an apparent discussion about another professional cricketer, appeared to accuse the latter of being reluctant to spend money on a meal out because “he is a Jew”. Mr Rafiq joked that he will “probs go after my 2nds again ha…Only Jews do tht sort of shit [sic].”

Mr Rafiq has since apologised and looked to learn more about anti-Jewish racism. In a JC-organised tour of the Jewish Museum, Mr Rafiq was accompanied by Holocaust survivor Ruth Barnett and Mr Silverman, who explained the history of the antisemitic trope of Jews and money and why Mr Rafiq’s historic remarks had been so hurtful.

Mr Silverman also told Mr Rafiq of his own experiences of being teased and insulted as a child because he was Jewish: “It was always two things, either ‘you killed Christ’ or comments about Jews and money. The word ‘Jew’ used as an insult was a constant soundtrack.” Mr Silverman added that “Forty years later, my daughter joined the same school. And she experienced exactly the same antisemitism.”

Mr Rafiq said: “Racism can be subtle and discreet. It breaks you slowly. I was constantly asking myself if I was being too sensitive, if it was only a joke. Now that I’ve learned about the history of my comments, I understand the hurt and I’m really sorry to the Jewish community.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues to act against instances of anti-Jewish racism in all sports.

Image credit: Rick Findler

The Cardiff University Students’ Union has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The welcome move will add pressure to Cardiff University, which earlier this year declined to adopt the Definition, ludicrously fearing “a potentially divisive situation.”

The motion was passed at the Students’ Union’s Annual General Meeting on 25th November, following unsuccessful efforts by student groups over the past year to pressure the University into doing so as well.

Elsewhere, Students’ Unions at the University of East Anglia (UEA) and Queen Mary University of London, failed to represent and show solidarity with their Jewish members by adopting the Jerusalem Declaration, which is a wrecking document intended to undermine the globally-recognised Definition.

Both Universities have themselves adopted the Definition, even as their students unions have now failed to do so.

It is understood that at the UEA Students’ Union, the measure passed amid controversy over the extent to which Jewish representatives would be able to contribute to the debate. The UEA Jewish Society said in an e-mail to the Union Council that “it is disgusting that this is even being debated and that non-Jewish people feel they have the right to tell us, the Jewish community, what antisemitism is.” The motion expressly repudiated the International Definition of Antisemitism, even though it is supported by Jewish students, the wider Jewish community and national governments around the world.

It is understood that the campaign to adopt the wrecking document has been underway for months at the campus. Jewish students are reportedly reviewing appeal options.

At Queen Mary University, the Students’ Union repealed its previous adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism and replaced it with the Jerusalem Declaration. The measure was reportedly not discussed with Jewish students, who reacted with disgust.

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We commend Cardiff Students’ Union for adopting the International Definition of Antisemitism and urge the University to follow the inspired lead of its students. We also call on the UEA and Queen Mary’s Students’ Unions to listen to Jewish students and think again.

“With efforts to water down the International Definition of Antisemitism increasingly failing, campus groups are now seeking to adopt the so-called ‘Jerusalem Declaration’ instead, which can only sabotage efforts to fight antisemitism.

“This week, we have seen students’ unions take the opposite approach to their universities: where the university has adopted the Definition, the students’ union adopts the Jerusalem Declaration, and where the university has failed to adopt the Definition, the students’ union does so.

“It is extraordinary that fighting racism should be so controversial: all universities and students’ unions, if they truly care about Jewish students, should be adopting the Definition in full and without caveat or substitutes.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

An anti-racism trainer who ran an inclusivity workshop for the Cabinet Office reportedly has a record of comparing Israel to Nazis and wishing death on “Zionists”.

An investigation by the JC revealed that Mizanur Rahman, known as Mizan the Poet, ran a training session at the Cabinet Office in 2019 called “an inclusive Britain”, despite having shared posts comparing Israel to Nazis and white supremacy.

According to the report, in 2014, Mr Rahman posted photos of prisoners at the Buchenwald concentration camp alongside people at the Ephraim-Taybeh checkpoint, referencing the supposed “similarities”. In a caption, he said: “In the Holy Land, the Zionist government, with the support of the majority of Israel’s population, are themselves perpetuating a holocaust against the Palestinian people. After the bodies are counted and the atrocities documented, how will the Zionist government excuse themselves for committing these crimes against humanity?”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

Mr Rahman also tweeted about a wounded Israeli soldier: “Hopefully he, and all IDF soldiers and Zionists, will lose more than just their limbs…their lives!!!!”

Another post said: “#Israel has no right to exist. Israel was founded on terrorism, ethnic cleansing and practises antisemitism as #palestinians are #semitic.”

In 2018, he reportedly attended an Al-Quds Day march in London, where flags of the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group, Hizballah, were on display. One of the speakers at the rally called for Israel to be “wiped off the map.” Hizballah has since been banned in full in the UK as a terrorist organisation.

After a session at the Ministry of Defence in 2019, he reportedly tweeted: “I spoke about institutional racism/Islamophobia, the role of the media, Prevent, detention centres and other ways that racism manifests in society.”

When former London Mayor Ken Livingstone was suspended resigned from the Labour Party after claiming that Hitler supported Zionism, Mr Rahman reportedly described Mr Livingstone’s remarks as “pure historical fact”.

This month, Mr Rahman apparently complained to the Labour Party after being banned from a list of potential candidates for local council.

According to the JC, when asked on Twitter whether he still believed that all Zionists should die, Mr Rahman said: “The answer to that is no. I, personally would like a peaceful solution to the conflict where Palestinian rights would be upheld and treated equally to their Israeli counterparts. With that said, the Palestinians are living under an occupation…” adding that he had “nothing against Jewish self-determination,” before giving further views on Israel.

A spokesperson for the Cabinet Office said: “The Cabinet Office has recently adopted an increased due diligence process for guest speakers in line with cross-government best practice. This includes enhanced searches of social media. All events are consistent with the Civil Service Code of Conduct.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It is astonishing that the Cabinet Office could have engaged a speaker who apparently holds such virulent antisemitic views to educate about racism. This incident is one of many that raise troubling questions about the ‘anti-racism training’ industry in this country. Not only has this field long had a blind spot when it comes to racism against Jews, but examples of industry figures actually promoting antisemitism arise too often to be ignored. Over the past several years, we have seen how frontline politicians have identified as ‘lifelong anti-racists’ in an effort to deflect very real allegations of antisemitism. It is time that public bodies and private corporations stop assuming that just because people call themselves ‘anti-racist’, they actually are.”

Image credit: YouTube

The Metro has apologised today after Campaign Against Antisemitism and others called out the newspaper for printing a letter yesterday telling readers that racism against Jews matters less if it comes from a member of another minority.

The letter, from “Vytautus” in Sheffield, claimed that “Racism is [exclusively] an attempt by a ‘privileged’ majority to undermine the destiny of a minority individual or group – it can only be applied by the privileged. What we term ‘racism’ by minorities is not racism but ‘prejudice’, as the minority cannot affect the destiny of the privileged majority.”

The letter went on to describe the cricketer Azeem Rafiq’s past antisemitic comments as “prejudicial” but insisted that they were not “racist”, because Mr Rafiq is from a minority community.

As to whether Mr Rafiq’s comments could not be racist also because they targeted Jews, the letter was ambiguous.

Campaign Against Antisemitism and others called out the newspaper for printing a “dangerously irresponsible” letter.

Metro’s editor, Ted Young, tweeted in response to complaints: “The MetroTalk page is carefully edited with all sorts of views coming in from around the country Nicole. Our readers always challenge views that are clearly wrong in the cut and thrust of debate. But In hindsight this should not have made the page. Apologies.”

Mr Young promised an apology in today’s edition, which was duly printed: “Yesterday, we published a letter that argued remarks about Jewish people from cricketer Azeem Rafiq did not amount to racism. The MetroTalk page is carefully edited with all sorts of views coming in from around the country. Our readers always challenge views that are clearly wrong in the cut and thrust of debate. But in hindsight the letter should not have made the page. Apologies.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

A Jewish child was attacked by a local gang in Stamford Hill.

The twelve-year-old victim was grabbed by the neck and kicked.

The gang is believed to be associated with the nearby Webb Estate and is accused of harassing Jewish residents for years.

The attack took place at 18:05 on 18th November on Leadale Road and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 8336 18/11/2021.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Labour Party councillor on Leicester City Council has reportedly been suspended after allegedly accusing Sir Keir Starmer of being an “agent of Israel”.

Jacky Nangreave, who represents Westcotes ward, is accused of saying of Sir Keir that “he seems to be an agent of Israel, I wonder what they can offer him.” She also allegedly posted a comment saying that “Zionism is terrorism”, with the hashtag “#HangTheGoddamnBankers”, according to a sixtreen-page-report by Labour Against Antisemitism.

It is claimed that she used a social media handle called Jacqueline Cryar.

Cllr Nangreave has also reportedly declared support for the disgraced former Labour MP Chris Williamson and the antisemite Jackie Walker.

Cllr Nangreave said: “I am very sorry for what I see is a misunderstanding with the party and I hope it will be resolved positively soon. I continue to be a councillor for Westcotes…Residents can contact me about any problems they have with the council or the area.”

Leicester City Council has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Image credit: Labour in Leicester

A Jewish child was threatened with a knife in Stamford Hill yesterday.

The twelve-year-old victim was riding his bicycle to school and was accosted by a 65-year-old man who said to him: “I will take out a knife to you, if you pass by again.”

The incident took place at 08:05 on 24th November on Leadale Road and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD 310 17/11/2021.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The four men charged in connection with the alleged antisemitic abuse shouted from a ‘Free Palestine’ convoy in North London in May have appeared in court today.

Mohammed Iftikhar Hanif, 27; Jawaad Hussain, 24; Asif Ali, 25; and Adil Mota, 26, all from Blackburn, all appeared remotely at Wood Green Crown Court today and pleaded not guilty to charges of using threatening, abusive or insulting words, or behaviour, with intent, likely to stir up racial hatred.

The charges relate to the convoy on 16th May, participants in which were caught on video allegedly shouting through a megaphone “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” as they drove through Jewish neighbourhoods waving the flag of the Palestinian Authority, during fighting between Hamas and Israel.

The incident took place a stone’s throw from a synagogue in West Hampstead and continued into St John’s Wood. The convoy had previously and provocatively passed through other Jewish neighbourhoods as well, including Hendon and Golders Green.

The abuse was condemned by the Prime Minister and Home Secretary.

In a statement, the Metropolitan Police Service admitted that they had failed so badly to monitor the convoy that it took hours to find the car in question, which was identified from photographs taken by a Jewish member of the public who had the presence of mind to capture images of the vehicles’ licence plates. Later that day, the four arrests were made.

The charges are punishable by up to three years in prison.

Today’s trial preparation and plea hearing will be followed by a further remote hearing on 11th February 2022.

Last week, the Home Secretary announced a full ban on the antisemitic genocidal terrorist Hamas in the UK, following calls by Campaign Against Antisemitism and allies.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The University and College Union (UCU) branch at Sheffield Hallam University has been condemned for passing a motion of solidarity with the disgraced professor, David Miller.

Prof. Miller, an academic obsessed with anti-Jewish conspiracy theories, was fired last month by the University of Bristol one month after Campaign Against Antisemitism commenced a lawsuit on behalf of current students against the institution, amid pressure from the Jewish community and leading politicians.

On 17th November, the inflammatory motion was passed by a vote of eighteen for and sixteen against, with eleven abstentions.

The motion says that the branch learned “with dismay” that Prof. Miller had been fired, calling the allegations against the disgraced academic “malicious and unfounded”. Deploying a familiar trope, the motion baselessly claimed that “Miller had been accused of antisemitism because of his criticisms of Israel and Zionism,” an antisemitic notion known today as the “Livingstone Formulation”, a phrase named by Prof. David Hirsch after the former Mayor of London.

The motion also insisted that there was nothing wrong in Prof. Miller’s claim that the Bristol University Jewish Society was “acting in the interests of a foreign state, Israel,” even though this too is a classic antisemitic trope.

The motion went on to suggest that Prof. Miller’s dismissal was somehow evidence of the “inadequacy” of the “discredited” International Definition of Antisemitism, even though this Definition enjoys the consensus support of the Jewish community and has been adopted by all major political parties and numerous national governments around the world.

The motion resolved to send an “expression of solidarity” to Prof. Miller; call on the University of Bristol to rescind its decision to sack him; call on the National Executive Committee of UCU to “consider the imposition of ‘greylisting’ on Bristol until Miller is reinstated”; and call on the leadership of UCU to write to the Vice Chancellor, Senate and Trustees of the University of Bristol to express UCU’s “condemnation of this assault on academic freedom”.

An amendment urging caution was reportedly delayed until after the motion was passed, and the amendment itself was then voted down.

Sheffield Jewish Society said in a statement that “Miller created a hostile for Jewish students at Bristol” and accused the local UCU branch of “importing this hostility to Sheffield by accusing those same students of being malicious actors and claiming that their accusations of antisemitism are unfounded.” The statement observed that the UCU branch chose not to speak to Jewish students and their representative bodies to understand their concerns, and noted that “when claims of antisemitism are dismissed as being ‘malicious and unfounded’, and assumed to be dishonest tools to silence criticism of Israel, Jewish students are not being safeguarded from antisemitism, but rather antisemitism is safeguarded and nurtured.”

The statement ended by calling on the Sheffield Hallam University UCU to “rescind the motion, which does harm to Jewish academic staff and students, and for the hundreds of [local UCU]  members who did not attend this meeting, and allowed this motion to be passed in their name, to take seriously their responsibility to stand against antisemitism within their university.”

Earlier this year, UCU Scotland also issued a statement defending Prof. Miller.

UCU has a horrendous reputation in the Jewish community.

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “David Miller is a conspiracy theorist who believes that Bristol’s Jewish Society and the entire nationwide Jewish student body ‘encourage Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism’. His teachings have been going on for years and, after a long, community-wide campaign and a lawsuit by Campaign Against Antisemitism on behalf of Jewish students, Bristol University finally made a decision to fire him.

“Rather than reflect on this episode, Sheffield Hallam UCU has maligned Jewish students, alienating them and Jewish staff and adding to a litany of insults to the Jewish community from UCU over the years. It is little wonder that UCU’s reputation in the Jewish community is in the gutter.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities. Sheffield Hallam University has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

A white supremacist sticker was affixed to a Jewish grave in Tasmania, Australia.

The sticker, with the words “White Force – Old School Aussie Hate”, was stuck over a Star of David on a grave at Launceston’s Carr Villa Cemetery.

The vandalism was reportedly discovered by a Jewish mother and daughter who visit the cemetery every week.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Anti-Defamation Commission

Controversial Labour figures Jo Bird and Pamela Fitzpatrick have been expelled from the Labour Party.

Cllr Bird, who re-joined the Labour Party in 2015 when Jeremy Corbyn was running for the Party’s leadership, has a long history of controversy relating to Jews, including renaming ‘due process’ in the Labour Party as “Jew process”, for which she was suspended; supporting the expelled Labour activist and friend of Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, Marc Wadsworth, who was thrown out of the Party after a confrontation with Jewish then-MP Ruth Smeeth; and worrying about the “privileging of racism against Jews, over and above — as more worthy of resources than other forms of racism.”

Elected to Wirral Council in August 2018, Cllr Bird is a member of Jewish Voice for Labour, the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, and she has described Labour’s institutional antisemitism as based on mere “accusations, witch-huntery and allegations without evidence”.

Cllr Bird appears to have been expelled for her association with the proscribed antisemitism-denial group, Labour Against the Witchhunt. Cllr Bird said on Facebook: “I’m delighted to say that the Labour Party have expelled me today. They say its [sic] for speaking at a meeting (more than three years ago) and signing a petition (early 2020) – organised by Labour Against the Witchthunt, which they banned only four months ago. I’m not free from the Labour Party’s hostile environment, where Jewish people like me are 31 times more likely to be investigated for talking about the racism we face.” She concluded by stating that “this racist Labour party is so different to the Party I joined in 2015. The Labour Party is dying as a vehicle for social justice.”

Pamela Fitzpatrick, a former Labour Parliamentary candidate against whom Campaign Against Antisemitism has had an outstanding complaint, has also been expelled. She says her expulsion was due to her having spoken to the proscribed Socialist Appeal group in 2020.

Former Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell came to her defence, tweeting: “The expulsion of Pam Fitzpatrick is the culmination of a campaign of harassment that should never be accepted in any organisation, let alone the Labour Party. Join me in calling for an independent investigation into this case & reinstatement of this fine socialist.”

Another former Labour Parliamentary candidate, Corrie Drew, has quit the Party after declining to defend herself following her apparent suspension from Labour in September. Ms Drew is also a former Chair of the Bournemouth Constituency Labour Party.

The pro-Corbyn former MP Laura Pidcock, who sits on Labour’s ruling National Executive Committee (NEC), has meanwhile submitted a motion at the NEC challenging the practice of expelling Party members based on apparent involvement with groups that were proscribed after the time of alleged involvement. The motion, seconded by Nadia Jama, also calls for clarity on the threshold of involvement in the proscribed groups that qualifies one for expulsion from the Party.

Both Mis Pidcock and Ms Jama voted against the proscription of Labour Against the Witchhunt by the NEC earlier this year.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The Home Secretary has been vindicated in her decision to ban the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group Hamas in full, after it emerged that the terrorist who murdered the grandson of a prominent British rabbi yesterday was a member of the group’s supposed “political wing”.

The Home Secretary’s announcement on Friday that she would proscribe Hamas in full followed calls by Campaign Against Antisemitism and allies for the Government to ban the terrorist group in its entirety. 

Until now, the UK has only proscribed the Izz al-Din al-Qassam Brigades — the so-called “military wing” of the terrorist group, leaving the supposed “political wing” free to operate and its supporters at liberty to proselytise, even though there is no material distinction between the supposed “wings” of Hamas, which share the same personnel and where political leaders launch military operations.

Yesterday’s terror attack, carried out by a member of Hamas’ supposed “political wing”, is a monstrous case in point.

Because of this loophole, Hamas flags can be flown, its ideology can be promoted, funds can be raised, material can be disseminated, and its representatives can operate in the UK.

In her speech in Washington D.C. on Friday, Priti Patel observed that “the current listing of Hamas creates an artificial distinction between various parts of that organisation – it is right that that listing is updated to reflect this.”

Ms Patel also said that “one of the saddest things: I’ve been a member of Parliament for ten years and antisemitism has dominated my time in Parliament, my time in politics, as an active politician, certainly in the United Kingdom. So, it’s well-versed and well-known, the acts of antisemitism that have taken place in the United Kingdom. And also some of those in political quarters as well that have been proponents of that.

“That is simply unacceptable and even this year alone, in central London and other parts of the country, in the United Kingdom, we have seen the most abhorrent and appalling acts of antisemitism, levelled against the Jewish community and that is simply not acceptable.

“And we will always stand up, we will always speak out, we will always say that we will not tolerate antisemitism which is racism and I think it’s absolutely right that politicians such as myself and others, continue in that fight to stop antisemitism and call it out.”

The fatality in yesterday’s terror attack was Eliyahu David Kay, a 26-year-old immigrant from South Africa and grandson of a prominent British rabbi. The terrorist, Fadi Abu Shkhaidem, also wounded four others before being killed by security forces.

Today, we mourn Eliyahu David Kay.

The Home Secretary is today announcing that the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group, Hamas, is to be proscribed in full by the British Government, subject to the consent of Parliament which is not in doubt.

For several months, Campaign Against Antisemitism has been meeting with the Home Secretary and other ministers, calling on the Government to proscribe Hamas, whose ideology and activities are Islamist, nationalist, antisemitic, misogynistic and homophobic. Many also consider the organisation’s militant teachings to be a corruption of Islam.

We also drew up a detailed dossier, which we provided to the Home Secretary and all MPs, making the case for proscription in order to close the loophole in British law that has allowed Hamas to operate in the UK and which was particularly visible during the recent record-breaking surge in antisemitism in Britain during the conflict between Hamas and Israel.

During the campaign, we have worked alongside numerous allies within and outside the Jewish community.

In a major speech today, the Home Secretary will say: “Hamas is fundamentally and rabidly antisemitic. Antisemitism is an enduring evil which I will never tolerate. Jewish people routinely feel unsafe – at school, in the streets, when they worship, in their homes, and online. This step will strengthen the case against anyone who waves a Hamas flag in the United Kingdom, an act that is bound to make Jewish people feel unsafe.”

She is also expected to say: “Hamas has significant terrorist capability, including access to extensive and sophisticated weaponry, as well as terrorist training facilities, and it has long been involved in significant terrorist violence. But the current listing of Hamas creates an artificial distinction between various parts of the organisation — it is right that the listing is updated to reflect this. This is an important step, especially for the Jewish community. If we tolerate extremism, it will erode the rock of security.”

Until now, the UK has only proscribed the Izz al-Din al-Qassam Brigades — the so-called ‘military wing’ of the terrorist group, leaving the supposed ‘political wing’ free to operate and its supporters at liberty to proselytise. Britain previously relied on the European Union’s proscription of the entirety of Hamas as a de facto ban in the UK, but following the UK’s exit from the European Union, this reliance was no longer tenable.

There is no material distinction between the supposed ‘wings’ of Hamas, which share the same personnel and where political leaders launch military operations. However, because of this loophole, Hamas flags can be flown, its ideology can be promoted, funds can be raised, material can be disseminated, and its representatives can operate in the UK.

Over the years—and particularly in recent months—our Demonstrations and Events Monitoring Unit found evidence of support for Hamas on British streets, and this is undoubtedly tied to the recent surge in domestic antisemitism. Thanks to this proscription, it will now be illegal to display Hamas flags and symbols or finance or publicly support the terror group.

The proscription of the Islamist terrorist group Hizballah in its entirety in 2019 is a fine precedent for this ban of Hamas. Just as the proscription of Hizballah in full, following a long campaign by CAA and others, sent a powerful message to the Jewish community — and Islamists — that antisemitism and terrorism will not be tolerated in the UK, so does the proscription of Hamas, particularly at a time of a record-breaking surge in antisemitism in Britain.

The first ever poll on the subject, conducted by Campaign Against Antisemitism last year, showed that an overwhelming 91% of British Jews want the Government to proscribe Hamas in its entirety.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We thank the Home Secretary for listening and taking this action to outlaw support for Hamas, which seeks the genocide of all Jews worldwide. Proscription of Hamas in full shows British Jews that the Government stands firm against those who seek to harm us, and it also brings the UK into line with our allies.

“During the recent surge in anti-Jewish racism on British streets we saw numerous examples of people wearing the Hamas emblem and even the Hamas-style headband traditionally worn by its suicide bombers. The Home Secretary’s announcement tells Islamists in this country and abroad in no uncertain terms that antisemitic terror and its supporters have no place in decent society and now they can be prosecuted if they peddle their hatred in Britain. Today is a good day in the fight against antisemitism.”

Earlier this year, crosses were daubed in blood in Jewish houses on Portland Avenue in Stamford Hill in what was described as a “grotesque escalation”.

Now, the same person – apparently identified by DNA from the blood – woke families on the same street in the middle of the night by banging on their doors and windows, petrifying children

The suspect is known to the local community.

The latest incident took place overnight on 17th November and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD397 18/11/2021.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The advocacy group Hope Not Hate has rescinded an award to an artist after he appeared to downplay antisemitism in the Labour Party and was pictured with the disgraced former MP Chris Williamson.

Singer Joe Solo was one of three nominees selected by a public vote to win a Hope Hero award for his anti-poverty project. The award was a joint project of Hope Not Hate and the trade union Community.

However, it since emerged that in September 2018 and February 2019 Mr Solo posted messages of solidarity with Mr Williamson on social media.

He also tweeted: “I don’t join in with the Corbyn/antisemitism row because I believe it is being used a political tool to enable much darker forces. So I believe Mr Corbyn is antisemitic? No, of course not. And nor do they…” The tweet ended with a link.

In a joint statement, Hope Not Hate and Community said: “Since the announcement of the award it has been brought to our attention that in 2018 and 2019 Joe Solo published several social media posts that we deem unacceptable.

“Hope Not Hate have long been clear that antisemitism in the Labour Party has been a major problem and vocal in our condemnation of Chris Williamson. One of the major mistakes made by the Labour Party was making excuses instead of acting when faced with antisemitism. We will not make that same mistake.

“As such we have decided to withdraw the award from Joe Solo and we have reached out to him to offer training on the issue of antisemitism and explain why we found the tweet unacceptable.”

The statement also praised Mr Solo’s work, and ended with an apology: “We also apologise unreservedly to our friends and comrades who have been hurt by this situation. We will continue to do more to be allies in the fight against antisemitism.”

Azeem Rafiq, the cricketer who recently highlighted the problem of racial abuse in cricket, has apologised after antisemitic comments that he made when he was nineteen were revealed today.

The thirty-year-old former Yorkshire cricketer has been praised for exposing racism in the sport, including during his tearful testimony at a hearing of the House of Commons’ Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee, where he said that racism destroyed his career.

The Times, however, revealed today that Mr Rafiq sent antisemitic messages in 2011, when he was nineteen. According to the newspaper, Mr Rafiq and his interlocutor, former Leicestershire cricketer Ateeq Javid, were apparently discussing another professional cricketer whom they appeared to accuse of being reluctant to spend money on a meal out because “he is a Jew”. Mr Rafiq joked that he will “probs go after my 2nds again ha…Only Jews do tht sort of shit [sic].”

In a statement to The Times, Mr Rafiq said: “I was sent an image of this exchange from early 2011 today. I have gone back to check my account and it is me. I have absolutely no excuses. I am ashamed of this exchange and have now deleted it so as not to cause further offence. I was nineteen at the time and I hope and believe I am a different person today. I am incredibly angry at myself and I apologise to the Jewish community and everyone who is rightly offended by this.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues to act against instances of anti-Jewish racism in all sports.

Sir Keir Starmer has used a keynote speech to attack anti-Zionist antisemitism within the Labour Party.

Speaking at a Labour Friends of Israel lunch, the Party leader said: “Anti-Zionist antisemitism is the antithesis of the Labour tradition: It denies the Jewish people alone a right to self-determination; It equates Zionism with racism, focuses obsessively on the world’s sole Jewish state, and holds it to standards to which no other country is subjected; And it seeks to paint the actions of Israel as akin to the crimes of those who sought to annihilate European Jewry in the Shoah.

“Anyone who has visited a Holocaust memorial, a concentration camp or spoken with a Holocaust survivor will be struck by the cruelty of that charge.”

Sir Keir’s statement is in accordance with the International Definition of Antisemitism, which lists “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” as an example of antisemitism.

On his Party’s institutional antisemitism, Sir Keir said: “I also want to pay tribute to all those – from the Jewish community and the party – who stood up and spoke out against antisemitism within Labour’s ranks. On the day I became leader of the Labour Party eighteen months ago, my first act was to acknowledge and apologise for the pain and hurt we have caused to the Jewish community in recent years. On behalf of my party, I want to start today by firmly repeating that message once again. And apologising, once again: Antisemitism is a stain on our party.

“I said I would tear this poison out by its roots. And, together, we are beginning to do so. I always said and you have always said that actions speak louder than words and this year, we have made real progress: We have introduced a new independent complaint process; We have proscribed groups which deny or excuse antisemitism. And I am delighted to say that we have welcomed Louise Ellman back to the Labour Party.

“Our work is by no means yet complete, but I give this pledge to you today: We will not give up this fight against this kind of racism, bigotry, and hatred until it is finally won.”

Sir Keir went on to observe that “racism against Jews is held to a different standard from other kinds of racism,”

He further declared that “I am confident that this shameful chapter in our Party’s history is coming to a close.”

In this 30-minute address, Sir Keir also stated his opposition to the BDS movement—the campaign to boycott the Jewish state—the tactics of which an overwhelming majority of British Jews find intimidating.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We welcome Sir Keir Starmer’s forthright rebuttal of anti-Zionist antisemitism and his commitment to fighting antisemitism in his Party. However, we are not as optimistic as Sir Keir that this ‘shameful chapter’ is ‘coming to a close’ as rapidly as Sir Keir would like the Jewish community and the wider public to believe. Until outstanding complaints against Labour MPs are investigated under the new semi-independent disciplinary process, British Jews will not have justice.”

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

An Oxford Dean involved in a bitter dispute at Christ Church College has been criticised for comparing his plight to the Holocaust.

The Very Rev. Prof. Martyn Percy is currently suspended after an allegation of sexual harassment was made against him, which he denies. The claim reportedly comes in the midst of his three-year battle with college academics over his modernisation plans.

In a 2,800-word blog post titled “The Red Triangle” and illustrated with a photograph of the concentration camp striped pyjamas uniform, a Star of David and a “P” symbol, used to denote political prisoners, Prof. Percy compared his case also to that of the anti-Nazi activist and pastor Dietrich Bonhoeffer. He wrote: “My experience of the last three years has given me a tiny taste of what it may have been like to be forced to wear the red triangle that the Nazis made political prisoners wear on the streets, and later in the camps.”

He went on to write: “Over the course of these three years, I have been subjected to public impugning of my reputation, and personal attacks resulting in severe trauma and life-changing injury. I am expected to live and act as though I am a convicted sex-offender, and subjected to draconian restrictions that would have raised eyebrows had I been a paedophile on bail. Few of my colleagues raised a voice in protest. Those that have were quickly taken aside, bullied, victimised and threatened. A good friend summed up the apparent hopelessness of my position. She said, ‘they won’t let you be Dean, much as Bonhoeffer was not allowed to be a Lutheran Pastor or the theologian he was called to be’.”

He also insisted, however: “I am not comparing myself to a victim of Auschwitz here – please don’t get me wrong. I am, rather, the victim of sustained, vicious, localised non-violent hatred, with elements in the community turning on me and those who support me.”

Prof. Percy was condemned by the undergraduate Christ Church Junior Common Room and the Graduate Common Room, which described his post as “abhorrent” and claimed that he was trivialising “the suffering of victims of Nazi persecution, including the Jewish community, the Polish community, people with disabilities, people of colour, and the LGBTQ+ community, groups to which the Dean refers in his essay.” The statement insisted that it was referring only to the blog post and was not taking a position on the wider issues surrounding Prof. Percy.

Prof. Percy has removed the blog post.

Last year, he stepped down from his post while the sexual harassment claims that he stroked the hair of a woman in the cathedral vestry were investigated by the Church of England in a Church Disciplinary Measure (CDM) inquiry.

Three years ago, he was suspended following claims of “behaviour of an immoral, scandalous or disgraceful nature” in a dispute relating to his salary. He refused to resign and a retired High Court judge rejected 27 charges against him after an internal tribunal, but Christ Church refused to reimburse his legal fees.

Last year, e-mails from Prof. Percy’s colleagues disparaging him were uncovered by the media.

A spokesman for the Diocese of Oxford said of the Red Triangle article: “The article posted on Martyn Percy’s personal website is a misappropriation of the Holocaust and is unacceptable. Whatever his complaints about an investigation of a sexual harassment complaint made against him, the Dean should not compare it to genocide. We fully acknowledge the complexity and pain of the present situation for the Dean and the complainant also. Despite his claims otherwise, significant support continues to be provided for all of those involved. Meanwhile, the ongoing legal processes must be allowed to take their course, and Dean Percy remains suspended from cathedral and college duties. We are glad to see the link to the article has now been removed from his website.”

A BBC presenter has been accused of repeatedly comparing Israel to Nazis and calling for “Death to you Zionist scum.”

According to media watchdog HonestReporting, Nasima Begum, an occasional presenter for BBC Radio Manchester, reportedly tweeted “whats sad is that the Jewish population faced genocide themselves in Hitlers Germany but theyve implemented the same on Palestine for years [sic]” in 2011. The following year, she tweeted: “exiling a people from their own land justifies anything. It’s the holocaust all over again except this time it’s innocent Palestinians and ironically the perpetrators are you Zionist scum.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

In another 2012 tweet, she called for “Death to you Zionist scum.”

While these tweets date from some years ago, her habit of inflammatory utterances on social media has persisted. Earlier this year, for example, Ms Begum allegedly claimed that Zionists have a “hold on mainstream media.” Ms Begum also claimed this year that for similar reasons she attended a rally against the BBC – her own employer – and praised the controversial rapper Lowkey.

She has also reportedly posted other shocking remarks, such as questioning the very idea that any Israelis can be “innocent” and saying: “I swear Israel is just the most vile ever thing to exist.”

Ms Begum recently tweeted a long apology, writing that “I am deeply apologetic for any harm or offence that I have caused with my ignorant language,” referencing the “tweets from over a decade ago” but not her more recent remarks.

She further claimed that the old tweets “do not reflect my views and are not a reflection of whom I am as a person – now nor at the time that they were written. However, I take full responsibility for the utterly reprehensible and unacceptable language that I used at a time when I was driven by what I felt and considered to be the lack of fair reporting in the wider media.”

The statement went on, eventually concluding with the “hope that my apology is accepted and that my character shines through however I understand and appreciate that it may take time to heal the wounds of those that I have hurt and I do not expect anyone to forgive me. But I do want all those affected to know that this apology is sincere.”

Mr Begum’s record – coming, moreover, from someone who tweets from the handle “viva viva falesteena” – raise serious questions about the BBC’s vetting and impartiality.

Earlier this year, Tala Halawa was fired by the BBC over numerous antisemitic comments she had made on social media.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors traditional media and regularly holds outlets to account. If members of the public are concerned about reportage in the media, they should contact us at [email protected].

Jewish ladies were chased on Clapton Common by a gang of thirteen-year-olds shouting about suicide and reportedly implying “threats to kill”.

The gang is believed to be associated with the nearby Webb Estate and is accused of harassing Jewish residents for years.

The incident took place at around 19:00 on 16th November on Clapton Common in Stamford Hill and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD56 17/11/2021.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

It has been reported that a Jewish man was verbally abused before the offender exposed himself and began chasing the victim. 

The suspect reportedly yelled “f**k Jews” before exposing himself to the Jewish man and chasing him “some distance, all the time the offender was holding his exposed private parts.”

The incident took place in Clapton Common and was reported yesterday by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: 4628541/21

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A woman shouted “f***ing Jew, dirty Jew!” at a Jewish driver before throwing a stone at the car.

The incident took place at 13:40 on 15th November on Filey Avenue in Stamford Hill, and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

Police are interested to speak to a female driver of a black Nissan Juke, with registration DV17 HPE.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD4632 15/11/21.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A man has pleaded guilty to wearing t-shirts in support of two banned antisemitic genocidal terrorist groups.

Feras Al Jayoosi, 34 and of Swindon, pleaded guilty at Westminster Magistrates’ Court today to four counts of wearing an article supporting a proscribed organisation.

One t-shirt reportedly worn by Mr Al Jayoosi supported the Izz al-Din al Qassem Brigades, which is the so-called “military wing” of the Hamas terrorist group. Hamas’ so-called “political wing” is not currently proscribed in the UK, although Campaign Against Antisemitism and others are urging the Home Secretary to proscribe Hamas in full, given that the supposed distinction between the “wings” is bogus and creates a dangerous loophole in Britain.

The other t-shirt supported the banned Islamic Jihad group.

Mr Al Jayoosi was accused of wearing the shirts at Barbury Castle in Wiltshire on 30th May and then in the heavily-Jewish north London neighbourhood of Golders Green on 8th June and 9th June this year.

Mr Al Jayoosi was released on conditional bail. Sentencing is expected on 17th December.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “This was yet another brazen display of support for the Hamas terrorist organisation, which seeks the genocide of all Jews worldwide. We welcome this verdict but the police have one hand tied behind their backs in dealing with this threat due to a legal loophole that the Government has yet to close. It is high time that the Government heeded our warnings by proscribing the entirety of Hamas instead of one notionally-distinct part of it.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Four Members of the Scottish Parliament (MSPs) have reportedly been pictured with the antisemitic former Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn.

According to journalist Stephen Daisley, in one photograph, Mercedes Villalba, Carol Mochan and Katy Clark were pictured smiling with Mr Corbyn and Alex Rowley is pictured with Mr Corbyn’s arm around his shoulder in another.

All four are Labour MSPs.

Ms Villalba, Scottish Labour’s environment spokesperson, described Mr Corbyn as “Still the kindest man in politics,” while Mr Rowley wrote that he was “Delighted to meet with my good friend.”

Mr Corbyn was suspended from the Labour Party before disgracefully being readmitted, but he remains suspended from the Parliamentary Labour Party, leaving him – and the Labour Party – in the absurd position of being a member of the Labour Party but an independent MP.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has lodged a complaint against Mr Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day of the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

It has been reported that a Labour councillor in Redbridge has had the whip removed after he was accused of being “offensive, misogynistic [and] antisemitic.”

Cllr Khaled Noor’s conduct “has fallen below the high standard we expect of our members,” according to a spokesperson for Redbridge Labour.

The primary incident in question was a meeting of the Labour Group in January 2021, which was chaired by Cllr Judith Garfield, who is jewish. Cllr Garfield complained that, in a lengthy intervention that delayed proceedings at the meeting, Cllr Noor spoke to her in an intimidatory tone and falsely accused her of “only supporting action against antisemitism and not other forms of bigotry.”

Cllr Noor claims that he is a victim of “Islamophobia and instances threatening behaviour, intimidation and bullying,” adding: “The allegation that I used an antisemitic trope is denied.”

A spokesperson for Redbridge Labour spokesperson reportedly said: “The whip has been withdrawn from Cllr Noor following a number of separate incidents where his behaviour has fallen below the high standard we expect of our members. The group only considers removal of the whip in exceptional circumstances where conduct breaches set standards; the fact that poor conduct has been repeated is a matter of regret but made action unavoidable.”

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A new survey has found that just over half of Britons do not know that six million Jews were murdered in the Holocaust.

The survey, commissioned by the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany, found that under a quarter of the 2,000 UK adults who were asked thought that two million Jews or fewer perished in the Nazi genocide. 89% of respondents had heard of the Holocaust, with about three-quarters knowing that it involved the genocide of the Jews.

Over two thirds of respondents – 67% – wrongly believed that the British Government allowed Jewish immigration to the UK, whereas in fact Jews were not permitted to immigrate to Britain at the outbreak of war, nor to pre-state Israel, which the British were governing at the time.

76% did not know what the Kindertransport was. The Kindertransport was an initiative in 1938-39 to rescue nearly 10,000 Jewish children from Europe.

Just over half of respondents believed that fewer people care about the Holocaust nowadays than in the past, and a majority also believed that something like the Holocaust could happen again today.

Around 90% of respondents believe it is important to continue to teach about the Holocaust.

Last year, a survey by the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany found that almost a third (32%) of 18-39-year-olds in Britain were unable to name a single concentration camp or ghetto established during WWII.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “These figures are deeply concerning, underestimating the scale of the Holocaust and overestimating the generosity of British immigration policy. This is frighteningly fertile ground for the cultivation of Holocaust denial. Clearly, there is a great deal more to do in the field of Holocaust education. That a majority of respondents believed that another Holocaust could happen today underscores the urgency of the fight against antisemitism, both through raising awareness and, crucially, zero-tolerance enforcement of the law.”

A joint open letter from a coalition of Jewish charities, including Campaign Against Antisemitism, has demanded that the University of Oxford and St Peter’s College, Oxford, do not “honour or use the Mosley family name” amid a donation scandal engulfing the institution.

The University was reportedly given a £6 million donation from a charitable trust established by Max Mosley, the Formula One tycoon. His fortune originated as an inheritance from his father, Sir Oswald Mosley, who was leader of the antisemitic British Union of Fascists and who wedded his wife in Joseph Goebbels’ house in the presence of Adolf Hitler. Mr Mosley is believed to have supported his father’s cause — and the Union Movement, which succeeded the British Union of Fascists — during the late 1950s and 1960s.

The £6 million donation to the University was to endow the Alexander Mosley Professor of Biophysics Fund. In addition, St Peter’s College was due to receive a £5 million donation to build a new block of student accommodation named Alexander Mosley House. Mr Mosley, who died earlier this year, set up the trust ten years ago in the name of his son, Alexander, who was an alumnus of St Peter’s College and died of a drug overdose.

Writing together, the charities told the University and College: “We find it extraordinary that, at a time when the university and its colleges are reviewing their legacies and making more efforts to be inclusive of minorities, your institutions could readily accept contributions from a notorious fascist family that has caused immense pain to the Jewish community within living memory and whose fortune derives from a man who strove to see the antisemitic policies of Adolf Hitler implemented in this country,” the letter said.

“We are at a loss to understand how you imagine a present or future Jewish student will react to being taught by a professor, or having to live in accommodation, that celebrates a family whose patriarch led violent marches through Jewish neighbourhoods, and who was married at Joseph Goebbels’s house in Berlin in the presence of Adolf Hitler.”

Signed by ten national and local charities, the letter concluded by urging Oxford’s vice-chancellor, Prof. Louise Richardson, and the master of St Peter’s College, Prof. Judith Buchanan, “in the strongest possible terms” to “apply a portion of the funds to education about antisemitism, delivered by a credible organisation; dedicate some of the funds to supporting Jewish life at the University, and at St Peter’s in particular; and confirm that no project, including the endowed chair and the student accommodation, will honour or use the Mosley family name.”

The letter is signed by AJEX, The Jewish Military Association; Campaign Against Antisemitism; the Community Security Trust; Generation 2 Generation, which helps the children and grandchildren of Holocaust survivors to tell their family stories; the Holocaust Educational Trust; the Jewish Leadership Council; Oxford Chabad Society; Oxford Jewish Society; the Simon Wiesenthal Centre, Europe; and the Union of Jewish Students.

It has also emerged that Imperial College London received almost £2.5 million and University College London received half a million pounds from the trust, even as both universities have been reviewing the names and legacies of their buildings in sensitivity toward other minorities.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities. The University of Oxford has adopted the Definition.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

A third man has reportedly been arrested after a video surfaced last week of West Ham fans chanting an antisemitic song at a Hasidic passenger on a flight to a match.

Two men have already been arrested in connection with the incident, during which West Ham supporters, on a Ryanair flight to Belgium where their club was playing KRC Genk, were filmed chanting “I’ve got a foreskin haven’t you, f***ing Jew” at a Hasidic fellow passenger.

A 31-year-old man from Dartford was arrested on 8th November after he voluntarily attended a police station 

Essex Police Chief Superintendent Tom Simons, who is leading the investigation, said: “Essex Police will not tolerate racism or discrimination of any kind. Having been made aware of the incident this morning, officers worked quickly to secure an arrest at the earliest possible opportunity.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to Ryanair asking what was done to protect the Jewish victim of the antisemitic chanting by the West Ham fans and how the airline will help the club identify and ban these supporters for life.

West Ham and the Premier League have adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “This is not the first time a minority of West Ham supporters have engaged in grotesque antisemitic abuse. We commend both the police for these arrests and the club for swiftly imposing bans on those from the video whom it identifies. Football clubs have long said the right things about kicking racism out of the football, and it is reassuring that West Ham is taking this opportunity to translate those promises into action. We are in contact with Ryanair to understand from the airline what action its crew took on board to protect its passenger from racist abuse.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism is calling for arrests over scenes last night at the London School of Economics (LSE).

A mob of students was filmed shouting an antisemitic chant in a protest against a talk by the Israeli ambassador at their university, before trying to intimidate her as she left campus.

A rally of some 500 students were caught on film chanting “from the river to the sea, Palestine will be free”, a refrain that only makes sense as a call for the destruction of the world’s only Jewish state – and its replacement with a State of Palestine – and is thus an attempt to deny Jews, uniquely, the right to self-determination, which is a breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism. The LSE has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

In deeply disturbing online posts, an Instagram account titled “@lseclasswar”, which is believed to be associated with the protesters, posted calls for violence, writing: “Whoever smashes the Ambassador [sic] car window (Lincoln’s Inn Field), gets pints. Let’s f***in frighten her.” They also posted: “18:25, we’re storming in. let’s make her shake. F*** the old bill.”

It is a criminal offence to incite violence or to aid, abet, counsel or procure the commission of criminal damage.

The mob was prevented from reaching the ambassador by police officers, however her security team had to move quickly to keep her safe. Jewish students left safely from the main entrance under the protection of CST.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “These were extremely disturbing scenes which reflect the tenor that discourse has descended to at LSE. Those responsible for the criminality that we witnessed must be arrested. If they are students, LSE must bring disciplinary action against them in accordance with the International Definition of Antisemitism, which it has adopted. LSE already has a poor reputation when it comes to protecting Jewish students, so when a mob shouts antisemitic chants and online there are calls for violence, it has a duty to act and cooperate with the police.” 

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

Andrew Gale, the Yorkshire head coach, has reportedly been suspended pending his investigation over a tweet that has been deemed antisemitic.

In November 2010, after an exchange of messages on Twitter with Paul Dews, the current Head of Communications at Middlesbrough Football Club, Mr Gale tweeted: “Thought you might pipe up! Button it yid!” in a now-deleted tweet uncovered by Jewish News.

Mr Gale said of the incident: “This post is part of a conversational thread between Paul Dews and myself. Paul worked for Leeds United Football Club at the time and I am an avid Huddersfield Town fan. The reference is to a chant that was prevalent at the time in relation to Leeds fans. Within a few minutes of the post, Paul called me and explained the meaning of the word and that it was offensive to Jews. I was completely unaware of this meaning and removed the post immediately”

“I would never have used the word had I been aware of its offensive meaning and I have never used it since.”

The England and Wales Cricket Board said: “We strongly condemn any form of discrimination and have procedures in place to address conduct which is alleged to be of this nature. We will investigate as part of our disciplinary process.”

It has been reported that a Jewish couple attending a maternity appointment at the Whittington Hospital in Upper Holloway, North London were verbally and physically assaulted.

A man allegedly swore at them before yelling: “Move away from CCTV so I can break your bones and open you up.” The man reportedly then threw a full two-litre bottle at the pregnant woman.

The incident was reported earlier today by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD2741 09/11/21.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Leeds United Football Club included a statement in which it condemned antisemitism into its matchday programme on Sunday.

The statement made a point to speak out against fans who they say have “tarnished some fixtures by using antisemitic chanting, noises and gestures.” 

On the issue of the usage of the word ‘yid’ in football, Leeds United added that it also opposed the “justification of opposition fans using specific terms as a form of identity”, and that the club “must make it clear that there is no place for such behaviour at Leeds United Football Club, regardless of its use by supporters of other clubs or its inclusion in the Oxford English Dictionary, whereby definition the Y-word is described as ‘derogatory and offensive’.” 

It continued: “Discriminatory actions or language have no place anywhere in football or society and everyone associated with Leeds United is proud to be part of an inclusive and diverse club. Our players, staff, fans and visitors come from such a wide range of backgrounds and cultures, including the Jewish community, and we want to ensure that everyone feels safe and valued at all times.

“We would like to urge all of our supporters to think about the words they use and show their support in the right way, at Elland Road and any other ground around the country.” 

Last week, two men were arrested after a video surfaced of West Ham fans chanting an antisemitic song at a Hasidic passenger on a flight to a match. West Ham has since confirmed that it has banned two of those involved in the chanting.

The Premier League, including Leeds United, have adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We commend Leeds United for taking a firm stand against antisemitism, particularly given the various high-profile instances of abhorrent anti-Jewish racism by some football supporters of other clubs. Antisemitism in sport in intolerable, and other football clubs should follow Leeds’ admirable example.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues to act against instances of anti-Jewish racism in all sports.

The controversial fringe environmentalist group, Insulate Britain, has doubled down on an inflammatory comparison of perceived climate apathy and the Holocaust.

The group has become notorious over recent weeks for its obstruction of major highways in acts of civil disobedience designed to pressure the Government to insulate all homes in Britain by 2030.

Insulate Britain latched onto the Archbishop of Canterbury’s comment in an interview last week implying a comparison of current climate talks with the run-up to the Holocaust. Shortly after making his remark, Archbishop Justin Welby issued an unserved apology.

However, Insulate Britain claimed that the Archbishop should not have apologised, tweeting: “We stand with @JustinWelby original statement [sic].”

In the face of outrage, the group then doubled down and made the equation more explicit, tweeting: “Those who know and are silent now will be known as bystanders, just as those amongst the general population in Germany who were passive and indifferent to the rise of Nazi Germany and the escalating persecution that culminated in the Holocaust.”

After even greater outrage, the provocative group deleted the second tweet but has not issued an apology.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Comparisons to Nazi Germany risk trivialising the suffering and murder of the six million men, women and children who died at the hands of that regime. Archbishop Welby did the right thing by issuing an unreserved apology. It is startling that Insulate Britain should double down on the comparison and baselessly reference the Holocaust, which was a deliberate and systematic genocide, entirely different from the perceived climate apathy which the fringe group is protesting. Insulate Britain will find that making such comparisons will not strengthen its cause.”

The University of Cambridge has banned a speaker after he impersonated Adolf Hitler during a debate. 

Art historian Andrew Graham-Dixon, 60, performed the act as a part of his argument against the motion entitled “this house believes there is no such thing as good taste”. 

In his impersonation, which the University Union’s President called the “longest Hitler impression” that the chamber had ever heard, Mr Graham-Dixon said: “This modern, horrible art that was promoted by the Jews.. and the modern art, it was cubist – inspired by the art of the ne***s. This tribal art, urgh, how horrible is that? We must expunge this from our Deutschland. We are the pure, Aryan people. Our genetics is pure, our hearts must be pure, our tastes must be pure.”

Mr Graham-Dixon later apologised for the impression and claimed that he was trying to “underline the utterly evil nature of Hitler.”

He added: “I apologise sincerely to anyone who found my debating tactics and use of Hitler’s own language distressing; on reflection I can see that some of the words I used, even in quotation, are inherently offensive.” 

However, Mr Graham-Dixon has now been banned from speaking at the University after Union President Keir Bradwell said that they “will create a blacklist of speakers never to be invited back” that would also be shared with other unions, adding that “Andrew will be on that list.”

Mr Bradwell issued an apology of his own after he failed to speak out against the impersonation at the time, stating: “I would like to offer my unreserved apology for the comments made by a speaker in our debate on Thursday night. Neither I nor the society condones the thoughtless and grotesque language used by the individual in question, and I am sorry for my failure to intervene at the time.

“The speaker in question employed a crass and deeply insensitive impression of Hitler to make the point in opposition that there is such a thing as bad taste […] It was inexcusable, and I regret not intervening.”

The University adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism last year.

A Labour councillor who reportedly defended antisemites Jeremy Corbyn and Jackie Walker has been elected to chair the National Constitutional Committee, the Labour Party’s highest disciplinary body.

Emine Ibrahim, a Haringey councillor and member of the board of London Labour Momentum, reportedly posted on Facebook in 2016: “Does anyone on here or in the party think Jeremy [Corbyn] is an antisemite? If they don’t then associating him with antisemitism is a slur on his character and his policies.”

Also in 2016, when asked how she could defend Ms Walker, who had said that “many Jews were the chief financiers of the sugar and slave trade,” Ms Ibrahim is reported to have said: “Because I have met her and spoken to her and so I believe her when she says she is not an antisemite.”

Ms Ibrahim told the JC: “With regard to Jackie Walker, I commented after she had been cleared by the party process of the time. As I had no role in party disciplinary processes at the time and as an ordinary party member, I took at face value that the decision was made based on a thorough investigation and party process.”

She added: “With regard to Jeremy Corbyn, again for the same reasons I have not commented on individual cases. Antisemitism and all forms of discrimination need to be rooted out in all its forms.”

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Former UKIP candidate Jeff Wyatt spoke at an anti-vaccination rally held by Piers Corbyn on Saturday, where Mr Wyatt made comparisons to the Holocaust whilst wearing the yellow star that was forced upon Jews during the Holocaust.

Mr Wyatt is the former Deputy Leader of the For Britain Movement who stood as a UKIP candidate in Milton Keynes. The For Britain Movement has been described as a “far-right UKIP splinter group” and has been accused of antisemitism and racism.

At Saturday’s rally, Mr Wyatt stood atop a podium whilst wearing a yellow star on his right arm and said: “The Nazi Germans perpetrated this against the people of Germany. They perpetrated the control and the fascism that we are experiencing now.”

He continued: “It’s nothing short of a re-run of the Nazi playbook.” 

Mr Wyatt reportedly claimed in August that wearing the yellow star was the “ultimate tribute” to Holocaust victims. Mr Wyatt wore a similar yellow star armband with the words “Not Vaccinated” written below, as well as the German translation of “Nicht Geimpft”. “It’s the ultimate tribute – because where we are heading is where the Jews went,” Mr Wyatt reportedly said.

He added: “Bear in mind in the 1930s, the Nazis didn’t just suddenly become the tyrants they were – they slowly had their evil way over the public of Germany. And the Jews, for years and years, said ‘just do what they say’ – and eventually they gassed them.”

On a video uploaded to the official YouTube account for UKIP Cambridge & SE Cambs, Mr Wyatt can be seen talking to the camera at an anti-lockdown rally from last year whilst holding a sign that reads “No Gestapo Policing”.

This is not the first time that the yellow star or comparisons to the Nazis have been used by anti-vaccination demonstrators.

In April, protesters at an anti-vaccination rally held in London were pictured wearing the yellow star. Comedian David Baddiel took to Twitter to share a photo of a woman wearing the yellow star, accompanying it with the caption: “Take. That. Off.”

Footage taken on 13th July showed Piers Corbyn comparing vaccinations to Nazi policy outside the Houses of Parliament, despite being arrested after a similar incident in February. The video shows Mr Corbyn and another man standing in front of a sign which reads “No Nazi forced jab” and yelling “arrest Matt Hancock” through a megaphone. 

The inflammatory and misleading comparison has also been used among international anti-vaccination and anti-lockdown circles.

Earlier this year, Joseph Szwarc, a Holocaust survivor, spoke out against wearing the yellow star in protests, saying: “You can’t imagine how much that upset me. This comparison is hateful. We must all rise up against this ignominy.” With tears in his eyes, Mr Szwarc added: “I wore the star, I know what that is, I still have it in my flesh. It is everyone’s duty to not allow this outrageous, antisemitic, racist wave to pass over us.”

The comparison has been made across the world, including in the United States, Canada, Ukraine and elsewhere.

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Graham Bash, the Political Officer of Jewish Voice for Labour (JVL) and the partner of the antisemite Jackie Walker, has reportedly been expelled from the Labour Party.

JVL is an antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation.

Mr Bash was accused in August in a Notice of Possible Auto-exclusion that he was facing automatic expulsion over alleged affiliation with Labour Against the Witchhunt, an antisemitism-denial group that has been proscribed by the Labour Party.

Mr Bash, an ally of Jeremy Corbyn and former Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell, has reportedly been investigated in the past over comments about “Jewish exceptionalism”.

Mr McDonnell tweeted in Mr Bash’s defence, writing: “I’ve known & campaigned alongside Graham Bash for over 40 years. He is one of the finest socialists I have met. I do not believe it can be just to expel someone from the Labour Party based upon actions or associations with an organisation before it has been proscribed. This week in Parliament alongside the whole of the PLP [Parliamentary Labour Party] I voted against the injustice of retrospective action like this being attempted by [Prime Minister Boris] Johnson & the Tories. If we condemn the Tories for this behaviour, it cannot be right for Labour to act in this way.”

JVL’s co-Founder, Leah Levane, was recently expelled from the Labour Party, while the group’s Media Officer, Naomi Wimborne-Idrissi, was suspended and readmitted.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The neo-Nazi group British Movement and the far-right group Patriotic Alternative held a joint demonstration on Saturday in Castleford, West Yorkshire.

British Movement described the demonstration as an example of “pan-Nationalist co-operation”. 

The groups also marched to the constituency office of Labour Party MP Yvette Cooper, the representative for the Normanton, Pontefract and Castleford area. The groups also posted flyers through her letterbox which called for the ban of kosher and halal meat. 

This stunt follows last month’s incident when the same flyers were posted through Jewish homes in Borehamwood. 

Simon Fell, the Conservative Party MP for Barrow and Furness, said last week: “Groups like Patriotic Alternative promote division and fear. They have no place in our community.

Earlier this year, a resident of East Belfast reported that he had a British Movement leaflet put through his door. The report of the leaflet came in the same week as stickers from the British National Socialist Movement – the successor to the British Movement – were found on street furniture in Manchester.

Founded during the 1960s and having supposedly dissolved in the early 1980s, the British National Socialist Movement exhibited antisemitism and advocated for violence towards ethnic minorities. The group now appears, however, to have reactivated, with a website currently featuring several antisemitic tropes and images, including references to “globalists” and “cultural Marxists,” praise for Hitler, and images of people performing the Nazi salute.

Patriotic Alternative is known for its efforts to recruit youth to its white nationalist ideology. Previously, the far-right group published an online “alternative” home school curriculum condemned as “poison” and “hateful” and attempted to recruit children as young as twelve through livestreaming events on YouTube, according to The Times.

It is led by the former head of the youth wing of the BNP, Mark Collett, who is reported to have dabbled in Holocaust denial, collaborated with the infamous American antisemite David Duke, and espoused antisemitic and racist views.

Earlier this year, the far-right group was found to be using the social media platform Telegram to create neo-Nazi channels dedicated to sharing vile messages, antisemitic conspiracy theories and images glorifying Hitler. A report into Patriotic Alternative published last summer found that several members of the group engaged in Holocaust denial.    

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

The Royal Court Theatre has issued an apology and changed the name of a character after receiving complaints of antisemitism.

The theatre received backlash after the new play Rare Earth Mettle, from writer Al Smith, which is coming to the Royal Court this week, used the name ‘Hershel Fink’ for the character of a Silicon Valley billionaire.

In response, the theatre wrote on Twitter that it was “grateful to members of the Jewish community who got in touch with the Royal Court to communicate the name of one of the characters in Rare Earth Mettle is antisemitic.” It went on to state that “the character is not Jewish and there is no reference to being Jewish in the play,” but that the theatre acknowledged that this was an “example of unconscious bias,” stating that they will “reflect deeply on how this has happened in the coming days” and that it was deeply sorry.

The theatre later released a separate statement on its website, in which it said: “The Royal Court Theatre apologises unreservedly for this situation. It was a mistake, it shouldn’t have happened, and we are sorry it did. We stand in solidarity with our Jewish staff, artists, audiences and friends and are grateful to those who got in touch to communicate that the character named Hershel Fink was perpetuating an antisemitic stereotype. In response, the writer has decided to change the name to Henry Finn – this will be effective from the first performances next week, and we shall reprint all communications and the play text with this change.”

The statement continued: “Now we are looking towards the dialogue that will help us reflect on the process that enabled the name to remain and what is missing in our systems that would have mitigated this unnecessary harm. Our anti-racism work is current and ongoing, and this experience proves once again how necessary and wide that work must be. We will work hard now in the hope of building trust and confidence within our Jewish community.”

Notably, the theatre is partnered with an organisation called Sour Lemons, which describes its mission as “dismantling systemic racism in the arts and culture sector.” The partnership, which encompasses the Royal Court and Young Vic theatres, is described as “a strategic two-year partnership to identify and dismantle systemic racism within the organisations.” It is remarkable that Sour Lemons did not speak out against the use of the stereotype.

The founder and Chief Executive of Sour Lemons, Sade Banks, has in the past tweeted her support for the boycott of Israel. An overwhelming majority of British Jews find the tactics of those seeking to boycott businesses that sell Israeli products to be intimidating.

Andrew Gale, the Yorkshire head coach, is being investigated over a tweet that has been deemed antisemitic.

In November 2010, after an exchange of messages on Twitter with Paul Dews, the current Head of Communications at Middlesbrough Football Club, Mr Gale tweeted: “Thought you might pipe up! Button it yid!” in a now-deleted tweet uncovered by Jewish News.

Mr Gale said of the incident: “This post is part of a conversational thread between Paul Dews and myself. Paul worked for Leeds United Football Club at the time and I am an avid Huddersfield Town fan. The reference is to a chant that was prevalent at the time in relation to Leeds fans. Within a few minutes of the post, Paul called me and explained the meaning of the word and that it was offensive to Jews. I was completely unaware of this meaning and removed the post immediately”

“I would never have used the word had I been aware of its offensive meaning and I have never used it since.”

The England and Wales Cricket Board said: “We strongly condemn any form of discrimination and have procedures in place to address conduct which is alleged to be of this nature. We will investigate as part of our disciplinary process.”

West Ham has confirmed that it has so far banned two supporters for life over antisemitic chanting on a flight to a Europa League match.

Two men have also been arrested after a video surfaced last week of West Ham fans chanting “I’ve got a foreskin haven’t you, f***ing Jew” at a Hasidic fellow on a Ryanair flight to Belgium where their club was playing KRC Genk.

Essex Police have arrested two men so far in connection with the incident. It is not currently clear whether the two banned supporters are also the two suspects.

West Ham’s Manager, David Moyes, said on Friday: “I don’t see our football club being like that. We are a diverse football club. There’s no room for discrimination anywhere.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to Ryanair asking what was done to protect the Jewish victim of the antisemitic chanting by the West Ham fans and how the airline will help the club identify and ban these supporters for life.

West Ham and the Premier League have adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The University of Oxford has become mired in controversy over a donation from the Mosley family.

The University was reportedly given a £6 million donation from a charitable trust established by Max Mosley, the Formula One tycoon. His fortune originated as an inheritance from his father, Sir Oswald Mosley, who was leader of the antisemitic British Union of Fascists and who wedded his wife in Joseph Goebbels’ house in the presence of Adolf Hitler. Mr Mosley is believed to have supported his father’s cause – and the Union Movement, which succeeded the British Union of Fascists – during the late 1950s and 1960s.

The £6 million donation to the University was to endow the Alexander Mosley Professor of Biophysics Fund.

In addition, St Peter’s College was due to receive a £5 million donation to build a new block of student accommodation named Alexander Mosley House. Mr Mosley, who died earlier this year, set up the trust ten years ago in the name of his son, Alexander, who was an alumnus of St Peter’s College and died of a drug overdose.

Prof. Lawrence Goldman, Emeritus Fellow in History, wrote to St Peter’s College urging it to refuse the donation, saying that it came from the “most infamous fascist dynasty in the English-speaking world.” Since the controversy, the College has reportedly decided to consult over the name of the proposed accommodation building.

It is understood that Lady Margaret Hall has also accepted a donation of around £260,000 from the trust.

The donations are particularly notable because the University and its colleges have become increasingly sensitive to the concerns of other minorities over the University’s past.

Oxford University and both colleges insist that the donations were reviewed and cleared by an independent committee in a “robust” manner, taking “legal, ethical and reputational issues into consideration.”

It has since emerged that Imperial College London received almost £2.5 million and University College London received half a million pounds from the trust, even as both universities have been reviewing the names and legacies of their buildings in sensitivity toward other minorities.

A spokesperson for the University of Oxford said: “We can confirm that donations to the department of physics from the Alexander Mosley Charitable Trust, including endowment of a chair in biophysics named after Alexander Mosley, a graduate of the university, were all considered and approved by the university’s committee to review donations and research funding.”

St Peter’s College said that the trust’s “generous” donation will make a “transformative” difference to students, adding: “Alexander Mosley was a student at the college and is warmly remembered by tutors and fellow students. He died in tragic circumstances and the [trust] was set up to remember him.”

A spokesperson for Lady Margaret Hall said that the donation “enabled a cohort of students from very diverse and low-income backgrounds to attend Oxford and participate in Lady Margaret Hall’s pioneering foundation year,” adding that there was no attempt to “rehabilitate” the Mosley family name and that the trust “did not ask for and were not given any public acknowledgement of the donation”.

A spokesman for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The Mosley family has an infamous record in relation to antisemitism. Oxford University should think hard about accepting a donation from the family’s trust, ensuring that a portion of the money funds education about antisemitism or supports Jewish life at the university.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities. The University of Oxford has adopted the Definition.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Campaign Against Antisemitism has called on the Metropolitan Police to disclose what action has been taken against SBV Vitesse supporters who appeared to perform Nazi salutes against Tottenham Hotspur fans.

The gestures were spotted at the 4th November match between the Dutch club and the North London team, which has long been associated with the Jewish community. The match was at Tottenham Hotspur Stadium.

Groups of Vitesse fans have a history of inflammatory behaviour, for example earlier this year the club distanced itself from fans who sang “Hamas, Hamas, Jews to the gas!” The chants were sung in solidarity with a team playing Ajax, a fellow Dutch club also associated with the Jewish community.

It is understood that commentators on the Tottenham match noted the gestures and that police ejected groups of fans from the stadium, although pictures and reports of the incident paint an unclear picture of whether the gestures were Nazi salutes or not.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has therefore called on the Metropolitan Police to disclose what action it took and what its investigation has turned up.

Image credit: Twitter

Two men have been arrested after a video surfaced earlier this week of West Ham fans chanting an antisemitic song at a Hasidic passenger on a flight to a match.

The West Ham supporters were on a Ryanair flight to Belgium where their club was playing KRC Genk. On the flight out, fans were filmed chanting “I’ve got a foreskin haven’t you, f***ing Jew” at a Hasidic fellow passenger.

Two men have now been arrested in connection with the incident. Essex Police released a statement on 5th November in which they confirmed that a 55-year-old man was arrested at Stansted Airport just before 16:00 on Friday. The man was arrested as he stepped off the plane from Belgium and was taken in to an Essex Police Station for questioning.

Essex Police Chief Superintendent Tom Simons, who is leading the investigation, later said: “Essex Police will not tolerate racism or discrimination of any kind. Having been made aware of the incident this morning, officers worked quickly to secure an arrest at the earliest possible opportunity.”

It has since emerged that a second arrest has been made. Essex Police announced that a 26-year-old man was arrested yesterday at approximately 16:30 as he stepped off a flight from the Netherlands. The 26-year-old was also taken in for questioning and has been released on police bail until 1st December. The police confirmed that the man was arrested on suspicion of Section 4A Public Order (racially or religiously aggravated).

Regarding the incident on the flight, a West Ham spokesperson has said in a statement: “West Ham United is appalled by the contents of the video circulating on social media and condemn the behaviour of the individuals involved. The club is liaising with the airline and relevant authorities to identify the individuals. We continue to be unequivocal in our stance – we have a zero-tolerance approach to any form of discrimination. Any individuals identified will be issued with an indefinite ban from the club. Equality, diversity and inclusion are at the heart of the football club and we do not welcome any individuals who do not share those values.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to Ryanair asking what was done to protect the Jewish victim of the antisemitic chanting by the West Ham fans and how the airline will help the club identify and ban these supporters for life.

West Ham and the Premier League have adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

A man who pleaded guilty to sending a series of antisemitic, hateful and racist tweets has been sentenced to eight weeks in prison at Westminster Magistrates’ Court today.

After an investigation by the Metropolitan Police, Nathan Blagg, 21, of Retford in Nottinghamshire, was charged in September with seven counts of sending by public communication network an offensive/indecent/obscene/menacing message/matter which violates the Malicious Communications Act. The charges refer to seven tweets sent between 29th September 2020 and 5th February 2021. 

Mr Blagg pleaded guilty to all charges. The court heard that Mr Blagg was initially reported by a West Brom fan before his posts were investigated by Chelsea Football Club’s security team and finally passed on to the police. The posts included images as well as tweets and retweets of offensive messages. 

Prosecutor David Roberts said that there was a “racially aggravated” element because of the “antisemitic nature” of many of the tweets. 

Maeve Thornton, defending, reportedly said that Mr Blagg had been suffering at the time from “low moods” due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Ms Thornton said: “He has got drawn into this in terms of a lack of awareness and understanding of the impact this was going to have. With hindsight, he now understands how wrong this is. He is indeed very remorseful and very apologetic and has taken steps to address his offending by removing himself from Twitter. There is not going to be a repeat of this behaviour moving forward.”

However, today Westminster Magistrates’ Court sentenced Mr Blagg to eight weeks in prison.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We welcome this sentence, which sends a message to fans that there is no place for antisemitism in football. We commend Chelsea FC and the police for investigating and seeing the case through. Kicking racism out of football will only succeed when all interested parties cooperate, as they have done in this case.”

In April, Chelsea Football Club announced that it had banned an abusive online troll from its matches for ten years after he hounded a Jewish journalist who came forward and received support from Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Chelsea and the Premier League have adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has called on Ryanair to help West Ham FC identify and ban fans who were filmed chanting an antisemitic song at a Hasidic passenger on a flight to a match.

The West Ham supporters were on a flight to Belgium where their club was playing KRC Genk. On the flight out, fans were filmed chanting “I’ve got a foreskin haven’t you, f***ing Jew” at a Hasidic fellow passenger.

This is not the first time that West Ham fans have been documented singing this antisemitic chant, or indeed engaging in other antisemitic abuse. Almost every year there is an incident related to antisemitism involving individual supporters or groups of fans of West Ham.

In 2016, two fans were convicted under the Crime and Disorder Act of racially aggravated harassment alarm and distress for singing antisemitic football songs on a train in 2015. British Transport Police issued an appeal for witnesses, which Campaign Against Antisemitism and others circulated widely.

In 2017, a Jewish man and his non-Jewish female companion were subjected to horrific antisemitic abuse by fans of West Ham on the London Underground.

In 2019, the club banned one supporter for life after video footage emerged apparently showing fans singing antisemitic chants in a game early in the 2018-19 football season.

Also that year, West Ham pledged to ban for life any fans that it identifies from a video in which football thugs can be heard chanting on public transport: “We’ll be running around Tottenham with our willies hanging out, singing ‘I’ve got a foreskin, haven’t you, f***ing Jew’.” Tottenham Hotspur has traditionally enjoyed the support of a large number of Jewish football fans.

Earlier this year, West Ham’s message on Facebook wishing the Jewish community a happy new year was inundated with negative – and in some cases explicitly antisemitic – responses, which the club has yet to take down.

Regarding this latest incident on the flight, a West Ham spokesperson has said in a statement: “West Ham United is appalled by the contents of the video circulating on social media and condemn the behaviour of the individuals involved. The club is liaising with the airline and relevant authorities to identify the individuals. We continue to be unequivocal in our stance – we have a zero-tolerance approach to any form of discrimination. Any individuals identified will be issued with an indefinite ban from the club. Equality, diversity and inclusion are at the heart of the football club and we do not welcome any individuals who do not share those values.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “This is not the first time a minority of West Ham supporters have engaged in grotesque antisemitic abuse. Ryanair must explain what its crew did to protect the Jewish victim and disclose whether it has alerted the police. The airline must also assist West Ham to identify the supporters so that the club can fulfil its pledge to ban these fans for life. Football clubs have long said the right things about kicking racism out of the football, and here is an opportunity to translate those promises into action.”

West Ham and the Premier League have adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The Metropolitan Police Service released a statement yesterday in which they said that a man in his early 40s has been arrested in relation to a series of swastikas spray-painted near a North London synagogue and the surrounding area on Saturday.

Police have said that at this time that they are not looking for any other individuals in connection with the vandalism.

A 16-year-old boy was initially detained soon after 20:00 on Saturday by officers responding to reports received only 20 minutes earlier of a male seen spraying swastikas on walls near Belsize Square Synagogue. A police statement said that they have subsequently found numerous swastikas sprayed on walls in the surrounding area and that they are investigating whether the same suspect is responsible.

However, it was announced earlier this week that the teenager had been released without charge and was ruled out of the investigation. 

It was also reported to Campaign Against Antisemitism that sightings of similar swastikas have occurred on Fairfax Road and Daleham Gardens.

The Labour MP Richard Burgon is reportedly set to address the Halifax Friends of Palestine group, despite its controversial record.

Mr Burgon, a former Shadow Justice Secretary and close ally of Jeremy Corbyn, is due to speak at the group’s gala dinner later this month.

It has been reported that the Yorkshire-based group participated in a rally in September celebrating a terrorist who killed six civilians in Israel, and another rally in August in which the chant “From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free” was heard. The chant only makes sense as a call for the destruction of the world’s only Jewish state – and its replacement with a State of Palestine – and is thus an attempt to deny Jews, uniquely, the right to self-determination, which is a breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Mr Burgon is one of a number of Labour MPs against whom Campaign Against Antisemitism has submitted complaints, which we expect the Labour Party to investigate once it has introduced the anticipated semi-independent disciplinary process.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Richard Burgon is a magnet for controversy. A key ally of Jeremy Corbyn, he previously claimed that ‘Zionism is the enemy of peace’ and then lied about doing so. If he is interested in making amends, withdrawing from this event would be a start. In the meantime, we expect the Labour Party to investigate our complaint against him and other MPs, so that the Jewish community can finally have justice.”

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A former supporter of Jeremy Corbyn who sought to run as a Conservative candidate in local council elections has reportedly been suspended by the Conservative Party after it emerged that he administrated a Facebook group that asked members: “Is Zionism Racism?”

According to a report, Khalid Sharif, who was confirmed as the Redbridge Conservative candidate for the Clayhall ward in next year’s local elections, has been suspended by the Party.

The poll was featured on Mr Sharif’s IG–Soc: Connecting Muslims in Redbridge Insha’Allah Facebook group. Comments by other members underneath the July poll reportedly included the claim that “just asking the question will be considered antisemitic. The Zionists have great powers hence they’ve made sure no one can say anything against them.”

Mr Sharif, a former member of the pro-Corbyn group, Momentum, apparently joined the Conservatives last year after Mr Corbyn’s election defeat, having described the former Labour leader as a “breath of fresh air” and lamenting that “that era has gone.”

A spokesperson for the Conservative Party reportedly confirmed that Mr Sharif has been suspended pending the outcome of an investigation.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The Paris Criminal Court has fined seven defendants who subjected the runner-up of the Miss France beauty competition to antisemitic abuse on Twitter after she revealed that her father is Israeli.

Four women and three men were sentenced today to fines ranging from 300 to 800 euros for posting antisemitic tweets targeting April Benayoum, Miss Provence and the runner-up of the Miss France contest, late last year.

Two of the defendant will also have to complete a two-day citizenship course.

An eighth defendant was let off after the court concluded that his tweet did not target Ms Benayoum.

Ms Benayoum’s father is Israeli and her mother is Serbo-Croatian.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Jewish families on Ashtead Road were terrorised by a group of youths, who threw bricks and kicked front doors, breaking the locks.

The incident took place on 1st November and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD7817 01/11/2021.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Google

Protesters in Glasgow have been criticised for comparing abortion to the Holocaust.

It was reported that an American evangelical movement has been picketing Scottish abortion clinics. One placard was spotted outside of the Glasgow Royal Infirmary that read “Abortion Is A Silent Holocaust. It Is Global Genocide”. 

Dr Audrey Brown, a leading gynaecologist, said that she was “disgusted by the language used,” and that it was “a completely inappropriate use of the word ‘Holocaust’.” 

She added: “I found this placard to be particularly upsetting…It really is a misuse of such powerful language and should not be allowed.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Abortion remains a heated issue, but rarely does anybody strengthen their case by making provocative and unfounded references to the systematic slaughter of six million men, women and children simply because they were Jewish. There are ways to express passionate feelings without needlessly equating it to the darkest period in human history.”

A Jewish child was racially abused by a woman in Stamford Hill.

The victim was walking on Portland when a woman, described as black and wearing a yellow blanket, shouted at him: “I am sorry to say you guys are the worst! F****** Jew!” She reportedly continued to point at him and shout expletives as he ran home, shocked traumatised.

The incident took place at 19:30 on 28th October and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD7476 01/11/21.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A suspect has been arrested after the phrase “f**k Jews” was spray painted outside a yeshiva in Gateshead on Saturday.

The individual was apprehended on the same day by yeshiva security before police arrived. It was reported that two similar incidents occurred in the area within the last month.

A Northumbria Police spokesperson said: “Shortly after 00:30 on Saturday (30th October) Police received a report a male had sprayed antisemitic graffiti near the Swallow Hotel, on Gladstone Terrace, Gateshead. An investigation into the incident has been launched and officers are treating the incident as a hate crime.

“Enquiries remain ongoing and anyone with information is asked to contact police via the Tell us Something page, or by calling 101 quoting crime number 120031T/21.”

The singer-songwriter Alex Clare, who was raised in a secular Jewish home but turned to orthodox Judaism in his early twenties, was told ten years ago that he had to choose between his career or his religion by his record label, he said in a recent interview. 

The musician said that while Island Records were “very tolerant” of his decision to pull out of an April tour with Adele due to some of the gigs coinciding with the Sabbath and the Jewish festival of Passover, the label appeared to grow annoyed when he declined to record a BBC radio concert in October in order to observe the Jewish festival of Sukkot. A difficult conversation with label bosses then led to Mr Clare being dropped after just one album.

Mr Clare commented: “They said, ‘It seems like you’re more into your religion than you are into your career,’ and that really wasn’t the case. I really was focused on my career, but personal lifestyle choices, whatever they are, haven’t always necessarily been so tolerated. I’m not unique – historically this has been a running theme, not just for Jewish people but anyone who makes commitments elsewhere.”

He continued: “When I signed, they knew that that was happening but they didn’t quite understand how serious the rules of keeping the Sabbath are. And for some reason every piece of promo that came in was seeming to fall on a Friday night or Saturday morning, and I was turning down opportunity after opportunity.”

“They thought I was nuts,” Mr Clare said of the label when he turned down at least five gigs of the tour with Adele. 

A spokesperson for Island Records said that they had “reached out to apologise directly to Alex.” They added: “What was said to him ten years ago was wrong and does not in any way represent our views or policies.”

Mr Clare noted that when he was re-signed by the label, they were “very apologetic.” 

“We have a saying in Hebrew called Gam Zu L’Tovah, which means ‘This too is good’,” he said. “We say that when something goes really badly wrong. It’s like the most crazy statement to have enough faith and say, ‘This right now is a really bad situation but ultimately God is good and life is good and this is for a greater good’ – whatever that might be. And in my case it really worked out that way. I got dropped by the label but months later I had a top ten hit all over the world, selling [double] platinum, and obviously got a much bigger record deal second time!” 

Reports have emerged that a figure behind the Labour Party’s one-sided anti-Israel motion is the son of a former Hamas health minister.

According to the Israel Advocacy Movement, Omar Mofeed, whom Al Jazeera described in an interview with him as one of the drafters of the motion, is in fact the son of Mufid al-Mukhalalati, a senior member of the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group, Hamas. Mr al-Mukhalalati, a former Health Minister for the terrorist organisation, which rules the Gaza Strip, died in 2014 and was eulogised by the group’s leaders.

Mr Mofeed, who has served as the Communications Officer of Ealing Central and Action Constituency Labour Party, has himself praised Hamas’s chief bomb-maker, threatened Israel and described Jews as “cursed”, according to the Israel Advocacy Movement.

Mr Mofeed said in his Al Jazeera interview that, in addition to the Arab Labour group, of which he is Chair, others inputting into the motion included Young Labour, twelve trade unions and the Palestine Solidarity Campaign (PSC), of which Mr Mofeed is a director. A past investigation by Campaign Against Antisemitism found the PSC to be riddled with bigotry.

The motion, which passed at Labour’s annual conference, was so one-sided against the Jewish state that the Party’s leadership declined to embrace it.

In a further twist, Labour Against Antisemitism reports that the Labour Party says that Mr Mofeed is “no longer a Labour Party member,” although it is unclear whether he was expelled or resigned and whether this was even before or after the motion he claims to have helped to draft.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Image credit: Israel Advocacy Movement

The Archbishop of Canterbury has apologised for comparing the climate threat to Nazi Germany.

Earlier today, in the context of the COP26 Summit in Glasgow, the Most Reverend Justin Welby was reported to have made reference to WWII. The BBC paraphrased him as saying that leaders will be “cursed” if they do not reach agreement over the next fortnight, and that a failure to act could be more grave than when the leaders of the free world ignored warnings about the Nazis in the 1930s.

However, Archbishop Welby has now apologised for the comparison, tweeting: “I unequivocally apologise for the words I used when trying to emphasise the gravity of the situation facing us at COP26. It’s never right to make comparisons with the atrocities brought by the Nazis, and I’m sorry for the offence caused to Jews by these words.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Comparisons to Nazi Germany risk trivialising the suffering and murder of the six million men, women and children who died at the hands of that regime. Making such comparisons rarely strengthens one’s cause. Archbishop Welby should be commended for his rapid and unreserved apology.

A Jewish man returning from synagogue was hit in the head with glass bottle, which reportedly broke, leaving him covered in a yellow liquid.

The attack took place on Rossington Street in Stamford Hill in the evening of 30th October and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: 4628710/21.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Swastikas bearing a similar resemblance to the ones found near a North London synagogue a few days ago have been discovered nearby.  

On Saturday, the Metropolitan Police Service appealed for witnesses after officers arrested a teenage on suspicion of religiously aggravated criminal damage after swastikas were spray painted near a synagogue.

The 16-year-old boy was detained soon after 20:00 today by officers responding to reports received only 20 minutes earlier of a male seen spraying swastikas on walls near Belsize Square Synagogue. A police statement said that they have subsequently found numerous swastikas sprayed on walls in the surrounding area and that they are investigating whether the same suspect is responsible.

Appealing for witnesses, the Metropolitan Police Service said that “Anyone who witnessed the offences taking place or who has other information and has not yet spoken to police should call 101, giving the reference 6604/30OCT.”

Now, more swastikas have been discovered not far from Belsize Park Synagogue. It has been reported to us that sightings of similar swastikas have occurred on Fairfax Road and Daleham Gardens.

The UK has ended direct funding of Palestinian Authority teachers, but the Middle East Minister has insisted that this decision is not connected to antisemitic material in the curriculum.

Labour MP Andrew Gwynne submitted a written question to Middle East Minister, Conservative James Cleverly, asking “whether his Department has plans to review the allocation of funding to the Palestinian education system following the publication of the Georg Eckert Institute’s report on Palestinian textbooks in June 2021.”

Mr Gwynne was referring to a report commissioned – and unsuccessfully suppressed – by the European Commission that revealed numerous instances of anti-Jewish racism in Palestinian Authority textbooks, including glorification of violence and terrorism against Jews. The report confirmed the findings of other similar investigations in recent years.

In his response, Mr Cleverly said: “Following Official Development Assistance (ODA) prioritisation exercises undertaken in March 2021, the UK no longer provides direct funding to the Palestinian Authority to support the salaries of education workers and health professionals. This decision was not influenced by the publication of the Georg Eckert Institute’s report on Palestinian textbooks published in June 2021. The UK remains firmly committed to ensuring a quality education for Palestinian children, demonstrated by our longstanding support to the UN Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) and through the British Council.”

The Government has recently said that the findings of the report were “not acceptable to the Government.” This view is in contrast to the excuses for antisemitism in textbooks made by some backbench MPs across parties.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We welcome an end to the direct British funding of a foreign education system permeated by antisemitic tropes. It is disappointing, however, that the Government did not take the opportunity to emphasise that combating antisemitism was a motivation behind the cut. That, rather than mere cost-cutting, would have sent the strongest message to purveyors of hate abroad.”

Antisemitism in Palestinian Authority and UNRWA textbooks funded by Britain, the EU and Western nations has been an ongoing problem for many years.

The alleged co-founder of the neo-Nazi terrorist group, National Action, has denied being a member of the proscribed group.

Alex Davies, 27, pleaded not guilty to a single charge of membership of a proscribed organisation between 17th December 17 2016 and 27th September 2017.

Mr Davies, of Uplands in Swansea, appeared at the Old Bailey via video link, and the trial is anticipated in April next year.

National Action was proscribed by the British Government following repeated calls by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others. Mr Davies and Ben Raymond are alleged to have founded the group in 2013 as university students.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

The Secretary of Labour Against the Witchhunt who was sacked by Hammersmith and Fulham Council after participating in a counter-demonstration against a Jewish community protest against antisemitism in the Labour Party has won his job back with a considerable payment of damages.

A judge has ruled that Stan Keable, a Public Protection and Safety Officer at the London council, was unfairly dismissed after he got the sack following his participation in a counter-demonstration with Jewish Voice for Labour, an antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation.

Mr Keable was expelled from Labour in 2017 and is Secretary of Labour Against the Witchhunt, an antisemitism-denial group that was proscribed by the Labour Party earlier this year.

Mr Keable was videoed in an exchange with a protester at a Jewish community rally against Labour antisemitism in March 2018. During the exchange, Mr Keable apparently said that “the Zionist movement collaborated with the Nazis,” and the video was uploaded to social media by a journalist and viewed almost 80,000 times.

Mr Keable was identified as an employee of the Labour-led council, whose leader called on officials to act swiftly. Mr Keable was reportedly suspended on the same day for “offensive” comments and dismissed two months later.

However, an employment tribunal judge heard that the Council accepted the contention that Mr Keable’s comments were not antisemitic and that Mr Keable had made the comments in a private capacity, had not published them himself and had not made them in a threatening or abusive manner, but that he was nonetheless dismissed because he had been identified as an employee of the Council and that a “reasonable person” would interpret the comments as meaning that the Zionist movement had “colluded with the Holocaust [sic]”.

The judge, however, determined that there was no evidence that the comments had been interpreted in this way, a ruling upheld last week by the employment appeal tribunal.

The Council was not only ordered to repay £70,000 in damages to Mr Keable but also, in an unusual decision, ordered to reinstate him.

Mr Keable said: “I want to go back to work. If I’d made offensive remarks at work, we’d be talking a different story. I’m quite willing to accept that some people were offended but that’s not a crime or a sin – it’s a necessary part of free speech.”

Hammersmith and Fulham council said: “As a public body we always expect the highest levels of conduct from our employees. We are therefore disappointed with the judgment.”

The Council is reportedly considering its options, as if it refuses to reinstate Mr Keable, it will have to pay further compensation.

Hammersmith and Fulham Council has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Image credit: Twitter

Graffiti that reads “(((Zionist hivemin)))” has been daubed on a residential building in East London.

The multiple brackets, also known as an “echo”, are used by some far-right groups in order to inform others that someone is Jewish. In response, many Jewish social media users have adopted the echo as a means of reclamation. 

The word “hivemin” is believed to be an incorrect spelling of “hivemind”, referring to a collective way of thinking.

A spokesperson for the Metropolitan Police said: “On the afternoon of Wednesday, 27th October police were made aware of antisemitic graffiti on a residential property in Durant Street, E2. Officers have asked the local authority to remove the graffiti. Enquiries are ongoing.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit. 

Image credit: Google

A councillor for the Conservative Party who had been suspended after being accused of supporting the far-right group Patriotic Alternative has now resigned from Worthing Council.

Tim Wills is alleged to have joined a Patriotic Alternative chat room on the social media platform Telegram in June, where he reportedly posted messages of support.

Patriotic Alternative is known for its efforts to recruit youth to its white nationalist ideology. Previously, the far-right group published an online “alternative” home school curriculum condemned as “poison” and “hateful” and attempted to recruit children as young as twelve through livestreaming events on YouTube, according to The Times.

Earlier this year, the far-right group was found to be using Telegram to create neo-Nazi channels dedicated to sharing vile messages, antisemitic conspiracy theories and images glorifying Hitler.

Hope Not Hate describes Patriotic Alliance is “a racist far-right organisation with antisemitism at its very core. They aim to combat the ‘replacement and displacement’ of white Britons by people who ‘have no right to these lands’.” The group reportedly holds that “it is Jewish elites, particularly, who are orchestrating the ‘replacement’ of white Britons.”

The group is led by the former head of the youth wing of the BNP, Mark Collett, who is reported to have dabbled in Holocaust denial, collaborated with the infamous American antisemite David Duke, and espoused antisemitic and racist views.

report into Patriotic Alternative published last summer found that several members of the group engaged in Holocaust denial.

On 22nd September, Mr Wills is alleged to have written: “My view is Covid is a loss maker for us, we just need to centre on white genocide […] because many of our white race are convinced about vaccines, but not about our replacement, and need to be informed about this?”

In another message, he is alleged to have encouraged members to “Remember the fourteen words”, likely a reference to the neo-Nazi fourteen-word oath: “We must secure the existence of our people and a future for white children”, a slogan initially devised by David Lane, a member of the white supremacist terrorist group “The Order” which was responsible for the murder of Jewish radio host Alan Berg.

He also reportedly said that because Patriotic Alternative “have no chance of political power any time soon, sadly”, he viewed the Conservatives as “the best of a rotten lot,” as the group would still have a “right-wing minority who are on side”. He also reportedly said that if it were not for his “sensitive job” as a Conservative councillor, then he would take on the vacant regional organiser position in his local branch.

After the allegations arose in October, Mr Wills was suspended from the Conservative Party. He has now reportedly resigned from the Council as well.

In a statement, Worthing Council said: “Cllr Wills is the subject of an ongoing investigation by the Council under its Code of Conduct procedures following remarks he is alleged to have made in an online forum run by an organisation called the Patriotic Alternative. He had already been suspended by the Conservative Party pending an investigation. In accordance with procedures the vacancy on the council will be advertised on this website in due course.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

As we mark precisely a year since the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) published its report on antisemitism in the Labour Party, it is a good moment to review how the Party has performed on this issue since then.

Campaign Against Antisemitism first contacted the EHRC in 2017 about Labour’s antisemitism problem, and by the summer of 2018 we had formally referred Labour to the EHRC, becoming the complainant in its unprecedented full statutory investigation.

One year ago today, following that investigation, the EHRC found the Labour Party to be institutionally racist against Jewish people, and the Jewish community was finally vindicated.

Sir Keir Starmer described this historic finding as a “day of shame” for Labour, having previously promised to seek out antisemitism in his Party and “tear out this poison by its roots.” There is evidence of attempts to fulfil this pledge. For instance, within minutes of our submission of a complaint against former Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn and other sitting Labour MPs in relation to antisemitism, Sir Keir suspended Mr Corbyn, pending an investigation (although his suspension from the Labour Party was disgracefully short-lived and he remained eligible to attend the Party’s annual conference this year). In addition, there have been proclamations by Labour’s General-Secretary to Constituency Labour Parties to avoid discussing antisemitism; the antisemitism-denial group Labour Against the Witchhunt and the disgraced former Labour MP Chris Williamson’s so-called “Resist” faction have both been proscribed, with all of their members threatened with automatic expulsion from the Party; and Ken Loach and Leah Levane have both been expelled.

Significantly, Labour’s National Executive Committee (NEC) resolved to introduce a semi-independent disciplinary process, a decision since endorsed by the Party’s annual conference, in compliance with the mandate by the EHRC to do so. Meanwhile, at the local level, Labour-controlled local authorities have a good record of adopting the International Definition of Antisemitism, which the Party so forcefully but unsuccessfully resisted adopting when Mr Corbyn was leader..

However, even these advances are qualified. Mr Corbyn was rapidly readmitted to the Labour Party by the same disciplinary process that the EHRC had just deemed unfit for purpose, and he remains in the absurd position of being a full member of the Labour Party but outside the Parliamentary Labour Party and therefore sits as an independent MP.

Welcome though the expulsion of Leah Levane may be, the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, Jewish Voice for Labour, of which she is co-Chair, has not been proscribed and remains active. Indeed it hosted yet another controversial fringe event at Labour’s annual conference this year. For that matter the pro-Corbyn Momentum faction, whose co-Chair denied that a Jewish MP was hounded out of the Party, has also not been proscribed, while Young Labour’s controversies have been ignored and the Palestine Solidarity Campaign, which a past investigation by Campaign Against Antisemitism found to be riddled with bigotry, has been positively welcomed by the Party.

Although majorities of the NEC and attendees at Labour’s conference supported the introduction of a semi-independent disciplinary process, significant minorities of each body did not, even though this risked putting the Party in legal jeopardy. Similarly, Constituency Labour Parties around the country have also often ignored or protested the General-Secretary’s prohibition on discussing antisemitism.

In addition, there are still significant shortcomings in how Labour has dealt with antisemitism in its ranks. Notably, the Parliamentary Labour Party and Shadow Cabinet include politicians who either actively supported an antisemitic leader — and Sir Keir himself is on record as having given his “100% backing” to Mr Corbyn — and those who did nothing as their principled and courageous colleagues quit the Party or, in the case of several Jewish MPs, were hounded out of it.

Our complaints against fifteen sitting MPs remain outstanding, and the Party is even yet to formally acknowledge them — notwithstanding reports that the complaint against Deputy Leader Angela Rayner has been dismissed without a word — which does not reflect a leadership wholly willing to address past failures. Indeed Sir Keir has repeatedly refused to engage with us, despite our being the complainant in the EHRC’s investigation into antisemitism in his Party.

Meanwhile, numerous MPs and officeholders have not been sanctioned for sharing platforms with members suspended or expelled over antisemitism, despite Sir Keir’s leadership election pledge to do so. Disciplinary actions in other high-profile cases have been reversed, and, when first published in purported compliance with the Action Plan agreed with the EHRC, Labour’s proposed complaints handbook was a joke. 

More broadly, the goodwill and trust between Labour and the Jewish community that did build up in the months since Sir Keir won the leadership of the Party was wasted during the conflict between Hamas and Israel, when Labour MPs and councillors, though not alone, were too often involved in stoking communal division, ignoring displays of antisemitism at rallies and on some occasions even joining in with them.

All of this has been noted by the Jewish community. Our latest Antisemitism Barometer, published at the start of the year (with polling conducted after Mr Corbyn’s suspension and well before the conflict between Hamas and Israel), showed that British Jews feel that the Labour Party is more than twice as tolerant of antisemitism than any other political party. Remarkably, compared to the previous year’s figures (polled while Mr Corbyn was still leader of the Party), Labour performed worse, with 88 percent of respondents considering that the Party was too tolerant of antisemitism under Sir Keir compared with 86 percent the year before under Mr Corbyn, perhaps due to disappointment caused by the apparent evaporation of Sir Keir’s bold promises. At times, this sentiment has spilled into the open.

It was therefore astonishing to hear Sir Keir declare at Labour’s conference last month that he had “closed the door” on antisemites in the Party and on Labour’s “shameful chapter.” Just as remarkable was what he did not say: his keynote speech did not mention antisemitism at all, with the partial exception of his delight in welcoming Dame Louise Ellman back to the Party. In case the extent of the task still ahead was in doubt, Sir Keir’s reference to the Jewish veteran former MP was met with some hissing from the crowd.

Yet even if the leadership succeeds in redirecting the Party and, more doubtfully, confronting problems in the Parliamentary Labour Party, in the background is Labour’s vast membership, over two thirds of which still believes that the problem of antisemitism in the Party has been “exaggerated” or that there is not a serious problem — findings similar to those in a poll conducted shortly after the 2019 General Election.

We continue to encourage the Labour Party in its positive steps and fulfilment of the Action Plan agreed with the EHRC, but we will also continue to pressure the Party on its failures and inconsistencies, and ultimately expect to see our complaints investigated and upheld so that the Jewish community gets more than just the promise of justice.

Only now has the Party resolved to introduce an independent disciplinary process, but the real challenge — to which our complaints speak — will be applying the new rules to those in the Labour Party who supported or enabled the unlawful victimisation of Jewish people.

Joe Glasman, Head of Political and Government Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “One year has passed since the publication of the EHRC’s report confirming Labour’s institutional racism against Jewish people. But while Sir Keir Starmer pledged to tear out antisemitism by its roots, so far there has been only a light trimming.

“Only now, a year on, has the Party resolved to introduce an independent disciplinary process. The leadership has yet to fulfill its promise of zero tolerance, and the real challenge will be applying the new rules to those in the Labour Party who supported or enabled the unlawful victimisation of Jewish people. In particular, Labour must investigate our complaints against its MPs if the Jewish community is finally to have justice.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The Court of Appeal has refused ‘Al Quds Day’ march leader Nazim Ali’s request for permission to appeal the High Court’s ruling quashing a decision by the General Pharmaceutical Council’s (GPhC) Fitness to Practice Committee.

The High Court ruling came after an appeal by the Professional Standards Authority (PSA) against the original ruling by the Committee at the request of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Mr Ali is the leader of the annual pro-Hizballah ‘Al Quds Day’ march in London who made antisemitic statements during the 2017 march. Since Mr Ali is a pharmacist Campaign Against Antisemitism brought a complaint to his professional regulator, the GPhC.

Last year, the GPhC’s Fitness to Practise Committee found that Mr Ali had brought the pharmaceutical profession into disrepute, following a two-week hearing that culminated on 5th November. Although the Fitness to Practise Committee had found that Mr Ali’s words were offensive, it did not find that the words had been antisemitic, and the panel let him off with only a formal warning.

Following the GPhC’s ruling, Campaign Against Antisemitism made representations to the PSA, which oversees disciplinary decisions made by the GPhC. We asked the PSA to use its statutory power to appeal the GPhC’s decision to the High Court under the National Health Service Reform and Healthcare Professionals Act 2002, on the grounds that the decision made by the GPhC panel was insufficient to protect the public because it was “irrational and perverse”.

In particular, we asked the PSA to review the GPhC’s ruling that Mr Ali’s statements were not antisemitic, including by attempting to distinguish between “antisemitism” and “antisemitic”. We have asked the PSA to consider the International Definition of Antisemitism, which has been adopted by the British Government, and the Guidance to all Judiciary in England and Wales produced by the Judicial College that makes clear that the word “Zionist” or “Zio” as a term of abuse has no place in a civilised society.

Furthermore, we argued that the ruling misapplied the law when asking whether a “reasonable person” would have considered the comments made by Mr Ali as being antisemitic. The GPhC’s Fitness to Practise Committee ruled that Jewish bystanders who saw the demonstration or watched the recording of it posted online could not be considered to be “reasonable persons” in the legal sense because of their “selective view of events”.

The PSA made the referral that we requested, opening the way for the High Court to decide whether to quash the GPhC panel’s decision. Subsequently, the GPhC itself also agreed with Campaign Against Antisemitism and declared that it would not oppose the appeal at the High Court, leaving Mr Ali to do so himself.

In June, the High Court allowed the PSA’s appeal, ruling that the case is to be remitted to the Fitness to Practice Committee to redetermine whether Mr Ali’s comments had been antisemitic.

Mr Ali subsequently sought leave to appeal the High Court’s ruling in the Court of the Appeal, but permission to appeal has been refused, leaving no further avenues before the Fitness to Practice Committee rehears the case.

At the time of the High Court’s ruling, Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “The High Court has agreed with us that the decision on whether Nazim Ali’s remarks at the pro-Hizballah ‘Al Quds Day’ march in 2017 were antisemitic was woefully inept. As we hoped, the High Court has now quashed the original decision of the Fitness to Practise Committee of the General Pharmaceutical Council in relation to Mr Ali’s antisemitism and ordered it to reach a new decision. This is exactly why we referred the matter to the Professional Standards Authority.

“We commend the Professional Standards Authority and the General Pharmaceutical Council itself for recognising the injustice of the earlier decision.

“We hope that the Fitness to Practise Committee will arrive at a new decision that accepts that Mr Ali’s comments were antisemitic and that on that basis the previous sanction was inadequate and wrong. The road to justice in this case has proved long and winding, but we are again heading in the right direction.

“We said that we would not allow this injustice to stand and we are delighted by this new judgement. Campaign Against Antisemitism will always be unrelenting in pursuit of justice.”

We are extremely grateful to Simon Braun, a partner at Perrin Myddelton solicitors, and barrister Thomas Daniel of 2 Bedford Row Chambers, who have acted for and assisted Campaign Against Antisemitism in this matter.

We additionally commend all those who also contacted the GPhC and PSA to protest against the initial unjust decision.

Joey Barton, the former football player and current manager of Bristol Rovers Football Club, has issued an apology after he described bad football performance as “a Holocaust” on Saturday.

Reacting to Bristol Rovers’ loss to Newport County, Mr Barton said: “I said to the lads during the week, you know, the team’s almost like musical chairs, you know. Someone gets in and does well, but then gets suspended. Someone gets in and does well, gets injured. Someone gets in, does well for a game and then has a Holocaust, a nightmare, you know, an absolute disaster.”

Mr Barton has now issued an apology, stating: “Clearly no offence was meant, but some people have rightly pointed out to me the use of the analogy was not correct. So if anybody was offended by that, I would like to apologise for that. I think the FA were right to write to me and remind me of that. You hope to use better analogies in future, but it was certainly with no malice or offence intended to anybody.”

He added: “It’s our duty to be word perfect and not create controversy. I get that everything we say, even this I’m saying now will no doubt be pieced together in such a way that it will be there to grab and capture the attention of people that use social media, the internet. For me, it was a poor analogy to use in the context of the modern-day world we live in, and it won’t happen again.”

This is not the first time a Holocaust reference has been made in the context of describing a poor performance.

In 2019, football pundit and former footballer, Perry Groves, apologised after reportedly describing a player as having “a Holocaust of a game” on a live radio show. One year earlier, Phil Brown, the football player turned manager, apologised for using the same phrase.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Trivial comparisons to the Holocaust, the systematic murder of six million Jewish men, women and children, are never acceptable. Joey Barton is right to apologise, but it remains remarkable that he and others too often feel it appropriate to make such thoughtless comments in the first place. Mr Barton would do well to consider undertaking Holocaust education and using his platform to encourage others to do so to better understand the impact of his words.”

It has been reported that the far-right group Patriotic Alternative has posted flyers through Jewish homes in Borehamwood calling for the ban of kosher and halal meat. 

Patriotic Alternative is known for its efforts to recruit youth to its white nationalist ideology. Previously, the far-right group published an online “alternative” home school curriculum condemned as “poison” and “hateful” and attempted to recruit children as young as twelve through livestreaming events on YouTube, according to The Times.

It is led by the former head of the youth wing of the BNP, Mark Collett, who is reported to have dabbled in Holocaust denial, collaborated with the infamous American antisemite David Duke, and espoused antisemitic and racist views.

Police have reportedly increased patrols in the area. A Hertfordshire Constabulary spokesperson said: “We are aware a number of residents in Borehamwood have received leaflets through their doors that have caused distress and offence,” said a force spokesperson. While no crimes have been committed, this has been recorded as a hate incident and we would like to reassure you that we take such matters very seriously. As a result, you will be seeing additional police patrols in the area.”

Leader of the Hertsmere Labour group, councillor Jeremy Newmark, said: “[The leaders of the Conservative and Liberal Democrat groups] share my view that there is no room for Patriotic Alternative in Hertsmere. They will not be allowed to get a foodhold round here.”

Earlier this year, the far-right group was found to be using the social media platform Telegram to create neo-Nazi channels dedicated to sharing vile messages, antisemitic conspiracy theories and images glorifying Hitler. A report into Patriotic Alternative published last summer found that several members of the group engaged in Holocaust denial.    

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Mark Collett, the leader of the far-right group Patriotic Alternative, interviewed Piers Corbyn last night where he asked Mr Corbyn about the “Jewish Question”. 

Mark Collett is the former head of the BNP’s youth wing who is reported to have dabbled in Holocaust denial, collaborated with the infamous American antisemite David Duke, and espoused antisemitic and racist views. He currently leads Patriotic Alternative, a group known for its efforts to recruit youth to its white nationalist ideology. Previously, the far-right group published an online “alternative” home school curriculum condemned as “poison” and “hateful” and attempted to recruit children as young as twelve through livestreaming events on YouTube, according to The Times.  

The interview, which ran for almost one hour and culminated with Mr Collett asking Mr Corbyn, the brother of the antisemitic former Labour Party Leader Jeremy Corbyn, if he wanted “an easy question or a spicy question”. Mr Collett, asking on behalf of one of his listeners who donated money in order to have their question read out, then asked Mr Corbyn: “Is Piers aware of the Jewish question?”

The “Jewish Question” is an antisemitic phrase that arose in nineteenth-century Europe which asserted that Jewish people’s presence in society was a problem that needed to be solved. The “Final Solution of the Jewish Question” was the name given by the Nazis to their programme to exterminate six million Jews during the Holocaust. It has been reported that this term has been reclaimed by neo-Nazis and members of the alt-right, often using “JQ” as a shorthand for the phrase.  

Mr Corbyn replied to Mr Collett’s question by saying: “Well I’m not quite sure what that means. I mean…I’m not a Holocaust denier in case it’s leading up to that, because certain things you say, we’re told we’re Holocaust deniers. Well, you know, the Holocaust happened and that was horrific. But that’s all I can say on that.”

Continuing his answer, Mr Corbyn claimed that he didn’t have the time to answer the question at that moment but showed interest in discussing it at a different time. “I mean, there’s lots of ways of defining the Jewish Question but the difficulty is in answering these can lead you up into certain dangers because you’ll say things…so, I’m not trying to get out of that but I’m not convinced we’ve got the time to elaborate on that at this point in time. But if you come and see me under different circumstances we could discuss that if you want more fully if the meaning of the question could be verified a bit more,” Mr Corbyn said. 

A video recently emerged of Mr Corbyn claiming that allegations of antisemitism against him and his brother are a “pack of lies”, and in August, Mr Corbyn suggested that “troublemakers” in Jewish areas posted leaflets created and distributed by Mr Corbyn, which compared the COVID-19 vaccines to the Auschwitz death camp, through their own doors in a “plot” to portray him as antisemitic. Mr Corbyn has compared vaccinations to Nazi policy on more than one occasion.

Mr Collett’s interview with Mr Corbyn was co-hosted by Jason Köhne, an accused white nationalist and self-proclaimed “advocate for white wellbeing” who promotes a website claiming that western civilisation is threatening white people.

Earlier this month, Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to Amazon after it was reported that the online marketplace had cut a book deal with Mr Collett, in which it was reportedly receiving profit off of his book that was found to be promoting Holocaust denial. Amazon has also been found selling Mr Köhne books.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit. 

The Green Party has adopted five distinct definitions of antisemitism in an apparent attempt to dilute the International Definition of Antisemitism used by all other parties.

In addition to adopting the International Definition of Antisemitism, the Green Party has also chosen to adopt the Jerusalem Declaration, a wrecking document intended to undermine the globally recognised International Definition. 

Joshua Alston – the motion’s lead proposer – said: “This motion would put us at the vanguard of the fight against antisemitism, and at the vanguard of the fight against the global far-right while protecting our pro-Palestinian policy.”

However, many have pointed out that the International Definition and the Jerusalem Declaration are not mutually compatible. The contradictory decision has sparked a backlash from many British Jews over the Party’s apparent unwillingness to accept the Definition alone. 

For contrasting reasons, the decision was also criticised by the Greens’ Policing and Domestic Safety spokesperson and former Deputy Leader, Shahrar Ali, a vocal opponent of the International Definition and proponent of the Jerusalem Declaration, who labelled the adoption of both a “fudge” and the “worst of all worlds”. Mr Ali speciously described the International Definition last month as “a bad definition of antisemitism [which] could disproportionately affect Palestinians, or their allies, as well as Jews – precisely because it would be counterproductive on its own terms and not help to tackle genuine antisemitism by conflating legitimate political criticism,” and supports the adoption by the Green Party of the Jerusalem Declaration, which he describes as a “good definition”.

Our Antisemitism Barometer survey of British Jews late last year found that the Greens were second only to Labour in how many respondents felt that the Party was too tolerant of antisemitism (43%). 

Campaign Against Antisemitism has extensively documented alleged antisemitism among officers of the Green Party of England and Wales, including the Party’s former Equalities and Diversity Coordinator who now holds the International Coordinator portfolio, on which the Green Party has failed to act.

Recently, we revealed how certain policies of the Scottish Greens (the Green Party’s counterpart in Scotland) are cause for concern for the Jewish community, with one particularly controversial position, among others, being the Party’s opposition to the International Definition of Antisemitism. Consequently, Scotland’s First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon, is under growing pressure over the SNP’s recent deal with the Scottish Greens.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far left of British politics has surpassed that of the far right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The National Gallery has removed a picture that it has deemed antisemitic from its upcoming online exhibition. 

Albrecht Dürer’s Christ Among the Doctors tells the story of Jesus as a twelve-year-old debating with Jewish doctors in Solomon’s Temple in Jerusalem. While many artists have painted the biblical scene, some feel that Dürer’s painting from 1506 uses antisemitic overtones to depict the Jewish characters.

A National Gallery spokesperson said: “We are aware that the representation of the Doctors may cause offence and both the wall texts and the audio guide in the exhibition will acknowledge and address caricature and antisemitic portrayal in the painting.

“We have removed the image and accompanying text from our online gallery of selected exhibited works as we felt that in this format there was not adequate space for the interpretation required for this work.”

The exhibition is set to launch next month and will focus on the work of Dürer.

A newly published independent race report has stated that Harrow Council ignored several claims of antisemitism that were flagged up by members of staff.  

In addition to antisemitism, several cases of sexism and racism were allegedly witnessed by some members of council staff, though no action had been taken. 

One participant in the report said: “A colleague reported several instances of antisemitism and racism and nothing has been done about it for years. It is no good at all to talk about combating racism, then do nothing about it when reported. We are so fed up of this and this is the reason why nothing will change.”

Other staff members reportedly said that they did not feel comfortable reporting incidents of “casual racism” for fear of losing their jobs.

The report recommended that the council issue a “formal apology”. Harrow Council has reportedly been contacted for comment. 

Harrow Council adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism in 2017.

Image credit: Google

Earlier this month, Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to the Kent-based C&T Auctioneers and Valuers Ltd to express our dismay over their auctioning of Nazi memorabilia, including an assortment of Third Reich daggers and busts and pictures of Hitler and his senior ministers.

Their two-day militaria online auction also featured plaques and medals, clothing, shoes, goggles, medical pouches, china, posters, toys and books, all from the Nazi era.

The auction house has since responded to our letter, and as well as giving us no indication that it intends to halt their selling of Nazi memorabilia, they have told us that the auctioning of the grotesque items “keeps the memory of what happened alive”.

Despite Campaign Against Antisemitism outlining our belief that such items belong in a museum instead of in the hands of collectors whose motivation for acquiring cannot be known, the auction house insisted that auctioning to private collectors can educate them in “the horrors of history”.

In an absurd justification, the auction house further stated that if the private auctioning of Nazi memorabilia were to cease, so too would society have to ban anything that ever related to the Second World War, including books, films and television programmes, adding that one would “need to never show another movie or anything set during this time period.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “C&T Auctioneers and Valuers are putting profit before ethics by participating in the trade of Nazi memorabilia. Respectable auction houses only sell such objects to museums and for academic purposes, whereas at C&T Auctioneers and Valuers anybody could buy them, even neo-Nazis. The ultimate shame is trying to convince Jews that selling Nazi daggers and portraits of murderers helps ‘keeps the memory of what happened alive’, a claim that would be laughable were it not so obviously laced with contempt and condescension. We condemn C&T Auctioneers and Valuers Ltd’s decision to carry on auctioning these items.”

While C&T Auctioneers and Valuers Ltd show no signs of ceasing the sale of Nazi memorabilia, Tennants auctioneers recently assured us that they will not put Nazi items up for auction again in future, after we contacted the auction house in connection with an auction of Third Reich items.

However, auctions of Third Reich items persist, including those recently hosted by Easy Live Auction.

Last month, a BBC Bargain Hunt expert apologised after it was revealed that Nazi memorabilia was due to be sold at his auction house. Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Students at the University of Essex reportedly protested against a speech on Afghanistan by calling for the destruction of Israel.

Col. Richard Kemp, the former commander of British forces in Afghanistan, spoke to the University’s Conservative Society while protestors outside chanted “From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free,” a chant that only makes sense as a call for the destruction of the world’s only Jewish state – and its replacement with a State of Palestine – and is thus an attempt to deny Jews, uniquely, the right to self-determination, which is a breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The talk was about Britain’s withdrawal from Afghanistan and had nothing to do with Israel.

The student body at the University of Essex has a history of controversy relating to antisemitism. Two years ago, more than 200 students at the University voted against the creation of a Jewish society, which are commonplace on British campuses as a home for Jewish students, facilitating their religious observance and cultural and social life as well as representing them to university authorities.

The vote came amidst a row over antisemitism, with one academic dismissed from the University after asserting on social media that “the Zionists next want to create a society here at our university.” The motion did ultimately pass.

Campaign Against Antisemitism monitors the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities. The University of Essex has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

In an interview on Saturday, Joey Barton, the former football player and current manager of Bristol Rovers Football Club, used the word ‘Holocaust’ to describe a bad performance during a football match.

Reacting to Bristol Rovers’ loss to Newport County, Mr Barton said: “I said to the lads during the week, you know, the team’s almost like musical chairs, you know. Someone gets in and does well, but then gets suspended. Someone gets in and does well, gets injured. Someone gets in, does well for a game and then has a Holocaust, a nightmare, you know, an absolute disaster.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Mr Barton’s comparison of the Holocaust — the systematic murder of six million Jewish men, women and children — to describe a poor performance on the pitch is at best, a shocking act of ignorance and at worst a disgusting gesture of disrespect to those who were murdered by the Nazis and survivors. Mr Barton should at the very least apologise to Holocaust survivors and undertake a course in Holocaust education.

This is not the first time a Holocaust reference has been made in the context of describing a poor performance.

In 2019, football pundit and former footballer, Perry Groves, apologised after reportedly describing a player as having “a Holocaust of a game” on a live radio show. One year earlier, Phil Brown, the football player turned manager, apologised for using the same phrase.

An online Sabbath service held by Manchester Reform Synagogue was zoombombed with Nazi imagery on Friday night.

Zoombombing is when people join a Zoom video call with the intention of derailing it. This usually involves spewing antisemitic, racist, or otherwise hateful rhetoric.

The synagogue’s rabbi, Robyn Ashworth-Steen, said that “Halfway through the service, during some prayers, [the offenders] unmuted, started to shout, and put on the screen a swastika and some other awful racist images. They were kicked out straight away but it was clear through the service that they were trying to get in.”

Rabbi Ashworth-Steen added on social media that while the community was shaken, they took comfort in its strength, writing: “We realise our collective strength. Then we get to the aleynu [sic] prayer and understand it is on us to fight racism and fascism within us and on our streets – for all minorities and persecuted people. Then we return to the Shabbat bride, the gift of rest and know we will emerge renewed. Shabbat shalom all.”

An anonymous attendee at the service told Campaign Against Antisemitism that they found the incident “very unsettling”.

“The service was like any other and when singing along to ‘Yom Zeh l’Yisrael’, a particularly upbeat, joyous tune, a German flag with a large swastika in the middle suddenly appeared on screen,” she said, and went on to say that while the act of antisemitism was dealt with extremely quickly, lasting approximately three seconds, it meant that the rest of the service, as well as the morning service the next day, felt uncomfortable. 

It is notable that Manchester Reform Synagogue was featured in the television series Ridley Road, a programme that tells the story of Jewish activists fighting against fascism in 1960s Britain. The attendee said that the fact that the zoombombers chose that synagogue in particular to target made the incident “feel a little too close to home.” 

She added: “The only positive I can take is that the service was online so no one was physically hurt.”

Greater Manchester Police reportedly confirmed that while there have not been any arrests yet, inquiries were still being conducted.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has previously reported on the phenomenon of ‘Zoom bombing’ and has urged communal institutions to take precautions to safeguard against antisemitic disruption of online events. 

The Hon. Piers Portman, the youngest living son of the 9th Viscount Portman and heir to 110 acres of West End real estate, has today been sentenced to four months in prison and ordered to pay over £20,000 after being found guilty last month of calling Gideon Falter, Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Chief Executive, “Jewish scum” in a confrontation at a courthouse in 2018.

Passing sentence at Southwark Crown Court, His Honour Judge Gregory Perrins said that Mr Portman has “strongly-held antisemitic beliefs”, and that he had “deliberately targeted Mr Falter because of his role in prosecuting Alison Chabloz.” Ms Chabloz is an antisemite who has been repeatedly imprisoned following work by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

In scathing sentencing remarks, HHJ Perrins told Mr Portman: “You said you’re an honourable British gentleman. You’re anything but.”

HHJ Perrins then imprisoned him for four months, with the possibility of release on licence after two months, and ordered him to pay a £10,000 fine, make an additional £10,000 compensatory payment to the victim, Mr Falter, and pay court costs. Mr Falter is donating the entire £10,000 to Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Mr Portman, 50, was prosecuted after approaching Mr Falter, Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Chief Executive, at Westminster Magistrates’ Court on 14th June 2018 following the sentencing of Alison Chabloz, a notorious Holocaust denier and antisemite. Campaign Against Antisemitism had brought a private prosecution against Ms Chabloz which the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) took over, and which ultimately led to a conviction and landmark legal precedent. Mr Falter had testified against Ms Chabloz, who has since been repeatedly sent to prison over her antisemitic statements, including denying the Holocaust and claiming that Holocaust survivors had invented their suffering for financial gain.

Mr Portman followed Mr Falter out of the courtroom and confronted him in the lobby of the court building, where an enraged Mr Portman came close to Mr Falter and said: “I’m Piers Portman. I have written to you before. Come after me, you Jewish scum. Come and persecute me. Come and get me.”

Mr Portman was referring to a 1,527-word e-mailed screed previously sent to Campaign Against Antisemitism in which he denounced his former wife and her divorce lawyer, Baroness Fiona Shackleton each as a “greedy, grasping and lying manipulator of the system that happens to be Jewish.” He accused his former wife of “playing the Talmud inspired ‘Tyrant posing as a victim.’” Noting in the e-mail that he had a “Harrow Public School education”, Mr Portman defended the term “Holohoax”, writing that “I fail to see how the fabricated word has anything to do with hating anyone. Surely it is merely an expression created by people that believe they have been lied to,” and questioning how the terms “Jew” and “Jewboy” could be antisemitic.

He concluded his e-mail by taunting Campaign Against Antisemitism to “Come and pick on me…come and have a do with me…come and perform your charity on me.”

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “I am extremely reassured by this sentence, which sends a very clear message to antisemites that even the wealthiest and most privileged cannot escape British justice. I have been awarded £10,000 in compensation which I am donating to Campaign Against Antisemitism to help us ensure that anti-Jewish racists like Mr Portman face the consequences of their actions.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism wishes again to thank the Community Security Trust (CST) for providing specialist protection officers to keep our personnel safe at the trial.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image: Piers Portman, right, leaves Southwark Crown Court with conspiracy theorist Matthew Delooze

A swastika has been found carved into a tree outside the office of an Orthodox Jew in Southend in Essex.

The Nazi symbol was cut into the bark overnight on 19th/20th October on a tree on Station Road.

Police are investigating. If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Campaign Against Antisemitism at [email protected] or on 0330 822 0321, quoting reference number: Ref 483 20/10/21.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2020 showed that three in five British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

Kent-based C&T Auctioneers and Valuers Ltd is hosting an auction with an array of Nazi memorabilia, including an assortment of Third Reich daggers and busts and pictures of Hitler and his senior ministers.

The two-day militaria online auction also features plaques and medals, clothing, shoes, goggles, medical pouches, china, posters, toys and books, all from the Nazi era.

We will be writing to C&T Auctioneers and Valuers Ltd regarding the grotesque auction.

Recently, Tennants auctioneers assured us that they will not put Nazi items up for auction again in future, after we contacted the auction house in connection with an auction of Third Reich items.

However, auctions of Third Reich items persist, including those recently hosted by Easy Live Auction.

Last month, a BBC Bargain Hunt expert apologised after it was revealed that Nazi memorabilia was due to be sold at his auction house. Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Former Liverpool and England footballer John Barnes reportedly wonders in his new book whether one can racially abuse Jewish people.

“Can you racially abuse Jewish people?” he asks, explaining that “if the Jewish people are a race, what race does a black Jewish person belong to?”

Mr Barnes’ particular conceptualisation of racism becomes a little clearer when he argues that “The only way to truly destroy racism is to destroy capitalism,” and the “only way to achieve true equality for all is by creating a socialist society, and that’s not about to happen whether we think it should or not.”

In recent years, Mr Barnes has been politically outspoken. In 2019, he appeared on BBC Question Time, and, whilst commending the Labour MPs who left the Labour Party in the previous week over “what they believe,” and recognising “it’s about antisemitism in the Labour Party,” he also took it upon himself to decide on behalf of Jewish people what is and what is not antisemitism.

On the issue of antisemitism, Mr Barnes asserted that “there is a difference between that and anti-Zionism…getting mixed up” and correctly pointed out that “you can criticise the state of Israel without being antisemitic.“ But he then turned against the view of the overwhelming majority of the Jewish community in saying that he thought that “from the Labour Party’s point of view, as much as Zionists may want to say it’s one and the same I don’t think it is. It’s a bit like saying all racism is the same, because it isn’t, for example the Jews, in my opinion, whilst it is a religion they aren’t necessarily a separate race of people. I think they get mixed up in that respect.”

Mr Barnes is welcome to write about his own experiences but should think twice before propagating misperceptions of Judaism and the Jewish people, on which matters he has proven repeatedly that he is no expert.

Actors Eddie Marsan and Tracy-Ann Oberman, the stars of BBC’s television series Ridley Road, have revealed that they have both received abuse on Twitter.

In Ridley Road, Mr Marsan and Ms Oberman play integral members of the 62 Group, a coalition of Jewish activists who fought against fascism during 1960s Britain.

While Mr Marsan is himself not Jewish, he has received a considerable amount of online abuse for playing a Jewish character. Posting screenshots of some of the comments he has received, Mr Marsan tweeted: “F**k me, this is relentless, all I did was play a Jew, I dread to think what would’ve happened if I was actually Jewish.”

He later tweeted: “If you do a show about racists, you’re going to p**s racists off. It means we’re doing something right.”

Speaking on the abuse, Mr Marsan said: “This is my culture. I’m not Jewish, I’m not religious in any sense. But what I am, the thing that made me curious and open minded, comes from the diversity I was raised in. So I am sticking up for my culture, because my culture is diversity. It’s unacceptable that friends of mine who are Jewish if they become actors, they’re going to suffer this abuse.”

Ms Oberman, who is Jewish, also took to Twitter to highlight some of the abuse that she has received, writing: “Im posting this to show antisemitism isn’t just a Hard Right Problem. Fascism takes on many guises.”

One of the comments referred to people “exploiting the Holocaust to gain support/sympathy for their colonialist-settler aims,” while another said: “You’ve turned millions against you & exposed the duplicitous tactics that have stereotyped you as rats for millenia, and why it always ends up in either expulsion or ovens”

Ms Oberman also called upon the actors’ union Equity earlier this year to provide a safe space for Jewish performers. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

A teenage neo-Nazi has been jailed for eleven years after using the social media platform Telegram to plot terrorist acts.

Matthew Cronjager, 18, was found guilty of preparing for acts of terrorism and disseminating terrorist publications on Telegram after it emerged that he had planned to kill his former friend, who is Asian, for allegedly sleeping with white women.

The Old Bailey heard that Mr Cronjager had attempted to obtain a 3D-printed gun or a sawn-off shotgun to commit the murder. The court also heard that Mr Cronjager had joined a right-wing terror cell, positioning himself as the “boss”, and created an online library to disseminate right-wing propaganda and explosives-making manuals. Mr Cronjager posted messages on a Telegram group called “The British Hand”, where he was unknowingly talking with an undercover policeman. 

Last year, we reported that teenage members of The British Hand were using Telegram to recruit and promote propaganda. The group uses a skull and crossbones logo combined with rifles over a Union Jack as its logo and launched in July 2020 on the popular social media platform, Instagram, which is owned by Facebook. The official account has been shut down multiple times, but members continue to use their personal accounts to disseminate the group’s message. Once recruited, the members join an encrypted Telegram chat room where, as of last year, it was believed that there were fifteen core members in their teenage years or early twenties.

It was said that Mr Cronjager wanted a “revolution” to carry out fascist beliefs, and wanted to become the leader of the UK division of an extreme right-wing group. During his arrest on 29th December 2020, police discovered a large amount of material that indicated his dedication to an “extreme right-wing cause”.

During his trial, Mr Cronjager initially tried to deny that he ever harboured far-right views by claiming that he was an undercover member of the anti-fascist group Antifa, but later admitted that he did at one point hold the views of which he was accused, for which he claimed to be “ashamed and disgusted”.

Judge Mark Lucraft noted that Mr Cronjager was “bright and intelligent”, which made the messages that he sent “all the more troubling”. Judge Lucraft sentenced the teenager to a total of eleven years and four months in youth detention, adding: “In my view you are someone who played a leading role in terrorist activity where the preparations were not far advanced.”

Concerns have previously been raised over the alleged increase in neo-Nazi content on Telegram. Earlier this year, the far-right group Patriotic Alternative was found to have created neo-Nazi channels dedicated to sharing vile messages, antisemitic conspiracy theories, and images glorifying Hitler.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Image credit: Counter Terrorism Policing North East

Newcastle United Football Club has launched an investigation after an individual allegedly made a racist gesture towards Tottenham supporters during a Premier League match.

Police have also been made aware of the incident which occurred at St James’ Park this past Sunday.

Though the club has not specified what the gesture entailed, a photograph that circulated on Twitter yesterday appeared to show a man performing a Nazi salute at the club’s stadium. 

On its website, the football club released a statement yesterday in which they wrote: “Our message is clear – football is for everyone. Discrimination has absolutely no place in football, in the street, online or in wider society and we will not tolerate it under any circumstances.

“Newcastle United will pursue the strongest possible action against anyone involved in discriminatory behaviour and will support any efforts by the authorities to secure a criminal conviction. The club is adhering to the Premier League commitment regarding Abusive and Discriminatory conduct, which facilitates the banning of any fan found to have been involved in abusive and/or discriminatory conduct from all Premier League stadia.”

It continued: “For this alleged incident to take place at a time when all Premier League clubs are visibly supporting the No Room For Racism campaign shows the work we all have ahead of us, to which we remain absolutely committed.”

Urging fans to report discriminatory behaviour at St James’ Park, they asked people to “please text HELP followed by your seat location and details of the incident to 60070”.

A Northumbria Police spokesperson said: “We can confirm we are investigating an alleged racist incident during Newcastle United’s home fixture with Tottenham at St James’ Park on Sunday. Enquiries are ongoing with the club to identify anyone involved and ascertain whether criminal offences have been committed. 

“As a force, we do not tolerate hate crime of any kind within our communities and are committed to taking swift and robust action against perpetrators.”

Last week, a poster with the words “Achtung Juden”, which is German for “Attention Jews”, put up by the Millwall Berserkers hooligan group was found near Millwall Football Club stadium. The poster also featured the cockerel from Tottenham Hotspur Football Club’s logo with its head detached from its body and lying in blood. 

The Premier League adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism last December.

There have been at least two attacks on Jewish children in Stamford Hill in just the past few days.

In the evening of 16th October, a sixteen-year-old Jewish child was chased down the road by a woman who then assaulted him with a beer glass while laughing. The incident took place on Egerton Road in the heavily-Jewish neighbourhood (CAD8103 18/10/21).

Then, in the evening of 18th October, a Jewish child had an egg thrown at him on a number 67 bus before the two adult assailants threatened him, saying, “We will still get you.” They then chased him off the bus until he reached a local shop for refuge (CAD8270 19/10/21).

Both incidents were reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting the relevant reference number.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Perhaps the most egregious part of the surge in antisemitic crime in Britain is that children are not being spared. The cowards who targeted these young people must be identified and prosecuted to the full. If zero tolerance means anything, it must mean that attacks on children are met with the full force of the law.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

There are reports that Cllr Tasleem Fazal has been readmitted to the Labour Party group at Blackburn with Darwen Council despite previously suggesting that ISIS is a Jewish plot. According the Council’s website, Cllr Fazal continues to sit as an independent.

Cllr Fazal was suspended from Labour after it was revealed that he had made a video during an anti-Israel protest in 2014 when he called peace protestors “murderers” and during which he was asked by a demonstrator wearing a skullcap: “ISIS – is ISIS Jewish?” From behind the camera, he responded: “Who’s created it? Who’s created it? Do your homework.” The notion that Jews or Israel created the ISIS terrorist organisation is a popular antisemitic trope.

After being suspended, Cllr Fazal sat as an independent, but he also continued to sit on the Council’s select Licencing Committee. Cllr Andy Kay was also suspended from Labour but retained his committee portfolios as an independent.

Blackburn with Darwen Council had as many councillors suspended from the Labour Party over antisemitism claims on its committees as Liberal Democrats.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A man shouted “Jesus killer” at a Jewish driver parking his car in Golders Green.

The victim, who wears a kippah, was parking his car near Sainsbury’s in Golders Green. He unknowingly parked with his wheels slightly crossing into the disabled parking bay and began crossing the road. As he was crossing, he heard a man shouting, “Look where he’s parked” and “Book him” to a nearby traffic warden. The victim turned to walk back towards his car, realising his error, and said, “I’ll move it.”

The man, however, continued shouting at him. The victim asked: “What’s it got to do with you?”. At that point, the man shouted “Jesus killer” at him and continued ranting and swearing, even after the victim threatened to call the police.

The victim moved his car to another spot over the road and continued with his shopping. Although not intimidated himself, the victim later reported the incident, which took place at 11:30 on 17th October, to Shomrim North West London, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

The assailant was described as white and in his twenties or early thirties and about 185cm in height. He reportedly looked homeless and was later seen begging.

If you have any more information, please contact Campaign Against Antisemitism at [email protected].

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Traffic disputes are unpleasant at the best of times, but there is no place for racist insults like ‘Jesus killer’. For all the appropriate emphasis on contemporary manifestations of antisemitism, age-old tropes like Jewish deicide also still retain currency. It is regrettable that the traffic warden took no action during the incident.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

An analysis by Campaign Against Antisemitism of new Home Office statistics released this week shows that Jews are more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Police forces across the country record hate crimes against Jews as religious hate crimes, and these records show that in the year 2020/21, 1,288 hate crimes were committed against Jews, making Jews the target in 20% – more than one in five – of the total number of religious hate crimes.

These figures mean that there is an average of over three hate crimes directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales. Hate crimes against Jews are also still widely believed to be under-reported, and also do not reflect the extent of antisemitic material and abuse on social media.

However, when one accounts for the miniscule size of the Jewish population, it emerges that Jews are statistically more than four times more likely to be the targets of hate crimes than any other religious group, with some 489 hate crimes per 100,000 of the Jewish population in 2020/21.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Once again, Home Office figures show that Jews are far more likely to be victims of hate crimes than any other religious group. Contrast this with the pitiful number of prosecutions for antisemitic hate crimes, and it throws into high relief the failure of the Crown Prosecution Service to take proportionate action against racism directed at the Jewish community. With England and Wales’ minuscule Jewish community suffering an average of more than three hate crimes every single day, identifying, prosecuting and punishing perpetrators is absolutely urgent.”