A civil servant who works in a Whitehall Department attended a talk last year delivered by the Head of Human Resources (HR) of their unit. During the talk, the speaker, who is themself from an ethnic minority, said that when they worked at a different Ministry, they were the only senior leader from an ethnic minority.

In the question and answer segment at the end of the presentation, the civil servant gently raised the point that the Permanent Secretary of that Ministry at the time was Jewish, but the Head of HR brushed away the civil servant’s comment, claiming that they had merely been talking about senior leadership in the HR department, which apparently was clearly not the case.

The civil servant, who has understandably requested anonymity, followed up the incident with an e-mail to the Head of HR who delivered the presentation and also wrote separately to the CEO of the Department. The civil servant, who is Jewish, was then told that they had acted in a “shocking” manner and that the query had “felt like an attack”. The civil servant later spoke again to the Head of HR who told them, in no uncertain terms, that they did not view Jews as an ethnic minority.

The civil servant felt that the incident caused them considerable distress and discomfort at their place of work, without recourse to the very department – human resources – that should be available in such circumstances. Moreover, they felt that their ethnic identity had been marginalised and belittled.

The civil servant occupied a relatively junior position in the civil service at the time and, notwithstanding the professional risks, spent some time trying to resolve this issue with senior management, to no avail. No apology was forthcoming and the senior management refused to acknowledge that any mistake had been made, even as certain leading figures in the unit were recognised across the larger organisation for their work on inclusion and diversity.

The civil servant was in contact with their union before turning to Campaign Against Antisemitism for additional support and guidance.

Having exhausted every avenue for resolving the issue informally, the civil servant proceeded to submit a formal complaint.

Almost a year after the original incident, the civil servant did finally receive an apology from the Chief Executive of the unit, but it only related to the distress that was caused and still did not address the original incident or the substance of the matter.

After a further delay of several months, the civil servant was told by the unit’s new Head of HR that antisemitism would be addressed better in future, including promotion of antisemitism training among senior leadership, and making efforts to ensure that Judaism is recognised as an ethnic minority.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism: “Whether it is overt racism towards Jewish people or more subtle aggressions that make Jews feel marginalised or belittled, no industry is immune to antisemitism.

“It is particularly alarming when these incidents arise in the context of HR or diversity and inclusion programming, as these resources are meant to protect all employees, especially those from minority backgrounds. Those tasked with providing these services should be more attuned than anyone to the sensitivities of inclusion and discrimination and to the support that vulnerable employees may require. Clearly those services failed in this case.

“This civil servant courageously pursued the matter to the end, and we are pleased to have provided them with support in doing so. It is regrettable that it took so long for lessons to appear to be learned by those in positions of authority, and time will tell if they have been. We hope that by publicising this incident, others with responsibility for the wellbeing of those in the civil service or any other industry will take heed.”

If you have been the victim of antisemitism and require assistance, please e-mail us in confidence at [email protected] or call +44 (0)330 822 0321.

Image credit: Can Pac Swire

Charges have been issued in connection to antisemitic graffiti found on residential mailboxes last week in Pikesville, Maryland.

Benjamin Katz, 31, has been arrested by Baltimore County Police in connection with the graffiti, which reportedly resembled a large swastika with the word “Cox” spraypainted above, an apparent reference to Dan Cox, a politician who won a recent gubernatorial primary election.

Accordingly, police have determined the vandalism to be politically-motivated, but antisemitic graffiti found in Bethesda, also in Marlyand, is still under investigation.

The Montgomery County Police Department is looking into the “white power 1488” and swastikas found on the Bethesda Trolley Trail over the weekend, near Bradley Boulevard and Arlington Road.

Campaign Against Antisemitism reports on news and incidents relating to antisemitism throughout the United States.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has recently completed the delivery of a multi-part training course to Essex Police.

The training was provided to around 60 police officers and other staff over the course of three sessions.

The training follows past engagement with the force on antisemitism cases, and we have delivered similar courses to other forces in the past, including Devon and Cornwall Police.

The material in the course has been described by officers as “ very useful” and “highly informative”, drawing on the personal perspectives and experiences of the course leaders, as well as their expertise.

One police officer has previously said: “I would recommend this training to anyone who wants to know more about antisemitism and for anyone who thinks that there is no longer a problem with hatred against Jews.”

We are grateful to Essex Police officers for their positive engagement with the training and are confident that they will apply insights into their policing.

Campaign Against Antisemitism regularly provides antisemitism training to regulators, police forces, public bodies, university societies and other institutions, free of charge.

If you would like to arrange antisemitism training for your association, please e-mail [email protected].

A Jewish home in Stamford Hill has had its phone line cut twice, allegedly by a neighbour reported to have referred to “those bloody Jews”.

The victim was reportedly threatened by her neighbour on Firsby Road that her internet would be cut off. The neighbour is reported to have referred also to “bad Jews”.

A BT Openreach engineer came to fix the victim’s internet after the first time that it was cut, and the neighbour reportedly came out to cut it a second time while the engineer was still in attendance.

The victim is suffering from complications from COVID-19 and needs the internet to update the clinic on a regular basis.

The incident was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CRIS 4611794/22.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

image credit: Google

Swastika graffiti was discovered on trees in Forest City Community Park in Wantagh, Nassau County, on 14th April, the eve of Passover and Easter.

A pentagram Satanic symbol was also discovered at the New York park.

In response to the incident, the swastikas will be scrubbed off and the Parks and Public Safety departments will conduct more patrols and additional check-ups of the park and its facilities, according to authorities.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Google

Nicola Sturgeon has reiterated her Government’s commitment to the International Definition of Antisemitism, even as one of her Party’s candidates in upcoming local elections has been accused of breaching it.

Responding to a comment that her Government included two ministers from the Scottish Greens (the Scottish branch of the Green Party), which was described as having “out-Corbyned Corbyn”, the First Minister and SNP leader told the assembly of 250 Scottish Jews: “I am not able to speak for another political party. But I do speak for and am accountable for every minister in my Government. My Government is a signatory to the IHRA [International] Definition of Antisemitism and all ministers have to be clear that they sign up to that and accept that — and that includes the two Green ministers. There is no tolerance in my government for antisemitism or discrimination, prejudice, racism of any kind. I want to assure you of that very, very clearly.”

Last year, Campaign Against Antisemitism helped to expose the Scottish Greens’ controversial record in relation to antisemitism.

Ms Sturgeon also praised Jewish students, whom she had met recently, for their frankness in discussing the discrimination that they had faced on campus. “I want to make this point very forcibly,” she said, “So long as anyone feels discriminated against, we as a Government have more work to do.”

The First Minister also spoke about Holocaust education, saying: “As generations pass, it is vital that future generations understand what happened. However, understanding the Holocaust is not the same as understanding what it’s like for Jewish communities in countries across the world today.”

On the subject of antisemitism in politics, Ms Sturgeon conceded that the SNP had faced problems. Indeed, Campaign Against Antisemitism’s latest Antisemitism Barometer has shown that 39% of British Jews believe that the SNP is too tolerant of antisemitism.

As it happened, at around the same time, her Party was being urged to fire an SNP candidate in the upcoming local elections after it emerged that he had allegedly tweeted that it was “sickening that Israeli Jews bring up their kids to hate and kill,” using a photo of an American-Jewish family.

The picture in the seven-year-old post is of Bill Bernstein, a kippah-wearing former gun shop owner from Nashville, posing with his daughter Gertrude, both with guns.

Wullie Graham, who is standing in Pollok ward in south Glasgow, was accused by political rivals of having published an antisemitic post and his Party was called on to remove him as a candidate.

In a statement, the SNP said: “Mr Graham has apologised for a post in 2015 that he readily admits was stupid and indefensible. He has taken steps to reach out to the Scottish Council of Jewish Communities as he seeks to make amends and learn from this.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

It has been reported that a man performed a Nazi salute at a Jewish woman on the London Underground when he saw that she was wearing a Ukrainian pin-badge.

Charlotte Saloman, 37, was travelling between Paddington and Baker Street on 5th April when the incident took place. Ms Saloman was first alerted to the potential danger when she noticed a man whom she believes to have been in his early 30s boarding the train and who soon began staring at her and her badge.

Ms Salomon said: “He sat opposite me and stared at my pin. Then he stood up, did a halfway-up arm salute, and moved further down the carriage. At first, I was puzzled, then I realised what the gesture was. I made eye contact with another passenger. They looked confused as well.”

Ms Salomon, Deputy Chair of the Saffron Walden Conservatives Association, was on her way to the House of Lords to take part in an event about women fighting antisemitism.

After sharing her account of the incident on Twitter, Ms Salomon received messages of support, but others contained offensive sentiments, including one that read “Heil Hitler” followed by a swastika.

It has been reported that the police are now investigating this incident.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A synagogue in Farmington Hills, Michigan, received a telephone call on 18th March from someone who claimed to have planted a pipe bomb at the synagogue.

The Temple Adat Shalom building was evacuated, and police and police dogs sent in to search for the device.No bomb was found, and the incident was described as a “cruel hoax designed to terrorise our communities,” by Rabbi Aaron Bergman in an e-mail to the congregation.

The hoax threat came the day after the conclusion of a Jewish festival that celebrates a biblical attempt to wipe out the Jewish people.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A new survey of French Jews has found that 85 precent believe that antisemitism is widespread in their country.

The survey was published by IFOP, a French international polling and market research firm.

The survey also found that 64 percent of the overall French population believes that antisemitism is widespread.

According to the survey, 68 percent of French Jews have faced antisemitic harassment or abuse. Twenty percent of French Jews have reported being the victims of at least one antisemitic physical assault. It was noted that attacks were more likely if the victim was wearing a religious symbol.

Around 30 percent of people polled said that “Jews are richer than the average French person,” while 37 percent believed that Jews had “too much influence in the French economy and financial system.”

It is over 65-year-olds who are more likely to have antisemitic prejudices according to the survey.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Authorities are investigating antisemitic and racist graffiti found at a school in Massachusetts.

The graffiti was found on bathroom walls at Natick High School on 8th March.

Anna Nolin, the Natick School District Superintendent, wrote in an email that “Natick Public Schools and the Natick Police Department do not stand for this type of behaviour. This behaviour is inappropriate, not aligned with our core values, and will not be tolerated. We will hold students or others involved fully accountable.”

This incident happened only a few weeks after “social justice training” was held for Natick School District personnel.

The discovery comes just a month after antisemitic, racist and anti-gay graffiti was discovered in a girls’ bathroom at Holten Richmond Middle School in nearby Danvers.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Google

Nicholas Wayne Sherman, 34, was sentenced on 1st March to 180 days of incarceration in Sacramento County Jail for leaving antisemitic leaflets at a synagogue and an elementary school in Carmichael, California, in October 2021.

He left “Aryan Nations” flyers on the doorsteps of homes and at the elementary school in Carmichael, many of which had swastikas drawn or printed on them.

Later that month, Mr Sherman tied papers to a menorah and a metal fence at the synagogue. These papers included antisemitic comments such as “Hitler was right” and photos of Adolf Hitler.

Mr Sherman was arrested in December 2021 and pleaded no contest to his charges. Eleven other misdemeanour charges were filed against him, although all were dismissed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Shalom Le Israel

Health officials with Jewish-sounding names in Salem, Massachusetts have been targeted with antisemitic messages and threats over COVID measures.

The city’s Mayor, Kim Driscoll, announced that members of the Board of Health and Health Department whose names suggested that they were Jewish had been directly targeted with messages and threats online, by e-mail and via voicemails.

In a statement, Ms Driscoll said that such actions were “repugnant and worthy of condemnation” regardless of one’s perspective on “COVID mitigation measures.” She added: “We reject and condemn vile, racist, antisemitic, and regressive attacks.”

Describing the “actions and messages” as “atrocious and utterly unacceptable,” Ms Driscoll urged citizens to do their part in “denouncing hate.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

A federal investigation has been launched following complaints by two Jewish students at Brooklyn College that they have been subjected to “severe and persistent harassment” on a Masters’ programme.

The ten-page complaint was filed on behalf of the students by the Louis D. Brandeis Centre for Human Rights Under Law. A senior figure at the Brandeis Centre  described the alleged harassment campaign against the unnamed students as “part of an effort to erase and misunderstand Jewish identity.”

The Office for Civil Rights of the US Department of Education has confirmed that it is investigating. Part of the City University of New York, Brooklyn College has 2,841 graduate students on its roll, of whom around 500 identify as Jewish. The case could cost the college its federal funding if the allegations are confirmed.

The complaint alleges that Jewish students on the Mental Health Counselling course had been “bullied and harassed in class discussions and on social media” and that Jewish students were targeted using the same “ethnic stereotypes, antisemitic tropes and divisive concepts that faculty members promote in their courses.”

The complaint cites examples such as a professor who claimed that Ashkenazi Jews in America had become “oppressors”, while another professor allegedly rebuked a Jewish student for ranking his/her Jewish identity before his/her white identity, suggesting that the student “did not understand oppression.”

After telling The New York Jewish Week that the harassment was “part of an effort to erase and misunderstand Jewish identity,” Denise Katz-Prober, the Director of Legal Initiatives at the Brandeis Centre said that this was “dangerous” because of the misunderstanding demonstrated by the recent comments made by with Whoopi Goldberg. She added: “It is an attempt to whitewash the Jewish historical experience, which results in the downplaying of antisemitism.”

Ms Katz-Prober said that colleges and universities had an obligation under the Civil Rights Act 1964 to prohibit discrimination on the basis of race, colour or national origin in any programme or activity that receives federal financial assistance. 

The complaint, specifically citing the actions of two unnamed professors and two unnamed administrators, alleges that since the beginning of the 2020-2021 academic year, professors “maligned Jews on the basis of race and ethnic identity” by advancing the narrative that “all Jews are white and privileged and therefore contribute to the systemic oppression of people of colour.”

When the Jewish students complained to administrators, they were allegedly told to “get your whiteness in check” and to “keep your head down.”

The complaint also asserts that Jewish students were bullied on a WhatsApp chat group and that after a female student expressed a desire to “strangle a Jewish student” and others showed support, a Jewish student who objected was accused of being racist. 

One of the students who filed the complaint told The New York Jewish Week it was “the hardest thing” that they had ever done and that they would not be doing it “if it wasn’t so blatant.”

The student said that this was “a very Jewish school” and that Jews should not “have to be scared; this shouldn’t happen.”

They added that class participation was “a very big part of your grade and the fact I have been told by a white teacher to keep my head down and to ‘get your whiteness in check’… really upset me.”

The student added that in a classroom discussion on how people of colour feel vulnerable in public, fellow students downplayed the accounts of Jews who expressed fear of being targeted.

They also said that two other Jewish students had dropped out of the programme – including one due to stress.

In a statement Brooklyn College said that it “unequivocally denounces antisemitism in any form” and does not tolerate it on its campus. The College said it could not comment on ongoing investigations, but was “committed to working cooperatively and fully with the US Department of Education.” The statement also noted its “We Stand Against Hate” initiative, which features lectures, workshops, concerts and other events “that reflect the school’s ongoing commitment to celebrate the voices that make up our diverse campus community” and also served as a “platform to denounce antisemitism.”

The Office of Civil Rights has investigated several complaints against universities alleging antisemitic harassment following which all have entered resolution agreements promising to take steps to combat antisemitic harassment and discrimination against Jewish students on campus.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

A conspiracy theorist who admitted defacing seventeen bus stops in London with graffiti, including the words “Jews and gays are aliens”, has denied that the offence was racially or religiously aggravated

Nicholas Lalchan, 47, from Edmonton, London, used a black marker pen to deface the bus stops, causing £100 of damage each time.

When he was charged, Mr Lalchan, who is Canadian, allegedly said: “New world order. The fourth Reich. We will see.”

Mr Lalchan was convicted of stirring up racial hatred by a jury at Aldersgate House Nightingale Court in central London in September 2021, having admitted possessing a marker pen with intent to cause criminal damage and being convicted of doing so with racial or religious motivation, which he had denied.

When police searched his home, they reportedly found leaflets, marker pens, maps of bus routes and a USB stick containing pictures that referenced Jewish people and conspiracy theories.

Judge Gerard Pounder told Mr Lalchan: “All it takes is for a small Jewish child to see this, and for them to get very upset. You were deliberately hostile and you aimed it at a specific group of people, whether that be gay people, a Jewish priest [sic] or Jewish people.”

Mr Lalchan’s lawyers are now appealing against his conviction for stirring up racial hatred so the court has adjourned sentencing. Explaining next steps, Judge Pounder said: “Your counsel will tell you what’s going on. It’s very complicated. I’m adjourning this until 18th March. That will just be to find out what’s happening in the Court of Appeal and fix a further date for sentence.”

As he was leaving the dock, Mr Lachlan said: “MI5, MI6 is looking to recruit me, they are trying to get me to work against the crown. Your Honour I don’t want to work for MI5, MI6, CIA.” When the judge told him that he would have an opportunity at a later date to make a statement, Mr Lalchan reportedly replied: “It might be too late then, Your Honour. Things are very fluid at the moment. Every single secret service is a traitor to its own population.”

Mr Lalchan is currently on bail and does not need to attend the next hearing. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A New York City school cancelled its production of Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice amid parental concerns about the antisemitic themes in the play.

According to a report in the New York Post, Jewish parents expressed concerns that the play may not be appropriate for the teenage drama students at Morton Middle School in Manhattan. 

The Shakespearean tragedy tells the story of the Jewish moneylender Shylock, depicted as the stereotype of “a greedy Jew”, who is insulted by his Christian enemies. A Smithsonian Magazine analysis has observed that there were more than 50 productions of the play in Nazi Germany between 1933 and 1939, lending “credence to the charge of antisemitism,” according to the magazine.

Theatre for a New Audience (TFNA), the Manhattan-based organisation collaborating with the students on the play, told the New York Post that they had taken into consideration the “polarising elements of the play” when developing the project and had worked with input from the ADL to ensure that the “challenging themes” would be treated with the “proper critical analysis, sensitivity, and thoughtfulness.” 

Nevertheless, the school decided to abandon the production, saying its decision was not taken “lightly,” that they had “worked diligently” with TFNA and had “listened to the members of our community to resolve concerns.”

According to school sources, opinion was divided. One member of the school community said that you needed “knowledge and context” to understand how “bad and dangerous the antisemitism” in this play was. But other parents were “opposed” to scrapping the production, while yet others calling for a dialogue, with one parent noting that, while he had “reservations,” by cancelling the play, the school was missing “a teachable moment.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

The parent of a Jewish student in a Tennessee school has expressed outrage after the teacher in a Bible class allegedly pushed Christian ideology and told students how to “torture a Jew”.

In a Facebook post, Juniper Russo wrote that although the class at East Hamilton Middle School, in Hamilton County, Chattanooga, was meant to teach the Bible from “an unbiased and non-sectarian viewpoint,” the class was, she claimed, used for “blatant Christian proselytising.”

Ms Russo wrote that she had been hesitant to enrol her daughter in the class, run by the Bible in the Schools programme, but had done so as her daughter had disabilities that made other classes inaccessible. 

According to Ms Russo, assignments given to students included questions about whether they read the Bible at home and which books of the Bible they read. She said that students were told about an atheist student who took the class and became a Christian believer and were shown a video which, according to Ms Russo, portrayed Christianity as “light, sunshine and colour” and “all other global religions as storms, darkness and shadows.”

While Ms Russo was already uncomfortable with the teaching, she decided to take her daughter out of the class after, she claimed, it “turned hostile” when the teacher allegedly “wrote an English transliteration of the Hebrew name of God on the whiteboard.” Telling the class that this name was “traditionally not spoken out loud” she allegedly added: “If you want to know how to torture a Jew, make them say this out loud.”

Ms Russo said that her daughter “felt extremely uncomfortable” hearing this comment and that she no longer felt “safe in the class.”

Ms Russo reported that when she tried to arrange a meeting with the teacher, the school administration and the director of the local Jewish Federation, she was told by the principal that her concerns were being taken seriously but that the teacher refused to meet her, claiming that it was against the policy of the Bible in the Schools programme.

Ms Russo also noted that the incident followed the recent ban by nearby McMinn County of Maus, a graphic novel about the Holocaust.

The Bible in the Schools programme has been operating in the area’s public schools since 1922. According to the programme’s website, it allows students to study the Bible from a “literary or historical perspective” and from a “viewpoint-neutral, court-approved curriculum.” It claims to be “inclusive to students from all walks of life.”

A spokesperson for Hamilton County Schools (HSC) said that it was investigating the “parent complaint” concerning the course. When completed, and “in accordance with school board policy,” HCS would “take appropriate steps.”

In a statement, the Jewish Federation of Greater Chattanooga said that it was aware of the issues concerning the Bible class and noted that both the school and HCS were “investigating the claims and taking them seriously.” The group said that it looked forward to “a healthy dialogue with the Bible in the Schools organisation.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Google

A Canadian parliamentary committee is asking representatives of the crowdfunding platform GoFundMe to testify about how the company ensures that money raised is not used to promote antisemitism, white supremacy and other forms of hate. The demand was issued after it emerged that GoFundMe was used to raise more than C$10 million to support anti-vaccination protests that featured antisemitic tropes and white supremacy and which brought the Canadian capital, Ottawa, to a standstill.

Urged by British Columbia New Democrat MP Alistair MacGregor, the Public Safety Committee (PSC) is asking representatives of the crowd-funding website to answer questions about how its funds were allegedly used to promote hate. GoFundMe announced that it was “reviewing” the anti-vaccination fundraising campaign to ensure that it complied with its terms of service and is understood to have frozen funds to protestors in the meantime.

Mr MacGregor said that he was concerned about “the anonymity of some donors” and what controls GoFundMe had to ensure that the money was not funding “extremist views like antisemitism, white supremacy and other forms of hate” that were “prominently” seen in the Ottawa protests.

The MP said that Canada must subject GoFundMe to “a closer examination,” as the “prime motivation” and “endgame” of its “anonymous donors” were not known. Their aims were unknown “and that’s a very real, big problem,” said Mr MacGregor.

In its statement, GoFundMe said that it had requested more information from the organiser regarding the use of funds. Tamara Lich, one of the protest organisers, said that the crowd-funding company had been given all the information that it sought and was confident that the suspension would be lifted. In the meantime, the controversial social media platform Gab, which is popular with the far-right, has provided links to cryptocurrency websites as a way to keep donations flowing during GoFundMe’s suspension of fundraising.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

Concerns have been raised that the Texas synagogue hostage-taker may have been influenced by antisemitic Urdu sermons that YouTube has failed to remove from its platform.

Malik Faisal Akram, 44, a Briton who took four hostages at the Beth Israel Synagogue in Colleyville before being shot dead by the FBI, was reportedly obsessed with two hardline Pakistani clerics popular on YouTube.

Israr Ahmed has 2.7 million subscribers on the social media network and was particularly popular with Akram, according to the JC. On his videos, he reportedly called Jews “the ultimate source of evil [and] the biggest agents of Satan”, adding that they “control the banking system of the world.” In another video, entitled “History of the Jews”, Dr Ahmed claimed that Jews had been acting against humanity for over 2,000 years. “The name of Jews became an expletive,” he said. “They became akin to pigs.”

Interestingly, one YouTube user reportedly asked why English subtitles for the sermons were not provided, prompting another to reply: “I’m happy that there are no subtitles. If these are available with subtitles, this’ll be removed from here.”

Meanwhile, the cleric Tariq Jamil has claimed in a video to his nearly six million subscribers that Jews “distorted” the holy books, among other inflammatory remarks. Akram reportedly organised a “rock star” welcome to Mr Jamil, who leads the hardline Islamic movement Tablighi Jamaat, when he visited Akram’s hometown of Blackburn in 2017. The local Tablighi mosque, Makki Masjid, had loudspeakers installed on the roof so that a crowd overflowing outside could hear his sermons.

According to Akram’s family, he joined Tablighi Jamaat and became a dedicated follower of is leader, Mr Jamil, in 2003. Within a year, he began adopting the harsh strictures of the sect, including growing a long beard and forcing his wife to wear a veil, against her wishes, according to reports. He also apparently began disappearing for months at a time in Pakistan and Britain. It is understood that Akram also raised funds for the group in Britain, a campaign of which Mr Jamil’s visit to Blackburn was part.

Akram was reportedly later banned from the Tablighi mosque after calling for jihad against Israel and the United States inside the mosque, as well as insulting the Gulf states who were warming ties with Israel. It is not believed that Akram had further engagement with Tablighi Jamaat after the ban.

A spokesperson for Google, which owns YouTube, said that the company was reviewing the videos and subscription channels highlighted by the JC. In 2019, YouTube updated its hate speech policy, leading to a significant increase in videos being removed from the platform. The guidelines state that antisemitism and hate speech are prohibited and that videos that breach the policy will be removed.

Previously, YouTube removed Urdu sermons by other figures after the JC reported them, but allowed the creators to continue to upload videos. The videos referenced the “Jewish lobby” and described Hitler as “an angel”. It is not known whether Akram watched those videos, but YouTube failed to remove the channels and continues to profit from them.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Scenarios like this make you wonder what exactly it takes for social media companies like YouTube to forgo a fraction of their profits by removing antisemites from their platforms. The substance of these racist sermons was apparently not enough for YouTube. Perhaps now, this evidence that the sermons may have incited Malik Faisal Akram to take Jews hostage in a synagogue will move the company to act. Or does it take actual dead Jews to persuade social media networks not to take the blood money that comes from broadcasting videos such as these? Government regulation of social media cannot come fast enough for the next victims of a social media user incited by those they watch or read online.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

Turkish pro-government media published an article that appears to try to link Jews with the Armenian genocide which took place in 1915, during WWI, under the Ottoman regime.

The article, alleging that “Jewish influence behind the scenes” had been involved in the “Armenian deportation,” was a long and rambling conspiracy theory, stretching from fourteenth-century Venice to 1970s London, referencing WWI and Nazi ideology. Its thesis supports the position of the Government of Turkey, which denies responsibility for the Armenian genocide.

The pro-Government media which supports the ruling AK Party has frequently published articles containing antisemitic content. This latest essay, headlined “Young Turks, Jews, Freemasons and the Armenian deportation,” was published by Daily Sabah. The outlet is known for its pro-Government line, undermining claims that the Turkish Government has instructed Turkish media to reduce the inclusion of antisemitic tropes in output as the country seeks reconciliation with Israel.

The article was tweeted by the newspaper with the claims of “Jewish influence” highlighted.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

“The Jew is the devil!” “Jews rape children and drink their blood” and “Jews brought slaves here” were among some of the slogans chanted by the National Socialist Movement (NSM) at a rally on Saturday in Florida.

The NSM is an explicitly neo-Nazi group, which calls for an all-white “greater America”, which would remove citizenship from non-whites, Jews and the LGBT community.

Videos of their march were released on Twitter. They appeared to show a driver being assaulted, monkey noises being made at a black woman, and other racist and antisemitic slurs. Reports further suggested that the group was wearing clothes with Nazi insignia.

Some local leaders spoke out to condemn the antisemitic slurs and the protest.

No arrests were made at the time, as the Orange County Sheriff’s Office argued that people have a First Amendment (free speech) right to demonstrate. The sheriff did say that “hatred has no place in our society” and that “any reports of criminal activity will be thoroughly investigated.”

Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer said that “Antisemitism and hatred are not welcome in this community. Despite displays of hate in Central Florida this weekend, our collective commitment to building an inclusive, compassionate community for all is stronger than ever.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Stop Antisemitism

A speech by United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres has disappointed mainstream Jewish groups for merely “acknowledging” the International Definition of Antisemitism but failing to adopt it.

However, Israel’s Ambassador to the UN, Gilad Erdan, has welcomed the Secretary-General’s commitment to combatting antisemitism.

Speaking at a UN event marking International Holocaust Remembrance Day, Mr Guterres said that “a shared understanding” of antisemitism could serve the work of the UN, as well as “all global efforts to uphold human rights.”

Mr Guterres then read aloud the Definition, but without mentioning all of the examples, which are integral to the Definition and its application. The Secretary-General also acknowledged “the efforts of countries that have agreed on the common definition of antisemitism.”

Mr Erdan had raised expectations over the speech when he told a news outlet that Mr Guterres would use his remarks to announce the UN’s adoption of the Definition along with its application at all UN bodies, hence there was some disappointment that the Secretary-General fell short of these expectations. The UN has thus not gone as far in signalling its readiness to combat antisemitism as numerous countries which have adopted the Definition.

Nevertheless, Mr Erdan interpreted the speech as effectively “adopting” the Definition and “applying it in the UN bodies,” adding that he had raised the issue in several meetings over the past year with Mr Guterres, who had now “effectively recognised” the Definition. In a statement, the Israeli Mission to the UN said that the speech meant that the Definition could be used to “fight antisemitism within various UN bodies.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

Vice President Kamala Harris has been criticised for a trip to Honduras on Holocaust Memorial Day to meet the country’s new President whose husband and running-mate have been beset by allegations of antisemitism.

On her arrival in Honduras, Vice President Harris tweeted a tribute to the six million Jews who perished in the Shoah, writing: “Today, we honour the six million Jews and other victims murdered by the Nazi regime during the Holocaust.” She continued: “We must teach our children the truth about the atrocities…so that together we give meaning to that timeless pledge, ‘never again’.”

Ms Harris was in Honduras to attend the inauguration of the new socialist President Xiomara Castro, in a bid to get her help to stem the crisis on America’s southern border. The leaders also held a meeting at which Ms Harris announced that the US would be sending more aid, including more Covid vaccine doses, to the Central American nation. The Biden administration sees cooperation and investment in the Northern Triangle countries – Honduras, Mexico and El Salvador – as the way to ease the crisis on its border. 

Ms Castro’s husband Manuel Zelaya, a former President, claimed after the country’s 2009 coup that “Israeli mercenaries” were torturing him “with high-frequency radiation,” while Ms Castro’s running mate, Salvador Nasralla, has reportedly said that Jews control the global money supply. Mr Nasralla also stated in 2020 that “the boss” of the country’s outgoing President Juan Orlando Hernández, was “the Government of Israel.”  

‘It’s totally disgusting and unacceptable that the US Vice President would attend this inauguration and give legitimacy to this vile behaviour, especially on the day we honour and remember the six million Jews and millions of others killed in the Holocaust,”  said Lee Zeldin, a Jewish Republican Congressman. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

A Seattle Jewish organisation has described the official reaction to antisemitic acts allegedly perpetrated by a senior police officer as “completely inadequate” and “an affront” to the Jewish community.

The criticism from the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle (JFGS) follows the response by city officials in the Kent area of Seattle, Washington, to offences in the summer of 2021 when Assistant Police Chief Derek Kammerzell allegedly posted a Nazi military insignia on his office door and made jokes about the Holocaust.

Mr Kammerzell was suspended for two weeks and ordered to attend cultural-sensitivity training. His claim that he did not know the symbol was of Nazi origin was accepted. In a statement released at the end of the year, Kent officials said that, based on labour law and on advice from two law firms that had reviewed the case, they believed a two-week suspension was “an appropriate and defensible response.”

JFGS described the response as “inexcusable” and said that it demonstrated “a complete lack of understanding of the impact” on the local Jewish community.

The group described the two-week suspension and sensitivity-training as “completely inadequate, especially at a time when incidents of hate against the Jewish people are higher than they’ve been in almost 45 years.”

JFGS called on the City of Kent to “publicly recognise the harm and hurt” caused to the Jewish community, adding that the “absence of true accountability” and “the sheer lack of consequences” were “shocking.”

This was an affront to the entire Puget Sound Jewish community, the group said said, adding: “Synagogues, Jewish community centres, and Jewish organisations rely on lawenforcement to help protect them from violent, antisemitic attacks.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

Four Labour Party MPs – Grahame Morris, Nadia Whittome, John McDonnell and Lucy Powell – are now under pressure in relation to antisemitism.

The Mail on Sunday revealed that the Labour MP Grahame Morris is the director of the controversial “Palestine Deep Dive” company. Research by Labour Against Antisemitism uncovered Mr Morris’ association with the company, of which he is the founding director. The MP reportedly admitted being a director of the purportedly educational organisation and that he had failed to declare this directorship to Parliament.

The company’s website has previously published an article claiming that “Israel’s racism” has “let loose the pogroms so reminiscent of Czarist times and Kristallnacht in Germany, 1938.” According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

The website has also attacked BBC’s Panorama for contributing to a “smear campaign” against Labour, due to its investigation into antisemitism in the Party. The website reportedly apologised for this latter article by the controversial musician and activist, Roger Waters, last month. Mr Waters has made other outrageous claims on the website as well.

The website has interviewed the activist and comedian, Alexei Sayle, who has claimed that allegations of antisemitism “amongst supporters of Jeremy Corbyn are a complete fabrication.” Palestine Deep Dive has also reportedly platformed the controversial figure Tariq Ali, who has previously tried to link Israel to the racist killing of George Floyd – a trope for which Rebecca Long Bailey was fired from the Shadow Cabinet – among other inflammatory claims.

Grahame Morris is believed to be the only sitting MP in the entire House of Commons not to have endorsed the International Definition of Antisemitism. In 2012, he himself apparently tweeted: “World’s richest Jacob Rothschild, John Paulson & George Soros Are All Betting That Financial Disaster is Coming.”

Mr Morris reportedly said that, although he is a director of the company, he has “no involvement in the editorial decisions” of the website, and he issued an apology for failing to register his directorship with the House of Commons.

A spokesperson for the company reportedly said that the website “has not knowingly published material that may be considered antisemitic, nor has it been challenged as such. If this would ever be the case, it would be removed.”

Meanwhile, former Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell MP and fellow Socialist Campaign Group member Nadia Whittome MP both reportedly shared a platform with expelled Labour member and outspoken filmmaker Ken Loach. Sir Keir Starmer pledged during his leadership campaign that any Labour member who shares a platform with a member expelled in relation to antisemitism would be disciplined, but he has consistently failed to fulfil this promise.

Reports have also emerged that Lucy Powell MP, the Shadow Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, has been campaigning with Cllr. Majid Dar, a Labour councillor in Manchester who was suspended following allegations of antisemitism. Cllr Dar’s sister, Yasmine Dar, is an ally of Jeremy Corbyn and served as the head of Labour’s disputes panel. She is infamous for claiming that the Party did not have a problem of institutional antisemitism even as her brother was suspended over antisemitism allegations.

Scandals relating to antisemitism continue to rock the Labour Party at other levels as well. For example, a Labour councillor in West Lancashire, Ron Cooper, has tweeted: “If Corbyn was Labour Leader again then hundreds of thousands of members would rejoin the Party. @Keir_Starmer Stands for nothing #Purge of socialists and following commands from Israel.” Cllr. Cooper was swiftly suspended from the Party pending an investigation, and currently sits as an independent councillor, the whip having been withdrawn.

There are also unverified reports that Maureen Madden, the Chair of the North Tyneside Constituency Labour Party, has been expelled from the Labour Party. She has reportedly shared Rothschild conspiracy theories in the past.

Furthermore, Jewish Voice for Labour, the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, has tweeted in response to verified reports of Chinese espionage in Parliament: “Chinese interference in Parliament is unacceptsble [sic] and the security services were correct to draw attention to it. When are they going to turn their attention to the widespread Israeli Parliamentary interference #LFI #CFI #LDFI.” Claims that the Jewish state or lobbyists on its behalf wield excessive power in foreign nations is a common trope.

Joe Glasman, Head of Political and Government Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Sir Keir Starmer’s failure to fulfil his pledge to discipline MPs and others who share platforms with expelled members continues to haunt him. He tells non-Jewish audiences that he has closed the door on antisemitism in his Party – while whispering to Jewish audiences that there is still more to do – but his own MPs and officeholders continue to push the door wide open. With the new disciplinary system yet to be tested, Labour cannot be said to have gotten to grip with its scandal of institutional racism against Jews.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has lodged a complaint against Jeremy Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day of the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Nicaragua is facing outrage after an Iranian official wanted in connection with the deadly AMIA bombing attended the swearing-in of controversial President Daniel Ortega for a fourth term following an election widely viewed as rigged.

Mohsen Rezaee, a Vice President of Iran and two-time former Presidential candidate, attended the ceremony this week despite being wanted by Interpol for his role in the bombing of the AMIA Jewish centre in Buenos Aires in 1994.

Mr Rezaee was the commander of the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps at the time of the AMIA bombing, which he is believed to have masterminded and which killed 86 people and injured hundreds. The United States has designated the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps as a terrorist organisation.

Mr Rezaee has been wanted by Interpol since 2007.

The Organisation of American States’ antisemitism envoy, the Brazilian lawyer Fernando Lottenberg, called for Nicaragua to abide by its duties as a member of Interpol, saying: “I repudiate the presence of the Vice President of Iran at the inauguration of Daniel Ortega in Managua. Mohsen Rezaee is under a red alert from Interpol. Nicaragua, as a member of Interpol, should soon comply with it.”

Argentina has its own arrest warrant out for Mr Rezaee, and the country’s Foreign Ministry said that “his presence in Managua constitutes an affront to Argentine justice and to the victims of the brutal terrorist attack against the AMIA.” 

During his visit, Mr Rezaee also met with Cuban President Miguel Díaz-Canel Bermúdez.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Belgian police are investigating videos circulating on social media which appeared to show a group of soccer fans in Antwerp giving Nazi salutes and shouting antisemitic slogans and chants that included references to Hamas and to gassing and burning Jews.

According to the local newspaper which reported the incident, it took place at a restaurant near the soccer stadium and involved fans of Antwerp’s Beerschot team.

In an unrelated development, the Royal Belgian Soccer Association fined Brugge soccer team, Club Brugge, around £2,000 for antisemitic chants heard at three recent matches. Fans of the club were heard shouting “Whoever doesn’t jump is a Jew.”

Antisemitic soccer chants occur regularly where the fans of certain teams perceive the rival team as having strong Jewish support or links to the Jewish community, such as Amsterdam’s Ajax and Britain’s Tottenham Hotspur. There are times, however, that the soccer chants have also been heard outside the context of sports, including at a graduation party of high school students in the Netherlands.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

The American social networking and microblogging platform, Tumblr has made changes to its app in order to block more than 400 search terms, including “antisemitism,” “racism” and “xenophobia”, in a move intended to reduce the risk of Apple banning it from the App Store.

Although some of the banned terms are designed to block access to pornography, Tumblr has stated that other terms relating to “potentially sensitive content” were banned so that the platform could “remain available within Apple’s App Store.”

In order to comply with Apple’s guideline, Tumblr said that it was “having to extend the definition of what sensitive content is as well as the way you access it.”

In 2018, the platform changed its community guidelines to explicitly ban hate speech.

In a blog post at the time, Tumblr stated that it was incumbent “on all of us to create a safe, constructive, and empowering environment.”

Tumblr said that to achieve this, its community guidelines needed “to reflect the reality of the internet and social media today,” as the internet was “being exploited by hate groups.”

Following the 2018 changes, users were able to report hate speech directly in the mobile app. Those guidelines were used to remove antisemitic, anti-Muslim, and anti-LGBT content.

The platform notes that under the new changes, users may see fewer results when searching for certain terms or phrases “that fall under the expanded definition of sensitive content,” and that in certain circumstances, a search “may not produce any results at all,” with users seeing a message stating that “content has been hidden.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

CCTV footage has shown a visibly Jewish man being punched in the face in Manchester.

Reports state that the suspect was drunk and in the midst of a heated argument with a woman, believed to be his partner, before he ran up to the Jewish man on the street and punched him in the side of the face.

It is understood that while the male suspect fled the scene, the woman was detained by the authorities.

The scene of the incident was attended by members of Salford Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol, and Hatzola, a volunteer-run emergency medical service. 

The incident occurred at 22:59 on 26th December on Leicester Road in Manchester and was reported by Salford Shomrim. If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Salford Shomrim on 0161 740 8000, quoting reference number: CAD 2747 26/12/21.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A jury in Virginia has found that prominent white supremacists and white-supremacist organisations are liable for more than $26 million (£19.5 million) in damages from the August 2017 “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, in which one civil rights activist was killed and dozens were injured.

During the rally, held to oppose the planned removal of a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee, white supremacists marched through the town carrying torches and chanting “Jews will not replace us.”

The case, seeking damages for the physical and emotional injuries caused at the rally, was brought about by the civil rights organisation “Integrity First for America”, alongside those injured in the violence as well as other town residents. The jury in the civil trial heard testimony for four weeks and took three days to deliberate.

Evidence entered in the trial known as Sines v. Kessler included social media posts, text messages and online chats between the rally organisers. According to the jury, the plaintiffs proved that the defendants – who included event organiser Jason Kessler and Richard Spencer, thought to have coined the term “alt-right” – violated a Virginia conspiracy law in advance of the event.

In her testimony, Holocaust historian Deborah Lipstadt said that there was “a great deal of overt antisemitism and adulation of the Third Reich.” Ms Lipstadt added that “very few things” surprised her, but she was “taken aback” by the evidence she saw.

According to reports, antisemitic slurs and hate speech were frequently heard from defendants during the trial, with defendant Michael Hill pledging during testimony that he was “a white supremacist, a racist, an antisemite, a homophobe, a xenophobe, an Islamophobe, and any other sort of ‘phobe’ that benefits my people, so help me God.’”

Commenting on the result in a statement, Integrity First for America said that the case had sent “a clear message” that “violent hate won’t go unanswered.” The statement added: “At a moment of rising extremism, major threats to our democracy, and far too little justice, the case has provided a model of accountability.”

During the 2017 violence, white supremacist James Alex Fields Jr drove his car into a crowd, killing civil rights activist Heather Heyer and injuring dozens. Mr Fields was convicted of murder in 2019 and sentenced to life in prison.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

A man in Manhattan had his kippah grabbed from his head by an unidentified male who also made an antisemitic comment, it was reported on Friday.

According to the NYPD Hate Crimes Unit, when asked to give back the kippah, the assailant allegedly threw it at the 34-year-old victim. Police said the attacker and the victim did not know each other. 

In a tweet that referred to a “disgusting” act, Mayor Bill De Blasio wrote: “Get the message: if you commit an act of antisemitism in our city you will face the consequences.” 

Alongside an image of the suspect issued by police, Mayor De Blasio added: “If you have any information on this disgusting act, contact the NYPD immediately.” 

A local website cited statistics from the NYPD noting that up until 31st October 2021, hate crimes against New York City’s Jewish residents had increased by 48 percent since 2020, with 164 attacks compared to 111. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

Image credit: New York Police Department

The President of Colombia has condemned police cadets who dressed up as Nazis in a ceremony meant to honour Germany.

President Iván Duque said on Friday that “any apology for Nazism is unacceptable,” after images emerged last week showing the Simón Bolívar police academy in Tuluá displaying Nazi flags and other items and cadets were seen wearing swastika armbands. One cadet also appeared to have put on a Hitler moustache.

“I condemn any demonstration that uses or refers to symbols associated with those responsible for the Jewish Holocaust,” Mr Duque wrote on Twitter. He said that all those responsible would be held to account, with the head of the academy already dismissed.

The event was reportedly organised as part of an “international week” aimed at “strengthening the knowledge of our police students”.

The ambassadors of Israel and Germany urged Colombia to do more to educate people about the Holocaust.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A white supremacist sticker was affixed to a Jewish grave in Tasmania, Australia.

The sticker, with the words “White Force – Old School Aussie Hate”, was stuck over a Star of David on a grave at Launceston’s Carr Villa Cemetery.

The vandalism was reportedly discovered by a Jewish mother and daughter who visit the cemetery every week.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Anti-Defamation Commission

The Home Secretary is today announcing that the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group, Hamas, is to be proscribed in full by the British Government, subject to the consent of Parliament which is not in doubt.

For several months, Campaign Against Antisemitism has been meeting with the Home Secretary and other ministers, calling on the Government to proscribe Hamas, whose ideology and activities are Islamist, nationalist, antisemitic, misogynistic and homophobic. Many also consider the organisation’s militant teachings to be a corruption of Islam.

We also drew up a detailed dossier, which we provided to the Home Secretary and all MPs, making the case for proscription in order to close the loophole in British law that has allowed Hamas to operate in the UK and which was particularly visible during the recent record-breaking surge in antisemitism in Britain during the conflict between Hamas and Israel.

During the campaign, we have worked alongside numerous allies within and outside the Jewish community.

In a major speech today, the Home Secretary will say: “Hamas is fundamentally and rabidly antisemitic. Antisemitism is an enduring evil which I will never tolerate. Jewish people routinely feel unsafe – at school, in the streets, when they worship, in their homes, and online. This step will strengthen the case against anyone who waves a Hamas flag in the United Kingdom, an act that is bound to make Jewish people feel unsafe.”

She is also expected to say: “Hamas has significant terrorist capability, including access to extensive and sophisticated weaponry, as well as terrorist training facilities, and it has long been involved in significant terrorist violence. But the current listing of Hamas creates an artificial distinction between various parts of the organisation — it is right that the listing is updated to reflect this. This is an important step, especially for the Jewish community. If we tolerate extremism, it will erode the rock of security.”

Until now, the UK has only proscribed the Izz al-Din al-Qassam Brigades — the so-called ‘military wing’ of the terrorist group, leaving the supposed ‘political wing’ free to operate and its supporters at liberty to proselytise. Britain previously relied on the European Union’s proscription of the entirety of Hamas as a de facto ban in the UK, but following the UK’s exit from the European Union, this reliance was no longer tenable.

There is no material distinction between the supposed ‘wings’ of Hamas, which share the same personnel and where political leaders launch military operations. However, because of this loophole, Hamas flags can be flown, its ideology can be promoted, funds can be raised, material can be disseminated, and its representatives can operate in the UK.

Over the years—and particularly in recent months—our Demonstrations and Events Monitoring Unit found evidence of support for Hamas on British streets, and this is undoubtedly tied to the recent surge in domestic antisemitism. Thanks to this proscription, it will now be illegal to display Hamas flags and symbols or finance or publicly support the terror group.

The proscription of the Islamist terrorist group Hizballah in its entirety in 2019 is a fine precedent for this ban of Hamas. Just as the proscription of Hizballah in full, following a long campaign by CAA and others, sent a powerful message to the Jewish community — and Islamists — that antisemitism and terrorism will not be tolerated in the UK, so does the proscription of Hamas, particularly at a time of a record-breaking surge in antisemitism in Britain.

The first ever poll on the subject, conducted by Campaign Against Antisemitism last year, showed that an overwhelming 91% of British Jews want the Government to proscribe Hamas in its entirety.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We thank the Home Secretary for listening and taking this action to outlaw support for Hamas, which seeks the genocide of all Jews worldwide. Proscription of Hamas in full shows British Jews that the Government stands firm against those who seek to harm us, and it also brings the UK into line with our allies.

“During the recent surge in anti-Jewish racism on British streets we saw numerous examples of people wearing the Hamas emblem and even the Hamas-style headband traditionally worn by its suicide bombers. The Home Secretary’s announcement tells Islamists in this country and abroad in no uncertain terms that antisemitic terror and its supporters have no place in decent society and now they can be prosecuted if they peddle their hatred in Britain. Today is a good day in the fight against antisemitism.”

Earlier this year, crosses were daubed in blood in Jewish houses on Portland Avenue in Stamford Hill in what was described as a “grotesque escalation”.

Now, the same person – apparently identified by DNA from the blood – woke families on the same street in the middle of the night by banging on their doors and windows, petrifying children

The suspect is known to the local community.

The latest incident took place overnight on 17th November and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD397 18/11/2021.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews more than four times likelier to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The advocacy group Hope Not Hate has rescinded an award to an artist after he appeared to downplay antisemitism in the Labour Party and was pictured with the disgraced former MP Chris Williamson.

Singer Joe Solo was one of three nominees selected by a public vote to win a Hope Hero award for his anti-poverty project. The award was a joint project of Hope Not Hate and the trade union Community.

However, it since emerged that in September 2018 and February 2019 Mr Solo posted messages of solidarity with Mr Williamson on social media.

He also tweeted: “I don’t join in with the Corbyn/antisemitism row because I believe it is being used a political tool to enable much darker forces. So I believe Mr Corbyn is antisemitic? No, of course not. And nor do they…” The tweet ended with a link.

In a joint statement, Hope Not Hate and Community said: “Since the announcement of the award it has been brought to our attention that in 2018 and 2019 Joe Solo published several social media posts that we deem unacceptable.

“Hope Not Hate have long been clear that antisemitism in the Labour Party has been a major problem and vocal in our condemnation of Chris Williamson. One of the major mistakes made by the Labour Party was making excuses instead of acting when faced with antisemitism. We will not make that same mistake.

“As such we have decided to withdraw the award from Joe Solo and we have reached out to him to offer training on the issue of antisemitism and explain why we found the tweet unacceptable.”

The statement also praised Mr Solo’s work, and ended with an apology: “We also apologise unreservedly to our friends and comrades who have been hurt by this situation. We will continue to do more to be allies in the fight against antisemitism.”

Anti-vaccination protesters in New York were spotted wearing the yellow stars that were forced upon Jews during the Holocaust and brandishing swastika signs during a demonstration that was held outside a Jewish Assemblyman’s office on Sunday.

The demonstration was organised by Rob Astorino, a Republican candidate for governor, in order to protest the bill sponsored by Democrat Assemblyman Jeffrey Dinowitz, whose office in the Bronx the rally was held outside, which called for children to be immunised against COVID-19 in order to attend school. 

Assemblyman Jeffrey Dinowitz condemned the invocation of the Holocaust as “repugnant and offensive” on Twitter, before adding: “People are perfectly free to express their opinion on vaccines or any issue, but to openly display Nazi symbols outside the office of a Jewish legislator is despicable.”

Assemblyman Dinowitz also stated that he was “disgusted and offended by the antisemitic imagery that was brought to my office by apparent supporters of Rob Astorino’s failing gubernatorial campaign…People are free to express their opinions on vaccine policy and on any issue, but I draw the line at swastikas.”

He went on to say that standing next to swastikas and yellow Stars of David outside of a Jewish legislator’s office “shows a lack of integrity at best and an embrace of right-wing extremism at worst.” Assemblyman Dinowitz also called on Mr Astorino to “condemn in the strongest terms” the Holocaust-related symbols that were present at his demonstration. “I refuse to be cowed by antisemites or anti-science extremists,” the assemblyman said. 

Mr Astorino took to Twitter to speak out against one of the signs bearing a swastika, claiming that he did not see the sign at the time and that, according to him, the woman holding the sign had a different one when he met her before the event. He added: “Regardless of who the woman was or why she was there, if I saw the sign I would have stopped and had it removed. Absolutely inappropriate.”

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio also denounced the symbols as “an insult to our Jewish community, especially our Holocaust survivors who have endured real pain” and stated that “This is what antisemitism looks like”, before adding: “We stand with @JeffreyDinowitz & our Jewish community.”

The inflammatory and misleading comparison has been used among other international anti-vaccination and anti-lockdown circles.

Earlier this year, Joseph Szwarc, a Holocaust survivor, spoke out against wearing the yellow star in protests, saying: “You can’t imagine how much that upset me. This comparison is hateful. We must all rise up against this ignominy.” With tears in his eyes, Mr Szwarc added: “I wore the star, I know what that is, I still have it in my flesh. It is everyone’s duty to not allow this outrageous, antisemitic, racist wave to pass over us.”

The comparison has been made across the world, including in the United Kingdom, Canada, Ukraine and elsewhere.

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

An arson attack on a synagogue in Austin, Texas has prompted a resolution by the City Council to condemn antisemitism and seek ways to combat hate. 

The attack on Austin’s Congregation Beth Israel on the night of 31st October was the latest in a series of incidents in the Texas city. In its response to the incidents, the Austin City Council passed a resolution condemning “all hateful speech and violent action that…promotes racism or discrimination, or harms the Jewish community.”

Speaking at the council session, Council Member Alison Alter said recent events were “simply further evidence of the challenges” the city faced. “The reality is that the hate is here, and we need to up our game, to lead our community, and to devote focus and attention so hate does not take root in our community.”

The resolution directs the Austin City Manager to work with local groups, including the ADL, “to review and then identify and implement improvements to the City’s response to hate.”

These improvements should include training for city staff to educate “participants in how hate manifests; how to effectively respond to incidents of hate; and how social media is used to propagate hate.”

Damage to the synagogue was so severe that its rabbi, Steve Folberg, and President, Lori Adelman, said in a message to congregants that it would take “weeks rather than days” to get their “sanctuary fit for occupancy” leading them to seek temporary accommodation for services.

A few days after the incident, some 500 people, including clergy and political leaders, gathered at the oldest synagogue in Texas – the B’nai Abraham – to condemn antisemitism. Rabbi Folberg and Ms Adelman said the rally and “expressions of solidarity” had been a source of strength for all  those “facing the practical and emotional demands of beginning to heal our community from this attack.”

In a media release, the Austin Fire Department issued stills from a security video of the arson suspect and his vehicle. The release said that the suspect had driven into the synagogue car park in a black SUV and approached the building carrying a five-gallon gasoline can. He then returned to his vehicle. The FBI is also now investigating the incident.

A series of antisemitic incidents in Austin have included the vandalising of a local high school with Nazi symbols, a banner hung from an overpass reading “Vax the Jews,” and the display of antisemitic posters on a local street.

Two of the incidents were allegedly committed by a local hate group calling itself the Goyim Defence League”, a group whose membership reportedly contains several neo-Nazis and is understood to be led by Jon Minadeo II. The group is responsible for stunts such as visiting a Chabad centre to claim that “these Jewish terrorists” were behind 9/11, and hanging a banner on a Los Angeles overpass reading “Honk if you know the Jews want a race war.” Earlier this year, Mr Minadeo II created t-shirts carrying antisemitic slogans such as the Holocaust was “a hoax”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

West Ham has confirmed that it has so far banned two supporters for life over antisemitic chanting on a flight to a Europa League match.

Two men have also been arrested after a video surfaced last week of West Ham fans chanting “I’ve got a foreskin haven’t you, f***ing Jew” at a Hasidic fellow on a Ryanair flight to Belgium where their club was playing KRC Genk.

Essex Police have arrested two men so far in connection with the incident. It is not currently clear whether the two banned supporters are also the two suspects.

West Ham’s Manager, David Moyes, said on Friday: “I don’t see our football club being like that. We are a diverse football club. There’s no room for discrimination anywhere.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to Ryanair asking what was done to protect the Jewish victim of the antisemitic chanting by the West Ham fans and how the airline will help the club identify and ban these supporters for life.

West Ham and the Premier League have adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

A man who pleaded guilty to sending a series of antisemitic, hateful and racist tweets has been sentenced to eight weeks in prison at Westminster Magistrates’ Court today.

After an investigation by the Metropolitan Police, Nathan Blagg, 21, of Retford in Nottinghamshire, was charged in September with seven counts of sending by public communication network an offensive/indecent/obscene/menacing message/matter which violates the Malicious Communications Act. The charges refer to seven tweets sent between 29th September 2020 and 5th February 2021. 

Mr Blagg pleaded guilty to all charges. The court heard that Mr Blagg was initially reported by a West Brom fan before his posts were investigated by Chelsea Football Club’s security team and finally passed on to the police. The posts included images as well as tweets and retweets of offensive messages. 

Prosecutor David Roberts said that there was a “racially aggravated” element because of the “antisemitic nature” of many of the tweets. 

Maeve Thornton, defending, reportedly said that Mr Blagg had been suffering at the time from “low moods” due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Ms Thornton said: “He has got drawn into this in terms of a lack of awareness and understanding of the impact this was going to have. With hindsight, he now understands how wrong this is. He is indeed very remorseful and very apologetic and has taken steps to address his offending by removing himself from Twitter. There is not going to be a repeat of this behaviour moving forward.”

However, today Westminster Magistrates’ Court sentenced Mr Blagg to eight weeks in prison.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We welcome this sentence, which sends a message to fans that there is no place for antisemitism in football. We commend Chelsea FC and the police for investigating and seeing the case through. Kicking racism out of football will only succeed when all interested parties cooperate, as they have done in this case.”

In April, Chelsea Football Club announced that it had banned an abusive online troll from its matches for ten years after he hounded a Jewish journalist who came forward and received support from Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Chelsea and the Premier League have adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) have punished Union Berlin football club after some of its fans performed Nazi salutes and shouted antisemitic abuse towards opposing supporters during its match with Israeli team Maccabi Haifa.

A youth group promoting German and Israeli interests who attended the match on 30th September said that they were “threatened by Union fans, pelted with beer and insulted, among other things, as ‘s****y Jews’”. Images of fans performing Nazi salutes, which is illegal in Germany, also surfaced on Twitter. 

Members of the group also stated that several Union Berlin fans tried to stop the abuse, to whom they were grateful. 

Shortly after the news of the antisemitic acts were reported, club president Dirk Zinglers stated: “This behaviour is shameful and we won’t tolerate it. We apologise to those affected. Antisemitism is unfortunately still present in our society, which is why it also shows itself in the stadium. However, we will never tolerate discrimination in our ranks. It is important to remain vigilant and to work tirelessly against it.”

UEFA said that it had punished Union Berlin due to “the racist behavior of its supporters” during the match, ordering the club to shut down sections thirteen and fourteen “where the home supporters are seated” in its game against Dutch team Feyenoord on Thursday. In addition, Union Berlin must also use those sections to display a banner bearing the phrase “#NoToRacism” alongside the UEFA logo.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Recent days have seen multiple high-profile antisemitic incidents in football, both domestic and international. UEFA is right to sanction the club and force it to publicise that the penalty is due to racism. But the club itself must also now act, by identifying the perpetrators and giving them life bans. Like those decent Union Berlin fans who tried to stop the abuse, the club itself, and German clubs more generally, should be particularly sensitive to antisemitism among any of their supporters and step in to stamp it out.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Farenet

The alleged co-founder of the neo-Nazi terrorist group, National Action, has denied being a member of the proscribed group.

Alex Davies, 27, pleaded not guilty to a single charge of membership of a proscribed organisation between 17th December 17 2016 and 27th September 2017.

Mr Davies, of Uplands in Swansea, appeared at the Old Bailey via video link, and the trial is anticipated in April next year.

National Action was proscribed by the British Government following repeated calls by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others. Mr Davies and Ben Raymond are alleged to have founded the group in 2013 as university students.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

The trial over the 2018 murder of a Holocaust survivor began yesterday in Paris’ Court of Assizes.

Mireille Knoll, an 85-year-old Holocaust survivor, fled Paris in 1942 at nine years old with her mother, escaping to Portugal. They narrowly avoided the Vélodrome d’Hiver, or “Vél d’Hiv”, the largest roundup of French Jews during the Holocaust where over 13,000 men, women, and children were arrested with the majority being deported to Auschwitz. Less than 100 people returned. 

On 23rd March, 2018, Ms Knoll was killed after being stabbed eleven times in her Paris apartment. Her body was found partially burned after those responsible for her murder then attempted to set her apartment on fire. The murder was deemed an antisemitic incident with President Emanuel Macron stating that her killer “assassinated an innocent and vulnerable woman because she was Jewish.”

The two accused of her murder are 32-year-old Yacine Mihoub and 25-year-old Alex Carrimbacus. It has been reported that Ms Knoll lived in the same building as Mr Mihoub and his family and knew the defendant since he was a child. Mr Mihoub, who reportedly made unannounced visits regularly to Ms Knoll, was said to have arrived with Mr Carrimbacus at Ms Knoll’s apartment where the two accused began drinking her port wine. It was during this visit that Ms Knoll was stabbed eleven times. The pair, who reportedly met in prison, have contrasting accounts of what occurred, though neither deny that they were both present at the scene of the murder. 

Mr Carrimbacus told investigators that Mr Mihoub approached him about a “money scheme” and “talked about Jews’ money” and “their wealth”, prompting magistrates to treat the killing as an antisemitic hate crime. Mr Carrimbacus alleges that Mr Mihoub angrily accused Ms Knoll of providing information to the police which resulted in his last prison sentence before slitting her throat and yelling “Allahu Akhbar,” the Islamic cry for “God is great.” However, Mr Mihoub claims that it was Mr Carrimbacus who killed Ms Knoll before robbing the apartment. Both men claim that the other started the fire after the killing. Investigators told media outlets on Tuesday that the men had a propensity “to lie” and “to manipulate”, rendering neither account particularly credible. 

In November 2020, an appeal made by the accused to the Paris Court of Appeal to drop the charge of antisemitism was rejected after the court believed that Mr Carrimbacus’s claim that he overheard Mr Mihoub lecturing Ms Knoll about “the financial means of the Jews, their good situation,” with Ms Knoll answering that “not all Jews have a good situation,” to be “plausible”. Court documents described the incident as the culpable homicide of someone “they knew to be vulnerable owing to her physical condition, and which in addition was carried out because of her Jewish faith.”

The court also acknowledged Mr Mihoub’s “ambivalence vis-à-vis Islamist terrorism which notably advocates antisemitism.” Following the murder, a police investigation found that Mr Mihoub regularly visited websites featuring content that promoted Islamism and antisemitism, and was already known to authorities for praising Saïd and Chérif Kouachi, the brothers behind the 2015 Charlie Hebdo shooting.

Mr Mihoub’s mother, Zoulikha Khellaf, is also on trial after she was charged with cleaning the knife used to murder Ms Knoll. 

Mr Carrimbacus’ lawyer, Karim Laouafi, argued that the charge of antisemitism should only be brought against Mr Mihoub, stating that “these elements are not present in Alex Carrimbacus. If the crime is antisemitic, that cannot be blamed on him.”

Charles Consigny, Mr Mihoub’s defence, responded by asserting that Mr Carrimbacus’ accusations of antisemitism against Mr Mihoub were lies. “It only exists because Carrimbacus invented a motive, and the prosecutors weren’t brave enough to drop it in the face of public pressure,” Mr Consigny said yesterday.

The Knoll family’s lawyer, Gilles-William Goldnadel, said yesterday that both of the accused should face “severe punishment for this horrible crime.” Speaking to reports as he entered the court, Mr Goldnadel said “We will need a miracle for the truth to come out of their mouths,” adding that Ms Knoll’s murder was a clear case of “antisemitism motivated by financial gain.”

In an interview, Ms Knoll’s son Alain said “I haven’t cried since my mother died, and I hope that when the murderers have been convicted, I will finally be able to cry…I want to know who stabbed my mother’s body eleven times. You must really hate in order to be able to do that, and this hatred can only be antisemitism.”

His brother Daniel added: “These people are not part of the community of humankind. They are monsters, they must be considered as monsters. Can we talk to monsters? I think it’s going to be next to impossible to talk to them.”

The killing of Ms Knoll took place only one year after the murder of Sarah Halimi, also occuring in Paris. Ms Halimi was a 65-year-old Jewish woman who was murdered by her 27-year-old Muslim neighbour, Kobili Traoré, after he tortured her before pushing her out of a window to her death. The Jewish community in France is said to be carefully watching the trial of Ms Knoll’s murder after France’s Court of Cassation ruled earlier this year that Sarah Halimi’s killer could not be held to stand trial due to being high on cannabis whilst committing the murder. 

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

Image credit: Facebook

Gab’s Twitter account has been deactivated after its CEO reportedly tweeted about “Judeo-Bolshevik” societies and dismissed accusations of antisemitism levelled against him as “Biblical truth”. 

Gab is a social-media platform that was founded in 2016 with a claim to “champion free speech,” and has become a haven for supporters of the QAnon conspiracy theory and other far-right groups and individuals banned from mainstream platforms.

Gab’s founder, Andrew Torba, was accused of antisemitism yesterday after he reportedly posted a string of tweets containing inflammatory remarks about Jewish people, including one which said that Gab was building a “parallel Christian society” after being “fed up and done with the Judeo-Bolshevik one”. 

The term “Judeo-Bolshevism” is an antisemitic trope that was used in Nazi propaganda and states that communism is a Jewish plot. 

Responding to the backlash to his tweet, Mr Torba appeared to double-down and continued tweeting. “Sadly many Christians today are so afraid of being called a silly meaningless name by the world (bigot, antisemite, homophobe) that they refuse to even remotely share or discuss the Gospel in their daily lives, let alone live it,” one post read.

Another tweet said: “Can’t even post basic Christian orthodoxy held for 2,000 years on Twitter dot com without being called ‘antisemitic’ by both the left and right.”

“You reveal your anti-Christian hatred when you refer to Biblical truth as ‘antisemitism’,” another post said in response to an accusation of antisemitism.

Mr Torba reportedly also posted two graphics. One, which was reported to have originated from an antisemitic cartoonist, depicts the nail in the hand of Christ, with the nail being labelled “Judeo” and the hand being labelled “Christian”. Another showed a man slaying a serpent with many heads, with one of those heads being labelled “Judaism”.

Responding to a tweet in which a user stated that Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ was “one of the most antisemitic films in history”, portrayed Jews as “grotesque and eternally cursed with bloodlust for money”, and refused to consult any Jewish scholars, the Gab account wrote: “What a king”

There has been some speculation as to whether Mr Torba’s account was deleted or whether he deactivated it himself in order to avoid a suspension, which he has reportedly done before. When one user allegedly notified Twitter of the posts, he was reportedly told by the social media platform that they were not in violation of the Twitter rules. 

This is not the first time that Gab has tweeted incendiary remarks about Jewish people. In July, Gab’s Twitter account was suspended after tweeting that antisemitism is “anything Jews don’t like.”

While Gab proclaims to be “pro-free speech,” others have described the network as racist and alleges that it promotes several conspiracy theories. Earlier this year, Andrew Torba was accused of wooing far-right figures to his platform with promises of greater visibility.

Far-right figures have turned to sites such as Gab to avoid restrictions on hate-content on more mainstream platforms such as Facebook and Twitter. Mr Torba has tried to distance Gab from the far-right groups that have made it their home. In 2018, on a podcast, he said: “Do we have alt-right users? Certainly. Alt-right users also exist on Facebook, on Twitter, on Reddit, and everywhere else on the Internet.” He went on to insist that Gab had “good people” who “believe in individual liberty…and free expression.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms.

A video has emerged of Piers Corbyn claiming that allegations of antisemitism against him and his brother Jeremy Corbyn, the antisemitic former Labour Party Leader, are a “pack of lies”.

Speaking outside of the Conservative Party Conference, Mr Corbyn was asked if anyone at the conference had raised concerns of antisemitism to him, to which the controversial lockdown-sceptic replied that “nobody has said anything about that at all”, before adding: “It’s all a pack of lies and people know that.”

When asked what he meant by the phrase “pack of lies”, Mr Corbyn said: “The idea that me and my brother are antisemitic…he’s not antisemitic and neither am I.”

In August, Mr Corbyn suggested that “troublemakers” in Jewish areas posted leaflets created and distributed by Mr Corbyn, which compared the COVID-19 vaccines to the Auschwitz death camp, through their own doors in a “plot” to portray him as antisemitic.

When asked “Why was it leafleted in Jewish areas?”, Mr Corbyn replied: “It wasn’t specifically leafleted in any particular areas. That is a lie made up by the media. Or, some troublemakers leafleted it through their own doors, I suspect, and then came forward.”

“To try and portray you as antisemitic?”, Mr Riach asked, to which Mr Corbyn responded “Yes, yes.” When Mr Riach asked whether it was a conspiracy or not, Mr Corbyn replied: “Well, certainly a plot.”

Recent footage showed Mr Corbyn comparing vaccinations to Nazi policy outside the Houses of Parliament. The video showed Mr Corbyn and another man standing in front of a sign which reads “No Nazi forced jab” and yelling “arrest Matt Hancock” through a megaphone. 

On 20th July, Mr Corbyn, alongside other anti-vaccination protesters, showed their support at a far-left demonstration that was held outside of Labour Party headquarters. Speaking about the COVID-19 vaccination and the lockdown, Mr Corbyn said: “You know what happened in Germany. The left there, they were begging Hitler to support them. They believed in Hitler. You know what happened. The rest is history…the Jews were labelled as a danger and were locked up.” Mr Corbyn also gave an interview at the demonstration in which he denied that he, or his brother Jeremy Corbyn, were antisemites.

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Mr Corbyn has a history of controversy in relation to antisemitic conspiracy theories. He has previously retweeted @whiteknight0011, a notorious neo-Nazi who declared that “They will force Trump in to war What do you think happened to Hitler? Bilderberg CIA IMF Banker Gangsters They are the problem” along with four images. The @whiteknight0011 account has since been suspended. One image showed Lord Jacob Rothschild, the Jewish banker and philanthropist, against the background of a Nazi flag, claiming that he controls the world. A second showed Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu as a puppeteer controlling ISIS through Israeli intelligence agency Mossad, orchestrating the war in Syria and Paris attacks as Lord Rothschild and the Queen look on approvingly. A third image showed the faces of supposed Jewish conspirators who run the world to society’s detriment, proclaiming: “Know your enemy”. The last image showed a family photo of the Royal Family, claiming that they are in cahoots with these Jewish conspirators in committing “the worst genocides, invasions and theft in all history.”

Mr Corbyn has also claimed that “Zionists” were conspiring against his brother: when Jewish then-MP Louise Ellman complained of antisemitic attacks against her, Piers accused her of using it as a cover for political attack, tweeting: “ABSURD! JC+ All #Corbyns are committed #AntiNazi. #Zionists can’t cope with anyone supporting rights for #Palestine”.

A Holocaust survivor has accused podcaster Joe Rogan of promoting antisemitism after he uploaded a video to his Instagram where comparisons were made between COVID-19 vaccines and the Holocaust.

The video in question featured an audio excerpt from one of Mr Rogan’s podcasts in which he reportedly professes the importance of freedom in response to the idea of having to show proof of a COVID-19 vaccination whilst various images are featured on screen, including footage from the Holocaust that shows Nazi officers, Adolf Hitler, white Star of David armbands and the Jewish ghettos in Europe.

Mr Rogan can be heard saying: “As soon as you give politicians power, any kind of power that didn’t exist previously, if they can figure out a way to force you into carrying something that lets you enter businesses or lets you do this or lets businesses open, historically, they are not gonna give that power up. They find new reasons to use it. We have to protect those freedoms at all cost, whether you agree with people’s choices or not, because it is the foundation that this country was founded on: freedom.”

“It is the literal structure that allows this country to be so f**king amazing…anything that comes along that can inhibit your freedom is, by definition, anti-American,” he adds.

The video is understood not to have been created by Mr Rogan but was uploaded to his Instagram account, and was posted with the caption: “FREEDOM. It’s the most important thing we have. It’s what makes this place special. It’s rare, and it’s fragile. Protect it at all costs.”

In response to this, 86-year-old Holocaust survivor Gideon Lev created two TikTok videos in which he criticised Mr Rogan for uploading and seemingly endorsing the video. In one of his videos, Mr Lev said: “I am an 86-year-old-survivor of the Holocaust and saw your video on American freedom and the COVID-19 vaccine. It included images of the Holocaust and of Adolf Hitler, the monster who murdered my father, 26 members of my family, and six million Jews and others in gas chambers, in ditches, in firing squads, and even in gas trucks.”

Mr Lev continues: “You are absolutely not promoting freedom, but promoting hate, antisemitism, and possibly even more violence and constant hate. You should apologise to us all, remove the video immediately. It is disgusting and thoughtless and careless and I am shocked by your lack of sensitivity. You want to speak about freedom? Come and speak to me.”

Anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination networks have become known as hotbeds of antisemitic conspiracy theories and tropes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The far-right organisation Britain First has registered as a political party, it was revealed this week.

The Electoral Commission approved the group’s registration despite its reputation as a far-right organisation whose leaders have been convicted of, and imprisoned for, hate crimes. Britain First was previously registered as a political party but was deregistered in 2017 after failing to renew its registration on time.

In an email to its supporters, Britain First wrote: “This is a stupendous victory for the Britain First movement. Although our street activities will continue, this day marks the birth of Britain First as a traditional political party that will take the fight to the establishment through the ballot box.”

An Electoral Commission spokesperson said: “The application to register Britain First as a political party has been approved. We assessed this application against the criteria set out in law, including consideration of public comments submitted to us. The party’s application met the legal criteria and the party has therefore been registered.”

In 2019, Facebook reportedly banned a number of far-right groups and individuals, including Britain First leaders Paul Golding and Jayda Fransen.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

The co-Chair of Jewish Voice for Labour, an antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, has been expelled from the Labour Party and thrown out of its annual conference, where JVL was hosting yet another outrageous event.

JVL claimed that Leah Levane was expelled “because she rightly said the Party has been cynically abusing antisemitism issues not to protect Jews but to make Labour a socialist free zone”.

In reality, Ms Levane was more likely expelled for her association with Labour Against the Witchhunt, an antisemitism-denial group that has been proscribed by the Labour Party. Ms Levane is a councillor at Hastings Borough Council, where she was reportedly the only councillor present at a vote to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism to abstain. In 2017, Ms Levane reportedly commented on Facebook on an item titled “Austria’s neo-Nazis find friends in Israel”, writing that it was “not surprising”. She also claimed online: “Jews are often agents rather than instigators of exploitation.”

JVL hosted a fringe event over the weekend at Labour’s annual conference. In the past, its events have attracted controversy. This year’s event – titled “Labour in Crisis – Tackling Racism in the Party” – came after numerous JVL members have found themselves threatened with expulsion from the Party.

The event welcomed numerous former Labour members who have been expelled from the Party, including the antisemites Jackie Walker and Tony Greenstein. The Party has claimed that it cannot prevent expelled members from attending fringe events, which, as one journalist rightly put it, “makes a mockery of claims in the Party’s own guide.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently bankrupted Mr Greenstein after his defamation lawsuit against us humiliatingly backfired.

Although the Party supposedly cannot prevent expelled members from attending fringe events, it does not mean that the Party cannot sanction those who shared a platform with such individuals, as per Sir Keir Starmer’s (poorly fulfilled) leadership election pledge. For example, the former Shadow Chancellor and current backbench MP John McDonnell attended the event.

Meanwhile, journalist Theo Usherwood was ejected from the event (before apparently being permitted re-entry), as was the Jewish activist David Collier.

Elsewhere, the pro-Corbyn MP and controversial former Shadow Minister, Dawn Butler, was also apparently seen wearing a JVL badge, while Andy McDonald, the Shadow Employment Rights Secretary, is reportedly due to host an event with the suspended Labour MP and antisemite Jeremy Corbyn in support of a Unite campaign.

Labour’s annual conference continues in Brighton until Wednesday.

The Labour Party was found by the EHRC to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

UPDATE: JVL has reportedly apologised “unreservedly” after LBC’s political editor Theo Usherwood was allegedly assaulted. Mr Usherwood accused Mr Greenstein of assaulting him and that the crowd had applauded when he was forcibly ejected from the room, before later being permitted re-entry.

Italian Police are investigating an incident in which an Israeli tourist visiting Pisa was assaulted, suffering head injuries.

On 31st August, Elad Forgash was shopping for souvenirs in the Tuscan city and was chatting to the sales assistant. Mr Forgash said that after telling the man that he was from Israel, the man allegedly said that he “hated Israel and the Jews because they were killers.”

Mr Forgash said that he remained calm, merely handing back the sculptures and saying he would “rather not buy from him.” Mr Forgash said the man then hit over the head with the sculptures.

“Luckily, there were tourists who filmed him,” said Mr Forgash. Police arrived and an ambulance took him to hospital. He reported suffering a fractured eye socket and a broken nose, which he said would need surgery in Israel.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

A leading European rabbi has criticised a European Court of Justice ruling that allows employers to ban employees from wearing religious clothing or symbols whilst at work.

Rabbi Pinchas Goldschmidt, President of the Conference of European Rabbis, told the Jewish Telegraphic Agency that last month’s ruling by the Luxembourg-based European court was “a step backwards” for religious freedoms.

The EU decision expands on a 2017 ruling by the same tribunal. That decision was made after two Muslim women in Germany sued their employers for banning them from wearing headscarves to work. A German court referred the case to the EU court.

Rabbi Goldschmidt said that the ruling had broader implications that extended to “Jewish men wearing a kippah.” He added that he was not aware of current work disputes of this kind involving Jews.

In its ruling, the court cited the need to preserve an atmosphere of “neutrality” in the workplace, adding that any workplace ban must correspond to a genuine “need” by employers.

Muslim groups have also protested against the ruling. IGMG, an group in Germany for people of Turkish descent, described the ruling as “unconstitutional.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project. 

It was reported yesterday that multiple Jewish graves have been toppled over in Layton, Blackpool.

Photographs posted on Twitter showed the graves lying on their sides and smashed. The graves are believed to belong in the Jewish section of Layton cemetery. The Twitter user wrote that one of the graves was “destroyed and filled with litter”.

It is not yet known whether this was an intentional act or not.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The Metropolitan Police Service has confirmed to Campaign Against Antisemitism that, notwithstanding our representations, another ‘Free Palestine’ convoy will be permitted to drive across the country and through the capital tomorrow.

Campaign Against Antisemitism took legal advice which we provided to the police and Home Office setting out the legal basis for prohibiting the returning convoy on the basis that it constitutes a “public procession” likely to cause “serious public disorder”, engaging section 13 of the Public Order Act 1986.

The fact that the Metropolitan Police Service has not chosen to avail itself of legislation specifically designed to prevent this kind of intimidation is deeply concerning, particularly after the previous ‘Free Palestine’ convoy drove through a Jewish neighbourhood shouting “F*** the Jews…rape their daughters” through megaphones, and a vehicle, believed to be from the convoy, chased a Jewish mother down a London street and rammed her car whilst she was driving her four-year-old child. Four men were arrested and bailed over the former incident and an alleged antisemitic incident committed in Manchester before the convoy arrived in London. 

Instead of banning the convoy under section 13 of the Public Order Act, police instead appear to have opted for imposing conditions on it under section 12, but as we noted in our representations, we can conceive of no conditions that will be both sufficient to protect the Jewish community and enforceable against a convoy potentially consisting of hundreds of vehicles.

The returning convoy is due to leave Bradford on Saturday morning and arrive outside Number 10 Downing Street at 13:00, joining a ‘Free Palestine’ protect that will be underway in Whitehall. The convoy’s passage through London will coincide with Jewish families leaving synagogue and walking home. Due to Jewish religious practices outlawing the use of mobile telephones during the Sabbath, they will have neither the means to call the police or take recordings in the event that they are targeted in antisemitic hate crimes.

Despite our request and legal representations, the Metropolitan Police Service has confirmed to Campaign Against Antisemitism that it will permit this convoy to proceed. In a letter, the police force insisted that it is “taking this incident very seriously” and understands “how alarming it is to feel threatened within your home community”. The letter promised that the force has “put in place a central command team to monitor any convoy and accompany it if it travels into London” and “will try to ensure any convoy takes a central route into London avoiding any residential areas”.

The letter also sought to assure the Jewish community that it will have high levels of policing, including outside synagogues. It is remarkable that the police can recognise that the threat to the Jewish community and its religious institutions is real enough to warrant enhanced policing, but at the same time permit a convoy from which it recognises that that threat may emanate.

The Metropolitan Police Service‘s insistence that it will be monitoring the convoy provides limited reassurance, given the events of the previous convoy and the numerous recent incidents of police officers standing by while alleged antisemitic hate crimes were being committed before their eyes.

Yesterday, the London Assembly unanimously passed a motion calling on the Mayor and the Metropolitan Police Service to commission and publish a strategy to tackle antisemitism in the capital.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “This week we have been at pains to explain to the authorities why we do not believe that imposing conditions on this convoy offers sufficient protection and that instead they must prohibit it. They have specific authority to ban any ‘public procession’ that poses a risk of ‘serious public disorder’ but they have chosen not to use their powers.

“The Jewish community is already traumatised by the recent convoy and will be even more severely impacted if cars are once again permitted to drive across the country terrorising Jews. Vehicles from the last convoy are suspected of involvement in antisemitic crimes, including incitement to rape Jewish girls, violence and the ramming of a car containing a Jewish woman driving her 4-year-old child. The convoy organisers have of course condemned this, but once in motion we have seen that they have no control over their members.

“The Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service has permitted this convoy to proceed and all eyes are now upon her and her officers to prove that they can ensure that British Jews are able to go about their lives without incident this weekend.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Police in Windsor, Ontario are investigating “hate-motivated crimes” after Canadian flags carrying a scarlet swastika in place of a maple leaf were found at prominent locations around the city.

Police condemned the criminal acts “that promote hatred”, while the Windsor Jewish Federation and Community Centre (WJFCC) denounced the swastika as an “egregious symbol” of an “evil regime.”

The intent behind the signs remains unclear, though the WJFCC is aware that the signs may be meant to compare COVID-19 measures to Nazism in criticism of Canadian Government policy.

In a statement, the WJFCC said that “perpetuating false equivalencies” was “dangerous”, as “comparisons minimise the intentional and industrialised mass murder of millions.” Its statement added: “These analogies have no place in civil discourse and should be condemned by all.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

According to Israel’s Ministry of Diaspora Affairs’ annual antisemitism report, anti-Jewish racism is expected to increase significantly around the world as a direct result of conspiracy theories against Jews and the State of Israel connected to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The report maintained that the most prominent forum for the expression of antisemitism in 2020 shifted from the physical realm to a hostile online environment.

The previous year saw a sharp rise in the dissemination of antisemitism online, including an alleged Iranian campaign to compare the Jewish state to a viral pandemic by launching “#COVID48”, in a reference to the year in which the Jewish state was established. The recent report stated that there was also an increase in antisemitism in the United States caused by the pandemic, various conspiracy theories and the presidential election.

The 140-page document noted, however, that there was a reduction in the number of antisemitic posts on mainstream social media sites, as a result of new measures taken by social media companies to regulate potential hate speech. Data from the Ministry’s monitoring systems highlighted that there was a 50% decrease in antisemitic content on Twitter, for example, between 2018 and 2020. Antisemitic users have apparently migrated to alternative platforms with less regulation and stringent terms of use to spread antisemitic propaganda, hate and conspiracy theories.

The Diaspora Affairs Minister has stated, as a result of recent findings, that “if antisemitism is a global phenomenon, then the war against it must also be global”, and that an “uncompromising struggle” should therefore be adopted to defeat “this plague”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

According to the Romanian Foreign Minister, Bogdan Aurescu, antisemitism and incidences of discrimination have intensified online throughout the coronavirus pandemic.

The head of Romanian diplomacy spoke at an event organised on the 80th anniversary of the Bucharest pogrom against Jews in 1941.

Mr Aurescu stated that the Romanian Government will soon complete and finalise the development of a national strategy against rising antisemitism, radicalisation, xenophobia and hate speech, with a plan that can be implemented to halt the growing phenomenon in the country. He assured that increasingly accurate data will help prepare law enforcement forces to tackle hatred, and school curricula and university courses will be harnessed to enable young people to recognise manifestations of such.

Mr Aurescu maintained that Romania is also actively involved in the development of the European Union’s first antisemitism strategy, which it hopes will be launched for public debate in the near future.

According to the head of the ministry, these strategies are intended to prevent the recurrence of tragedies such as the Bucharest pogrom during WWII, which saw at least 120 Jews murdered, hundreds injured and 1,100 homes, shops and synagogues looted and damaged. He stated that this was not an isolated incident, with the ensuing Pogrom of Iasi and the deportation of Jews to the Transnistria region.

The Government hopes that it can close “one of the darkest and most painful chapters in the history of Romania”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Taoiseach Michéal Martin addressed a virtual commemoration in the Mansion House, Dublin on 24th January to mark National Holocaust Memorial Day.

Mr Martin said that education is an “important tool” in strengthening and deepening the collective understanding of the events of the Holocaust, and maintained that the country is continually committed to combating antisemitism.

The two remaining Holocaust survivors in Ireland, Tomi Reichental and Suzi Diamond, also addressed the event, which was organised by the Holocaust Education Trust Ireland. Mr Martin stated that the value of sharing their personal experiences and their continual efforts to raise awareness is “incalculable”.

The Irish Prime Minister also noted that last June the Government appointed a specific anti-racism committee with a mandate to construct and develop a new national action plan, and he maintained that the fight against rising rates of antisemitism in Europe must be “sustained” to account for growing technologies and platforms that provide new opportunities for “old hate and prejudice”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A Muslim author who has allegedly expressed negative sentiments about Dutch Jews and Israel has been named as the keynote speaker at The Netherland’s Remembrance of the Dead event.

The National Committee which organises the annual commemoration announced last week that Moroccan-born Abdelkader Benali will deliver the address at this year’s main memorial ceremony in Amsterdam. Held on 4th May and attended by King Willem-Alexander and other dignitaries, it is the day when the nation remembers its fallen soldiers and the victims of Nazism, who include 102,000 Dutch Jews.

According to a 2010 article published in the HP de Tijd weekly by Harald Doornbos, a respected Dutch journalist, Mr Benali expressed antisemitic views in July 2006 in Beirut, Lebanon, during a conversation between the two. Mr Doornbos, a specialist on the Muslim world, wrote “Benali let loose”, and quoted Mr Benali as allegedly saying that southern Amsterdam “is full of Jews. And that’s annoying that there are so many of them. Amsterdam Jews. Makes you feel uneasy as a Moroccan. It looks like Israel. So many Jews, it just feels crazy.”

In a 2009 opinion piece published in the Volkskrant newspaper, Mr Benali called Gaza a “ghetto.” According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, comparing Israel’s actions to those of the Nazis is an example of antisemitism.

This is not the first controversy for the organisers: in 2017, after naming rapper Emerson Akachar as “ambassador for peace,” it emerged that a year before he had been filmed shouting “Hamas, Hamas, Jews to the gas” during a soccer match. The committee revoked the honour. In 2012, meanwhile, a poem describing an SS soldier as “a victim of World War II” was pulled after sparking protests.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

One of the largest Holocaust memorial centres in the world is set to be built in Ukraine at Babyn Yar (also known as Babi Yar), near the capital, Kyiv.

Plans for the Babyn Yar Holocaust Memorial Centre (BYHMC) were unveiled on 20th January. The site will have a dozen buildings including, a Holocaust exhibition space and a memorial to those slaughtered at Babyn Yar. The BYHMC will also include an educational centre, a multi-media centre and a spiritual centre containing a synagogue, church and mosque.

Babyn Yar was chosen because it was the site of the the first major massacre of European Jews in World War II. In September 1941, over 33,000 Jews were taken from Kyiv to the Babyn Yar Ravine and shot. Afterwards, the site became a Nazi killing ground for Jews and non-Jews with an estimated death toll of 100,000.

The synagogue and exhibition space are scheduled to be completed this year in time for the 80th anniversary of the massacre.

Natan Sharansky, the Ukrainian-born former head of the Jewish Agency and one-time Soviet refusenik, is the chair of the BYHMC’s Supervisory Board. Describing the concept as “amazing”, he said that the museum and educational centre would be “different from many other Holocaust centres”, so helping to “fill a vacuum in the field of Holocaust studies.”

Poland’s former President, Aleksander Kwasniewski, who is also a member of the Supervisory Board, said that the new centre “will allow us to find a common language with the younger generation.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A campaign to find the perpetrator of antisemitic attacks on two Jewish sites in Huntsville, Alabama, will include digital billboards.

The billboards are part of a campaign to find the perpetrator behind antisemitic graffiti daubed at the Etz Chayim Synagogue and at Chabad of Huntsville last April. Rewards totalling $18,000 (£13,000) are being offered. The FBI is offering a $15,000 reward for information leading to arrest and conviction, while the ADL is offering a separate $2,000 reward and Huntsville Area Crime Stoppers a further $1,000.

Based on surveillance footage, investigators believe the same man vandalised both locations. They hope to be helped to find him through “digital billboards across north Alabama and southern Tennessee,” according to a press release.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: Google

Antisemitic and anti-black racist slurs and pornographic images appeared online when a virtual lesson being given by an elite San Francisco school was hacked.

According to the San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD), the hacking took place during an anti-racism talk to students of Lowell High School. The SFUSD said that students were using the Padlet platform to share reflections on anti-racism lessons when the messages and images appeared.

The SFUSD said its Department of Technology were trying to identify the hacker and trace the origin of the posts.

Lowell principal Dacotah Swett issued a video statement, saying: “My heart goes out to the members of our community who were targeted — our Black and Jewish students.” Directing comments to the perpetrators, she said that she would pursue “by all means available” to her those who made “these racist and antisemitic attacks on our community.”

Noting that their “words and actions” had no place at Lowell, she added: “Your actions constitute hate speech and you will be held accountable.”

Students from Lowell High School have complained about ongoing racism at the elite school where nearly 70% of students are either Asian-American or White. Less than 2% of students are Black, and 12% are Hispanic.

The San Francisco Chronicle reported that a petition had been started by a Lowell teacher and black student calling for a federal investigation into the hacking.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A screaming Holocaust-denier infiltrated a virtual gathering last weekend of the Or Shalom Synagogue, according to the Vancouver congregation’s leadership.

They said that the antisemitic racist used a fake identity and “snuck into their virtual gathering” in what they are calling a “Zoombombing.”

Synagogue co-Chair David Kauffman explained that due to pandemic-related restrictions the synagogue in Canada’s main West Coast city held a virtual event on Sunday evening. He said that an unknown person using a “Jewish sounding” name joined the Zoom, but kept his video off before screaming and “disrupting with what sounded like a recording of Holocaust denial”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has warned about the phenomenon of Zoombombing over the past year, as video gatherings have become more common during the period of pandemic lockdowns.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Southwestern Law School has issued an unequivocal condemnation of the “intensely offensive antisemitic statements” reportedly expressed by an alumnus.

A recent report revealed that a California lawyer, Farhad Khorasani, posted a number of hateful and antisemitic statements on social media across his personal platforms.

In past Facebook posts, Mr Khorasani claimed that Israel is “the main enemy of the human race and the world” and its supporters are a “satanical cartel”. He made a further statement that read: “the Jew anywhere is an existential threat to Aryans, Muslims and Iranians everywhere. Hitler has proved that he knew these terrorist semites very well. Hitler was right, we need a new Hitler”.

The lawyer, who has his own firm, has also previously promoted Holocaust denial and alleged that Israel was responsible for the 9/11 terrorist attacks, a common antisemitic conspiracy theory.

The California Bar Association stated that it investigated the complaints made against Mr Khorasani, however it said that they would not pursue any disciplinary action against the Iranian-American international lawyer.

In an Instagram post on 23rd January, Mr Khorasani claimed that his social media accounts had been hacked and that he was not responsible for the hateful content. He issued an apology and the posts were removed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Baroness Tonge has blamed the rise in antisemitism on actions of Israeli Government, again.

In a debate called by CAA honorary patron Baroness Deech over the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by universities, the disgraced Baroness Tonge called for an “investigation into why these [antisemitic] incidents are increasing”, noting apparent upswings during conflicts between Israel and the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group Hamas in Gaza in 2009 and 2014.

Baroness Tonge continued: “Whenever I suggest a connection between the two, I am told this is ‘victim blaming’, which it is not. The victims are innocent Jewish people — students, in this case. They are victims because of the illegal actions of the Israeli Government. Please will our Government investigate the connection?”

While Baroness Tonge is correct to note that conflagrations in the Middle East can have an impact on antisemitism in the UK, this is not always the case. For example, the rise of the antisemite Jeremy Corbyn to the leadership of the Labour Party — and the unlawful anti-Jewish racism carried out by the Party during his time in office — were not in some way a response to developments in the Middle East.

Moreover, if there is such an upswing in antisemitism in the UK during Middle East skirmishes, it is likely because antisemites in Britain are holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the State of Israel (or its perceived actions), which is itself antisemitic, according to the International Definition of Antisemitism. It is regrettable that, in a debate about whether universities should be adopting the Definition, Baroness Tonge did not allude to this point or to the Definition at all. She remains more concerned to blame Israel for the rise in antisemitism instead of the antisemites.

Earlier in the debate, Baroness Tonge was skewered by Lord Polak as someone who has had “a career of repeating old, medieval tropes.”

Baroness Tonge was suspended from the Liberal Democrats before eventually resigning, has a long history of Jew-baiting, denouncing Campaign Against Antisemitism, suggesting that the antisemitic attack on a Pittsburgh synagogue might be Israel’s fault, blaming Israel for a rise in antisemitism, and sharing a cartoon comparing Israel’s policies to those of the Nazis, which is a breach of the International Definition.

In December 2019, Campaign Against Antisemitism joined 88 members of the House of Lords in condemning remarks on Facebook by Baroness Tonge following the general election, in which she commented: “The Chief RabbI must be dancing in the street. The pro-Israel lobby won our General Election by lying about Jeremy Corbyn.”

In 2020, Lord Pickles called for reform in the House of Lords after Baroness Tonge called Israel America’s “puppet master” and received no sanction.

Staffordshire University has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The adoption comes after a call from the Education Secretary for universities to adopt the Definition.

The Vice-Chancellor, Professor Liz Barnes, said: “At Staffordshire University we strive to provide a safe and inclusive environment for all members of our community. Our decision to adopt the [D]efinition is a crucial step in combatting prejudice and makes clear that antisemitism will not be tolerated at our institution. We are committed to eliminating all forms of discrimination and will continue to promote a positive culture where staff, students and visitors are confident to be their authentic selves and are able to achieve their potential free from prejudice.”

Recently, BirminghamLancasterCambridgeManchester Metropolitan and Buckingham New Universities have adopted the Definition.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities and public bodies. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

Tom Tugendhat MP has asserted that Shami Chakrabarti “only got her peerage because she cosied up and covered up antisemitism in the Labour Party”.

The Conservative MP and Chairman of the House of Commons Foreign Affairs Select Committee made the claim on BBC’s PoliticsLive yesterday, where he featured on a panel with Baroness Chakrabarti.

He said: “It’s a bit rich for Shami to talk about cosying up when she only got her peerage because she cosied up and covered up antisemitism in the Labour Party.”

Baroness Chakrabarti denied that this was the case.

But Mr Tugendhat insisted: “The entire Jewish community sees you as having covered up the antisemitism [in] the Corbyn Labour Party.”

Baroness Chakrabarti then referred Mr Tugendhat to her report on Labour antisemitism, the publication of which directly preceded her nomination for a peerage, which was the first such nomination Jeremy Corbyn had made, having promised never to nominate anyone to the House of Lords. Lady Chakrabarti’s report was a whitewash.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has lodged a complaint against Jeremy Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day of the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The former head of New York Police Department’s discrimination office who was accused of posting “hateful” online messages is reportedly to retire.

A spokesperson for the New York Police Department said that Deputy Inspector James Kobel, commanding officer of the Equal Employment Opportunity Division, had submitted retirement papers shortly after the department said that it was planning to suspend him.

Mr Kobel is alleged to have used the name “Clouseau” on a message board called The Rant where law-enforcement officials post anonymously. As Clouseau, he is alleged to have posted antisemitic, anti-Black, misogynist and homophobic slurs. Commenting on an article about Orthodox Jews tired of being photographed by tourists, Clouseau said: “I think that eventually all of the inbreeding may lead to the demise of these clowns. The severity of birth defects will only increase. Unfortunately, the local taxpayer is going to be on the hook for the bill when the children need special programs in the local school districts and the parents continue to leach [sic] off the system.”

The Oversight Division of the New York City Council identified Mr Kobel as “Clouseau”. He Mr denied the charge but was suspended pending an investigation, and has now resigned. The Mayor of New York City, Bill de Blasio, had said that Mr Kobel should be “terminated immediately” if found guilty.

The head of Mr Kobel’s union said that Mr Kobel had retired to avoid a departmental disciplinary hearing, believing that, “given the current political climate”, he did not expect to “get a fair administrative trial”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Concerns have been raised over the alleged increase in neo-Nazi content on Telegram.

The Dubai-based social media platform has reportedly begun removing some content and even some channels in response to the trend, which comes as the platform has, by its own estimation, acquired 25 million new users in the past week.

NBC News claims that at least fifteen far-right channels on Telegram have recently been banned, while content had been censored on other channels.

Part of the rise in user numbers is allegedly due to white supremacists and neo-Nazis leaving major platforms which are moving to curb hate speech. However, Telegram founder, Pavel Durov, claimed that the “vast majority” were those who “no longer want to be held hostage by tech monopolies.”

Whatever the truth, Megan Squire, a professor of computer science who monitors extremist groups, claimed that a number of Telegram channels were still “actively posting explicitly white supremacist and pro-Nazi content.”

NBC’s national security analyst, Frank Figliuzzi, a former assistant FBI director, welcomed the curbs at Telegram, claiming that such crackdowns “help to keep the violent extremists off-balance.” As they “scramble to find new homes, they inevitably make mistakes,” leaving “clues and trails” that law enforcement can use to defeat them, he said.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A Microsoft-owned company has apologised over the dismissal of a Jewish employee who referenced “Nazis” in a comment to colleagues, and the company’s Head of Human Resources has resigned over the episode.

GitHub, a code-sharing site for software developers, said on Sunday that its Head of HR had resigned after an investigation into the employee’s dismissal uncovered “significant errors” in judgment and procedure.

In an interview published on TechCrunch, the employee said that on 6th January, the day on which the Capitol Building was breached, he had made a comment on the Slack messaging service cautioning colleagues in Washington D.C. to “Stay safe homies, Nazis are about.” Two days later, on 8th January, the employee was allegedly fired by GitHub.

According to a statement from Chief Operating Officer Erica Brescia, other GitHub employees raised concerns about the dismissal and an independent investigation was launched. The company found that there had been “significant errors of judgment and procedure”, she said. In a blog post on Sunday, Ms Brescia said that the Head of HR had “taken personal accountability and resigned.” She added: “To the employee we wish to say publicly, ‘we sincerely apologise’.”

GitHub Chief Executive Officer Nat Friedman acknowledged in a post that the violent mob had included “Nazis and white supremacists.” In a statement, Mr Friedman said: “Employees are free to express concerns about Nazis, antisemitism, white supremacy or any other form of discrimination or harassment in internal discussions.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A US college which was at the centre of a row over antisemitism and failing to protect the rights of Jewish students has reached an agreement with the complainant and adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

In January 2020, the Georgia Institute of Technology – known as Georgia Tech – was accused of “failing to confront antisemitism and protect the rights of Jewish students.” The  accusation came after Lauren Blazofsky, the then-director of Georgia Tech Hillel, was barred from attending a campus event called “Palestine 101”.

On behalf of Hillels of Georgia, the American Centre for Law and Justice asked the US Department of Education to investigate whether Ms Blazofsky was barred from attending because she was Jewish.

On 19th January, the College announced that the parties had reached an agreement and that the case was closed. A College statement declared: “Antisemitism and any other forms of discrimination are not acceptable,” and confirmed that the College was adopting the Definition.

Ms Blazofsky, who is now Associate Director of Hillel at Emory University, said that she was pleased with the outcome, noting that the  “goal all along” had been to ensure that Jewish students could “rely on Georgia Tech to protect them when faced with antisemitism or discrimination.” She added that she was happy to see that the College had recognised the Definition, as it means that the College can “move forward to educate the community about all forms of modern antisemitism.”

Mark Goldfeder, the lawyer who handled the case, said he believed the “unified statement” on this issue would “help prevent any future instances of antisemitic behaviour, and ensure that if something does happen it is dealt with appropriately.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is proud that our teachers’ guide on antisemitism for Years 5-13 is now also available through BBC Teach.

The guide is available in two versions: Love Thy Neighbour, designed specifically for Church of England schools, and Love Your Neighbour, for Catholic schools. Both versions are also suitable for all other schools, and versions for other faiths and non-denominational schools are also in production.

The guides are intended for use with an accompanying student-friendly PowerPoint presentation, which is also available on our website and through BBC Teach.

These guides, which were prepared by a former teacher who refined this material whilst speaking to 25,000 children in over 100 schools, provide information for teachers on topics such as prejudice, stereotyping, bullying and the importance of being an upstander and not a bystander. They also complement numerous bases.

You can download the guides here or visit BBC Teach here.

Today marks the 15th anniversary of the kidnapping, torture and murder of Ilan Halimi, a 23-year-old French Jew.

Social media posts remembered Mr Halimi who, on 20th January 2006, was kidnapped by an antisemitic gang and then tortured in what Washington Post columnist James McAuley described as “one of the most brutal antisemitic attacks in France in recent memory (and there have been quite a few).”

Mr Halimi, who lived in the Paris suburb of Bagneux with his mother and sister, spent three weeks in captivity as gang members tortured him and tried to extort ransom money from his relatives. He died on the way to the hospital after being dumped near a railway track on the outskirts of the French capital.

Part of the eulogy written for Mr Halimi by Judea Pearl, father of murdered American journalist Daniel Pearl, was also shared on Twitter: “Let there be no silence on your grave, Ilan; no rest, nor learned discussion… until another Zola rises with a louder ‘J’accuse’.”

Francis Kalifat, president of CRIF, the organisation representing French Jews, wrote on Twitter, “I think of his family and all the victims of antisemitism. Neither forgiveness nor forgetting.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A suspect has been named in connection with the antisemitic vandalism of a prominent Montreal synagogue.

Adam Riga, who also goes by the name Adam Rackett, has reportedly been identified as the man charged with the antisemitic vandalism of the Shaar Hashomayim Synagogue in Montreal.

One of the Canadian city’s major Jewish landmarks, the synagogue was spray-painted with swastikas a week ago. In a letter to congregants, the synagogue’s Rabbi Adam Scheier said that the perpetrator, who had been stopped by a synagogue security guard, was carrying a canister of gasoline when arrested after spray-painting doors of the synagogue with swastikas.

Mr Riga is understood to be a supporter of the movement to boycott Israel.

Montreal police said that a psychological exam had been ordered on the a 28-year-old, as he appeared to be suffering from mental health problems.

On Twitter, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau called the vandalism “despicable,” while Marc Miller, the Indigenous Services Minister, condemned it as an “utter disgrace.”

Former Premier Stephen Harper tweeted that his prayers were with the Shaar Hashomayim Synagogue and its congregation. “I’m saddened and appalled to see such a vile antisemitic attack on a place so sacred to the Montreal Jewish community,” he declared, adding: “We must come together as Canadians and denounce all forms of hatred.”

Rabbi Reuben Poupko, co-Chair of Québec’s main Jewish representative organisation, said yjsy the Jewish community was “outraged” by the “vile assault on Congregation Shaar Hashomayim.” He added: “This attack targets the entire community and all those who embrace civility and tolerance.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Morocco’s quasi-official Association Mimouna has signed an agreement with the US State Department to work to combat antisemitism in Morocco.

The agreement was signed on 15th January via Zoom by the President of Association Mimouna, El Mehdi Boudra, and the State Department’s Envoy to Monitor and Combat Antisemitism, Elan Carr.

The agreement – a Memorandum of Understanding – follows the signing of the Abraham Accords aimed at normalising relations with Israel and promoting the acceptance of Israel and Zionism. A similar Memorandum of Understanding was signed in October between the State Department and Bahrain.

While neither the Moroccan organisation nor the signatory in Bahrain are Government bodies, both have the blessing of their nation’s respective royal family.

The Memorandum of Understanding commits the parties “to work together to share and promote best practices for combating all forms of antisemitism, including anti-Zionism and the delegitimisation of the State of Israel.” It also commits them to combat “other kinds of intolerance and hatred.”

In a statement, Morocco’s ambassador to the United States, Princess Lalla Joumala, said that the agreement “reinforces the deep and longstanding partnership ” between the United States and Morocco “in the fight against all forms of intolerance and the promotion of peace and mutual coexistence.”

She added: “It is an unwavering engagement spearheaded by His Majesty King Mohammed VI” who “ upholds the proud heritage of tolerance perpetuated by his forefathers.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A watchdog monitoring peace and tolerance in the Middle East has accused the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) of distributing educational materials containing antisemitism and calling for jihad.

The Institute for Monitoring Peace and Cultural Tolerance in School (IMPACT-se) has published a report that alleges that material promoting jihad and violence was distributed by UNRWA to hundreds of thousands of pupils in the Palestinian Authority and Gaza, which is controlled by the genocidal antisemitic terrorist organisation, Hamas.

UNRWA reportedly said that an internal review had been conducted. The UNRWA Commissioner-General Philippe Lazzarini blamed the distribution of the offending educational materials on the coronavirus pandemic. “Unfortunately, in the rush to continue students’ education uninterrupted, some material the Agency had previously identified as not in line with UN values was mistakenly included.”  

The Australian Department of Foreign Trade and Affairs (DFAT) has said it would investigate the issue, following the IMPACT-se report. Australia gave $8.39 million in 2020, making it the 19th-biggest contributor to the $921 million pledged to UNRWA in 2020.

A DFAT spokesperson told The Australian newspaper: “UNRWA has a fundamental obligation to remain unbiased and impartial while it delivers its humanitarian mandate.” 

According to the IMPACT-se report, some textbooks erased Israel from maps or labelled the country as “Palestine.” Other books featured phrases such as: “Jihad is one of the doors to Paradise” and “The motherland is worthy of any kind of sacrifice.” A social-studies booklet aimed at fourteen- and fifteen-year-olds contains the claim that Israel “deliberately spreads disease by dumping radioactive and toxic waste”, which is reminiscent of the age-old antisemitic trope that Jews spread disease.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Sylvain Sylvain, the musician hailed as the “lynchpin” of the rock band, New York Dolls, has died at the age of 69 following a two-year battle with an unspecified form of cancer.

The guitarist was born Sylvain Mizrahi to a Syrian Jewish family in Cairo in 1951. His family emigrated during the Suez Crisis, which is believed to have triggered a renewed wave of antisemitism across the country, from which the family was fleeing. The family eventually settled in Queens, New York following a brief stay in France.

He joined the New York Dolls in 1972 after befriending the band’s original drummer, Billy Murcia, at his high school. The guitarist pursued a solo career and recorded numerous albums up until the late 1990s.

Lenny Kaye, Patti Smith’s longtime Jewish guitarist, issued a social media post on Sylvain Sylvain’s personal Facebook page to announce his death and celebrate his accolades.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Prosecutors in Russia have launched an investigation into a circus performance that featured a monkey clothed in a Nazi uniform and two goats dressed in blankets embellished with swastikas. It is alleged that the incident may have broken laws surrounding the promotion of fascism.

The performance, watched by young children and their families, was commissioned by the Russian Orthodox Church in Udmurtia, a region in western Russia. Social media footage showed the animals being controlled by circus performers and trainers around the ring dressed in Soviet uniforms. The audience can be heard applauding and cheering throughout the show, which occurred on the day after Orthodox Christmas.

Following public outcry, the church released a statement in which it assured that the performance was used to celebrate the “victory over fascism” in Moscow in 1942, and to reflect a “worldwide condemnation” of the ideals of Nazi Germany.

In 2014, the country introduced a ban on Nazi symbols, however the law was later amended after politicians highlighted that it applied to documentaries and films about the Nazi regime and the Second World War. The Chairman of the public chamber of Udmurtia stated that the use of Nazi symbols, akin to those incorporated in the circus, are permitted for educational purposes.

Prosectors have not issued a comment on their current investigation.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Rachel Riley, the Jewish TV personality and campaigner against Jew-hatred, has been vindicated in a defamation case that she brought against a Twitter troll who Campaign Against Antisemitism exposed in 2017 over his blog in which he claimed that there was a “conspiracy” by Jews and those who would defend them in the UK, and in which he has posted and linked to the work of notorious antisemites.

Mr Sivier had promoted a narrative started by another online troll that Ms Riley was bullying a teenage girl.

In a statement celebrating today’s judgement, Ms Riley noted that from the moment she began to criticise antisemitism in the Labour Party, she was subjected to a “large volume of abuse” that “seemed to increase exponentially”.

Instead of addressing her concerns, she explained, trolls on social media “turned their attention to discrediting my arguments by smearing my character”. One of them launched “a particularly nasty (defamatory and untrue) smear” accusing Ms Riley of bullying, but due to the fact that he was not located in the UK, Ms Riley did not pursue him for libel.

Today’s judgement has vindicated Ms Riley and her persistence, with the court striking out all of Mr Sivier’s defences, which the judge described as “fanciful” and “verging on the perverse”. This judgement leaves Mr Sivier with the option to concede or proceed to a full trial in which he would need to meet evidentiary thresholds that, in the circumstances, are thought to be impossibly high.

Mr Sivier has continued his crowdfunding campaign for legal funds.

Ms Riley was represented by solicitor Dr Mark Lewis, who is also an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism, and barrister John Stables.

Campaign Against Antisemitism congratulates Ms Riley on her success today, and applauds her, Tracy-Ann Oberman, and other activists against antisemitism who are unafraid to confront and expose antisemitic abuse online.

The Central Board of Jewish Communities in Greece (KIS) has denounced what it calls “another attempt to diminish and exploit the Holocaust” following the publication of a cartoon in a Greek newspaper.

The KIS said that a cartoon published in the Greek daily Efimerida ton Syntakton on 16th January depicting the iconic image of Auschwitz with a play on its slogan to make a point about universities (“Studies Make You Free”) was “a hideous and vulgar” use of the Holocaust for political purposes.

The KIS said that Kostas Grigoriadis, the cartoonist responsible for the cartoon, had drawn another in the same newspaper in 2018 in which he also depicted the entrance to the Auschwitz death camp to protest plans for a twelve-hour work day.

In a statement, KIS said that neither the expressions of respect towards the victims of the Holocaust nor the newspaper’s “firm position against antisemitism” excused it for publishing cartoons that insulted “the memory of the victims” by “trivialising the place of their martyrdom.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

The terrorist group Al-Qaeda In The Arabian Peninsula has condemned the Governments of four Arab countries for their rapprochement with Israel and has called on Muslims to kill Jews who visit.

In its report, Middle East Media Research Institute’s (MEMRI) Jihad and Terrorism Threat Monitor states that an editorial  in the 8th January issue of the terror group’s publication described the Governments of the United Arab Emirates (UAE), Bahrain, Sudan and Morocco as “traitors” and accused them of a “humiliating stance” on “the Jewish occupation” and the “violation” by “the criminal Jews” against the Muslim nation.

After further accusing them of being “submissive to the Ziono-Crusader coalition”, it allegedly urged Muslims to “seize the opportunity presented by the visits of Jews to Muslim countries to cut off their heads,” pointing out that “the jihad waged against Jews today” was not limited to “those who are in Palestine”, as Jews were “walking around in the region,” offering “a rare opportunity.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Jeremy Corbyn, the former leader of the Labour Party, has launched a bid in the High Court to overturn his suspension from Labour over remarks he made following the publication of the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s (EHRC) devastating report into antisemitism in the Party.

The first hearing, which took place earlier this week, related to the disclosure of evidence pursuant to Mr Corbyn’s insistence that there was a deal between his representatives and Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer on which Sir Keir supposedly reneged.

Campaign Against Antisemitism lodged a complaint against Mr Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

Separately, a case brought against the EHRC in connection with its report by two members of the public has apparently failed to advance because the claimants lacked legal standing. At least one of the claimants, Justin Schlosberg, last year lost a case in the High Court challenging Ofcom’s decision not to sanction the BBC over the Panorama investigation into Labour antisemitism.

Another challenge against the EHRC has reportedly been brought by the disgraced former Mayor of London Ken Livingstone and Cllr Pam Bromley, who were both singled out for criticism by the EHRC’s report.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The Daily Blog, a far-left website in New Zealand, has shared an antisemitic cartoon three times.

The image depicts Zionism as a virus – reminiscent of the age-old antisemitic trope that Jews spread disease, which has received new life during the coronavirus pandemic – and features an “S” in a font widely associated with the Nazi “SS”. According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

The first of the three articles to which the cartoon was attached – back in November – was titled the “crucifixion of Jeremy Corbyn”, a further offensive allusion. The two more recent articles are from earlier this month.

The Daily Blog describes itself as uniting “Top Left-Wing Political Commentators and Progressive Opinion Shapers”. It launched in 2013 and its editor is Martyn Bradbury. Sitting outside of the mainstream media landscape, it is not believed to have a large following.

This cartoon was apparently drawn by the notorious cartoonist Malcolm Evans, who claims that he was sacked from his job at New Zealand’s largest newspaper, The New Zealand Herald, in 2003, for refusing to stop drawing controversial cartoons about the Jewish state, although the newspaper’s editor denied that this was the reason.

The New Zealand Jewish Council has made representations on the issue and is considering appropriate further action.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Geeta Sidhu-Robb, who last year was shortlisted as a Liberal Democrat candidate for the London mayoralty, has reportedly been expelled from the Party.

Ms Sidhu-Robb was revealed to have made antisemitic comments when she was a Conservative candidate in the 1997 General Election (she apologised for the comments at the time and again more recently when they re-emerged).

However, the Liberal Democrats’ leader, Sir Ed Davey, said that the Party’s vetting process was “completely flawed” and that he was “furious” when the incident resurfaced.

A disciplinary panel was reportedly convened and, after hearing evidence, apparently unanimously decided to uphold all the complaints.

Ms Sidhu-Robb reportedly said: “I have already publicly apologized for an act of momentary stupidity that took place 24 years ago under extreme provocation, but I am not a racist or antisemite and never have been, as anyone who knows me will attest. I find it deeply disappointing that a faction within the Liberal Democrats, who felt threatened by a fresh, engaging, female-centric approach to politics, have used this incident as a pretext to remove me from the party. However, I am now looking forward to focusing fully on my broader work, empowering a new generation of women to become strong, healthy, confident leaders by sharing the tools which have helped me during my career as an award-winning entrepreneur.”

A Lib Dem spokesperson reportedly said: “The Liberal Democrats take all allegations of this nature extremely seriously. The party suspended Geeta Sidhu-Robb within 24 hours of receiving a complaint and can confirm that, following our investigation, she was expelled late last year.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A professor at the University of California Merced will not be teaching in the upcoming semester after he was revealed to have allegedly posted antisemitic tweets.

Prof. Abbas Ghassemi, who teaches engineering at UC Merced, will not be teaching in the upcoming Spring semester, according to reports.

Prof. Ghassemi has deleted a Twitter account, dating from July 2019, from which he allegedly tweeted a drawing labelled “the Zionist Brain” that divided an image of a brain into sections that used antisemitic tropes such as avarice and “world domination”. Other areas of the brain were labelled “land usurpation” and “compulsive-lying”. The same image has been seen on a website dedicated to peddling antisemitic conspiracy theories.

Other tweets included wording such as “Surprise, surprise!! The entire system in America is controlled by [the] Zionist. Change of president is just a surface polish, change of veneer. Same trash different pile!” and “the Zionists and IsraHell interest have embedded themselves in every component of the American system, media, banking, policy, commerce…just a veneer of serving US interest and population – everyone pretends that is the case.”

When the tweets were first revealed, a spokesperson for UC Merced said:“As the now-inactive Twitter account made clear, these were the opinions of a private individual.” But since then it is understood that an investigation has been opened and is still ongoing while Prof. Ghassemi is apparently suspended.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to the University of Leeds regarding a politics professor with a history of antisemitic tweets.

Ray Bush, Professor of African Studies and Development Politics, appears to have tweeted from the Twitter handle @raymondobush a large number of tweets that breach the International Definition of Antisemitism, which the University of Leeds recently adopted.

There are three types of breaches.

First, Prof. Bush states that Israel’s existence itself is unacceptable, using the exact language of the Definition in referring to Jewish self-determination as “a racist endeavour”. The Definition states that “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour)” is antisemitic. Prof. Bush has, for example, made this claim herehereherehere (“#DefyIHRA the state of #Israel is a #racist endeavour”), herehere and here.

Second, Prof. Bush has breached the Definition by comparing Israelis and Zionists to Nazis. According to the Definition: “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is antisemitic. He has done so here (“Does it take a nazi to recognise a #nazi #Israel #racism ?”) and here, for example.

Third, Prof. Bush has contravened the Definition by claiming that concerns about institutional antisemitism in the Labour Party, which were vindicated by the recent report of the Equality and Human Rights Commission, were due to a campaign run by the “Israeli embassy.” He has thus supported one of the oldest tropes used to justify acts of antisemitism – the discredited myth of a Jewish conspiracy in which Jews are disloyal and act as a fifth column against the interests of their home countries. The Definition states that: “Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as a collective – such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions” is antisemitic. He has done so, for example, here (“The reason they hate Corbyn of course is because he is anti #Zionist and the antisemitic campaign is ran by the #Israeli embassy among others) and here.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “These posts are clearly in breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism. Anyone airing and disseminating dangerous antisemitic views such as those promoted by Prof. Ray Bush is not fit to be entrusted with the responsibility of teaching young people. For this reason, Prof. Bush must be held to account. Accordingly, we have written to the University of Leeds to request that it investigates and takes appropriate disciplinary action to protect Jewish students from Prof. Bush.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected].

A Holocaust museum is due to open this week in Oporto, Portugal’s second-largest city after the capital, Lisbon. It will be the first museum of its kind in the country.

The idea for a Holocaust museum in the city was conceived by the local Jewish community. During World War II, the the local Jewish community played an important role in giving refuge to Jews fleeing other European countries.

The Mayor of Oporto and the President of Oporto’s Jewish community will preside over the inauguration, which will be attended by dignitaries, including the Secretary of State for Culture Jorge Barreto Xavier, UNESCO official Karel Fracapane and the head of the Portuguese delegation to the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance.

Leaders of other faiths are also due to attend, including the Bishop of Oporto and the President of Muslim community.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Image credit: The Holocaust Museum in Oporto, Portugal

Watford Football Club has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

In a statement, the Championship club said: “Through the adoption of this definition, we aim to increase the understanding of antisemitism within our supporters, staff, and the wider football family.” The statement added: “It will also become an additional key element within our educational process moving forward, should we receive reports of antisemitism, specifically around acceptable language and behaviour.”

The Hornets join nineteen Premiership clubs and the Premier League, which all adopted the Definition last month. The twentieth club, Sheffield United, declined to do so.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has consistently backed efforts by the Government to encourage widespread adoption of the Definition by local authorities, universities, public bodies and other institutions. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

A court has ruled that a neo-Nazi teenager who planned to throw homemade bombs at Durham synagogues can be named.

Jack Reed, 18, can be named after his bid for anonymity was rejected by a court.

Last January, Mr Reed was sentenced at Manchester Crown Court to six years and eight months in prison after being found guilty by a unanimous jury of preparation of terrorist acts between October 2017 and March 2019. He has also been given a separate custodial sentence for unrelated child sexual offences against a schoolgirl.

Mr Reed, who is from Durham, had begun drafting a manifesto titled “A Manual for practical and sensible guerrilla warfare against the kike system in the Durham City area, Sieg Heil”. Other items seized from his home included a copy of Mein Kampf and material on explosives and firearms.

The prosecution claimed during the trial that the defendant had become “an adherent of neo-Nazism – the most extreme of right-wing ideology”, noting that he had written in his diary on the occasion of Hitler’s birthday that the Nazi leader was “a brave man to say the least. Although maybe having written proof that I admire their number one enemy isn’t such a wise idea. I will however say that I one day hope to follow in his footsteps.”

Mr Reed’s anonymity was due to expire on his eighteenth birthday, which fell on Christmas Eve, but an extension was granted following a request to continue the restrictions, which, after the latest legal proceedings, has now been denied. The defence claimed that there would be a “huge negative impact” on the teenager – who is undergoing mental health assessments – and his family, if his identity were revealed.

At a hearing at Manchester Crown Court, the judge reportedly ruled that the Crown Court had “no power…to make the order sought”. In fact, the judge even ruled that there was no power even to have made the short extension.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Antisemitic stickers have been found appended to street furniture in Penzance.

According to Cornwall Against Antisemitism, stickers reading “The Holocasut didn’t happen. But it should have” and featuring a swastika, have been found in numerous locations, including the A30 Heamoor roundabout underpass.

Other stickers read: “Antisemitism is caused by Semitism”.

Those seeing the stickers have been called on to report them to the police on 101.

Last year, members of the proscribed National Action group were sentenced to prison, having engaged, amongst other activities, in far-right stickering and recruitment campaigns.

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues to monitor and report on far-right stickering campaigns, including by the far-right Hundred Handers group.

Concerns have been raised by calls from the British far-right to emulate the attack on the US Capitol in the UK.

Posts on 4chan and Gab, both networks popular with the far-right, were of particular concern, including a Gab group called Britfam with close to 5,000 British members.

A significant proportion of the posts were reportedly threats against British politicians and calls for action emulating the attack on the US Capitol, and included antisemitic abuse toward social media companies (for example, “another Jew silencing us”), the British Prime Minister and the President of the United States. 

There were also references to the Rothschilds and Israeli involvement.

Research by the Community Security Trust and Hope Not Hate suggests that calls for violence currently remain marginal, but called for vigilance from Government.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been monitoring and acting against the threat from the far-right for years and continues to support the authorities following suit.

Labour’s Deputy Chair of Newham Council has been suspended over social media posts, including the same antisemitic post as that shared by Naz Shah MP several years ago, according to the Jewish News.

Cllr Nazir Ahmed shared a post in December 2017 with an image situating Israel in the middle of the United States and calling for the relocation of Israel to America. This was the same post for which Ms Shah apologised and was suspended from the Labour Party in 2016.

Cllr Ahmed described the image as an “easy solution for Israel Palestine conflict!”

According to the report, in another Facebook post, from 2014, Cllr Ahmed shared a video that asked whether “Israel have USA in the pocket [sic]”.

A Labour spokesperson reportedly said that the “Party takes all complaints of antisemitism extremely seriously and they are fully investigated in line with our rules and procedures, and any appropriate disciplinary action is taken.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently lodged a complaint against Mr Corbyn, holding him responsible for conduct that is prejudicial or grossly detrimental to the Labour Party, as the Leader during the period of the EHRC’s shameful findings. Given the serious detriment that this conduct has caused, we are seeking Mr Corbyn’s immediate resuspension and, if the complaint is upheld, we will be requesting his expulsion. On the day the publication of the EHRC’s report, we also submitted a major complaint against Mr Corbyn and other sitting MPs. These complaints are yet to be acknowledged by the Party, and they must be investigated by an independent disciplinary process that the EHRC has demanded and Sir Keir has promised but has yet to introduce.

The Labour Party was found by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) to have engaged in unlawful discrimination and harassment of Jews. The report followed the EHRC’s investigation of the Labour Party in which Campaign Against Antisemitism was the complainant, submitting hundreds of pages of evidence and legal argument. Sir Keir Starmer called the publication of the report a “day of shame” for the Labour Party.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A customer at the Mill Hill East Waitrose was called a “f”””ing Jew” by a fellow customer who had allegedly jumped the queue and whom she had confronted for not wearing a facemask, according to the JC.

The victim, from Hendon in North London, reported that the other customer turned to her and said: “f*** off, you f***ing Jew. Go back to where you came from, you c***.”

The victim said that she reported the customer to the Waitrose staff but was shocked at being told to “walk away”, with the staff allegedly ignoring the matter.

She then tried calling 999 but was informed by the operator that this was not a police matter.

The victim said that she felt “very vulnerable walking around the aisles”, particularly as she continued to see the other customer, whom she eventually encountered again at the checkout line. “She started calling me a c*** again and said ‘keep the mask on, I bet you’re so ugly behind that mask’.”

She claims that a manager then ordered both of them to be quiet.

The victim has apparently not returned to the branch, and says that she has contacted the chain twice to demand an apology. “I do feel absolutely victimised. I’ve never felt like this before. I felt horribly alone, and that’s why I can’t let it go. It’s keeping me awake,” she reportedly said.

When approached by the JC, a spokesperson for the Metropolitan Police reportedly urged the victim to report the incident online, saying: “That would be unlikely to amount to an investigation in respect of close contact/unmasked etc, but an allegation of racial abuse ought to be recorded.”

A Waitrose spokesperson reportedly said: “We are very sorry to hear about this. We do not tolerate any sort of discrimination. Any customer who is found to discriminate against a member of staff or another customer will be banned. We are also now taking a more robust approach to mask wearing and customers must wear a mask when they are in our shops unless they are exempt.  We will refuse entry to those who do not comply. Once again, we are very sorry to learn about the customer’s experience.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The online marketplace Etsy has apologised for selling a t-shirt with the phrase “Camp Auschwitz” and reported that it had immediately banned the seller after being made aware of the item.

The t-shirt also featured a skull and crossbones and had apparently been posted by an American seller. It was available for purchase in the UK for £19.95.

The item, which came to prominence after photographs emerged of a protestor at the attack on Capitol Hill wearing similar apparel, was described on the website as “everything you’ve dreamed of and more” and “flattering for both men and women”.

The Auschwitz Memorial, which noticed the item and called for its removal, thanked Etsy for swiftly complying.

An Etsy spokeswoman reportedly said: “We are deeply saddened by the events that took place at the US Capitol. Etsy’s long-standing policies prohibit items that promote hate or violence, and we are vigilantly monitoring our marketplace for any such listings that may have been inspired by recent unrest. We removed this item immediately when it was brought to our attention and have also banned the shop that attempted to list this item. Items that glorify hate or violence have no place on Etsy and we are committed to keeping our marketplace safe.”

A man with “entrenched racist views” has walked free from court after shouting antisemitic abuse and giving Nazi salutes on a flight from Warsaw to Liverpool.

Louis Mann’s rant was reportedly filmed by a fellow passenger, a family member of Holocaust victims, who said that he was “shaken”, “shocked” and “disgusted” by the abusive language. Mr Mann is a 28-year-old medical student studying in Poland and was allegedly under the influence of alcohol during the incident.

The prosecution advised that “The defendant was a passenger on a Wizz Air flight from Poland, Warsaw, to Liverpool on 19th October 2019 The flight arrived at Liverpool John Lennon Airport at 17:37,” adding: “The flight was full and passengers reported during the flight Mr Mann had had to be repeatedly asked to sit down, to fasten his seatbelt and to refrain from making rude and offensive gestures.”

The offence for which Mr Mann was charged apparently took place once the flight had landed in the UK. He allegedly “got out of his seat before permitted to do so” and responded to requests from the flight crew to sit down with a “tirade of racial and religious abuse by words and gestures”. According to the prosecution, “He was standing in the aisle of the flight making a Nazi salute and was shouting ‘Anglo-Saxon race, we are superior’.” He also apparently said, “‘Know your place, don’t answer back, you’re a Slavic race traitor n***** lover’,” spoke of “inferior people”, and shouted abuse to “Jewish n***** lovers”.

Mr Mann’s racist rantings apparently continued as he was being arrested and even once he reached the custody suite, where he told one policeman: “You’re alright, you’re Aryan.”

According to the defence, Mr Mann was impacted by recent mental health problems and that he had been “groomed” by far-right groups in Poland.

Wlodzimier Tych wrote in a victim impact statement: “Prior to this I have always felt very welcome in this country. I have lived in this country for 31 years; I have never experienced this sort of behaviour. I am of Jewish origin, this made me feel very shaken and upset, I also felt angry, disgusted and upset as he continued his behaviour regardless of other people’s feelings.”

Mr Mann, of Morecambe, admitted being drunk on the plane but denied a charge of racially aggravated harassment. The court described Mr Mann as having “entrenched racist views” and upheld the drunkenness charge, increasing the sentence to reflect the racial element.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Today, Campaign Against Antisemitism publishes its latest Antisemitism Barometer, comprising a survey of the British public’s views toward Jews and a poll of the Jewish community.

The Barometer’s poll of the British public’s views towards Jews is the first survey to use the Generalised Antisemitism Scale, devised by Dr Daniel Allington of King’s College, Louise Katz of the University of Derby, and Dr David Hirsh of Goldsmiths, for the purpose of this study. The survey was designed and analysed by Dr Allington, with fieldwork carried out by YouGov.

  • Using the new twelve-question Generalised Antisemitism Scale, the survey shows that 55% of British adults do not harbour any antisemitic views; they did not affirm a single one of the twelve statements.
  • The other side of the coin, however, is that there is deeply troubling normalisation of antisemitism, as 45% of British adults did affirm at least one antisemitic statement, although over half of them only agreed with one or two antisemitic statements.
  • 12% of British adults have entrenched antisemitic views, affirming four or more antisemitic statements. 
  • The most popular antisemitic statement was that “Israel treats the Palestinians like the Nazis treated the Jews”, with which 23% of British adults agreed. That view is antisemitic under the International Definition of Antisemitism adopted by the Government.

The Barometer also includes a separate survey of British Jews designed and analysed in consultation with Dr Allington and carried out by Campaign Against Antisemitism and Jewish community partners. The survey reveals that:

  • British Jews are showing early signs of recovery from the Corbyn era but have been left scarred. Far more British Jews are optimistic about their future in the UK this year, but the proportion who decline to display visible signs of their Jewish identity due to antisemitism is at a record high.
  • British Jews’ confidence in the criminal justice system is low: a majority believes that the Crown Prosecution Service does not do enough to protect British Jews and the courts were also strongly criticised. Only the police receive more praise than criticism.
  • British Jews reserve the greatest opprobrium for politicians. They believe that almost every political party is more tolerant of antisemitism than it was last year; the Labour Party is viewed as more than twice as tolerant of antisemitism than any other party showing that it still has a great deal of work to do to win the confidence of British Jews.
  • In the first ever poll on the subject, an overwhelming majority of British Jews — 91% — want the Government to proscribe Hamas in its entirety.
  • Two thirds of British Jews are deeply concerned by the BBC’s coverage of matters of Jewish concern, and 55% by its handling of antisemitism complaints, Channel 4 also performs poorly with British Jews. Both broadcasters are state-funded.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Britain’s Jews are back from the brink. This study starkly shows that Labour under Jeremy Corbyn dealt a crushing blow to Jews’ confidence in their very future in this country, and that our community is now beginning to recover.

“But scars remain. Notwithstanding the relief felt by so many, our data shows that nearly half of those who normally wear outwards symbols of their Judaism now feel they have to hide it, and despite nine months of Sir Keir Starmer’s leadership of Labour, British Jews remain just as sure that the Party harbours antisemites.

“Though Britain remains one of the best countries in the world in which to live as a Jew, almost a fifth still feel unwelcome in this country. The departure of Mr Corbyn is no substitute for the sustained action and leadership to protect the Jews of this country — in politics, universities and social media — for which we have been calling for years.”

The full Barometer is available at antisemitism.org/barometer.

Italian police are investigating an online antisemitic attack that occurred during a Zoom presentation of a book written by leading Italian Jewish journalist Lia Tagliacozzo on 10th January.

The incident, carried out by ten people, aimed antisemitic slurs and slogans at the journalist and organisers of the virtual event, Turin’s Jewish Studies Centre. The threatening and discriminatory phrases included “Jews we’re going to burn you all in the ovens”,“the Nazis are back” and “You must die”. Laughter and fascist chants could also be heard. Several images of Hitler, swastikas and the Third Reich eagle emblem were displayed across viewers’ screens.

The attackers reportedly registered themselves onto the event using fabricated e-mail addresses and the names of individuals known in the wider Jewish community.

The perpetrators were removed swiftly from the Zoom meeting and the event was able to continue with more than one hundred participants present.

Ms Tagliacozzo, who is the daughter of two Holocaust survivors, praised the organisers for their prompt response and ensuring that the cyber-attackers were unsuccessful in preventing the continuation of the presentation.

Following a post on her social media page, Turin prosecutors stated that the case would be taken seriously to ensure the group is identified and held responsible.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Eddie Elmer, a resident of Vancouver, Canada, has decided to speak out after falling victim to a hate-motivated physical assault for the second time in a year.

The incident occurred “in the heart of downtown” Vancouver early on 9th January. Mr Elmer reported that a male approached him while he was waiting to cross at a junction and began shouting antisemitic comments. The perpetrator reportedly yelled, “you Jewish people”, and proceeded to strike Mr Elmer in the head and leg.

In August of last year, Mr Elmer reported another hate-related incident in which an unknown male called him a homophobic slur, followed him and threatened to “put a bullet in [his] head”. He has subsequently issued a public statement on his personal social media page and expressed a deep concern for his safety and wellbeing in Vancouver.

A report to the Vancouver Police Board in October of 2020 discovered that hate crimes had increased by 116 percent since the previous year.

Mr Elmer called the emergency services directly after the recent incident, and the suspect was arrested on an unrelated warrant. The city’s hate crimes section is reviewing the file and the investigation is ongoing.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist in this project.

Research into the educational materials used by the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) has discovered that the content contains antisemitic prejudice and the glorification of terrorism. The recent study was conducted by the research body IMPACT-se, which monitors school curricula on a global scale.

The report claims that the materials violate the United Nations’ requirements, outlined by the cultural organisation UNESCO, to remain neutral, respect “the other” and pursue peace, in order to refute incitement and potential bias.

It stated further that UNRWA resources actively encourage martyrdom and terrorism, and fail to condemn the use of violence. The idea of a Jewish state is described as “the Enemy” and multiple conspiracy theories and false claims are mentioned to justify violence. The materials, also included in unrelated subjects such as mathematics, reportedly seek to demonise the Jewish community and undermine Jewish history and culture.

Some of the resources have allegedly been copied from Palestinian Authority textbooks that have received significant criticism for their overtly antisemitic views.

UNRWA educational materials are used to teach over 500,000 children.

IMPACT-se concluded that the content of UNRWA educational materials undermines “any facade of UN-mandated neutrality”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

Anti-Jewish laws introduced during the Third Reich are among pieces of legislation that the German government is being asked to remove from its statute books.

One such law required German Jews who did not have a “typically” Jewish name (according to a list compiled by the Reich Interior Ministry) to add a forename, “Israel” for men and “Sara” for women, in all official documents. The law, passed in 1938, came into effect in January 1939 and gave Jews one month to register their “new” name or face a prison sentence.

The Federal Antisemitism Commissioner Felix Klein found 29 statutes that had still to be deleted entirely, including many introduced under the notorious Nuremberg Laws. Although the post-War occupying powers purged the Israel/Sara law, it was never completely deleted. Describing it as “the most blatant of all”, Mr Klein said that anyone who wished to change their name in Germany, even today, was still “confronted with this antisemitic-motivated law.”

Mr Klein said that he had sent the German Bundestag a complete list of antisemitic laws still on the statute books, calling for their reformulation or deletion.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A letter containing antisemitic insults and slurs was discovered by employees of the National Museum of Judaism and the Shoah in Italy on the morning of the 8th January.

The contents of the letter have not been published, however reports suggest that the letter included a threatening message and several expletives directed toward the Jewish community.

The director of the Museum, situated in the northern city of Ferrara, said that the cultural and educational mission of the institution remains unwavering and the organisation will not be intimidated by such acts of antisemitism.

Local law enforcement were alerted to the recent incident, and the General Investigations and Special Operations Division has launched an investigation to identify the perpetrator. The envelope was addressed to the popular museum, however the location of its sender is currently unknown.

The Mayor of Ferrara stated that the city, with a historic Jewish heritage, maintains a zero tolerance for racial hatred and discrimination, and those responsible for antisemitic attacks will be held to account.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A Confederate flag, described as “a potent symbol of white supremacy” was placed at a New York City Holocaust museum on Friday.

The incident at the Museum of Jewish Heritage: A Living Memorial to the Holocaust came two days after the incident at the US Capitol which featured far-right activity.

Jack Kliger, the museum’s President and CEO, said that the police had been informed. In a statement, he described the flag as “a potent symbol of white supremacy, as evidenced by the events at the US Capitol this week”, adding that the incident showed that “hate has now arrived at our doorstep.”

The New York Police Department confirmed that the incident was being investigated, but did not confirm whether it was being treated as a “bias crime”. The spokesperson called it an “atrocious” act.

The museum played a central role in New York’s efforts to combat antisemitism in early 2020 after Governor Andrew Cuomo proposed that every pupil in a New York City public school should be required to visit a museum dedicated to the Holocaust.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

A Jewish family was subjected to antisemitic abuse while walking on New York’s Upper West Side on 3rd January.

Dovid Efune, who runs the New York-based Jewish newspaper The Algemeiner, was walking with his wife and three young children when a man accosted them with hostile questions and antisemitic insults.

Mr Efune, who wears a kipper and tzitzit (ritual fringes) and describes himself as “conspicuously Jewish”, gave a first-person account to his newspaper saying that as he and his family were walking on Broadway and 82nd Street, a man began walking alongside and calling out questions about Jews. After being asked to go away, the man allegedly said: “Why aren’t you in Israel? Are you not Jewish?” After being asked more forcefully to go away, he allegedly shouted “Go to Israel” and then “Heil Hitler!”

Mr Efune said that the man “eventually took off” when he began calling the police, adding that the police “never arrived.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has expanded our coverage of antisemitism worldwide. Please contact us if you would like to share feedback or volunteer to assist with this project.

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